19 Burst results for "Middle East Program"

"middle east program" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

06:00 min | 7 months ago

"middle east program" Discussed on Between The Lines

"Earlier this month, , a deadly blast in Beirut killed more than one hundred and seventy people, , engine thousands, , and lift three, , hundred, , thousand homeless. . And a vast landscape of destruction. . Now, , Lebanon was already in extremely bad shape before this blast exacerbated by the covid crosses the chronic corruption and dysfunction that had defined Lebanese politics for decades with all that had brought the economy to ruin. . Many people have lost they laugh savings and investments no wonder widespread protests recently led to the resignation of the Lebanese Prime Minister and his cabinet. . So the poodle listen a broader historical context. . Let's welcome back to the program Joshua Landis. . He heads the Middle East Program at the University of Oklahoma Josh Welcome back to between the lines. . It's a pleasure being with you Tom. . Now Lebanon was once a model for the Middle East by route was dubbed the Paris of the East. . Now, , today Lebanon looks like Syria Iraq how did this happen? ? Well it happened because Lebanon is an extremely divided country it like Iraq and Syria there are Shiites and sinise dividing the Muslim side but there's also about thirty three percent of the population are Christians. . Both marinade there and and Greek Orthodox. . So you have the same. . Religious Divisions in Lebanon that you do in Syria and Iraq but in fact, , you have more and that's one reason why Lebanon fell into such a bloody civil war from nineteen, seventy, , , five to ninety, , which was. . Patched up. . Most recently and They've been running in what turns out to be a real puns e scheme through the central. . Bank. . In which they shored up the Lebanese pound by borrowing gobs of money billions upon billions of dollars and. . and. . Supporting the exchange rate, , but it turned out that that <hes> was a Ponzi scheme because tons of Lebanese in Australia. . The United States Europe were sending their dollars to Lebanon to be in these dollar-denominated accounts that were getting interest rates as high as twelve thirteen percent. . So everybody wanted that kind of interest rate, , but it turned out to be a Ponzi scheme in just collapsed a few months ago, , which was sparked these terrible demonstrations and instability because the country is now impoverished inflation has gone through the roof and people are discovering that they don't have any money and it's it's <hes>. . Lit tensions between different sectarian groups, , and of course, , as I mentioned in my introduction many people in Lebanon I've lost their life savings and investments. . To people realize that it goes back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War One this in France and Britian what do they do that essentially created free great minority ruled regimes in the Middle East, , tell us mall. . Yes they did and Lebanon was carved out by France which got a both Syria and Lebanon from the League of Nations after World War One. . The League of Nations <hes> conceded this to France to really rule over the mass colonies, , but they are called mandates and. . France carved out Lebanon as an independent country. . And made the borders such that they were as big as they possibly could maintaining a Christian majority so that the government would be dominated by Christians at the center ruling over Shiites Druze a bunch of sending Moslems none of whom would be able to compete in theory with the Christians and this allowed for a very French friendly country on the Mediterranean that France thought would serve it. . Well, , the problem is that <hes> within the years. . The demographics began to change and Muslims became the crushing majority and this led to the civil war in hundred, , seventy five and ever since then the various religious groups have been squabbling over. . Political power. . And today fifty percent of all parliament members that have to be Christians. . National Pact even though Christians are probably only a third, , the population which underlines how You know precarious. . The entire political system is, , and of course, , in Iraq following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire with the British mandate the Sunni minority pretty much ran the show from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire right through the downfall of Saddam Hussein, , and in Syria it was the Alawite minority that ran the show and of course <hes>. . Stiffer differs from the Sunni majority during the recent civil war. Correct. . . You're absolutely right and this was a pattern throughout the northern Middle East where the colonial powers whether it was. . Britain or was France would establish a minority in power given the lion's share of power, , and that helped them to rule by divide and conquer, , but it left a terrible legacy. . That the Middle East is suffering from today because the Alawites this religious minority that's twelve percent of the country ruled Syria and today the uprising was an attempt by the Sydney majority to overthrow that minority that's clinging to power in Syria Saddam Hussein sunny twenty percent of the country Cenis and the Shiite majority and Kurds rose up to try to get rid of Saddam Hussein leading to very bloody civil war ethnic war and and that's that's one of the major causes for instability throughout. . The region is this terrible fight between these different religious groups

Lebanon Brent Scowcroft Tom Switzer Pacific theater Middle East Sarah Kovner Syria Joshua Landis Ponzi scheme Beirut National Security Adviser Middle East Program Prime Minister Iraq sinise University of Oklahoma Australia Paris
The French history behind Lebanon's problems

Between The Lines

06:00 min | 7 months ago

The French history behind Lebanon's problems

"Earlier this month, a deadly blast in Beirut killed more than one hundred and seventy people, engine thousands, and lift three, hundred, thousand homeless. And a vast landscape of destruction. Now, Lebanon was already in extremely bad shape before this blast exacerbated by the covid crosses the chronic corruption and dysfunction that had defined Lebanese politics for decades with all that had brought the economy to ruin. Many people have lost they laugh savings and investments no wonder widespread protests recently led to the resignation of the Lebanese Prime Minister and his cabinet. So the poodle listen a broader historical context. Let's welcome back to the program Joshua Landis. He heads the Middle East Program at the University of Oklahoma Josh Welcome back to between the lines. It's a pleasure being with you Tom. Now Lebanon was once a model for the Middle East by route was dubbed the Paris of the East. Now, today Lebanon looks like Syria Iraq how did this happen? Well it happened because Lebanon is an extremely divided country it like Iraq and Syria there are Shiites and sinise dividing the Muslim side but there's also about thirty three percent of the population are Christians. Both marinade there and and Greek Orthodox. So you have the same. Religious Divisions in Lebanon that you do in Syria and Iraq but in fact, you have more and that's one reason why Lebanon fell into such a bloody civil war from nineteen, seventy, five to ninety, which was. Patched up. Most recently and They've been running in what turns out to be a real puns e scheme through the central. Bank. In which they shored up the Lebanese pound by borrowing gobs of money billions upon billions of dollars and. and. Supporting the exchange rate, but it turned out that that was a Ponzi scheme because tons of Lebanese in Australia. The United States Europe were sending their dollars to Lebanon to be in these dollar-denominated accounts that were getting interest rates as high as twelve thirteen percent. So everybody wanted that kind of interest rate, but it turned out to be a Ponzi scheme in just collapsed a few months ago, which was sparked these terrible demonstrations and instability because the country is now impoverished inflation has gone through the roof and people are discovering that they don't have any money and it's it's Lit tensions between different sectarian groups, and of course, as I mentioned in my introduction many people in Lebanon I've lost their life savings and investments. To people realize that it goes back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War One this in France and Britian what do they do that essentially created free great minority ruled regimes in the Middle East, tell us mall. Yes they did and Lebanon was carved out by France which got a both Syria and Lebanon from the League of Nations after World War One. The League of Nations conceded this to France to really rule over the mass colonies, but they are called mandates and. France carved out Lebanon as an independent country. And made the borders such that they were as big as they possibly could maintaining a Christian majority so that the government would be dominated by Christians at the center ruling over Shiites Druze a bunch of sending Moslems none of whom would be able to compete in theory with the Christians and this allowed for a very French friendly country on the Mediterranean that France thought would serve it. Well, the problem is that within the years. The demographics began to change and Muslims became the crushing majority and this led to the civil war in hundred, seventy five and ever since then the various religious groups have been squabbling over. Political power. And today fifty percent of all parliament members that have to be Christians. National Pact even though Christians are probably only a third, the population which underlines how You know precarious. The entire political system is, and of course, in Iraq following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire with the British mandate the Sunni minority pretty much ran the show from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire right through the downfall of Saddam Hussein, and in Syria it was the Alawite minority that ran the show and of course Stiffer differs from the Sunni majority during the recent civil war. Correct. You're absolutely right and this was a pattern throughout the northern Middle East where the colonial powers whether it was. Britain or was France would establish a minority in power given the lion's share of power, and that helped them to rule by divide and conquer, but it left a terrible legacy. That the Middle East is suffering from today because the Alawites this religious minority that's twelve percent of the country ruled Syria and today the uprising was an attempt by the Sydney majority to overthrow that minority that's clinging to power in Syria Saddam Hussein sunny twenty percent of the country Cenis and the Shiite majority and Kurds rose up to try to get rid of Saddam Hussein leading to very bloody civil war ethnic war and and that's that's one of the major causes for instability throughout. The region is this terrible fight between these different religious groups

Lebanon Syria Middle East France Iraq Ottoman Empire Saddam Hussein Middle East Program Ponzi Scheme Beirut Prime Minister Joshua Landis League Of Nations Parliament TOM Australia University Of Oklahoma
"middle east program" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"middle east program" Discussed on KCRW

"Sony says Saudi Arabia kept at it. Let's countries were walking away from nuclear, but they decided look this is our long-term plan, which she finds a little puzzling given that the country is perfectly suited for other kinds of less costly electricity production, particularly renewables, they have these vast deserts the pretty. Easy. I would think to put out big solar farms squad Sony's background is in arms control. And she's worried that Saudi Arabia might be interested in nuclear technology for a different reason nuclear weapons why. Because of their chief rival in the region is wrong. Its nuclear program has had military dimensions in the past. According to the International Atomic Energy agency, speaking last year on CBS is sixty minutes Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin salon said if Iran got a nuke Saudi Arabia would too. The. Saudi Arabia does not want to acquire any nuclear bomb. But without a doubt if Iran developed a nuclear bomb, we will follow suit as soon as possible. Been someone's words matter because Saudi Arabia's nuclear plans are moving from paper to reality. Recent satellite images show construction is underway on its first research reactor on the outskirts of Riyadh Aaron Stein is director of the Middle East program at the foreign policy research institute, he says this new reactor is too small and too low power to be of any use embalm making this is not something a country with engage upon for a weapons program. In fact, even large civilian nuclear power plants can't be used easily to make bombs, but there are other parts of a civilian nuclear program that can im- particular if Saudi Arabia decides it wants to make its own fuel for its nuclear reactors instead of buying it on the open market that would require enriching uranium which uses..

Saudi Arabia Saudi Crown Sony Iran Aaron Stein Riyadh International Atomic Energy ag Middle East policy research institute CBS director sixty minutes
"middle east program" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on Here & Now

"Now is the Trump administration moves through people with operating will experience. At the border at the department of homeland security is there a concern that there is not very many people left on the bench to do the work. There is definitely a concern about the personnel situation at homeland security department, and who they can install permanently to lead that agency. A few of the names that have already been tossed around would have an extremely difficult time getting through the Senate confirmation process, and these are people like Ken Kuch Nellie and Chris co BAC the hard, right? You know, immigration activists who have definitely impressed the president. But at the same time would have an extremely difficult time answering some of the questions that they would face from from Senate Democrats, if they did get to the point where they were the nominee. Let's Gabby or White House reporter for politico. Thanks very much for speaking with us. Thank you so much, Peter. Well, Isreaeli go to the polls tomorrow. Oh, what a fact will prime minister Netanyahu's pledged to annex Jewish settlements in the occupied. West Bank have on voters. This is land Palestinians, NPS makers hope will be a future Palestinian state and the promise from Netanyahu has been widely condemned around the world as one that may win him last minute votes in his tight race for re-election, but will jeopardize a term peace agreement with Palestinians, Aaron David Miller is here a Middle East program director at the Wilson center in past adviser to democratic and Republican ministrations. Hi, Erin, I Robert how are you? I'm good. But how is this settling in Israel? I'm who is Netanyahu wooing sort of give us the context of you know, what's on the ground politically in Israel right now. The context is Benjamin Netanyahu is in the fight for his political his legal and his politically existential life Lee cooed has ruled the forty two years since banal come begging league claim to the party in nineteen seventy seven thirty one of those years has been dominated by Liku governments only. Price has Likud lost to to former Israeli chiefs of staff a Barack on one hand, and you talk Rabin on the other. And now Netanyahu was facing. And Benny Ganz. A man who is the Quinta central Israeli deep military experience, decorated war hero trial.

Benjamin Netanyahu Israel Senate Ken Kuch Nellie Benny Ganz politico Aaron David Miller Likud Barack prime minister Gabby West Bank president Middle East Isreaeli Rabin Peter NPS Wilson center
"middle east program" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on Today, Explained

"This is today explained. I'm Sean Ramos jerem whenever I start an interview. I asked my guest to tell me what they do. Just so I get it. Right because sometimes titles are long in complicated. My name is John Alterman J O N LT. Your man senior vice president Brzezinski churn global security and geo strategy and the director of the Middle East program at the center for strategic and international studies in Washington DC. Okay. Now last real questions. Are you not done? I thought Zoltan have just announcing my title, the whole thing. Okay. So so Dr ultimate there. Two major conditions to the United States withdrawal from Syria. One is not until ISIS is defeated and two is not have the Kurds are in a precarious position if they're unsafe. So I want to understand each of those a little more starting with ISIS. How exactly is ISIS doing right now? Why is this is down but not out and one of the challenges of ISIS is it's it's strong because it's always been a very adaptive organization. It's been an online ideology, it's been a fighting force. It's been a terrorist group that does onesies twosies and a bunch of lone wolves in Europe. And elsewhere. It has been a federated set of armies that operate in Tunisia, and Libya, and Egypt and Yemen and a whole bunch of other. Places. So what we talk about when we talk about ISIS is you're actually talking about a lot of things some of which rely on activities in Syria, some of which are inspired by what's happening in Syria, and some of which might only have a little bit of relationship to things in Syria. But in many ways are independently owned and operated franchises. What's really hard is determining when an idea is dead. When does ISIS lose its ability to inspire anybody in Syria to do anything, the reality is we're likely not to know that ISIS is going to be able to disrupt ISIS is going to be able to kill people in Syria for a long time to come. What is good enough is going to be in the eye of the older?.

ISIS Syria Sean Ramos senior vice president Middle East Washington DC Zoltan John Alterman J O Europe Brzezinski United States Tunisia director Yemen Libya Egypt
"middle east program" Discussed on Intersections

Intersections

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on Intersections

"Joining us for conversation about the Gaza Strip and US policy towards it. I'm joined by two friends and colleagues here. One is Howdy. Our thanks ton Amer visiting fellow here at Brookings, and formerly deputy special envoy for Israel, Palestinian, Goshi, focusing largely on Gaza. Thank you any long Goldenberg. Thanks, great to be here on Goldenberg run the Middle East program at the center for new American security and also worked with Hattie and others at the State Department on the Israeli Palestinian issue and previous negotiations. Great. Thanks for being with us here to describe your report that we wrote in close collaboration and joint partnership with the center for new American security, a report on American policy towards the Gaza Strip and how we think it might change reformed a task force for that. We gathered some of the best and most experienced mines here in Washington Americans who've had exp. With American government. And with analyzing the situation we spoken to numerous stakeholders in the region and elsewhere and tried to think about how American policy towards Gaza might change. We will be launching that report on December third at Brookings, and please tune in for that. If you're in Washington, please join us, and if not you can join on the web at ten AM on December third so perhaps you can start by telling us a little bit about the situation right now. I think we all know the station in Gaza is bad. But if a little bit more about what that actually means. It's surprising. How bad the situation in Gaza is Gaza's essentially manmade humanitarian catastrophe that kind of unfolds day after day were sitting here in Washington DC. So I like to think about how big GAAS is Gaza is about just under two million people living in an area about twice the size of Washington D C with a critical challenge. There is this lack of freedom of movement, the inability of people of Gaza to move to adjacent areas. And so imagine living in Washington DC, wearing Gaza only.

Gaza Gaza Strip Washington DC Goldenberg American government visiting fellow Middle East Israel Hattie State Department Goshi
"middle east program" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on AP News

"The brewers command from the mound. AP's Chuck Freeman reports a shutout gives Milwaukee a two one lead over Los Angeles in the National League championship series survived a near hiccup from closer Jeremy Jeffers to beat the dodgers four nothing. It's been a difficult postseason for Jeffers who gave up the go ahead home run in game two. He loaded the bases in the ninth inning with Thai run at the plate Jeffers came back to strike out. Yes. Monte grigol and Brian dosier to end the game. The brewers grabbed the to nothing lead through six innings in attitude. Big runs in the seventh on Orlando is homerun off dodger starter in loser. Walker? Bueller? Milwaukee starter you'll leashes pitched into the sixth inning. Chuck Freeman Los Angeles. As the investigation continues into the disappearance and reported slaying of Saudi writer, Jamal Khashoggi. The debate over consequences continues AP correspondent Shelley Adler reports Senator Lindsey Graham told FOX and friends that he's all for sanctions against Saudi Arabia. We deal with bad people all the time. But this is in our face. I feel personally offended. They have nothing, but contempt for us. Now, a Middle East expert Jon Alterman, the director of the Middle East program at C S I S people will treat Saudi Arabia differently. And I think frankly, Saudis will treat the United States differently. Exactly where on that spectrum between normal and North Korea. We will end up. I think is going to depend in part on exactly what the Saudis come out with an expert to Shelley, antler, Washington. Prince Harry and his wife, the duchess of suspects have met with thousands of fans outside the Sydney Opera House prince ariza's, the appreciates the warm, welcome. He and his wife, the former Meghan Markle have received generally couldn't think of a better place to announce the upcoming baby boy or girl. So I thank you, very very much. It was the Royal couples first meeting with the general public since her pregnancy was announced Monday, MS they kicked off their tour of Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand this incredible country of yours among those taken by surprise. By the baby announcement were there, Sydney hosts, Governor General, Sir. Peter Cosgrove and lady Lynne Cosgrove from the time of your engagement through your courtship. And then further into your your marriage. We've been very anxious to have you here. So we could adopt you as well. Governor general sense staff to quickly by a toy. Kangaroo with Joey and his pouch and a pair. Australian sheepskin boots for their pregnant guest. Hi. I'm Megan crane AP digital manager and host of the podcast ground game. A look at the top political issues bubbling up around the country ahead of this year's midterm elections. It's available on apple podcast and podcast one. While you're there, be sure to subscribe rate and review it that's the podcast ground game. AP.

brewers Jeremy Jeffers Saudi Arabia Chuck Freeman Shelley Adler Los Angeles Milwaukee Middle East AP Meghan Markle dodgers Megan crane Peter Cosgrove Jamal Khashoggi Sydney Opera House Prince Harry Orlando National League Bueller
"middle east program" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on KSRO

"To the future. Good morning. Six nineteen at ks SRO, I'm Pat Kerrigan. And it is the question of the day in DC and in some parts around the world UN ambassador, Nikki Haley, leaving that post at the end of the year and on the live line with us. This morning is author and vice president Middle East program director at the Wilson center, Aaron David Miller. Good morning, Erin morning. How are you? I'm well. So everybody's got their opinion about why. Nikki Haley is leaving. What's yours? I worked for half a dozen administrations. Republicans and Democrats have really never seen a situation quite like this. I don't think there's anybody on planet earth, except Nikki Haley who knows the exact reason why she's leaving and theories abound. Letter of resignation talks about term limits and her her view that it's important to change. She also talks about entry into the private sector all that time in public service. I'm sure financial security is important. I think also there's there's this that she she actually operated as UN ambassador and a very unique unique period. There was an invisible secretary of state for the first year in Detroit administration in the NFC was kind of dysfunctional. So she had enormous opportunity and freedom of. Ah of latitude to speak and to become involved in an issue. She wanted she also had a pretty close relationship with the president. And as a politician rather than a diplomat. I think he gave her free rein even though she disagreed with him on an issue. So I frankly, I think the job for her going forward now with Mike Pompeo secretary state jumbled national security advisor, just probably wasn't as energizing exciting or as impactful as it was during her first year, very well said it was quite the love fest yesterday arid and the White House with President Trump, and Nikki Haley interesting that she made a point of saying during that that get together that she would not be running for president in twenty twenty. What do you make of that statement? I mean, I think I we're talking it's it's two years away. And she's making a transition into the private sector. It would be unseemly. And I think very damaging to the conservative base of the Republican party if she openly challenged the president. Yeah. For for the nomination. So I don't think that's that's what hurt her game is. I think the question for her is over the next couple of years. How are you going to maintain her profile? And how is she gonna figure out a way as a Republican conservative woman to bridge the gap between the base of the party who may think she's too liberal on one hand and yet capture enough independence and Republican moderates. Should she decide, and I can't imagine? She won't. Yeah. That's big run in twenty twenty four. Yeah. That is a big a big nut to crack all of those parts of what you just had to say Erin with regard to Nikki Haley, and you're right. There is a period of you know, when you're without that particular microphone. Or camera lens? It is sometimes difficult to maintain that kind of a profile. Yeah. She'll be much sought out clearly as as as a speech as a speaker and figuring she's already committed herself. The other piece of this in the in the post Brad Kavanagh era. There's also this sort of complication net. If you're a woman running for office. Do you really want to become very closely identified with an administration, or at least with the president that has openly mocked at least on one occasion, a victim of sexual assault. And that's a tricky. That's tricky issue. I suspect so she's going to have to navigate a fine fine line seem to seem suit done that quite credibly over the last couple of years. That's true. Very true. All right, Erin, let's get out your magic eight ball. Now and ask you who you think will be entering into that position. At the end of the year. It won't be vodka. We know that. Me thinks federal nepotism laws and smart politics would probably rule von Trump out. I mean, I I must say that. I, you know, having again work for forever doesn't secretaries of state. And and seeing US ambassador said at you and come and go there's been very strong figures. But usually that. Position doesn't have the sort of prominence and influence within within the government. Attract the interest of of so many people I mean, negating Italy's approval rating sixty three percent of the American public approved of the job. She did. So you're not gonna get a Nikki Haley two point. Oh, I mean, hopefully, you'll get you'll get someone on there. A couple of candidates Dina Powell who is a former national deputy national security advisor might be one. But who knows I mean, there might be a a Senator or a member of the house? Who's retiring looking for a job? So it could it could go it could go that way too. I guess my only point is you're not gonna get a kind of. I don't think a larger than life figure along the lines of Indika Haley. Yeah. Tough tough shoes to fill for sure. Aaron thanks so much for being with us this morning. Appreciate your input. Always a pleasure. Take care. That's Aaron David Miller. He is the director of the Middle East program director at the Wilson. Center. Six twenty five at k s..

Indika Haley Erin morning president Nikki Haley Aaron David Miller UN vice president Middle East program director Republican party advisor Pat Kerrigan Wilson center President Trump Brad Kavanagh Mike Pompeo Detroit Middle East Dina Powell US
Iran Rejects Compromise as OPEC Heads for Battle in Vienna

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

04:05 min | 2 years ago

Iran Rejects Compromise as OPEC Heads for Battle in Vienna

"Good morning ana officials in indonesia's say one hundred and seventy eight people are missing after a ferry sunk on the island of sumatra the wooden vessel which was overcrowded with passengers and motorbikes went down on monday three deaths have been confirmed while two more bodies were discovered this morning only eighteen people have been found canada's parliament has passed a law to make the recreational use of cannabis illegal it's only the second country to do this off to uruguay it follows an election campaign promise from prime minister justin trudeau and a major shortage of gas which adds fister soft drinks and beer is starting to impact uk producers is being blamed on a number of factories which produce carbon dioxide either shutting for maintenance or suffering technical breakdowns drinks manufacturers are understood to be experiencing disruption at a time when demand is high during the hot weather and the world cup global news twenty four hours a day on and it took on twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts more than one hundred twenty countries i'm the unguaranteed this is bloomberg markus thanks very much indeed leon so no fizzle left in the you know paul moment well keeping a close eye on that situation i assure you over the summer we're gonna talk will next this as iran has put itself on a collision course with saudi arabia at this week's opec meeting it's all minister has rejected a potential compromise that would see a small oil production increase two apiece energy consumers as we head into this week long talks over opec meetings and discussions over in vienna i suppose the question is whether there is still room for compromise or whether iran and be johnson ganay the iranian oil minister sensually removed that room they seem to think they did didn't they we ain't gonna talking in soundbites we've been playing earlier on suggesting that they've got some sort of veto that it has to be a unanimous decision we'll see how how the iranian view goes down interesting made sure i'm ready to send a little bit earlier on on the middle east program and she was talking about how novak of russia of course have been calling for a one and a half million barrels increase the more expected ranges what three hundred six hundred thousand i think increase and she was describing that novak line is a nonstarter but he's this is the art of the deal is this learning from trump and how he likes to progress things so start over ten rather than any any serious suggestion of where we head i'm also pretty interested in the demand story here because we've set ourselves up to talk oil from a supply perspective because that's what opec is all about yet at this point we are caught in the midst of a trade spat between china and the united states and how that plays out for the demand side of things is going to be fascinating when it comes to the talks themselves though we're seeing sort of two blocks emerging here we've got the iranians and the iraqis on the one hand and then we have them facing off with the saudis and the russians on the other hand the question is where all of the others all of the other opec nations will fall in this spectrum between the two i mean we're talking about opec cohesion here this is a group that managed to pull itself together essentially and they've been quite good when it comes to compliance for about a year and a half we were reminded by stuart wallis that that cohesion that here hearings that speaking from the same hymn sheet very much the exception not the rule when it comes to opec history our colleagues george wallace for selling us yesterday and so interesting to see what we get from them in terms of the number and then what that really means that we what they say and then they'll be what happens what they do how much they pump again this sort of in the weeds and discuss what that means interesting also to ask where this capacity is gonna come from because we talk about opec increasing production as if they all have the capacity to do that they don't the saudis to the russians not in opec but part of that group they do and a couple of other names in chile within opec have that capacity but the others don't but they still might be given the theoretical ability to increase production even if they can't for example venezuela on the ground actually do so.

Indonesia Twenty Four Hours Million Barrels One Hand
"middle east program" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"From madari house in london this is the monocle daily i'm andrew miller on tonight show is rarely an palestinian officials read from the usual scripts following yesterday's killing of at least fifty eight palestinian protesters by israeli soldiers also ahead russia inaugurates its new bridge to crimea furthering its attempts to make it's an accession of the peninsula fate accompli seattle's council decides that if big companies want to base themselves in the city they can start paying taxes mexico's election season turns violent and it was the idea that you could actually make nonfiction narrative that you could give it the kind of trust that picture man we'll hear from andrew solomon about the life and legacy of the late great tom wolfe over at plus review of the asian newspapers and of you of north korea from someone who was there seventy two hours ago that's coming up on the monocle daily live from london starting now and welcome to tonight's monocle daily with me andrew muller after the bloodshed the recriminations the toll of palestinians killed by israel troops during yesterday's protests along israel's fortified frontier with gaas at now stands at fifty eight more than two and a half thousand people were injured the accusations and counter accusations at the un and elsewhere have been precisely as might have been anticipated palestinian spokespeople have damned israel for conducting a straightforward massacre israeli authorities have retorted that gaza's rulers hamas have used civilians as human shields for a terrorist incursion i'm joined now by aaron david miller vice president and director of the middle east program at the woodrow wilson sent in washington dc and a former middle east negotiator in republican and democratic administrations alike erin first of all to yesterday's events along the frontier with gaza if you look at the wider historic.

gaza washington vice president and director aaron david miller andrew muller andrew solomon russia london woodrow wilson hamas madari house un israel north korea tom wolfe mexico seattle crimea andrew miller seventy two hours
"middle east program" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Want to predict it but we've embarked now on a very slippery slope aaron david miller is vice president of the wilson center and former middle east negotiator for the state department thanks for being with us thank you as president trump briefly mentioned in his announcement yesterday there are americans detained by the iranian government over the years around and its proxies have bombed american embassies and military installations murdered hundreds of american service members and kidnapped imprisoned and tortured american citizens they're currently five americans in one green card holder who were being held in iran and when president trump announced on tuesday that he was pulling out of the iran nuclear deal this small group might have the most to lose if the two countries relationship falls apart highly is funding arias in iranian american who was held in prison in iran in two thousand seven she wrote about her experience in the book my prison my home she's the former director of the middle east program at the woodrow wilson center and is now a fellow there on the heels of president trump's announcement i asked her to reflect on her time in detention as woods leaving to come back to the united states i was stopped on my way to the airport and they kept me need on for eight months under country arrest of which is spend hundred than five days in solitary confinement in evin prison where currently the johnny and americans who are prisoners in on our kept amine they believed i was part of a plot to over through the romanian government they would very suspicious of the united states intention then as they are now how did you end up getting released.

aaron david miller vice president iranian government director woodrow wilson center trump woods united states romanian government president iran evin eight months five days
"middle east program" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Well because back with you can you hear me i can hear you well was absolutely right netanyahu was just on television giving a public speech said the israeli public is very appreciative of president trump and his decision now this is a real victory a real victory in real vindication for what he's been trying to push for for many years now which is maximum pressure on iran no real negotiations you know in his mind which is now going to be the case trump seems to to be going for a quote unquote the nuclear option with regard to the iran and its nuclear program and and it's quite unclear what their what their end game is trump said he wants to come back to the table but it's not clear to my mind you know under what conditions that are under what terms they'd be willing to do that david miller with us middle east program at the wilson center and a past advisor to republican and democratic secretaries of state aaron we spoken to you quite a bit about this day should it come into here it is your thoughts i mean i in reference to near he's point in your question i don't think there's an end game because enlarge part for there to be an end game they would have to be a strategy and the reality is like so many of the president's initiatives let me just say here i voted for republicans and democrats i worked for democrats this is not a partisan comment but the reality is this president has become preacher naturally adept at coming up for solutions that america to problems that america doesn't have you seen withdrawal from climate you see them withdraw from tpp you see you see it in the travel bans you see what's going to happen on monday in jerusalem where the us and usmc belongs in in in west jerusalem but there's there was absolutely no compelling reason to bury what remains with the peace process by south quote unquote taking jerusalem off the table and solving this problem so this is a strategy born in my judgment of domestic politics in campaign promises born of the desire to overturn now the foreign signal foreign policy accomplishment however flawed the j c a is ending his flawed my good friend mutt rob malley helped negotiate it but at the same time it is viable it is functional and to to.

netanyahu trump iran david miller wilson center advisor aaron president democrats america us west jerusalem rob malley
"middle east program" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Airstrikes that are now taking place in syria president trump announcing the military operation about thirty eight minutes ago addressing the nation from the white house narrow and an inability to to use them or is this go more broad than that and if it's a former i think they probably they're likely to keep their head down at least militarily for the time being i'm sure the pentagon planners are are taking extraordinary care to make sure that russian assets are not targeted but on the other hand degree for installation for some kind of mishap is there so i think you know we won't know the answer that question right away but but i think over the next twenty four forty eight hours i think we'll have a better sense of how russia and iran intend to respond and by the way that may not be limited just to syria there obviously president trump have eight eight symmetric capabilities that can be deployed you know in the region and you can be very came axa former state department official and now a fellow in the middle east program at the carnegie endowment for international peace we are awaiting a briefing from defense secretary mattis at the top of the hour to explain more about the combat operation now underway in syria a joint operation involving the united states britain and france president trump said it was meant as a deterrent after buster assad is suspected of using chemical weapons we have seen a document the national security council sent to members of congress tonight and the document says that there is reliable information to indicate syrian military officials coordinated what appears to be the use of chlorine in that attack on april seventh the document says that a large volume of high resolution reliable photos and video from the scene clearly documents victims suffering from his fixation and foaming at the mouth would no visible signs of external wounds and certainly those images were shocking and horrific and clearly made an a an impression on president trump who tonight ordered the us military along with britain and france to strike precision strikes as he put it at targets associated with the chemical weapons program of syria i'm aaron katersky you're listening to live coverage from abc news want to return to.

france iran pentagon president aaron katersky britain congress white house buster assad trump united states mattis official syria russia twenty four forty eight hours thirty eight minutes
"middle east program" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on Kickass News

"Speak to people now side as you just said and that changes the the parameters of your of your own thinking so being outside of government now it is liberating i miss parts of it i'll admit but it is liberating because i'm able to not be as constrained by what we think we have to think or by but we think we cannot do in you founded the middle east and north africa program at crisis group i think about sixteen years ago you've since worked in other organizations and been backing government has your perspective on that specific region changed significantly in those years while the region has changed significantly right so i guess by definition my perspective has i mean that's not forget back in the early two thousands when i started the program the biggest complaint about the region was that it was too static it was sclerotic nothing was ever going to change the leaders were there forever qaddafi in libya was forever saddam hussein in iraq was there forever you missed now while you know something i'm not sure about missing it but it is a a main concern awake at when we wake up is what's going to be the new unrest the new outbreak of violence let's just look at what happened in syria and the la in the space of about a week yeah you've had fighting between turkey and kurds at involves allies of the united states between russia and the us between iran and israel between hezbollah and israel i mean this is really a region that is in chaos and that presents a whole new set of challenges were no longer thinking how are we going to shake things up but how are we going to provide some sense of normalcy and the stability for people who've suffered now at least since two thousand eleven one new development after another and it's shaken up there i noticed that fairly recently you opened an office in dc or started doing advocacy we started a us program so we've always had an asia program at a middle east program africa in which we look at conflicts that affect those areas we decided and i think the decision was partly i know it was party triggered.

libya saddam hussein iraq syria turkey united states russia iran israel hezbollah dc africa qaddafi asia middle east sixteen years
"middle east program" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The interests of the people in there people that have to come to this area and the gateway community representative michel noel of utah thank you very much thank you you are listening to weekend edition from npr news president trump may announce this week that the united states will recognize jerusalem as the capital of israel also on the table the eventual relocation of the us embassy from tel aviv words been for over fifty years to jerusalem those would be enormously controversial moves with profound implications should they happen to talk about why we have aaron david miller he is the director of the middle east program at the wilson center he's also a former state department middle east negotiator thanks for coming in always a pleasure little so palestinians want jerusalem as the capital of their future state of the city's fate is profoundly intertwined with the peace process what's your view on this announcement should president trump make it no worked for half a dozen sectors is stood my voice to all of them was always the same when it comes to jerusalem a don't miss a relative don't floral and it's a tinderbox waiting for a match and the reality is so we've skirted the issue these many years the argument for an israeli embassy a us embassy in west jerusalem is compelling no question about it the issues timing and the implications of such a move and the president on wednesday presumably is going new announced that to the us recognizes jerusalem or west jerusalem the tricky issue in itself as capital of the state of israel and if he does that what do you think the ramifications will be i mean it's hard to say with respect to violence it's input impossible to predict the reality though is it palestinians are warning against the move uh thing that there will be violence from us in particular and that it will be the end of the peace pauley if hamas and the islamic jihadis were looking for an issue to exploit this was this would clearly beer in violence essentially has been the story many times 1990 ninety ninety six two thousand most recently over metal detectors.

michel noel utah trump united states israel aaron david miller wilson center west jerusalem president pauley hamas representative npr fifty years
"middle east program" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The capital of israel also on the table the eventual relocation of the us embassy from tel aviv words been for over fifty years to jerusalem those would be enormously controversial moves with profound implications should they happen to talk about why we have aaron david miller he is the director of the middle east program at the wilson center he is also a former state department middle east negotiator thanks for coming in always a pleasure so palestinians want jerusalem as the capital of their future state so the city's fate is profoundly intertwined with the peace process what's your view on this announcement should president trump make it no worked for half a dozen senators has stood my verged all of them was always the same when it comes to jerusalem a don't miss arou of dough floral it it's a tinderbox waiting for a match and the reality is so we've skirted the issue these many years the argument for an israeli embassy a us embassy in west jerusalem is compelling no question about it the issue timing and the implications of such a move and the president on wednesday uh presumably is going to announce that to the us recognizes jerusalem or west jerusalem the tricky issue in itself as capital of the state of israel and if he does that what do you think the ramifications will they i mean it's hard to say with respect to violence it's impossible to predict the reality though is it palestinians are warning against the move uh thing that there will be violence from us in particular and that it will be the end of the peace pauley if hamas and the islamic jihadis were looking for an issue to exploit this was this would clearly beer in violence essentially has been the story may terms 1990 ninety ninety six two thousand most recently over metal detectors on her amish arief a temple ma ma my take on this is quite simple there is simply no compelling us interest to deal with jerusalem at a time when israelis and palestinians have zero trust and confidence in one other at a time when the president of the united states pursuing his ultimate deal and when he wants to involve key arab states jordan and particularly saudi arabia to facilitate and help israelis and palestinians in the.

israel aaron david miller wilson center jerusalem west jerusalem president pauley hamas united states saudi arabia fifty years
"middle east program" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Analysis for the day ahead national international and local news tomorrow and morning edition this is here and now tomorrow marks the deadline for a decision from president trump on whether or not he will relocate the us embassy in israel in june he signed a waiver delaying the move from tel aviv to jerusalem for six months but in a speech at the united nations on tuesday vice president mike pence said that trump is quote actively considering when and how to make the move erin david miller is a distinguished scholar in the middle east program at the wilson center he's a former adviser to republican and democratic secretaries of state on arab israeli negotiations and he joins us now welcome back it's it's always a pleasure to be heard and you say that recognizing jerusalem as israel's capital would be the single dumbest move this administration has made in the middle east why i know that seems somewhat hyperbolic but dumb e in large part because there's not a single compelling american national interest in my judgment that would impel compel or justify that action and it's not the question of whether or not the the our our embassy belongs in west jerusalem it does i think dared that israel is in the anomalous position being the only country in the world in which the united states does not have its embassy in host countries preferred capital capital of choice but the reality is what does the united states get out of this and what are the risks the jerusalem embassy law which was passed by congress in 1995 has a wave national security per waiver provision again though exercising a waiver which is done uh every six months does not mean that the president is going to move the embassy the language calls for opening an embassy and it an argument has been made that the president simply dozen half the sign the waiver and if he doesn't sign the waiver the state department's budget for building and appropriations is cut by fifty percent which would give the department of real incentive according to some to see about opening an embassy in jerusalem but on policy grounds alone it it frankly would undermine any semblance of the united states as an effective broker.

israel united nations vice president mike pence trump erin david miller wilson center west jerusalem united states congress jerusalem jerusalem embassy president six months fifty percent
"middle east program" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And just reminder of our panel today we have as a day mafany former jared correspondent with time amal side author of hezbollah politics and religion fire had nasa consultant at the saudi embassy in washington and they neca team whose head of the middle east program at chatham house now lena katibeh wanted to ask you a bite saudi intentions now we will try to read what the scientists are trying to do in the region just to kick it off his adele jubeir the saudi foreign minister speaking at the arab league this week in cairo and that was an emergency meeting called by the side is after the hutu rebels and yemen father missile at riyadh earlier this month and then cut it yesterday the kingdom of saudi arabia will not stand with his hands tied whenever this blatant attack and will not languish in defending its national security and to preserve the security of its people we are required to be nationally responsible and preserve the stability and security of our nation to oppose these hostile iranian policies towards us and yet to jail certainly the catchy can you just give us your understanding of what the side is a during the saudis have a rivalry with the iranians both of them want influence in the middle east both both of them are using this through supporting allies in different places outside of their borders when it comes to yemen this is a crucial issue for saudi arabia because of the geographical proximity of yemen it's literally on the border of saudi arabia the missiles that was launched from yemen into saudi arabia obviously is unprecedented and has caused a lot of alarm in saudi arabia now how saudi arabia is dealing with the m crisis is a whole other a question so far we have seen a military campaign launched by saudi arabia to try to curb who see activity in yemen but this is not quite succeeding saudi arabia also tried to support regime change in syria it also did not succeed mainly because the international community did not help so so saudi trying to exert influence in many different ways and iran is doing the same let's just looker arrears relationship with saudi arabia because there's a long history of business relationships between that family as we've heard and the the state of saudi arabia.

consultant saudi embassy washington chatham house foreign minister arab league cairo riyadh saudi arabia yemen syria jared hezbollah nasa lena katibeh iran
"middle east program" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"middle east program" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"So what does this i ever isis attack inside iran actually mean and how white tehran respond to help us with that i'm joined by two people with deep knowledge of iran in its role in the region rhonda's salim is the director of the track to dialogues initiative at the middle east institute and karim saw poor is a senior fellow in the middle east program at the carnegie endowment for international peace welcome to both a runda salim i would like to start with you i wonder if you could just help us uh give us your since your first reaction to this attack and in particular why you believe perhaps these two targets were chosen in tehran they already potent symbols for the alliance lennick public and the and the and they strong especially the mausoleum of imam khomeini that tack outside it is is something that is seen by the isis a community or the community that that is pro isis as being a it's a important symbol to attack because it symbolizes the heart and the founder of the islamic republic and so and so it is it is a first attack claimed by isis in iran they have been trying to do this at that for some time uh and i think the fact that they have been able to succeed today a will will will will will not diminish iran you in january shema resolve to fight isis if in iraq for example although i have to say in syria they are not devoting much should be sort sistal fighting isis letting americans for that fight and instead fighting mostly devoting their resources to fight the syrian position the nong nong had to.

iran rhonda salim director middle east institute senior fellow tehran imam khomeini founder iraq syria nong nong karim