35 Burst results for "Middle Income"

Larry Kudlow Breaks Down Biden Taxation Proposals

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 2 d ago

Larry Kudlow Breaks Down Biden Taxation Proposals

"Speech today. Was just The usual Left wing. Progressive Pap. He wants to level the playing field. It's all about class work there. We're going to take from the rich. Who, of course, don't pay their fair share of taxes. And we're going to give all these new Government welfare programs. And by the way, not a single one of those programs has a work requirement or an education requirement. There will be completely dependent on the state. The worst part of it to me is just the factual lies by To say that you have lots of corporations who don't pay any taxes. Lots of rich people, quote unquote who don't pay enough taxes. Their fair share, and we have to level the playing field. Look at. I don't want to level the playing field. I want to raise the playing field. I want to expand the pie. I want ordinary middle income blue collar wage earners to get more wages. To have better equipment and technology so they can be more productive. Then their family incomes will go up, all of which happened following the trump tax cuts. The Biden tax increases are going to reverse everything here. I mean, it's just the idea that $400,000 Nobody under $400,000 don't pay higher taxes. Well, think of it. This. First of all the joint tax committee shows that that's untrue. That people there's a little bit you're right below and the 30,000 that has something to do with the implementation of the child tax credit. But the main thing here is People around 100 or $200,000. $300,000 You know you're talking about families. Families we're talking about. It could be two incomes.

Joint Tax Committee Biden
Masks, Infrastructure Spending: Generational Theft Is Robbing From Your Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:38 min | Last month

Masks, Infrastructure Spending: Generational Theft Is Robbing From Your Children

"Spending bill with the democrats. What are those two things have in common. We'll put simply. This is a pattern that are ruling. Class has grown accustomed to of generational theft robbing from your children to satisfy the present. Now i think having short-term abilities to borrow money for war or for a central government programming insert emergency circumstances. That could be justified. That's nowhere near where we are as a nation starting after the two thousand eight housing crisis which was created largely because of the federal government by the way our leaders grew addicted and so did our financial leaders by the way and our wall street leaders and the people in the corporate world with cheap money from the federal government advantageous public policy programs where they could boost their prophets expand their portfolios while middle income workers continually get crushed leveraging your fiscal situation as a nation to gratify the present and the rob or pillage plunder ransack from. Your children is morally disgraceful. And we're going to name the names of every single one of the republicans here on this program. Because i felt that we haven't been controversial enough this week on our

Federal Government
AstraZeneca to Seek US Approval of COVID Vaccine in 2nd Half

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

AstraZeneca to Seek US Approval of COVID Vaccine in 2nd Half

"AstraZeneca has said it will seek U. S. authorization for its cabin nineteen vaccine in the second half of this year the new timetable comes off to the Anglo Swedish drugmaker had initially suggested in April that it would submit the application within weeks the new announcement comes as the company with the second quarter financial results the report said that the drug maker delivered more than seven hundred million doses of the vaccine so over a hundred and seventy countries in the first half of this year that includes eighty million doses that went to the cutbacks initiative for low and middle income countries the U. K. European Union World Health Organization have already authorized to use of the AstraZeneca vaccine Karen Thomas London

Anglo Swedish Drugmaker Astrazeneca U. K. European Union World Hea Karen Thomas London
WHO: Rich Countries Should Donate Vaccines, Not Use Boosters

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

WHO: Rich Countries Should Donate Vaccines, Not Use Boosters

"Hi Mike Rossi you're reporting the World Health Organization says rich countries should donate coronavirus vaccines and not use boosters the top official at the World Health Organization is voicing concern about western countries distributing third doses of coronavirus vaccines when many poor countries have yet to immunize their people at a press briefing W. H. O. director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus called on drug makers to prioritize supplying their covert nineteen vaccines to the Africa vaccine acquisition task team known as Kovacs and to low and middle income countries with very little coverage both Fizer and Madura have agreed to supply small amounts of their vaccines to Kovacs but most of their doses are reserved by rich nations in recent months vaccination efforts in nearly sixty of the world's poorest countries have stalled hi Mike Rossi up

Mike Rossi World Health Organization W. H. O. Director General Tedr Kovacs Fizer Madura Africa
The Pandemics Ending Here. And Almost Nowhere Else.

The Big Story

01:40 min | 3 months ago

The Pandemics Ending Here. And Almost Nowhere Else.

"Rowling's. This is the big story dr yet. Tina banerjee is an assistant professor at mcgill university and the school of population and global health. She's an expert in global and public health equity as well as social justice. Hello dr benedict hydrated. Thanks for having me on this show. Oh you're so welcome. Thank you for your expertise today. Do you want to start maybe Giving us perspective. I think from outside. Canada from an equity point of view on when we worry about our vaccine wrote in canada. How are we doing compared to everyone else so as canadians. We need to be very grateful that more than fifty percent of our population has received the first fox nation. And that is extremely high when you compare it to low middle income countries if you are living in high income countries such as canada the likelihood is that you have already got your cove in nineteen vaccine or will soon get one sadly this is not the reality for millions of people living in several low and middle income countries more than half a billion vaccine doses have been administered so far guess what three quarters of them have been used by the world's richest countries which means that only zero point one percent of covid nineteen vaccine does have been administered in low income countries. And at this rate in might take many years for low middle income countries to reach a high level vaccine coverage

Tina Banerjee School Of Population And Globa Dr Benedict Canada Mcgill University Rowling
"middle income" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:03 min | 4 months ago

"middle income" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Start with a check on the markets and joining us now is Abigail Doolittle. So just looking at the screen here looks like his tech is leading us up again, and equities attack. It's certainly the leader for socks David, and it's a pretty solid risk on day relative to stocks and, quite frankly, crook from across acid standpoint, bonds are higher. Slightly so that maybe is a little bit of a towel in terms of not all risk on. But as you know, yields being down, which happens when bonds or higher that helps out stock, So that's what we're seeing the S and P 500 up. 1%, the NASDAQ 100 that Tech heavy index up even more of 1.8% This after the NASDAQ last week had its first up week in five weeks Now, interestingly, Falling yields, though not is great for the reflationary trade, So the Russell 2000 up less and the banking index up very slightly, So David as has been the case over the last few weeks. Maybe it's a couple of months. It all seems to blend together. At this point. It has all to do with inflation. And right now investors seem to be looking past the possibility of inflation are forgetting that that could come back on the radar. Sending stocks for the most part higher. Okay, thank you so much and will do it. For that report the markets, let's turn for the markets to the economy. President Biden wants to invest a lot Maurin that U. S economy and also to increase the taxes so you can pay for it through massive federal investment. Treasury Secretary Yellin says American business should be in favor of the plans because, she says company will make companies will make more for the investments. Then they have to pay in taxes for his analysis of the likely effects of the Biden spend and tax proposals. Welcome now, Glenn Hubbard of the Columbia Business School Where he served his dean for 15 years. And before that, Dr Hubbard was chairman of President George W. Bush's Council of Economic Advisors. So, Professor Thank you so much for being back with us. And I say Janet Yellen went to the Chamber of Commerce last year last week and said, This is a good deal for you. Because you're gonna make so much more money. You're gonna want more pay more taxes, and she right? I don't think so. I mean, essentially what she's arguing is that the Biden plans would raise economic activities so much Cos should want it. I don't think that's likely to be the case at all. I think the plans Have real numbers problems I eat not paid for adding to the deficit likely, if anything, shrinking growth from the higher corporate taxes, so I would just respectfully disagree. Okay, so first one on the positive side. If we did have massive infrastructure investment, could it increase crop productivity? Would it increase productivity? It could and there in lies. The rub. The reason to do true infrastructure is that it adds to our future wealth, and it increases productivity. Yet a lot of what was in the American jobs plan is not really infrastructure. It's it's social spending, and it may or may not be meritorious that's for the political process to decide. But adding to productivity and future wealth. It's not so if one imagined a true infrastructure program that were smaller and paid for Yes, that could be a real positive. But the most recent forays between the two sides suggest that's highly unlikely s O, You know, well what the White House would say. If they were here in person. They would say, listen, we will increase productivity by helping people pay for childcare, for example in elderly care because it will free them up to work more. Well, that's not usually what we mean by productivity that might be allowing people to work. But one of the biggest things holding people back from work now is the generosity of social programs, particularly the plus up in unemployment insurance benefits. Again, Respectfully. I just don't think that works. You may want to do some of these social programs. But having them be debt financed and calling them infrastructure is not a good idea. The corporate tax plans that are politically plausible can raise it Most $700 billion over 10 years. That's a heck of a lot smaller than the numbers being bandied around. On the spending side. One of things that President Biden says is this will help workers certainly won't hurt workers because nobody making less than $400,000 a year will be hit you and some other concerts. Well, that's not necessarily true. If you really do increase the taxes the way you're saying that will ultimately devolved to workers. How does that work? Well, the in one of two ways. David. The first is unease. E one if you have a higher corporate tax and you reduce investment as a result of capital formation. You reduce productivity and wages and that's for all labor. And that's not just some academic idea. The official scorekeepers like the Congressional Budget Office, and even the Treasury Department. Have it within their own estimates. So you cannot say that The other pieces. Well, let's suppose it shows up in stock market values. Well there, too. Not all stocks are held by the wealthy. Many middle income households have stocks through. Therefore, one k plans, you may or may not want to raise the corporate tax personally, I wouldn't but you cannot say it won't affect people making less than 400,000 years when it comes to corporate tax. How do you as an economist, evaluate the proposal that seems to be moving forward now of a minimum global tax 15%. Guess the United States is proposing now it appears that G seven may well move forward that maybe the always CD. Wanted 15% is likely still too high for that kind of consensus. Theo a CD has struggled for years in trying to get an agreement, so it's probably lower. The Biden administration's already walked back 21, which would have made US firms incredibly uncompetitive, because nobody else would have gone along. Personally, I would rather see global competition and tax policy and to the extent that we want larger spending in the United States reform the tax system used value added tax for carbon tax or Something else to pay for Glenn. What about the 1993? Clinton tax increases Because there's something of a perception from some people that in fact, that actually lead to prosperity, we taxed a bit more. We invested it well, we got the deficit down, and actually, it led to some of the boom we had back in the 19 nineties. Is that right? It might be, but a correlation is not the same thing is causation. A lot of things were going on in the economy. Remember, in the mid nineties, we started seeing an acceleration in productivity growth potential growth in the economy, So I don't think you can draw from that that raising taxes is a good idea. And in any of that those were slightly higher top personal rates, not a huge increase in the corporate tax, which is what this administration is contemplating. One of things that you've written about is really changing our social structure and really having Morshed social spending with that's a good idea of that ideas. Possible ramifications, you say if you want to do that the way some particularly Northern European countries, and you actually need a consumption tax like a V H and said, Why is that a better way to do it? Well, if you want a large your government just arithmetic you don't need economics and politics. Just arithmetic tells you you can't pay for that with taxes on the rich. And indeed, if you look at countries that have large governments, they tend to fund them with consumption taxes, not taxes on capital. I'm not advocating that larger government. I'd much rather see our government. Focused on growth and opportunity and participation. But if the body politick wants that there's really no way out other than a consumption. Going a lot of this discussion and this is both. I think Republicans and Democrats seems a little shortsighted. We don't talk about things like Social Security. Other entitlement which is coming down the pike here, we're gonna own a lot of money. What is the longer term implications for the economy s o the debt that we have and are incurring. The Congressional Budget Office tells us if the administration got everything it wants in these fiscal plans, we add the deficits over the next 10 years. Another $7.6 trillion. Raising the stock of public debt significantly. The bigger numbers as you point out are in Social Security, Medicare entitlements, It is completely possible to reform those programs in a very progressive way. E cutting back benefit growth for higher income households..

Janet Yellen Glenn Hubbard Columbia Business School Abigail Doolittle Clinton Biden last year Hubbard Congressional Budget Office Democrats 15 years 15% Glenn $7.6 trillion White House 1993 last week David President Republicans
Feast and Famine: Vaccine Supply

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Feast and Famine: Vaccine Supply

"Pharmaceutical companies could provide nearly eleven billion. Covert vaccine this year but the vaccines can't come quickly enough. In the united kingdom quickly spreading variant. That was first detected in india is worrying health officials. We believe this variant is more transmissible than the previous one. It could threaten the country's planned lifting of all covid restrictions by june meanwhile indoor gatherings in homes and restaurants are allowed to receive today the uk's vaccinated much of its population at lightning speed so following advice from the joint committee vaccination and immunisation we will accelerate remaining second doses to the over fifties on those chemically vulnerable but the prospect variants like these is prompting it to order even more doses for boost to jobs in the autumn. Be while america has even begun vaccinating teenagers yet. Rich countries have shared relatively few doses with poor and middle income ones and every new case is opportunity for more infectious and vaccine resistant. Variant to emerge only zero point. Three percent of vaccine supply is going to low income countries. Three cool down. Vaccination is not an effective strategy for fighting a deadly respiratory virus unless global supply keeps pace with walked become an insatiable vaccine demanded rich countries. It could be a long while before vaccines filter down to everyone else. Lots of things. That could stop rich countries from donating supplies.

UK Joint Committee India America
Sanders says 'a lot more work has to be done' on 'human infrastructure'

Broncos Country Tonight

00:33 sec | 5 months ago

Sanders says 'a lot more work has to be done' on 'human infrastructure'

"Senator Bernie Sanders says now is the time to invest in the human infrastructure of America in a working class family. Can't find good quality, affordable child care. That's human infrastructure on CNN's state of the union, the Vermont Independent, said the U. S must invest in low and middle income families. After dealing with the challenges caused by the pandemic, he says. It's time to show these families that the government here's their needs and is looking after them. He went on to say President Biden's infrastructure proposal is serious, but noted that even if passed, more work will still have to be done.

Senator Bernie Sanders Vermont Independent CNN U. America President Biden
Bangladesh Celebrates 50 Years of Independence

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:23 min | 6 months ago

Bangladesh Celebrates 50 Years of Independence

"Is not quite leapt from rags to riches in one generation but it has come a long way in the last half century. Susan savage writes about bangladesh for the economist looking around. Now it's really really busy. It's full of people. Vehicles and carved bosses are everywhere. There's another traffic fancy thousand lewd as well which is a sign of how much the country's moved from being agricultural to being The nobody got one. Point was parts of india and then it was part of pakistan and it was the poorest corner of both those and now she's gdp per capita is much higher than pakistan's and even caught up with india's recently before the pandemic growth in bangladesh was at about eight percent for several years. Running which is higher than most asian countries bangladesh's not just doing well in terms of wealth but also in terms of health. Life expectancy is longer than in india and longer than in pakistan child. Mortality is better. Bangladesh graduated to middle income status in two thousand fifteen and it's also fulfilled the criteria to move from at least developed to a developing country which has made a lot of people in bangladesh. Very

Susan Savage Bangladesh Pakistan India
A Look Inside The World's Biggest Vaccine Maker

Short Wave

06:28 min | 6 months ago

A Look Inside The World's Biggest Vaccine Maker

"So rosa palm trees here green lawns. A little bit like a college campus riding in a golf cart up to the factory. Your some of these are the migos month. Rubella reviews vaccine serum institute of india was already the world's biggest vaccine manufacturer even before this pandemic the company says two thirds of all children in the world. Get its vaccines and most of them are made here. At a sprawling factory complex in western india inside conveyor belts with all these tiny little vial weasing going for automatic resilience section automatic. Visual inspection is inspecting me europe machine. It's a high tech operation but look outside the factory window and you see a reminder of this companies more humble roots horses in the nineteen sixties. This was a farm breeding race horses and one day. One of the horses got bitten by a snake. Suresh giada serums executive director. Explains what happened next. Bimbos do the lanes. Were not working great in india so he could not get their disney. We could not get anti snake venom serum in time the horse died but it's owner had an idea you said yesterday why not start making it ourselves. So the serum institute of india was born. It began making serums against tetanus and snake venom and leader added vaccines against all sorts of childhood diseases. They specialize in generic versions at low profit margins and export to one hundred and seventy different countries last spring. A tiny package arrived here by career from oxford university in england to the very small. While is one in chief scientist. Shali graham describes what was inside components of a viral vector vaccine against the corona virus serum scrambled to start mass producing them immediately in huge floor to ceiling stainless steel vats of the one. Embryonic human embryonic kidney selling yeah scientists petty ready recalls how he was developing other vaccines these fats when his supervisor told him to quickly convert everything over to the corona virus vaccine while under lockdown as the pandemic exploded it was difficult to follow very strict rules of solution during this People to do overtime. This was before. Clinical trials showed that the oxford astrazeneca vaccine would work. It was a gamble with so much at stake. He says everybody's waiting for the all mankind waiting. The whole world is waiting for it to this winter. When trials finally proved this vaccine did indeed work is celebrated internally. Not like party or something but we had that moment of joy gonna champagne. No no serum hopes to soon be churning out a hundred million doses per month of this one vaccine on top of all the other vaccines they're still producing here. The oxford astra zeneca. Formula is particularly attractive to india and other low and middle income countries. Because it needs just regular refrigeration not subzero temperatures. This is for storage area. The capacity of seventy million dollars. So what we're looking at here is enough to vaccinate. Whole countries is ongoing process of building out of cold storage along these conveyor belts and out to sixty eight country so far racing against russia china. In what some are calling vaccine. Diplomacy india's huge capacity is attracted interest from the so called quad. The us japan. Australia and india. They announced financing to help another indian producer make a billion more doses of another co vaccine but while indian manufacturers are partnering with global pharmaceutical companies. The indian government is challenging pam at the world trade organization. There is an agreement that binds all wto members to certain levels of protection for intellectual property. Twenty year patents. Regional thrashers legal scholar at the global development policy center in boston. She explains how india and south africa are asking the wto to suspend those patents. Cova vaccines so that companies like serum can crank out generic versions quickly and in certain countries the majority of the population won't be vaccinated for something like five years that gives those viruses a long time to mutate. So the argument they're making is not. Hey look out for us but more this is in the interest of all of us. Everyone serums executive director. John says he supports that effort at the wto watery required is a vaccine today. Not tomorrow you want to stop the disease and stop it sprayed and that can happen. Only if there is no restriction on using technology many global health experts agree. The pope has said he does too but some companies including astrazeneca have pledged to sell vaccines at cost without profit and suspending. their patents. They say is not the answer it would kill innovation and would not speed up distribution bottlenecks more to do with supply chains than access to the vaccine technology itself. Both sides of this debate are over emphasizing. The role of patents. Daniel hamill is a law professor at the university of chicago. He says the serum institute success chose a middle path. It got a license from astrazeneca. It's been able to mass produce vaccines within the current regulatory environment ensures the potential licensing arrangements without cancelling patents ceremonies if you're disabled to gain rights to make vaccines on a large scale. That's a good thing could serums factory. As vials of corona virus knock scenes wiz off conveyor belts inside chief scientist ms. Shali graham points to construction underway outside a new pandemic preparedness facility for another year or two renew community that has not actually ideas to have extra machines extra labs all on hand to make billions of doses of vaccine against whatever virus hits

India Rosa Palm Rubella Reviews Vaccine Serum Suresh Giada Serums Serum Institute Of India Shali Graham Oxford Oxford University Global Development Policy Cent Disney Golf Astra Europe England Indian Government World Trade Organization Thrashers Astrazeneca PAM
Why consumer confidence is surging

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:22 min | 6 months ago

Why consumer confidence is surging

"Can confirm the facts of this story. We are tired of the pandemic and ready to shop. The technical term for this of course is consumer sentiment which determines how much we spend which makes up about two thirds of this economy and which is kind of key to our pandemic recovery while the university of michigan's consumer confidence survey shot up more than eight percent in march to its highest level in a year. that's still seven percent below what it was before the pandemic the government rescue package combined with the fourteen hundred dollar check or checks landing in many people's accounts. Well it's a pick me up marketplace's mitchell hartman gets going. It's been a week and a half. Since president biden seinfeld american rescue plan payments started going out within days. And that's been a big shot in. The arm. For consumers says john lear at morning console which polls americans everyday consumer confidence is really on a tear. They are growing more confident at a faster rate than they have fallen. The prior to stimulus packages. Lear says this time around the checks are bigger and they're going out faster plus the monies targeted to low and middle income households who were most likely to have lost work and be strapped for cash now. Rising confidence is likely to spark more consumer spending but lisa ruin that forbes adviser says it's not clear how much or how fast what we're seeing now. Is this really cautious optimism. Where people say okay. We can see signs that things are going to be getting better. But we're not quite ready to jump in headfirst. Forbes advisors latest survey finds. Roughly half of americans don't believe it's a good idea to reopen businesses one hundred percent before corona viruses fully contained and morning console finds. Well over half of americans. Still don't feel comfortable traveling or going to a restaurant. Shopping mall or sporting event. Jon lear's says moore vaccination and continued corona virus vigilance are crucial for sort of at this critical junction. Right now where. We need to keep cases down for the next three months. Let's say so that we're able to unleash. The full extent of are pinned up demand. Later in the summer he says. The money's there from the latest relief checks and surging savings. Folks just aren't feeling quite confident enough to spend up

Mitchell Hartman Biden Seinfeld John Lear University Of Michigan Forbes Advisors Lear Jon Lear Lisa
Explaining Biden's Tax Plan

Gil Gross

02:39 min | 6 months ago

Explaining Biden's Tax Plan

"Biden administration agenda. He has several tax proposals, and so there will be increases on income tax, especially for the those making over the middle income range all the way up to the high income earners. He is going to do away with pretax contributions to 41 case. It looks like And make you report all of that on your 10 40 tax return, And then he's going to give you a credit for people making more than the average American that is going to cost you tax because the tax credit is not going to be the same amount that you would have had. Had you been able to this put in the pre tax dollars in the higher tax brackets, Okay? The capital gain. Tax rates are gonna double and he's going to do away with the step up in basis on long term capital gains. That would mean if you inherited a million dollar rental property that your folks bought 30 years ago for 250,000. And it doubled the 500,000 and 15 years and that 500,000 doubled to a million and another 15 years and you inherited and you sell it for a million won under the trump tax. Cuts, you would only have to pay 20% in federal capital gain tax on 100,000 What you sold it for over above what it was worth when you inherited it. Now there is still a surtax for Obamacare. What is it 2.8% of whatever on then you have many states will charge a capital gain tax rate to so many people pay more like 28%, or 30% in capital gains rates between the federal and state. Well. Biden wants to increase that upto ordinary income rates of 39.6% from 20%. So that's almost double. But you do away with the step up in basis. That means if you inherited that million dollar rental property from your folks You're gonna have to pay tax on the entire gain. And at 40%, you're gonna pay 400,000 instead of 20,000 and tax. So these are the things that are taking place and also the estate tax. He's going to take that from about 40% of toe 67% and probably lower the threshold when you start paying that tax. Heaven forbid he doesn't take it down all the way to the million where Hillary Clinton wanted to take it back down to, But many states will tax you on what you leave behind as an inheritance on every dollar over a million bucks, Okay? So folks taxes will likely be going up to cover a lot of these various initiatives that Joe Biden wants to implement. So this is where

Biden Administration Biden Hillary Clinton Joe Biden
Casting the net wider: remaking the welfare state

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:23 min | 6 months ago

Casting the net wider: remaking the welfare state

"Good evening my fellow americans to light. I like to talk to you about where we are as we mark one year. She's everything stopped because of this pandemic last night. President joe biden spoke to america in primetime address from the white house for the first time since taking office he promised to direct states to make all adults eligible for covid vaccine by may and discussed the bill he had just signed into law. The american rescue plan one point nine trillion dollar stimulus program extends unemployment. Benefits it helps. Small businesses lowers healthcare premiums for many it provides. Food and nutrition keeps families in their homes. America's not the only country that's responded to the crisis with increasing generosity. I kind of went in. It was like a state of panic. That i honestly i can't tell you day-to-day thoughts were because they were just scrambled. Like what am i gonna do. What am i gonna do. How am i going to survive. How am i going to what. That's more good. Hope a fifty. Seven year old self employed chef based in canada when the pandemic swept away all of her work. She didn't expect much outside. Help after alberta's oil crash in two thousand fourteen. She received no government support and had to close her restaurant. But this time around with covid nineteen. The federal government included the self employed in. Its rescue package. I honestly i couldn't believe it. Until i saw myself until i filled out the application i pressed met and two days later. There was money in my bank account. And i was absolutely shocked across the world from america to canada to western europe. The pandemic prompted a shift in thinking about the role governments can and should play in crises. The greatest expansion of the wealth estate in living memory in this past yet social nada is our public policy editor. She's been tabulating that expansion which currently stands at nearly sixteen trillion dollars. That's more than four times. The support that countries provided during the financial crisis of two thousand and seventy thousand nine. And it's a shot departure from the pas not just in size but in shape too and because of that this could well mark the start of a new chapter for the welfare state. How do you mean how was this response. Different from what came before significantly. I think it mocked a risk shift from individuals to the state with governments essentially bailing out the people say things like schemes in britain and much of europe as well as cash gifts and in unemployment benefits in america what lawsuit of the state stepping up and taking a lot of risks that otherwise would have fallen onto households and individuals that is a sharp contrast from what we've seen over the past couple of decades when risks such as example being replaced by an algorithm or foreign worker had actually increasing been offloaded from governments and employees own individuals and you saw a lot of countries just for pragmatic reasons really move to universalism so with government prefers blanket benefits instead of fussing of eligibility. Or what's the basis of the way that it was before the pandemic the risen one model of course of welfare state but if we take as a starting point side of a social contract where there is a certain amount of poverty relief and social security that is supplied by the state to go back to suit of the early twentieth century. So the great depression in america really triggered the idea of we need some social security and in europe of course in the second world war was reading the moment when people started to realize that there were these collective big risks that they wanted to ensure against and then the big shift in both sides of the atlantic ready staw in about the seventy s and the welfare state becomes leaner and more focused on getting people into jobs and so benefit make order to get the incentives work or boosted welfare in many countries become stigmatized and at the same time. The labor market is made. More flexible has made easy to fire people. And you really see particularly from the early ninety s on more and more risk being shuffled back to individuals but even before covert hit there was talk about a need to change things right absolutely as with so many things covid nineteen has really shown quite a start light on the flaws in the traditional model and although the lessons are different for every country there are a few general ones. The welfare state on the hall was built around yesterday's worker middle skilled work who today is increasingly. Rare will become even rarer we've seen the labor market polarize over the last couple of decades in rich countries. The sheriff skilled in high-skilled workers growing whereas middle skilled and indeed middle income jobs have been falling and will continue to fall and the pandemic also related to that highlighted. How little job. And income security many of our essential workers indeed have because they fall into that low paid bracket low security bracket and then the other thing that covert has exposed is the vulnerability of work with kids of course when schools closed. There was suddenly this extra job that needed to be done. The situation has put childcare which we knew was an issue before the pandemic but it sort of forced onto the agenda and one of the encouraging things. I think that might be coming out of this. Is countries making better plans for things like child benefit. So part of the coronavirus relief plan. Joe biden will temporarily raise the child tax credit quite significantly and democrats already whispering the really like to make this change permanent. And do you think we'll see that pattern more. Broadly a will to make permanent to the kinds of changes. The governments were essentially shocked into by the pandemic. The will is that. I think it's too early to tell but the demand is clearly. Then that's an important start. Say lots of people. Such as mrs hope who we heard earlier have experienced vulnerability that can come with the show but also have seen how the state can help these moments of shock. And i think it would be very hard in a next crisis for states to roll out similar policy bazookas to help the people so i think on the demand side and again this is something we already sold before the pandemic domon strengthening for better more generous safety nets are that will only grow on the back of the pandemic experience whether the will is that is launching a political question and it's also a fiscal question but i am carefully hopeful because this past year has provided a live experiment of all sorts of policies that otherwise would have taken years to get the political backing for and so after all this experimentation. What are the lessons from the pandemic that you think should last. I think the most important goal here is just to ensure or cushion workers against certain shocks and just to make that a bit more practical and most of communists have argued that covered his shown the generosity of benefits should be pegged to the state of the economy so that when indeed were going through a mass period of shock and it's much harder to actually find a job benefits should be more generous. And when the economy's healthy again then you can make them a bit. Less generous against more flexibility in the welfare system to short revamped post covid social safety net would on the one hand provide enough flexibility to incentivize work but also have a state that wasn't afraid to step in when disaster hits and crucially estate that would also invest in human capital in childcare in health in educating the next generation as well as rescaling older workers today and that second element is important because just bringing out a huge umbrella on the stormiest days won't be

America President Joe Biden Canada Western Europe Europe White House Alberta Federal Government Britain Depression Joe Biden MRS
Ghana is first nation in world to receive COVAX vaccines

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 7 months ago

Ghana is first nation in world to receive COVAX vaccines

"The United Nations Kovacs initiative has finally got underway as gonna receive the world's first and every of coronavirus vaccines from the program do arrival of six hundred thousand doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine in the west African country marks the beginning of the largest vaccine procurement and supply operation in history it's been a long way to start for a program that has the fault falling short of hopes that a potential source we given quickly to the world's most vulnerable people the initiative form to ensure fair access to vaccines by low and middle income countries has been hampered by the severely limited global supply of cases and logistical problems I'm Karen Thomas

United Nations Astrazeneca Karen Thomas
State Trends In Employer Premiums And Deductibles

The Hospital Finance Podcast

05:32 min | 7 months ago

State Trends In Employer Premiums And Deductibles

"Recently. The commonwealth fund examined the extent to which people with moderate incomes in employer health plans face high premium and deductible costs relative to their income to discuss the results of the study and the implications for policy holders going forward. I'm joined by sarah collins vice president of healthcare coverage and access at the commonwealth fund. Sarah welcome to the show. Thank you so much. Mike so sarah watches. Start out by telling us why you initiated this study and what you're looking for well employer health coverage is really the backbone of the us health insurance system more than half the population of the united states about one hundred sixty million people get their coverage through an employer so the purpose of this study was to look at trends over the last decade and the amount that workers and their families are paying for their employer health insurance and the size of their deductibles in all fifty states and the district of columbia and we compare these worker cost to median income in each state in order to get a sense of the economic burden of these costs on middle income families. And how did you go about conducting the research. We've been conducting the study nearly every year since twenty ten Using the latest data From what's known as the insurance components. Federal medical medical expenditure panel survey This survey is the most comprehensive national survey of use employer. health plans In twenty nineteen Which is the latest year of data. That's available This survey interviewed more than forty thousand business. Establishments With an overall response rate of fifty nine percent we computed from the survey reported statewide average premiums so we take the premiums reported by business establishments and average them across the state and we do the same deductibles and then we compared those averages to the median income in each state so this provides a rough measure of the affordability protectiveness of employer coverage and allows us to track changes over time. And what did you find after you conducted this study. We found that premium contributions and deductibles in employer plans took up a growing share of workers incomes over the past decade those costs together so premium contributions and deductibles accounted for eleven point five percent of meeting median household income and twenty nineteen. This is up from about nine point one percent a decade earlier the this cost burden in employer. Health plans has increased over the past decade because cumulative growth in median income has been slower growth in premium contributions deductibles. We also find that these contributions premium contributions deductibles as well as needing income vary considerably across the country the total cost of premiums and deductibles across single and family policies ranged from a low of about fifty. Five hundred dollars in hawaii. Too high of more than eighty five hundred dollars in nine states. Meet an income ranged from a low of about forty nine thousand and mississippi in mexico too highs around ninety thousand or more in massachusetts minnesota new hampshire new jersey what workers pay towards their premiums and deductibles comprised about ten percent or more of median income in thirty seven states in two thousand ten and twenty nineteen. This is up from about ten states Twenty ten in nine states workers combined costs were fourteen percent or more of meeting income workers in new mexico and louisiana face the highest potential cost relative to their income more than seventeen percent and we actually also find that people living in states that have lower meeting incomes like new mexico are doubly burdened on average workers in states where the median income is lower than the national median income face higher premiums and deductibles compared to people in states with higher median incomes. Also find that. Many people employer plans across. The country are insured Because their deductibles are high. Relative to their incomes tacoma fund has found that insured people who have high out of pocket costs and deductibles relative to their income are more likely to face problems accessing care or paying medical bills Than people who are not under insured. We've we've defined someone with insurance as under insert at their health plans. Deductibles deductible equals about five percent or more of income or if they're out of pocket costs reached similar thresholds in this study across the country. Many people employer plans are underinsured by this measure average deductibles relative median income or five percent or more in twenty states and ranged as high as seven percent in mexico.

Commonwealth Fund Sarah Collins United States Sarah Mike Columbia New Mexico Hawaii Mississippi New Hampshire Massachusetts
UNICEF begins shipping syringes for the global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines

UN News

00:49 sec | 7 months ago

UNICEF begins shipping syringes for the global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines

"Critical task of ensuring that all countries have enough medical equipment to vaccinate people safely against covid nineteen gathered pace on tuesday with news. That one hundred thousand syringes have been sent to the maldives ahead of an inoculation drive. The shipment is part of the first wave of syringes and safety boxes organized. By the un children's fund unicef over the next few weeks the agency plans to dispatch more than fourteen and a half million single use needles to more than thirty countries including cote d'ivoire sotomayor and principi. These include the point. Five milliliter syringes. Which meant for use with the astrazeneca vaccine while the point. Three millimeter version is for the pfizer bio entex shot in total unicef aims to supply up to one billion syringes and ten million safety boxes to countries in two thousand and twenty one ahead of the broader rollout of new corona virus vaccines in eighty two low end low to middle income countries

Un Children's Fund Unicef Principi Astrazeneca Pfizer Unicef
Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

Coronacast

09:50 min | 7 months ago

Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

"Today is the day that vaccination start to roll out across australia but we got a little preview of that yesterday with the with the prime minister and world war two survivor and a couple of other people getting the vaccine yesterday. Yes they go to i. Those of the pfizer vaccine which also followed a day on saturday of anti xers demonstrating and being talked to list in one city by pete evans. Some people criticizing the prime minister. Full so-called jumping the queue to get the vaccine before anyone else does but maybe leading by example. I just don't think you can criticize our leaders for having the it's not as if whole parliament skating it. It's really just showing their confidence in the vaccine. I think it's really important. Thing down the track. You'll see the health minister leader of the opposition getting the astra vaccine or the chief medical officer. Getting the astra vaccine to show that the our leaders are. You do have trust in this. And do you do believe in science. And i mean it's like laser immune to getting the virus either. Pay dutton got covid early. Jia by tribe and you you want your leadership cupboard and there's tens of thousands of accents that are gonna roll at in just the next couple of weeks. So i suppose people sort of is on the horizon going cool vaccine zahia. That's a really big comfort in a time of pandemic. When do we start to see things going back to normal. That's the critical question. And it depends what you call going back to normal because in most parts of australia. Things are pretty normal. We've got very little if any covid. Nineteen virus around in australia and new south wales is going weeks so has so have other jurisdictions so available around so we're back to normal internally back to normal means opening the borders having international travellers and tourists coming to australia us being able to go overseas listening. You'll becoming part of the world again. I think that's what we mean by becoming not becoming normal and covered that on tonight's Seven thirty program by talking to a mortar spoke to chris. Murray who heads the institute for health metrics and evaluation and he's of the he runs one of the world's leading modeling groups and covered on the health report back in november. He predicted the dr the global downturn in cases of covid nineteen that. We're seeing now he. He predicted almost to the week and his was. That was going to be nothing to do with. Thanks to nation and everything to do with season. -ality that really. It would have itself out in terms of the winter surge in covid nineteen. Because it's so seasonal. So i decided to go back to him. Seen other vaccinations going out. What what what's your modeling moving forward and it was quite sobering. He says he's not as bullish. Nah as he was back in november the variables that he's taking into consideration people's behavior. Now remember we're talking about the northern hemisphere not stralia new zealand but of almost no virus. And we've got close borders visit. If people's behavior goes back to normal before you get down to very low levels of virus transmission then you. He believes that you could. Well see a third wave evolving at the end of the northern summer. Pretty much like you saw in in twenty twenty and what could make that. Which is the second variable that he's worried about our vaccine resistant. Very variants of the virus escaped the vaccine and that they could really muddle the muddy the water considerably. How does that fit with other data that seeing coming out saying that the vaccines are reducing transmission in places like i and that's a place where the at least the uk variant is very prevalent on the uk very sensitive to the vaccine it's african variant and other variants than meyer is including the brazilian variant. We're not much is known. And you'll remember that. We spoke some days ago. About the brazilian city minnows. Seventy six percent of people had been infected with the virus. There were only five hundred admissions to hospital in the beginning of december beginning of january first nineteen days of january. Three thousand five hundred hospitalizations in so vaccine trials a very high percentage of people where had had covid nineteen when they were into the trial and in the placebo group they got reinfected with the south african variant so these vaccine escape variants are really worrying in terms of reinfection. Saw the vaccine does is turns covered one thousand nine hundred common core. Which is why. I'm gonna take the astra and we're five. We'll take whatever is given to me. Because i don't want to die of covid. Nineteen but if what we are looking for an opening of the borders and international normalization at least in australia. According to chris murray. We've made the wrong bet with the astro vaccine. He says you really do need to be immunizing with pfizer or madeira. Or perhaps even novak so that still to be proved in the real world. We're much higher. Degrees of efficacy and reduction in transmission and remember the other issue reduction in transmission is that these new variants emerge in countries. Where there's a lot of spread where the virus is multiplying and replicating all the time. And that's where these new variants are being thrown off. They won't be thrown off in austria. Where there's no virus around they'll be thrown off in low income countries like sight words middle income countries like south africa. They'll be thrown off in the united states in britain and other places if the virus keeps on circulating. So what we've got to do is get to very high levels of immunization very very quickly with highly effective vaccines and hope that that minimizes these of virus. Which is resistant to the vaccines. And then what we gotta do. And it's got to be done right now actually getting vaccines op through visor. Moderna novak's which are designed to cope with the resistant variants. That are around. Perhaps the brazilian one certainly the south african one and within a few months star boosting with them. This is really demoralizing. When with sort of on the cusp of vaccine. Roll out of here in australia woman. And if i'm just an average person sitting at home listening to corona 'cause what should i take away from these. Iud urging people from getting vaccine that they often no. Because i think it's really important that we all get covered so that shoots so first of all we're going to have a layer of protection. The international evidence is increasingly by the pfizer vaccine prevents transmission. So that means with hotel. Workers bar workers being immunized and hopefully their families to and that's a really important part of the story. We are creating a ring of confidence around the hotel borders. We've also got to institute with the pfizer vaccine. Not the astros vaccine ring vaccination around outbreaks so that we are controlling this any outbreaks there and everybody else immunized with the astra vaccine so that we are turns it into the common colds. We create a very safe situation. The problem is wayne. Do we open up to international travel and windy relax on hotel quarantine and with a country. That's largely covered with the extra astro vaccine. Which is not very effective somewhere doggy. Effective at all against the south african variant certainly in terms of transmission. Then it becomes a very nerve wracking decision to make. So that's why we've got to be planning in twenty twenty one for a booster. Does of vaccine resistant covid nineteen. That's actually a question that we had from john who's in australia who leaves in the us. And he's basically asking now. The australian vaccination program is rolling out. Do we expect. When do we expect the quarantine might be lifted. And what kind of factors go into that decision making so you could be quite cool about it if you think that we are all. We've turned effectively. Destroyed population susceptibility to covid nineteen into the common cold. And it does look as though the it's pretty effective at doing that with you're talking about african variant or indeed other variants. So we're pretty protected so you could say well maybe sooner rather than later but you know. It's just a very nerve wracking theme because we variants from all over the world and we are not donating vaccine to low-income countries. At the rate which will get van covered quickly enough and they will be throwing off variants and those variance will come to look at hiv hiv started around contrast saw in zaire and then you tens of millions of people have been infected with. Its an died. It doesn't matter where these variants arise from. They will spread to other parts of the world. So we've got to get the globe immunized as quickly as possible otherwise. It's very hard to relax just when you thought you had this thing pinned down at escapes again. Norman so so becomes really does become a bit like flu where the first vaccination does protect us to very significant extinct in terms of dying and serious disease. That's why i'm lining up. For whatever vaccine i get and i would urge other people to do the same. But it means that the government has got to not be complacent about this any shape or form and has to star ordering what's called multi vaillant vaccines are trying to ranging them now so that by spring summer of this year. We're getting boosting booster shots with multi valent vaccines that will covers against the current range of resistant. Variants around the world and that swing will open up borders.

Australia Astra Pete Evans Pfizer Institute For Health Metrics A Stralia JIA Dutton Moderna Novak New South Wales Chris Murray UK Murray Meyer Madeira Chris Novak New Zealand Austria
Biden to announce US will donate $4 billion for COVID-19 vaccines for poor countries

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

Biden to announce US will donate $4 billion for COVID-19 vaccines for poor countries

"The bite administration will provide four billion dollars to an international alliance aimed at distributing covid nineteen vaccines to less wealthy countries. Npr's asia roscoe reports president biden will officially announce the investment in virtual meeting of g seven leaders. Tomorrow the us government will initially provide two billion dollars to help with vaccine distribution in ninety two low and middle income countries. An additional two billion dollars will be doled out through twenty twenty two. The funding was approved by congress. In the corona virus aid package passed december. The official said allowing the virus to spread unchecked and other countries puts americans at risk by allowing more variance of the virus to develop biden is expected to urge other wealthy countries to step up with their own contributions to the vaccine. Alliance ice roscoe. Npr news

President Biden NPR Us Government Asia Congress Biden Roscoe Npr News
Vaccines arrive in Australia. Now the challenge begins

Coronacast

04:26 min | 7 months ago

Vaccines arrive in Australia. Now the challenge begins

"We mocked a really significant milestone in the coronavirus pandemic e that. We've been having norman. The first isis of the fis coronavirus vaccine. Which has been approved for use by the therapeutic goods administration touchdown in australia. Ready to start rolling them at next week to the high priority groups so big milestone. what does the next phase actually look like though the rollout. Well i think a lot of it's been left to the states a suspect that what you'll see is remarkable uniformity which is the first line of defense and the first line of people who are most vulnerable as we've seen again and again and again people who are working on our borders driving buses transporting people from the airport and working in hotels looking people who've just arrived so those are the people who will be immunized i i i would imagine a right around the country that will protect them. They will get the pfizer vaccine. Mostly which is good because that gives the most chance of reducing transmission if they do get infected was protecting them against disease and then aged care and high priority. Health care workers so frontline healthcare workers that first phase and. We haven't heard too much of exactly. Who's going to do what we're in terms of administering vaccines. I know that. A lot of general practices have volunteered. We do have a good network of general practices. So should be okay. But i'm getting any feedback from various parts of australia. Saying they're really from people in the business. If you like who are saying. They're really not sure what the plans are so. I think it's still a work in progress. But the first phase shoot go ok e one would hope and then there's a process of with komo's taking responsibility for care and getting enough doses out into each care which are most vulnerable communities. Should the vaccine escape into the general community right one of the questions that were getting a lot of from people from audience members. He's will we be notified when it's when it's out turn but we don't know that yet. I'm not sure how that's how that is indeed going to work. But i assume that there are ways through medicare numbers and other means that the government can text phone number. I know but. I assume that there are ways of finding out who you are. What you've got an assume that also that your general practitioner how to battling those are the sorts of things that are not entirely clear how people will be identified individually so the scale of vaccinating an entire country even with a relatively small population like ustralia is a messy. Ask so we heard last week will health organization expert advisor from the university of new south. Wales mary louise mc laws saying that. We're going to need to vaccinate something like one hundred ninety thousand people per day to get to the targets that have been set for october this year. Is that going to be feasible. Well low to middle income countries do mass vaccination programmes all the time but they do frequently in fact some some would say that. They're better equipped than many advanced countries richer countries to do this and we've had a rabies outbreak through extraordinary numbers very quickly and and so you can get large venues with nurses factory. Like processes logistic simplified dines. It's all there and people head for mass vaccination areas. You can actually get through very large numbers very quickly if you need to you so those numbers are not impossible. But they are hard to achieve. It's gonna take a ramp up so we're going to start off slow and then ramp up from there. The rate limiting step is actually going to be the supply of vaccines. Are we going to have seven. Hundred thousand dozes available a week and it's going to take a while to to that point so i think that's the issue rob van. Can we administer those vaccines. i mean. Interestingly we do fifty to sixty thousand covid tests a day nationally at the moment perhaps a similar framework could be used to roll out the vaccines. Yeah i think they are thinking of respiratory clinics that model being used as well with the drive through with the general general practitioners which was very useful as well as public hospitals providing those sort of drive through facilities as well. You can get through very large numbers. You just go to have accused people ready together. You've got to have the supply. You gotta have the cold chain and you've got to be computerized so that you can enter people's names into the register and you've got to somewhere where you can keep them for fifteen minutes and then observe them with resuscitation facilities so it's not a simple as during the

Therapeutic Goods Administrati FIS Australia University Of New South Wales Mary Louise Mc Norman Komo Pfizer Medicare Rob Van
"middle income" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"middle income" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Lower and middle income families will get a tax rebate of up to $500 under a deal Governor Murphy and legislative leaders reach today. It's a victory for Murphy, which fulfills a court campaign promise. Of raising taxes on the wealthy. The rebate would go to single people with at least one child and earning up to $75,000.2 families making up to $150,000. Just released, report finds the Jersey economy is back on the road to recovery. But the impact of the cova pandemic will linger for years. Rutgers Professor Michael There who heads up the economic advisory service, as many jobs that were lost are gone for good because so many people have gone online to do their jobs and shop. And maybe you know that the wholesale site might be out in central Pennsylvania, past Harrisburg, Middletown or or some other place like that, and Phone call Senator probably out in Iowa, he adds, Assuming there's an effective covert vaccine by next summer, the Jersey economy should be back running on all cylinders by the year. 2024. New Jersey's unemployment rate fell in August. 2 10.9%, down from a record high of 16.6% in June. Industries that saw the biggest jump in job gains include education and health services. Leisure and hospitality and trade, transportation and utilities, according to the State Labor Department, Also about 49% of jobs lost due to covert have been regained. New York City is once again delaying the start of in person. Learning from most of the one million students in the public school system, Mayor de Blasio announced elementary school students will do remote learning until September, 29th. Middle and high schools will stay remote through October. 1st pre k in special ed students will be the only ones to resume in person instruction on Monday as originally planned. Governor Murphy is calling on Jersey teens and twentysomethings to stop going to big parties without masks or social distancing. Says the message is just because you're young and seemingly invincible. It doesn't mean you actually are or that you can't spread the virus on to someone who may be particularly vulnerable. If you yourself are not symptomatic, he adds. All Garden State residents need to use common sense of the common good and not engage in knucklehead behavior that puts.

Governor Murphy Professor Michael There New Jersey cova Mayor de Blasio New York City State Labor Department Jersey Garden State Rutgers Pennsylvania Senator Middletown Iowa Harrisburg
"middle income" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"middle income" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Cut I like middle income tax cuts I think would be a good time Zacks because if the Democrats would approve that go along with it the federal tax yeah I would do it if they can approve it I would ride sharing is expected to take a hit because of the outbreak we get more from CBS business reporter Jason Brooks looper is warning that it's going to feel the impact from the corona virus the San Francisco based firm disclosed in a regulatory filing that the number of users may decline materially or fluctuate as a result of many factors including a pandemic or an outbreak of disease such as the corona virus or fear of such an event uber says it may also see fewer supplies for new mobility offerings like dockless and electric bikes and scooters fifteen percent of uber's rides or trips to and from airports lift is also making recommendations to its drivers based on the latest coronavirus guidance from the CDC the justice department says investigators have identified four hundred defendants who have targeted the elderly for fraud resulting in billions of dollars in losses here's CBS's Alison Keyes Attorney General William Barr says one of the ways the defendant swindled the seniors were by fraudulent Wrobel calls in one week in Florida alone he says thirteen million Wrobel calls were made he says it's not only an abuse of trust it is frequently impossible for them to recover the financial loss and this means a devastating impact on the victim's bar says this is due to the victim's stage of life Alison Keyes CBS news Washington a Rhode Island man faces child neglect charges police say they found a three year old alone in the twin river casino parking lot at around twelve fifteen Sunday afternoon the temperature was about nineteen degrees Germaine Jenkins of protected told officers the boy was alone for just a couple of minutes investigators say it was more than ten minutes they've been popular in Europe for years and they're now making their way around the United States including here in Massachusetts WBZ's Suzanne solves real reports on a senior playground they're planning to build in Dedham this spring seniors can have fun cat that but the chair of the Dedham parks and recreation commission Jonathan Briggs says don't let the name fool you it's really a senior activity park saw the park itself would have exercise equipment that would be geared towards the fifty five plus and seniors which would be more low impact type activities as well as shade areas places to meet certain shade talk so not only would it be physical benefit but also social benefits he says it could even include a bocce ball court in Dedham Suzanne's house bill WBZ Boston news radio today campaign twenty twenty comes to Massachusetts and thirteen other state road to victory in November starts right here right now for Tuesday for more than thirteen hundred delegates are up for grabs a little tiny tax on the richest people we can provide universal healthcare coverage all day long on WBZ Boston news radio most of us find political ads annoying primarily because the non stop but the content can be taxing as well this is Dan right I think deep down one of those reasons is because we know voting is something we should do how do you feel about weight loss commercials if they ignore you as well maybe it's because losing weight is something you also should do instead of changing the channel with the ads come on wouldn't feel better knowing you've made a one eighty losing the weight holding you back people approach me all the time saying Dan thanks to you I.

"middle income" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

12:36 min | 2 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Of the program and returned as college interns serving these communities where they grow up so. right there is a testimony because these folks these kids the young ones are coming in. getting involved in the program going through the program getting the skills that they might all not all forgotten we're gonna talk about. the summer programs and such because what's one of the big things right now is when these kids are not in school. that three or four month period man if you can get them to where they're maintaining reading levels maintaining math skills maintaining communication skills maintaining relationships skills not just reading math arithmetic all that math is arithmetic by the way I don't know if you knew that or not but maintaining those skills but even personal one on one relationship skills during that three or four months where they're not in school then when they hit school again you're less likely to have a child that's expelled for fighting. you're less likely to have a child that has to spend the first two months of school getting caught up from the things they learned the last six months before they hit the summer and so was going with that is you get these kids out there going through programs like Trent project transformation graduating if you will from these programs and then later on wanting to get involved as a mentor ours these americorps as you were talking about wanting to come back to project transformation not as a student now but as somebody that can give back and say Hey I was one of you wants in here is where I am at now. that's exactly right it means a lot to respond to what you said but I think in the you know looking at the challenges facing these kids to begin with just taking one aspect of of their academic area of literacy in kids in low income areas is this there's a startling statistic that most people don't know about their studies done that look at middle income children and youth and the average number of age appropriate books for a child in middle income neighborhoods about thirteen for everyone child in a low income family it's about one age appropriate both for every three hundred children in that community so simply getting access to books for kids in that environment is an obstacle but this is not just a program to give children access to books and we do give a lot of books away as well but it is that relationship it's that investment in their lives to help build it a love of reading so they can continue that as they grow up you talked about the summer gap that exist in the achievement gap that exists with low income and middle income students by the time their fifth grade most low income students are on average two and a half to three grade levels behind academically especially in reading it's not that they're learning at any different reading rates than other of middle or upper income counterparts is is that during the summer months they don't have the same opportunities you know for me I was blessed growing up in a summer vacation for me man very that very thing vacation camps activities while lower income students simply don't have those activities and so the achievement gap oftentimes becomes experience gap and so giving children youth opportunities in the summer to focus academically but many other Richman activities helps prevent that summer slide so they can stay on track and even get ahead in the reading and that's a big part of a part of transmission provides but. these kids that have now graduated as you said they've grown up in our program not because they just love the program they fall in love with these college age young adults who invest their entire summer sometimes entire year sometimes multiple years in the lives of these kids and they can't wait to come back to you get connected with these young adults and having positive young adult role models in their lives just any adult role models in our lives is so critical for these kids and so when they come to our program actually our program began as elementary age serving only and over time kids went into middle school and they kept coming back but kept showing up in the parking lot of the searches and wanting something provided for them and so we started out in the middle school youth program they graduated their ninth grade and then they came back as high school students and they didn't want to say goodbye to product information so we started recently a high school leadership program for the tenth or twelfth graders and now we're seen the the fruit of those fifteen years of high school students who are probably the many times the first in their family to graduate high school and go to college often the main incentive is so they can return one day to be one of our college interns you have to have one year college and you're about forty can serve in that capacity and man what a remarkable thing it is for kids from the community now serving as mentors for the next generation in that neighborhood well gives them incentive also to go get that college education because then man you get him interested in learning and then they go. to go to college something maybe before they even hit project transformation was not even in there okay military might be the first one of their family you know they went to college much was graduated from college so that's awesome we've talked over and over with organizations like volunteer center were Texas and others about the importance of volunteering in the community whether it's to our church whether it's the the food bank whether it's food banks of talk to them as well about as well but getting involved somehow some way and not just the importance of it and what those that you're helping get from it whether it's the organization itself but the people in need whether you're helping at the food bank not just with the food bank is getting out of it or what. those are coming to the food banks the different areas to get the food now what they're getting but what the volunteer is getting and you have an interesting on the full peace paper of looking at here for the project transformation of those who graduated college more than eighty more than sixty percent of interns now work or volunteer in a ministry or service related field kind of talk about that stat because that stands out it does it so out of eight hundred more than a hundred fifty of these young adults and that's just one area of this you can call them volunteers who are giving so much of service hours to the communities in a big a big piece of the draw for them to be a part of this program is to have a hands on service experience Mr experience working with these kids in these families in these neighborhoods but they're also coming to ask themselves a deeper question about why am I here one of my gonna use the few days that I have on this earth for in my life and one of the passions that I have one of my gifts for my my interest in and then on the flip side one of the greatest challenges and needs I see in my community and the world around me and we often quota philosopher and theologian Frederick Bikaner who says your vocation or your call is that place where you're deep gladness intersects with the world's deep need we kind of with all that out there probably to the point where our interns kind of sick to hear about that quote but that we really challenging them with that and so over the course of eight weeks over the course of a full year internship whatever the case may be we we do we pour a lot into the lives of those young adults helping them discern that and figure that out because it's really important mean we hope they they figure out that early in life rather than in a mid life crisis or when they're fifty and realize you know what I knew I'd want to do this in my life and now I'm gonna go do it. why not help them figure out when they're in their early twenties and so one way that happens is not only with the work with the kids we do but every Friday. in the summer we have what's called Friday experiences they take a break from their kids and we give them different options of different non profits different organizations community development organizations church leaders community service leaders share of their profession their call in journey into that line of work and what advice they may pass along to the young adults who are in the midst of figuring that out themselves and so I think the young people to come and serve with us get inspired they get educated the their hearts break for what they witness and stories they hear about from the kids and families are working with but they also get a whole new definition of what being in ministry or being in service can look like from a vocational perspective such that they continue that line of work and they continue to pursue their passion and in call after their time of Prada transformation and that's where that sixty four percent comes into play after they get out of college as best we can keep track of them they change email addresses like they change underwear sometimes it's hard to keep track but the best we can do they report back to us where they're serving and it's an incredible stat to throw out there that that many of them are pursuing fields of service and ministry to use their gifts to continue to help those in need yeah that's pretty awesome and it was just gonna say it's just like a job you know if you've got a job and that's what it is is a job. you're probably not happy you're probably stressed out and you're probably not flourishing in that job in other words you're not advancing generally care it's a paycheck. just there to pay rant where to pay your mortgage or whatever but you're not really involved. and volunteering can be like that and I've talked over and over and over with folks that are CEOs are executive directors of an organization and I ask him how to get started why such and such organization why volunteer here and I loved it annexing you know they're the CEO or they're the executive director of project transformation or whatever it might be and it's the same thing if you find a job that has a field that you are interested in you're more likely to want to advance to learn more to to to flourish in that job and the same thing with volunteering if you just go volunteer at some X. Y. Z. nonprofit while you're doing a great job and great service a yes they need to you're probably not going to do it very often you're probably not going to put your best foot forward and believe it or not whoever it is that you're helping there is gonna can and noticed you're kind of there you know whereas if you find okay this is what I'm passion about a passion about helping. underprivileged children or I want to help the hungry or I want to do whatever this is and then you find a organization that matches that passion man you're gonna succeed huge yeah I would agree wholeheartedly with everything you said I mean we have the privilege of working with about fifteen hundred volunteers that come through our doors every year primarily to work one on one with kids in reading and we like to say once you come once you're hooked and that's that's pretty much the case for for most of our volunteers they've absolute fall in love with the kids are working with a come back the next day or the next week and they request work with the same kid just because they've developed that bond and that's really the heart of everything we do it's about relationships no matter in what capacity you're serving with this organization you're serving not just pointing out a storage closet or something like that you're with people in your sharing your story you're listening to their story and that's that's a big part of it is to your not here filling up empty vessels analyze these kids yes you're teaching them and share what you know but you're also listening to their experience in growing yourself through that relationship and you know that's that's what I love about this were exhortation is that it's it's being in solidarity with those around us and learning to be in relationship with our neighbors to may look differently from us we have a different background from us but there's so much that we can learn if we were just kind of step out there beyond our..

sixty four percent fifteen years sixty percent eight weeks four months four month six months two months one year one day
"middle income" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Putting in a ten percent tax cut for middle income families is going to be put in is that still on the table what we're looking at it scratch two point no we're looking at all that by the way senator Rick Scott of Florida very smart guy made an interesting idea proposal another network last week he said look why don't we take that terrorists from the China trade and turn those back to the taxpayers in the form of tax cuts that's an idea an idea but right now it's a little of that money going to shore up our farmers well we've got room to do that as well I mean look let's have let's let people keep more of what they earn them keep more of what they invest that's the supply side ally for curve we believe in that I can't say definitively this morning I'm saying is there's a lot of good ideas to create more incentives to work save and invest look president trump is transforming and rebuilding this economy we've done very well in our first two years just short of three percent which is kind of America data as we face severe monetary restraint from the fed seven rate hikes I think they're reversing that now but that was tough going but now I want to open economic freedom and opportunity economy for entrepreneurs large businesses small businesses and it's set again look at the consumer so much as a work in the wages are rising they're spending and they're saving a lot of Wall Street firms looked at the numbers last week and they raise their forecasts so there is no recession in sight you said we want to talk about the trade war with China I do too it's giving some investors I would say heartburn but time is also taken a hit recording its slowest UT P. in twenty seven years since nineteen ninety two here's what White House trade adviser Peter tomorrow said this week about that the end game is clear they have China stop engaging in these actually can I'm in Russian that cost us over seventy thousand factories China's threshold for pain seems to be pretty high and even president trump and not just with the terrace could impact consumers and delay that announcement of additional trade to tears how do you think that this ends and can you assure us that any deal with China makes it possible for companies to believe that there enough intellectual and proprietary.

senator Rick Scott Florida China heartburn trump America UT White House Peter president twenty seven years three percent ten percent two years
"middle income" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on On The Media

"They don't take more active role during filing season actually going on in testing out the providers software through mock returns, and using different profiles of tax payers to see how the the software actually reacts. And if in fact that up selling is going on the extent to which it's going on. And so one is left with the conclusion, maybe the conclusion that is reluctant at least as far as I'm concerned because I'm I'm very pro higher s I'm a fan of the agency is that they really just don't care about this program. From the standpoint of providing that consumer taxpayer protection, and they're they're much happier turning it over to private industry. I I wanna ask you about the whole notion of an online free system for filing particularly short-form taxes in theory. At least that makes sense. Does it not in theory? The the arrangement whereby private sector companies partner with the IRS or for that matter with a state tax agency and assist. Low income and middle income tax payers in theory that kind of partnership could work just fine. It just as failed and it's not working. It doesn't mean they can't work. But this current system is not working. And so we're going to put that permanently in the internal revenue code. It. Just doesn't make any sense. And another one of your reservations is that should this be enshrined in the US tax code. It would erase the responsibility. For the IRS and the various vendors to periodically examine how the program is working the IRS as the federal agency that's charged with protecting taxpayers and upholding tax payer rights has over the years failed to provide sufficient oversight of the program notwithstanding calls for it to do. So from for instance, the national taxpayer advocate, consumer rights groups, the IRS advisory council, and then independent researchers as well. It is definitely true that the IRS is not in a position even if they wanted to not in a position to create an administer the kind of program that it would take to replace the current free file program because of insufficient resources that Congress's has given the IRS indeed budgets since two thousand eleven has been slashed by sixteen percent as adjusted for inflation. But there's another component to this. And it's just that the IRS has become overly reliant on industry. Just generally speaking..

IRS US Congress partner advisory council sixteen percent
"middle income" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Lift act, which is a huge tax credit for workers up to three thousand dollars a person would really benefit low and middle income people get though, it would not help people whose incomes over a hundred thousand dollars, and it also seems to penalize marriage weirdly, and it would be hugely costly. So there lots lots of things to like about it because it, you know, it would be redistributing money from the rich to working poor, and and middle income people, you know, has no chance in hell of passing given that has no chance in hell passing. And it's also not that it doesn't really fire the imagination. So I read an article by Jordan Weisman of slate about Harris big policy idea the lift act as we were preparing for the show made the point that so Sanders is ideas about echo. Comic policy are are really quite radical in comparison to others, but they have a they have a grandeur to them. It's like universal. You know, we're gonna pay for your college education. It's healthcare for all. It's it's there's a there's an ambition and a clarity. And grandeur has Harris made a mistake. John. Do you think in picking something which is pretty decent public policy idea has elements that that certainly be helpful in terms of reducing inequality, but has no chance to succeed and also isn't imaginative well that I it's that's kind of where I was going because it's kind of like the wall. So what what what President Trump did with by talking about the wall and making these claims about Mexico a candidate was his his supporters when I would ask them. They didn't really care if Mexico is gonna pay for the wall in the theater around the wall and in the theater around the the build the wall chance. And all of that Trump was sending signals about his that. He was basically more, you know, nationalist than thou that he was sending a signal to those voters. Whatever the details are you can trust me is the guy who's going to be in there swinging on this on this issue. So how does that how does that work and play in in democratic politics? And that's why I was wondering about comma harasses her record and also her framing of herself as a person who is working hard to establish equality and Justice in twenty twenty is that about sending that kind of a signal which is like, which is I am obsessed with these issues, and whatever this particular is are you can tell from the way I talk about this. And from the just the way I cast this whole issue that whatever I may face. I will be the one in there who is most tuned to the disparities of equality injustice on my guess is that her ability to seize the imagination. Probably is more associated with her work on criminal Justice. What about her background, John? Like, I mean, that's obviously something that Barack Obama used to great effect. And you know, so Harris has this interesting. She is the child of immigrants her dad was from Jamaica. He's an economist her mom's from India and became a professor at Berkley working on health policy and her parents split up when they were little so she and her sister or the mom raised them in a black neighborhood in Berkeley that at the time was a working class neighborhood. She talks a lot about wanting to help, folks. Like, the folks I grew up with it's a sort of, you know, black version of Elizabeth Warren's background may be sort of similar sense that you're coming from this different. These different kind of rules. And I wonder if that's something she can use to greater effect. I have this weird premonition, and I'm probably wrong because I'm wrong about almost everything that this the..

Trump Harris Barack Obama John Elizabeth Warren Jordan Weisman Mexico Sanders Berkley President twenty twenty Jamaica India Berkeley professor hundred thousand dollars three thousand dollars
"middle income" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on KGO 810

"Middle income wage increases, but because the middle income tax brackets lack the progressivity of the higher income tax brackets, it will actually generate less revenue for the state. So it's perverse in some sense good for individual good for the people the state, not necessarily good for the budget. The governor did not mention any cuts and tax rates despite a touted budget surplus on a visit to the border city of macallan, Texas. President Trump is pressing his case for border wall funding before gathering a federal workers, president saluted the front-line agents. You have no idea how much you loved by the public. Maybe not by the fake news. But you love by the public beyond belief at the same time. Many federal workers will miss their first paychecks Friday. Vice president Pence says his boss has not made any decisions about declaring a national emergency to build a. Border wall with Mexico, but he adds the president's gonna get it done one way or another pants called on Democrats to negotiate an end to the shutdown which is now in its twentieth day Trump and the Democrats are at an impasse over wall. Funding back in San Francisco public health officials report the first flu related death of the season. The person who died as an adult. But no additional information was given Santa Clara county announced their first flu death of the winter season Tuesday. We have an update on the search for a suspect who shot and killed a seventeen year old high school student in Belmont police say three people were detained during a search in Pleasanton, but later released in connection with the incident involving Mohammed Othman he was a senior varsity football player at carmont high. It was shot and killed in the parking lot of central elementary school in Belmont on Monday. Investigators say it appears the victim and the suspect knew one another and the shooting wasn't random. There are plans to analyze surveillance video of homes near central elementary to try and gain leads in the case K G O's Terry routes reporting students at. Carl Mont high in Redwood City are planning a visual for Othman incoming days. This report sponsored by the United Airlines rock and roll half. Marathon, San Francisco run the Golden Gate Bridge. The United Airlines rock and roll half marathon San Francisco on April seventh register now at run rock and roll dot com. That's run rock and roll dot com. We'll check your traffic and weather next on cage. I'm probably okay to.

Mohammed Othman President Trump San Francisco president Belmont Vice president United Airlines Santa Clara county Golden Gate Bridge Texas Redwood City Pence Carl Mont Mexico carmont high Terry Pleasanton
"middle income" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on World News Analysis

"The ten percent. And the issue we have become a middle income countries in two thousand twenty one and two two thousand forty one. We have become a the countries. See what you know, poverty and sticking today. And she said Bill parent fat complicates government said today. Veal Toland well corruptions the improve impedance of the jurisdiction fix with pre Matic capital. The people all sixty years of changing agent, the people at the at the Asian people. They tie the people and the phone on infrastructure. Constructions? I, you know, the actually you're quite back would now and as the introduce five G before two thousand ten three nine construct you high way between an out of cities construction. All right, posits and Guam passage in the indication education construct King, John no mass yet to know the teams come consolidate debt, just in the constitution of the congress. Does swung too director of South Asian and central Asian studies at the Shanghai municipal center for international studies. This is today. Stay with us. Hello. This is Michael Jong greetings from Los Angeles of the Golden State of California. Thank you today for making me part of your team. I truly enjoy the debates. We had look forward to many more in the years to come. Welcome back. You're listening to today. I'm joing into eighteen Jonah Argentina Sunday nine.

Veal Toland John Bill Michael Jong Shanghai Guam Los Angeles Argentina director congress California sixty years ten percent five G
"middle income" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Three quarters of patients with brain hemorrhage worldwide are in load middle income countries where these four simple predict has could have the greatest impact professor restore al-shar. He Salman you are listening to the science after the BBC with me, Mony Chesterton still to come and new effort to catalog landslides the. Factors around every event that's taken at least one human life, the extinction crisis that's hitting the rural rivers of Britain. Plus if you've ever had criminal photo leg, you'll probably have your own ideas about solutions. He's have a hot bath and lots of my Mazembe gave fluids up and also sleep hop out stretching, either push through it or stretch, depends on how bad the cramped it's actually which of these remedies have science behind them. My studio guest today is Jason Palmer, an editor the economist magazine and former BBC science reporter with news of what happens when you give unofficial intelligence, the very human emotion of curiosity, it watches a lot of television. Well, who wouldn't first landslides triggered in many ways by volcanoes earthquakes by erosion. Often human mistakes, sometimes storms, just this week in Hawaii, hurricane lane is still causing landslides and in July. At least one hundred seventy nine people died after the worst weather in decades triggered landslides and floods in western areas of Japan and yet landslides are neglected disaster. When we think of natural disasters natural perils, we think of the quake's of tropical storms and we have a good idea of how many earthquakes happen around the world. So how many storm events they may be ongoing any time because we have a good network of monitoring equipment, safe breath quakes we have a global network of seismometers, but landslides.

Salman BBC Jason Palmer Mony Chesterton professor economist magazine Britain Japan Hawaii reporter editor Three quarters
"middle income" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

"In that second job category and so what i like to think of if if you're going to go down that path is having exit plan i'm trying to save up an extra twothree grand maybe five over the course of a couple of months or a year for this particular investment this particular financial milestone and then i'm going to transition to something that maybe fits more of what we hear think of as a side hustle which is something that has the potential to scale and produce a life changing and more passive impact is that is that kind of a fair statement there near opinion yeah i like that because you know if it's a skill that pretty much everybody has like driving a car there is a naturally a lot of downward pressure on how much you can earn yeah just seems it just seems like it's it's not living up to your fullest potential it's probably not what your kind of envisioning you don't wanna replace your middle income meeting come job assume with a minimum wage job right although interestingly the what's exciting about that stuff is like it's so low barrier to entry so easy to get started at a driver in chicago is just like when i wanna make money i turn on the app and for him you know he was in between jobs in that was enough to kind of support him while he was on the job search and i met some of the most interesting lift drivers are the ones that have like the sides side hustle they're like well i'm really like an audio producer engineer guy in dc no he's starting conversations and some he told me the story like some client who is a music producer like flew him out to national for some event gig and it's just like you know you're starting fifty different conversation today and something good is going to come out too yeah i love that whatever i knew i always talk with the driver and i get a lot of this thanks to oh i'm trying to become a real estate agent i'm trying to do this so that the other thing they always they've always got an interesting story about what they're trying to do too forward i think it's very rural and for many of them it is kind of that bridge for the between between gigs so is there a frequent like most frequent or really common side hustle or you know i asked a question that i asked like twelve other questions to with i'd like to get back to the whole side hustles than anybody can do something that's really easy or something that's not most importantly not expensive to up in with yeah so i i think the the the sharing economy that we kind of been talking about like these different peer to peer apps are great place to start the airbnb is in the world the lift drivers of the world the rover dot com like pet sitting gigs of the world ubereats in insta cart deliveries and stuff like super easy to get started with nobody to entry but a ceiling on on how much you can earn other like with the dog watching stuff friend of mine semi note there like dude we're on pace to make twenty grand on rover this year it was like that is nuts you know but they had a couple of dogs it's no big deal you know let's just add a couple more to the mix so the sons can be significant so i will say that like but there's some time investment to so tier two would be linked the freelancing round freelancing consulting realm so if you if you've had a job you've ever had a job right that was by definition some skilled at somebody thought was worth paying for it so maybe you can take those skills to freelance on the open market in maybe the third tier that she might consider is what will call like the bilo sell high hustle this is i mean the same business model of amazon and walmart in every store in the country basically where i've seen in where i've had some fun with this myself it's like while you're out shopping you can download the amazon seller which is free and you can create a free amazon seller account into stop by the clearance isle while you're.

"middle income" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"In that second job category and so what i like to think of if if you're going to go down that path is having exit plan i'm trying to save up an extra twothree grand maybe five over the course of a couple of months or a year for this particular investment this particular financial milestone and then i'm going to transition to something that maybe fits more of what we hear think of as a side hustle which is something that has the potential to scale and produce a life changing and more passive impact is that is that kind of a fair statement there near opinion yeah i like that because you know if it's a skill that pretty much everybody has like driving a car there is a naturally a lot of downward pressure on how much you can earn yeah just seems it just seems like it's it's not living up to your fullest potential it's probably not what your kind of envisioning you don't wanna replace your middle income meeting come job assume with a minimum wage job right although interestingly the what's exciting about that stuff is like it's so low barrier to entry so easy to get started at a driver in chicago is just like when i wanna make money i turn on the app and for him you know he was in between jobs in that was enough to kind of support him while he was on the job search and i met some of the most interesting lift drivers are the ones that have like the sides side hustle they're like well i'm really like an audio producer engineer guy in dc no he's starting conversations and some he told me the story like some client who is a music producer like flew him out to national for some event gig and it's just like you know you're starting fifty different conversation today and something good is going to come out too yeah i love that whatever i knew i always talk with the driver and i get a lot of this thanks to oh i'm trying to become a real estate agent i'm trying to do this so that the other thing they always they've always got an interesting story about what they're trying to do too forward i think it's very rural and for many of them it is kind of that bridge for the between between gigs so is there a frequent like most frequent or really common side hustle or you know i asked a question that i asked like twelve other questions to with i'd like to get back to the whole side hustles than anybody can do something that's really easy or something that's not most importantly not expensive to up in with yeah so i i think the the the sharing economy that we kind of been talking about like these different peer to peer apps are great place to start the airbnb is in the world the lift drivers of the world the rover dot com like pet sitting gigs of the world ubereats in insta cart deliveries and stuff like super easy to get started with nobody to entry but a ceiling on on how much you can earn other like with the dog watching stuff friend of mine semi note there like dude we're on pace to make twenty grand on rover this year it was like that is nuts you know but they had a couple of dogs it's no big deal you know let's just add a couple more to the mix so the sons can be significant so i will say that like but there's some time investment to so tier two would be linked the freelancing round freelancing consulting realm so if you if you've had a job you've ever had a job right that was by definition some skilled at somebody thought was worth paying for it so maybe you can take those skills to freelance on the open market in maybe the third tier that she might consider is what will call like the bilo sell high hustle this is i mean the same business model of amazon and walmart in every store in the country basically where i've seen in where i've had some fun with this myself it's like while you're out shopping you can download the amazon seller which is free and you can create a.

"middle income" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"It may take years it looks like real steps are being taken to at least lend some of the treasure back to ethiopia mary hopper reporting a method to measure blood sugar levels without using a needle as being developed for the first time researchers have created at his patches that might signal the end of finger prick blood tests and offer improved treatment for more than four hundred million people who live with diabetes a reporter gareth bala has more the number of people with diabetes is rising rapidly especially in low and middle income countries left untreated the disease is a major cause of blindness kidney failure heart tanks and lower limb amputation over these issues can occur if the body is unable to regulate blood sugar levels this is led scientists to look for easy and cheaper ways to monitor blood sugar and improve on the most common method which requires patients to prick their finger to simple a small drop of blood the new he's if patch analyzes glucose from fluid between half or on the skin taking readings every ten to fifteen minutes don't to angelina ille is one of the researchers involved with a project these technology has the potential to become the first needle free approach to monitor blood sugar throughout the day and this is important as we know that people do not like needles and that having to pierce their skin rises a barrier towards frequently monetary diabetes currently in development phase the new patch has already been successfully tested on pigskin and human volunteers following further clinical trials it could be available within one to two years with researchers hoping the sensor will connect to users foes or smart watches to provide more anchorage measurements and better quality of life for diabetic patients that was kind of bali over one hundred years ago and talked to explorers venturing to the south pole were forced to abandon their ship the endurance because it was sinking in a heroic escape that since inspired songs films and even poems the captain ernest shackleton led his whole crew to safety the vessel was crushed by ice in the way.

mary hopper gareth bala diabetes angelina ille ernest shackleton ethiopia reporter one hundred years fifteen minutes two years
"middle income" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

NPR's World Story of the Day

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

"Under stand is that ethiopia has global ambitions the government is trying to build the middle income country and it has made some strides but these protests have really put a strain on those plans because they haven't stopped another thing is that they've taken an ethnic tone the arrojo's who are the majority in that country started expressing disillusionment with never having had the presidency and the hirose who used to hold power in the country joined in as these protest went on with some of the same sentiments that they felt left out of the prosperity of the country so this became a very serious situation for a government that has a long history of repression it was serious because two of the country's biggest tribes had essentially turned against it for much you heard from people in a ethiopia today are are the prime minister's words being greeted as a new beginning or they skeptical of what their hurt there is a ton of scepticism a lot of activists on social media have expressed deep deep scepticism one of them said that this was a small step in the right direction but he said it needed to be implemented immediately and without any conditions one of the questions is i gather it's not clear who exactly a political prisoner is and as to when they might be released or when the prison might be shut down did the prime ministry shea that's right the prime minister did not the fine who is a political prisoner he did say that the prison will be turned into a museum but gave no time line for that and bears aitor peralta talking about the announced closure of one of ethiopia's most notorious prison zater thanks thank you robert.

ethiopia prime minister social media shut down aitor peralta robert
"middle income" Discussed on Up First

Up First

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on Up First

"Middle income working families their taxes are going down while democratic senator chris van hollen tells abc's this week that corporations are actually the big winners it's a huge give away too big corporations millions of middle class tax payers we'll see their taxes go up i even know republicans promised that would not happen all right let's bring in scudetto from pierce politics team either scott morning david so it looks like this is going to be the first major win for republicans and uh and president trump it i mean are they coming away with what they hope for your i'm not all of what they wanted but a lot of it they wanted to cut taxes for a lot of people they have this will likely be the biggest tax bill to pass in decades this was sold as a middleclass tax cut though in the bulk of the benefits here go to corporations and the wealthy republicans also talked a lot about simplifying the tax code and in the end this remains just as complicated as ever seven tax brackets everything else given other years gone it seemed like republican leaders in the end weren't looking for a personal record here they just wanted to finish the race in it's something done that they could campaign on looked it looked to be in question just days ago when it looked like him senators once certain but you you had republican senator bob corker had been a a no on this bill he is even come around now after a late provision was added right what can tell us about that he's a great example of that mindset he had had major problems all along specifically when it comes to how this would would raise the debt and he voted 'no the first time around but corker said last week this is a rare opportunity for republicans to boost the economy he didn't want to stay in the way of it but he will be an interesting voice to watch this week there was reporting over the weekend that a provision added into the bill in conference would really help corker is commercial real estate business he's on the defensive here he released a letter last night saying he had nothing.

david president senator bob corker real estate business senator chris van hollen abc pierce scott
"middle income" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"You know good for me but if you're a middle income person and you have a preexisting conditions and you're going to have medical expenses you know you have um you may have a harder time uh finding a policy you can afford you may have a harder time finding policies that cover and provide the benefits that you need again depending on where you define middle income but you know ah if you look at the aggregate and you look at what this bill does i think it is fair to say that looking at the whole income spectrum rich to poor healthy in an and demographic back realty disick the overall and this is i think the best way to think about the bill the over all affect of this bill will be to increase the medical exposure to medical bills for the population as a whole and that is because of what this bill does it pulls so much money out of medicaid so much money out of the tax credits that people use to buy health insurance and so you know it's gonna vary from person to person some people will be better off some people will be worse off but at the end of the day more people are going to be exposed to bigger medical bills and it's just a matter of which people you're talking about and in what form they pay them premiums deductibles what have you yeah over over what jonathan mentions there and sort of the the how this bill opens it up for people to buy customised plans plans to cover less the ideas that ensures are also supposed to have to offer plans uh that comply with all of the obamacare regulation so it will cover your preexisting conditions and such um the concern i hear from a lotta people is that because those plans will mostly appeal to people with significant medical costs um that the premiums on those plans are likely to be very high uh so how can people be confident that if they have a preexisting condition that they will have access to a plan that they can afford.

tax credits health insurance jonathan
"middle income" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"middle income" Discussed on Discovery

"One method is to vaccinate young girls against the hpv virus before they become sexually active and that is slowly beginning to happen in tanzania but vaccination content millions of women who are already sexuallyactive they need a cheap reliable screening method simpler than the widely used pap test or smear where cells from the cervix are examined under a microscope in a middle income countries like tanzania they need to use the tools at hand nurse beatrice is stacking boxes of equipment onto the backseat of an autorickshaw before squeezing in herself and setting offer clinic on the outskirts of the capital dar es salaam beatrice works for mary stopes in partnership with the government offering cervical cancer screening in hard to reach health facilities around the country today she hopes to see around seventy women again he role in an open courtyard outside the clinic beatrice arrives to find benches packed with waiting women so these are the boxes that regards and you have gloves things emission mission glass on this is a flops and lots of vinegar vessels of women all the is virginis with graham okay this now now to see inside the vagina so fall washing hands you will legalize so you pointed inside the vagina you can see the cervix with this light beatrice's first patient is a 47yearold woman she undressed is an lies down on the examination bed the first step is to insert a speculative a peak like instrument into the vagina to separate the walls so she can get a clearer view of the cervix inside.

tanzania beatrice mary stopes graham