35 Burst results for "Middle Ages"

Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:00 min | 6 d ago

Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

"Today. We look at a condition that comes with a multitude of serious health issues. Obesity and we start with the best ways to figure out our optimal weight based on our height. We seem to become inured to the mortal threat of obesity. Go back medical issue. A half century or so when obesity wasn't just run of the mill. The descriptions are much more grim. Obesity is always tragic and its hazards are terrify but it's not just obesity of four million deaths every year tribute excess by nearly forty percent of the victim are just overweight or obese. According to two famous. Harvard studies weight gain of as little as eleven pounds from early adulthood through middle age increases risk of major chronic diseases such as diabetes cardiovascular disease and cancer the flip side though is that even modest weight loss can major health benefits. What's the optimal bmi The largest is in the united states and around the world found that having a normal body mass index a bmi from twenty to twenty five associate with the longest lifespan. Put all the best available stays with the longest follow up together and that can be narrowed down even further to a bmi of twenty two twenty two. that'd be about between one hundred and twenty four hundred thirty six pounds for someone who stands five foot six but even with a normal bmi the risk of developing chronic diseases such as type two diabetes heart disease and several types of cancer starts to rise towards the upper end even starting as low as a bmi one a bmi five eighteen point five and twenty four point five or both considered within the normal range but a bmi five maybe shared with twice the heart disease risk compared eighteen point for just as there are gradations risk within a normal bmi range their spectrum with an

Obesity Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Harvard Cancer Diabetes Heart Disease United States Heart Disease
Do We Age More at 34?

Forever35

01:30 min | Last week

Do We Age More at 34?

"Okay so i googled. Okay like what is refined koogle like age. More at thirty four and what i found was that this comes from a study conducted at stanford university school of medicine and will link to an article. That was on stanford's website it says stanford scientists reliably predict people's age by measuring proteins in blood and then lower down in the article. So it does say here. That aging is not done perfectly even pace. And then it says there seems to be a more herky-jerky trajectory with three distinct inflection. Points in the human life cycle which occurs at thirty four sixty and seventy eight because the proteins in your blood. Change noticeably change. This is what the article says okay. I'm not a scientist as we've established many times neither story okay so cool i mean but it sounds like that's that's detecting it in internal internally as opposed to like grey hairs coming out. I mean i have friends who went gray or fully bald at the age of twenty. So i think i think all this study shows and the article makes his point that like we have kind of three points in our life like you know young adulthood says late middle aged and old age right so this seems like nothing new to

Koogle Stanford Stanford University School Of
Nugs (MM #3677)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Nugs (MM #3677)

"The minute with kevin mason not obvious from listening to these mason minute podcasts. I'm a pretty middle class. Middle aged white guy. Let's be honest. I am what i am. There's nothing exotic if you will about me. So i'm not the hippest guy around i read up on things i stay in the loop is day in the no but i don't worry about catchy phrases lingo. The other day on tv heard somebody. Talking about exh- they were talking about chicken nuggets. I guess in some worlds nuggets or chicken nuggets is a shortcut for chicken nuggets. I've heard that a few times but also heard friends. Some of which work in the cannabis industry talking about nogues and in the cannabis industry in the marijuana industry. Those are manicured buds from the cannabis. Plant there the good stuff there. High quality canvas. so what's enoug- is it marijuana or is it chicken. I know there's not one definition but it's kind of comical to me because i've heard them both used as almost common knowledge. We all know that. Doug's mean i guess it depends on who you're talking with.

Nuggets Kevin Mason Nogues Mason Doug
Nugs (MM #3677)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Nugs (MM #3677)

"The minute with kevin mason not obvious from listening to these mason minute podcasts. I'm a pretty middle class. Middle aged white guy. Let's be honest. I am what i am. There's nothing exotic if you will about me. So i'm not the hippest guy around i read up on things i stay in the loop is day in the no but i don't worry about catchy phrases lingo. The other day on tv heard somebody. Talking about exh- they were talking about chicken nuggets. I guess in some worlds nuggets or chicken nuggets is a shortcut for chicken nuggets. I've heard that a few times but also heard friends. Some of which work in the cannabis industry talking about nogues and in the cannabis industry in the marijuana industry. Those are manicured buds from the cannabis. Plant there the good stuff there. High quality canvas. so what's enoug- is it marijuana or is it chicken. I know there's not one definition but it's kind of comical to me because i've heard them both used as almost common knowledge. We all know that. Doug's mean i guess it depends on who you're talking with.

Nuggets Kevin Mason Nogues Mason Doug
Chloé Zhao Becomes the Second Woman to Win BAFTA for Best Director

WBZ Morning News

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Chloé Zhao Becomes the Second Woman to Win BAFTA for Best Director

"Milestone for women at the U. K's top film awards this weekend. So I'm so that's your homeless Is that true Nomad lands Chloe Zhao became only the second woman and the first of color to win a BAFTA for best director for her story about a middle aged woman who lives out of her van. So we treat our elders says a lot about who we are as a society and we need to do better. The movie star Frances McDormand took best actress Anthony Hopkins leading actor for the father didn't have to act because I'm

Chloe Zhao U. Bafta Frances Mcdormand Anthony Hopkins
Germany restricts AstraZeneca vaccine

BBC World Service

01:59 min | Last month

Germany restricts AstraZeneca vaccine

"Over the AstraZeneca covert vaccine has been resolved. Germany has announced its to restrict its use again. The German chancellor Angela Merkel, says it will only be given to those over the age of 60. The move follows a recommendation by Germany's vaccine commission, which has been investigating more than 30 cases in which people mostly younger women, developed blood clots in the brain after receiving the jab. Here's our Berlin correspondent Jenny Hill. These are people who 4 to 16 days after they received in AstraZeneca job developed a very rare form of blood clot on the brain. They've bean five such cases in the U. K Here in Germany. Nine people have died and the vast majority of those affected why the younger or middle aged women now we don't know whether that's significant. It may simply be that Younger women, a disproportionately represented in the priority groups have been given the AstraZeneca vaccine here. Angela Merkel announced the decision She didn't want, she said to sweep these very rare but very serious cases under the carpet. This number all Has cancer infant Does Alice. We know that vaccination is based on one principle on that is trust. We have to be able to trust the vaccines on. That's why we wait until each vaccine has passed the approval process. That's why we only use vaccines that have European approval. This'll also includes the ongoing testing of their effectiveness and safety on the permanent weighing of risks and benefits. Nevertheless, this does present the German chancellor. With a problem. Germany's vaccination rollout is extremely slow, just 11% of the population have received Ah first dose, and she herself acknowledged this will further erode public confidence in the AstraZeneca vaccine. There's a concern likely shared by other governments, including, of course, the British government, who tonight have said what the World Health organization Say this vaccine is safe. The

Astrazeneca Germany Angela Merkel Jenny Hill Berlin U. Alice Cancer British Government World Health Organization
Philadelphia doctor on the risk of Covid surges due to slow vaccinations rates

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | Last month

Philadelphia doctor on the risk of Covid surges due to slow vaccinations rates

"Rubin. He's the director of Policy, Labatt Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. And, he says, You know the virus is spreading. But a lot of people including Children, of course, and teens, and many younger and middle aged people have not yet been vaccinated. As communities open up as we're seeing rising infections and Children and young adults again to some degree, we're seeing the anticipated effects of reopening. We're gonna have some more transmission. We're hoping to be out is is ahead of vaccination, so that transmissions happening and healthier and lower risk individuals so that we don't see it bounce back and hospitalizations again. You know, into his point. Their deaths have been declining. But you know this is why there is such urgency to vaccinate as many people as possible as quickly as possible, right?

Labatt Children's Hospital Of Rubin
Iraqi Christians buoyed by Pope Francis visit

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Iraqi Christians buoyed by Pope Francis visit

"Expectations and confidence running high among Iraqi Christians off the pope Francis's visit to the country and one agent now not the decor and more young resident of Cuba coach says when the pope comes here it means that he's saying the things a good and going well and this is a country where there is co existence among the various components of society during the trip Francis trouble by helicopter across the Nineveh plains to the small Christian community of Keira Krausz residents now send a confident message which they hope will encourage others to return and rebuild their homes a call for this but it was tied in with a middle aged man tells the AP any great Iraqis need some assurance before returning I mean he says hello this loss has to be compensated I'm Charles in the past month

Pope Francis Keira Krausz Cuba Francis Charles
Texas School Scraps Assignment That Had Girls 'Obey Any Reasonable Request of a Male'

WBAP Morning News

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Texas School Scraps Assignment That Had Girls 'Obey Any Reasonable Request of a Male'

"To have been a recent lesson and chivalry ended up being something else entirely. At a high school in Lubbock, girls and boys that shallow water high school were given very different assignments during an exercise intended to explore chivalry with a medieval theme. While male students were instructed to show courtly courtesy, the teen girls we're told to cook and obey any reasonable requests from the males for chivalry Day. We're also told to dress in a feminine manner. The problem, it's not the Middle Ages. It's the year 2021. The Twitterverse erupted with charges of sexism faster than one of Henry. The eighth marriages, the shallow water independent school district. Opted to cancel any future chivalry days.

Lubbock Shallow Water Independent Scho Henry
Karaites: Bible Only, Please with Shawn Lichaa

Judaism Unbound

09:31 min | 2 months ago

Karaites: Bible Only, Please with Shawn Lichaa

"Is someone that we've wanted to have on the podcast for a long time. But we're trying to figure out the right place and we realized that we were starting this series on the bible. We thought this is the right place to have a discussion with somebody who is a leading voice within the community. That's a group of jews that basically it doesn't accept one of the key pillars of rabbinic judaism. Which is that at mount sinai when moses was given what we call the torah by god the written torah moses was also given an oral torah at the same time by god and that oral torah was preserved for hundreds and hundreds of years until some period after the destruction of the second temple when it was written down initially as the mishna and then over time in additional ways as what we call the talmud and the carrots represent a group of jews. That didn't believe that there was an oral tradition. Given at mount sinai that was if basically equal magnitude as the written torah in the bible that the written torah their written bible has a much more significant. Or perhaps i should say supreme significance in what we understand judaism to be what we understand god to one of the jews etc. The percentage of jews. That are carrots has waxed and waned over the course of the last two thousand years of jewish history. It was much much bigger in the middle ages. And of course here in america when we talk about the various groups of jews that there are people think about you know the nominations orthodox conservative reform reconstructionist renewal but often. Don't really think about carrots largely. Because it's a small community here in america and our guest today is working to preserve its traditions and make them available for study or consideration more widely. We're really excited to have this conversation today. With lisa who a leading voice in the carrot community he is a board member of the carrot juice of america and founder of the carrot. Press in the a press self-description they say our mission is simple. When kerry literature ceased to be commonly available the jewish world lost a tremendous amount of scholarship exegesis in diversity. Students have jewish theology and history lost access to a rich heritage and carrots themselves. Were no longer. The masters of their own intellectual heritage. The karaoke press aims to change all this and they publish a combination of translations of older care a literature as well as more contemporary ratings. Sean leash himself is the founder of a blue thread a jewish blog with a threat of right throughout and he speaks widely about carrot judaism at venues across america including synagogues jewish the library of congress the association of jewish libraries. And now judaism unbound so sean lee shia welcome to judaism unbounded so great to. Have you excited to be here. We're excited to have this conversation We've been talking about the bible in this series and it's interesting to now move from talking about the bible too. Well what people do with the bible. So i think that some of us have a very unsophisticated understanding of them and some of us have an extremely unsophisticated understanding of other. So i would say that. The thing that i know is basically that i think it's it's worth saying because i think people may say that says strange sounding word that actually in hebrew aramaic like kara means to read so as also a way of talking about the torah. So my understanding is that it's people who really don't believe that the judaism that emerges from the time after the bible is is accurate you know and so really what we should be doing is going back to the bible so now take me more sophisticated than that. There is judaism after the bible. And that judaism is correct. Now the question is like what does is and what does correct me. maybe i'd give you like one nuance to what you said. But it's a massive paradigm shift in what most people think about judaism. There is a written law and there is an oral law. Right so god. According to this form of gave the written torah and oral torah explaining it carrot judaism does not believe that god gave an oral law carried using god gave a written torah. And that's what the carrots follow. Now we also have the entire hebrew bible. That's tanaka and we use that as a source of our laws and understanding difficult times and biblical precedent. But we definitely believe that there is a judaism. Astor the tanakh after the bible closes. And let's talk about what that means every day for everybody. When did this split happen or did it happen. Multiple times between those. Who believe that the that there is an oral and that there isn't so look from a theological perspective right and like we. Carrots would say there was never an oral law and or the people who decided to follow the law broke off away from. What's carrots would say was true and these words very lucy. True historical israelite israelites. Judaism but definitely in the second temple. You see lots of different juice groups in the middle ages. The issa whites the whites anna nights the rights. You're the nights all these different jewish movements in all these different places in all these different times. So yes i think the answer. Your question is that there are many different times where judaism came apart came back together. Came apart came back together. And maybe i should rephrase that instead of saying we're judaism cap came back to but maybe the people who ascribe to judaism have different views at sometimes are more divergence from each other or sometimes came closer to each other so i really want to sit with what you said to start that which is from a care perspective the rabbinate. We haven't used that word yet. But the rabbit nights branched off and followed a new oral law. That had that was not from a care perspective sort of from the divine and i want to sit with that. Because i think there's such a deep way in which even those of us who aren't like orthodox rabbinate jews. We've we've sort of soaked into us that like Judaism of judaism this idea of an oral tradition. You know tomlin that's sort of. There's even for people who don't go to synagogue very much. They might not know what talmud is in deep way but like there's that original document and then there's all these things later that eventually i written but the idea. They're circulating around as oral teachings and they sort of are given the status. That's maybe a slight bit lower than that written doc. Foot and in many ways equal to that original document and sometimes we would even argue as judaism unbound like the newer stuff kind of replaces the torah ways in which there are correctives made from a rabbi perspective in those talmud texts in other texts that sort of change what the torah or other biblical texts are say. This word rabbinate is not a word i had ever heard until i met you but like i i'd love to talk about like there's a term rab night that exists. Wants you back out and say There are other kinds of judaism. If it's almost like we've had conversations with people were like the phrase white jew comes up like if you think all jews are white. It's a silly thing to say. White jews right. It only makes sense. When white jews is a a subsection of broader group of jews similarly the term rabbinate only make sense. When you recognize there are other kinds of jews like carrots. So i'd love to hear from you sean. Like what is it to sort of inhabit a judaism that people don't even know as judaism ism that like is is so fundamentally erased like the terminology that we have is built around. Its own existence when you zoom out and you think judaism and then you kind of say. Oh wait a minute. What's what is rob nights. Era nights jew is somebody who follows the rabbinic tradition so keira heights or are jews. Who follow the curator. Kerr carry tradition In this case. It's a bible based and not tom based tradition juice. Follow the rabbinic tradition. So that includes the entire hebrew bible and all of been literature. Now you've mentioned this question about like never having to think about what it means to be around nights in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy nine and haddassah magazine jewish traveller section a. Rabbi his name is rabbi borrow helmand. He traveled to cairo egypt and he was studying arabic in cairo egypt. Now i'm gonna put a little bit of a notes here in my family comes from the jewish community of cairo. So back to this right. He's he's traveling to cairo. And he's there and he's learning arabic and he is telling his muslim arabic teacher. I cannot come to class on chabad. Because i'm an observant jew. And i won't be the muslim teacher asks in a very comforting friendly voice. Basically what kind of jew are you. Are you a carrot or a rabbi nights and this rabbi tells us. That's the first time you ever had to identify as around nights. And the truth is that unless you are living in egypt and the last century probably no other place in the world where the carrots were prominent enough where somebody would have to say. Are you to revenue.

America Sean Leash Association Of Jewish Librarie Mount Sinai Sean Lee Moses Library Of Congress Kerry Lisa Kara Tanaka Astor Tomlin Rob Nights Keira Heights Cairo Rabbi Borrow Helmand Sean Egypt
Mike Shinoda on Beats, Rhymes and Linkin Park

Broken Record

06:41 min | 2 months ago

Mike Shinoda on Beats, Rhymes and Linkin Park

"Tell me about what you're doing on twitch weird man. It's great i love it. When quarantine for star started everyday was the same day. I was in pajamas half the time. It was just like walking around. in sweats. like wasn't depressed but it was just like everything is the same so when i started streaming effectively because it created like structure so i stream i started then and i still do stream five days a week. A stream weekdays ten to noon or one ish and that was a nice like it was a nice way to be like. Oh i've got like you know. I've got my weekdays now i'm not streaming today. I know it's saturday. It's just a stupid thing. And i got to us. Really dig in with this space and get creative and get weird which is part of the most fun part of it is doing stuff you go. I didn't even know that was a weird idea. That was fun to do and all last year is getting. I was getting faster. And faster and faster in terms of making a track. And then i realized that the end of last year like how do i do. Now that i've done this for a while and starting to get a little bit burnt. It like i wanted to do something different with it and i decided early on my wouldn't do vocals because i think that would burn me out so it's just making instrumentals and then i realized i could since i live on twitch and there's anywhere between i don't know like a thousand and i think we peaked at like almost thirty thousand people watching at one time i wanted to do something to like. Enhance the channel and give back to the people that have been watching so i started taking fans submissions of vocalists and songs. 'cause i just realized looking instagram and looking at tiktok like there's so many good artists out there who have no following. They've got like you know. Six hundred people following them and they're actually very good and so. I just started taking submissions from those people. That i let i called. I mean you'll get this joke right away. I started calling the shots the a an army. So it's like it's like nine hundred people whose job it is to go find me the best stuff and they do they go they go and find the good stuff and they bring it to me. And they're like the more they say the more they shout like. Look at this one. Look at this one. I know it's pretty good so cool. Yeah and so. I've been i do two to three starting like a couple of weeks ago. I've been able to do two to three brand new songs all in a morning. Probably like a stream. And a half. I get a song done from scratch till i finished and i sent him. Something effectively like mixed and mastered so incredible that they can release so fun man. It's really really fun. And the fans. I mean you can imagine how excited they are right and some of the cases what i what. I haven't talked to the fans on the channel about actually on telling you about. This is that i will reach out to somebody and say. Hey that thing you posted on tiktok or instagram was really cool. Would you want me to produce it. And i say that. Because they've used the hashtag they've used shinoda produce me as the hashtag so they've they've raised their hand and said i want my to produce me. I hit them on the. Dmz say you want me to produce and they always say yes and then half the time they say. I haven't finished the song though. Like the thing i posted is verse and a chorus and i don't have a second verse. I don't have a bridge or any you know middle aged or whatever anything else and so. It's like okay. Well like take your time. Don't rush. Because i want you to be. I want you to submit something you love because like the whole ideas for you to get to more people than you've already got to so give me something great and when it's ready than send it to me and i and generally if it's if it's somebody in that scenario i find that they'll get back to me within like three or four days. And what are they usually get back to you with a more expanded same demo but with all the parts. Yeah it's usually like a we. Transfer link or something like that with multi tracked vocals and i always tell them like. I'll tell them like speed it up like to this bpm or whatever or i'll tell the make shirts and you're like very best range. It sounded low to me but up to you. And then i can and they can go crazy on the on the the Overdoses and harmonies and background book. Whatever else they wanna do they do but they do that. Before the trackers before there's a track is that correct. Yeah before there's a there's a trap so what you get is basically finished vocal stems for a song. Yeah i menu start from scratch. You take it as an acapella. Yeah and you build music to support whatever that is. Yeah do you remember when we were doing. A thousand suns together. Yup that at the end of that record before the first single the catalyst was the single on that record before the single came out so no fan had heard the song we released pieces of stems to that song and we told them take these pieces. Make a song out of them. We didn't give them enough to know what the song even was. We just take pieces and make a song out of it. And whoever's thing is the coolest to us we're gonna put you on our record on the album itself and we ended up putting them on. I think it was when When they come from me was the song we put them on but we chose it based on who is like as i recall beginning some of this wrong but as i recall it was like we gave them pieces to remix but they'd never heard the song they were remixing so i called it like the pre mix like they just they had to just assume the song and that's how i feel like there's something to that something about that the release this where it's like. I don't know what you're thinking. Your song is. But here's what i hear just based on that vocal on a grid socal. It's fun man. Superfund that thousand sons is is my favorite of the things we worked on together. That's my favorite. Just because i feel like it really is it. Felt like the beginning of something new and something new and really good. We didn't like the the the record before it minutes to midnight was the whole effort. The whole when are we first met. You asked the band. What are you guys envision doing with this album like y y are we talking like what do you wanna do and we all said like we want to. We wanted to redefine the identity. The banning the whole point was to make something that didn't sound like the stuff that people that are here because albums went in two so similar. And you're like great. That's exactly how i feel. And he's you said. I don't know if i would want to work with the band if you didn't feel that way so it's great. We're all on the same page and we just kind of hit it off from there

Shinoda Army Suns
"middle ages" Discussed on The Steve Harvey Morning Show

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

06:00 min | 2 months ago

"middle ages" Discussed on The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"Liquid. Ginger ale i more of the rv morning show and some trending news coming up at thirty three minutes after the hour. Right after this. You're listening to david. harvey morning. Show here we go something funny. Come on junior truth be told for some churches out here. Go need to have testimony time. Really tell if y'all church have internet you don't need to be having testimony because these testimonies get into loan. They need a screener.

"middle ages" Discussed on The Steve Harvey Morning Show

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

05:37 min | 2 months ago

"middle ages" Discussed on The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"Nothing nothing. There's nothing you can do not.

"middle ages" Discussed on The Steve Harvey Morning Show

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

03:10 min | 2 months ago

"middle ages" Discussed on The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"When they.

"middle ages" Discussed on The Steve Harvey Morning Show

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

07:33 min | 2 months ago

"middle ages" Discussed on The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"And only steve harvey man got a radio. Show steve harvey got radio show because god and blessing business. Yeah that's all. I'm just a recipient. Steve harvey got radio show. Because god is in the show. You fable business. He showed me some favor. Steve harvey got a radio show. Because god is into forgiving business garden. Forgave me thousands and thousands of times you know and i say that as a big number like that because it's probably true. God is a forgiving god. That's how this today ness how you exist today and one of things. I wanna remind you about even in existing today jolo's dean had has a book out called. It's your time i love. This book is called. it's your time. And that's kind of what. I want to touch on today and i want to remind you all that it still you'll time see you know there's look you know they've got unsuccessful. People have created a lot of sayings to justify our failures as people well. My ship has passed that that that was created by a person who did not quite make their goal in the amount of time that they had set for so two justified. Here comes this great seemingly very clever saying and a lot of us will. My ship has passed so we adopted at. Here's another one. Well i guess it just wasn't to be. That sounds good. Don't it because they mix it up with look a bit of faith base in it. I guessed it was well. Here's another one. I guess if god wanted it for me. I'd have it. Are you serious man. are you serious. You're actually gonna use that one to two to justify where you are in life man. That's as so. That's so not the case. I want to remind everybody today that it still your time that you know your ship hasn't sailed you didn't miss all of your opportunities. There's others it's still your time. You know you still got a chance. You still have a shot. Here's a good. Would you still have hope you do all of you. As long as god is who he is. There's hopefully you you can never lose sight of that. You can never let the devil win that battle that. There's no hope for you and cause you to do something that's unthinkable. I'm just going cash in the chips. I'm i'm gonna take my life. I'm going to commit suicide. No no no. Wait a sec. Wait a sec. That's not god talking to you. That's something wrong and it's not coming from him. It's still your time. You still got a chance. There's always hope but listen to me. You got to move and you got to move on it. So many people are not getting the full benefit of their life and so many people are not getting all the blessings. God has for because you keep waiting on the perfect time man. How many times have i heard people come to me and say hey man. I'm just waiting on everything the lineup right man. I'm waiting on the perfect time to eight count. Tell you some if. I will waiting on the perfect time. I wouldn't be hardly any of the things that i become. And one of my greatest blessings was was marrying marjorie. I wouldn't even have married marjorie. If i was waiting on the perfect time. 'cause i had gone through what i thought was enough misery to cover my entire lifetime and so when i was first divorced i just said mad. I it's going to be five six years for i do this again. I said it two years later. I was manny. But guess what man. It wasn't the perfect time. I didn't have my doke. Slow all my ducks lined up in a row. It was still some things. I needed to clean up. Ivan told is some things. I want to clean up out of my life before you know. It's a it's a. I i wanna make sure i got all the stars align. I wanna waiting all ducks in a row. I was waiting on the perfect time. If i had not stopped at margin i had set out and said to each other. They'll be no perfect time and she said i'll go with you. Whatever you going through that was it. I took a chance. The ducks would not lined up in a row at a lot of baggage in my life. Man i wanted to try to clear on. Do some things financially different. I wanted to just get rid of some residue. I had in my life. She said no would do it together. 'cause ain't no perfect time and guess what it wasn't so if you out there waiting on the perfect time to do something it may not come. There is no such thing is waiting on the perfect time. I've said this one hundred times and hit comes one. Oh one. The road to success is always under construction. You a finna. Go out a new barrels on the road. You're not going to end not run into d. to aside you're not going out to without seeing the men work inside the to get off. You're not going out there to see it. so guess what. Stop waiting onto the stars. I got man. This is the perfect time to do it now. If you waiting on the perfect time that could be one of your biggest problems still waiting. You have got to move and you've got to move on it and you've gotta make a decision to go now. God will get you through everything necessary for you to get through. But you can't quit though. See here's a part. You can't quit just because the road. You own is under construction. You can't get off at the exit. 'cause you tired of all the bumper to bumper traffic. Is that way. Get you some god like i said get you some god and going and go see what your life can be like so stop waiting on the perfect time stop waiting on the stars to align themselves you got to move and you got to move on it get you. Some god apply some faith and get started and remember when you get out there coming toward you go the road to construct. The road to success is always under construction. If it was easy everybody would be stop expecting it to be. Come on out here. Get up in this thing is funky out here. Got all that. It's hard out here. Yeah.

Steve harvey steve harvey thousands Ivan two five six years today two years later one hundred times jolo eight count first divorced one of one thousands of times marjorie so many people So many people God greatest blessings
Chinese New Year festivities kick off under shadow of coronavirus in New Orleans

All Things Considered

03:39 min | 2 months ago

Chinese New Year festivities kick off under shadow of coronavirus in New Orleans

"Orleans emerged as an early cove in 19 hot spot after Carnival celebration served as super spreader events. Despite this year's new restrictions, the city is still welcoming tourists and that's led to push back from locals offer you House of member station W. W. N o reports. Orleanians typically spend the weeks between epiphany and fat Tuesday, eating, drinking and partying. Last year's festivities drew more than a million visitors in a recent study found the gatherings resulted in nearly 50,000 Corona virus infections. This year there no parades, and many locals have pledged to sit the season out. But that hasn't stopped people from flocking to Bourbon Street, but he was have circulated of largely unmasked crowds clutching to go drinks and dancing. Despite admonishments from the city, people are still breaking the rules. On Saturday afternoon. About half of the people in the cities French quarter were unmasked, openly defying the city's mandate. Revelers stopped to catch Mardi Gras beads thrown from balconies and one middle aged woman lost her mask in the process. It fell to the ground and she didn't pick it up. Seems like these horrifying Matt Maloney, a 24 year old cook. Well, Mardi Gras is known as a season of fun. She's usually stuck working. Sometimes it's nice. You get off of a 13 hour shift, and you go catch the end of the parade and have a drink with your co workers or whatever. But now, I mean, most of us are gonna be running for the hills because we don't want to have a further risk of catching Cove it right In January, she was exposed to the coronavirus of work. It took two weeks off without pay to quarantine. Loney says she wants the city to do more to protect hospitality workers. Here's New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell know that when it comes to our health and our people, especially our hospitality workforce. I'd rather be accused of doing too much. Been doing too little. She's already announced new restrictions for Mardi Gras weekend in response to recent large gatherings in the French Quarter. Starting today through Mardi Gras Day on Tuesday, all bars will be closed citywide. Tourist heavy areas will have police checkpoints to prevent crowding and the Claiborne Corridor, a local gathering spot will be fenced off. City relies heavily on tourism in a typical year, sales and property taxes account for more than 40% of its operating budget. Now, most of that money is gone. We estimate we're still losing about About 120 to $130 million a week. That's Stephen Perry of New Orleans and Company, a tourism organization that serves the marketing agency for the city. Before this new wave of restrictions business had been hoping for a Mardi Gras bump. For much of the pandemic. Hotel occupancy has been in the single digits during last year's Mardi Gras festivities. It was above 90%. Harry says local restaurants and hotels are exceedingly safe. And the best way to protect businesses is to let them stay open. If you shut them down, you're talking about the abject failure of hundreds. Of small business people and their inability ever To reopen well. Some of the crowds on Bourbon Street have been locals or college students will sudden says tourists are big part of the problem. Sudden is a New Orleans native and a columnist for the local paper. He says city leaders should tell everyone to stay home for Mardi Gras. It's like Having a House party. If you have a house party, it's your party. And if it's your party, you decide who gets to come. We like seeing people come and have a good time at our party but wants to have a party and have a bunch of people get sick, sudden says he's pleased with the new restrictions and hopes people stay home so they could celebrate next year. For

House Of Member W. W. Matt Maloney Mardi Gras Mayor Latoya Cantrell Claiborne Corridor New Orleans Orleans Stephen Perry Loney Harry House Party
What Happened To Connie Converse

Unexplained Mysteries

05:33 min | 2 months ago

What Happened To Connie Converse

"In nineteen twenty four elizabeth eaton converse was born into a devoutly religious family being by the nineteen forties. She changed her name to connie and moved to new york city to pursue music. She spent her twenties writing folk songs and rebelling against her traditional after little came of her musical ambitions in new york. Connie moved to ann arbor michigan in nineteen sixty where she took an editorial position at an academic journal by the age of thirty six. Connie was struggling with her mental health in particular and affliction she referred to as her blue funk. This was made worse. When in the early seventies connie received two devastating pieces of news. She lost her job and her doctor told her she needed a hysterectomy. After turning fifty in august nineteen seventy four. Connie converse said goodbye to her brother and friends packed up volkswagen beetle and drove away. Officially she's never been seen or heard from again in her final instructions to her brother. Connie asked philip to pay her health insurance up until a certain date. She never explained. Why but philip worried that something terrible would happen. When that day passed searching for answers. Philip found a filing cabinet that belonged to connie in his antics inside. He found old journal entries poems notes and a farewell letter addressed to quote. Anyone who ever asks it read. So let me go please. And please accept my. Thanks for those happy times that each of you has given me over the years. And please know that i would have preferred to give you more than i ever did or could i am in everyone's debt. Philip did as connie requested. He let her go for thirty five years. Never knowing if she was alive or dead always hoping she'd return but from the moment she laughed. Philip and connie's closest friends feared the worst they own about connie's blue funk for quite some time though. Connie was never officially diagnosed with clinical depression. So far as we know in her farewell letter she wrote as an over educated peasant. I've read a good bit about middle-aged oppression and no several cases other than my own. According to establish psychiatric consensus those who suffer from major depressive disorders tend to lose interest in activities that previously brought them joy in connie's case when she moved to ann arbor. She stopped writing music. But even while living in new york connie's lyrics described feelings of isolation in her song called. Sorrow is my name. She wrote from the perspective of sadness is self sneaking in and out of people's minds in the bridge of the song sorrow kroons. And if you fear me i will come in haste and if you love me i will go away and if you scorn me i will lay you waste and if you know me i will come to stay. Perhaps connie wrote from her own experience overcome by a deep unshakable sadness that she felt would live inside her forever. She certainly wouldn't be the first person to live with undiagnosed depression in fact historians theorized that many historical figures battled similar mental illnesses before they were ever fully understood for example. Both frankenstein author mary. Shelley and president abraham lincoln reported experiencing significant bouts of melancholy. They'd regularly fall into deep sadness often unrelated to the events of their day to day lives. Some scholars have interpreted these spells as episodes of clinical depression diagnosis. That didn't exist in the eighteen. Hundreds when both lived almost a century later as connie struggled with her blue funk there was still an incredible amount of debate surrounding what constituted and caused depression throughout the nineteen hundreds doctors around the world published opinions but the medical field never reached consensus early. Researchers like sigmund. Freud believed depression was the result of traumatic experiences of course psychologists today understand that the causes are much more nuanced and multifaceted. They include both genetic and societal factors and this understanding started to take shape in the nineteen seventies when clinician set standards for diagnosing and treating clinical depression then in nineteen seventy five one year after connie disappeared doctors. I coined the term major depressive disorder.

Connie Elizabeth Eaton Converse Connie Converse Philip Depressive Disorders Ann Arbor Depressive Disorder New York Beetle Volkswagen New York City Michigan Cabinet Depression President Abraham Lincoln Frankenstein Shelley
Dissecting the Rise, Fall and Future of Topshop

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:00 min | 3 months ago

Dissecting the Rise, Fall and Future of Topshop

"What do you think talk shop representative young costumers here in the uk because this was prior to the international expansion. And all of that. But i remember coming to london during that time and it was. It was a destination you know it was a place that people all around the world had heard because it had become kind of representative of that kind of cool brittannia moment and all of the stuff that was happening in the uk at the time. What did young customers feel about the talk shop brand. After after this all of this new activity. I think they felt that it was as unite bill. A kind of a real ownership of it on a at this hour as we great because with because we've sort of created together but like you know it was something let's talk if that makes any sense as a so that brings me to the question. That's on so many people's minds this week as we hear the news of top shop being acquired by a sauce you. Where did things begin to go wrong for top shop in. What was the tipping point where top shop began to lose. Its way well. I think it's a very difficult question to answer. In some ways. I mean young. Fashion is roussel. you have to be constantly reinventing yourself to make sure that you'll always relevant to your customer base. I felt well. You know bennett grain had taken over a two thousand. I had been very clear as soon as he joined the business. I didn't want him today any conflict. Because he wasn't china he was. You know an acid struck him more than anything else. He bought as an insult them again. I had a lot of conversations when he was not a retailer. In the way that i saw a return should be said was sort of capture the margins in the business but then pejorative that time. He then broke kate. Moss and hats off to him. She was a great choice at the time we hadn't wrote any celebrities weeks outlets limiting wasn't really talk shop. It was all about design evoke nelson. I knew that she would be incredibly with the with the talk shop customer base but also knew that it would it allowed to get into top shop if he lied to enter into an stop being apart top shop and i knew that i couldn't work with him. I could. I could do this with my team because we were all incredibly passionate because we understood it. I could not with him. Why not because we just had temporarily different views about everything is was that you basically that the buying decision was that you bought something as cheap as you could possibly buy. A new sold differs much. As you'd be get foreign mike. Philosophy was that you would make sure that you designed on bought something. That was so amazing that no one will be able to resist. It said we will philosophically. We had a very different view. The business so assigned that he took over he i think he felt that he knew young fashion that he could cross the business. And i'm sorry but you know he's he's. He's a middle-aged mom who doesn't have very much retail general certainly didn't ever about young fashion on. I think from that moment on probably He started to make decisions about cultural. Besotted run it in a way. That's a Realize that that a business needs to be constantly. Reinvented that you need. Passion within the union huge passion from everyone involved and if those people are not as passionate Do i really have to do this. then i think it's i think he is very quickly. My feeling was that before he kinda came into it. It was like we were a room full of people together. All of us creating together something. We were terribly proud of. I'm so it was amazing but we were doing it together. I think he his his view much was was a top down management. I'll tell you to do that. You'll do it. And i think that's not just a very very different thing. You know if someone says to me you've got you do that. Yeah i'll do it. But maybe i'll do it but i wanted to very well whereas if i feel on upon something creating something that i will give it everything and i think that's what it needs and needs everything. Is that ultimately why you decided to leave that. You could bring your everything you know what what happened to precipitate your departure. Well just just. Purely the fact that i knew that he he had an end that he would now become involved in social and a half million. Just didn't want to work for that. You know. I didn't have to work for him. You know and also. Let's not forget. I was by that time in my early. Booties and i kind of thought you know what this is. This is young high russians. I am no longer opposed. I kind of grown answer bit. I could do something else better. And i could give everything to another to another type of business. Oppose the other thing that was happening of course during the rise of top jump was also the rise of other big fast fashion houses whether that be zara or you know h inam the other new giant global companies looking back now the companies. That took that as fast approach to fashion are now really being in the the really the kind of the focus of fashion's Climate crisis challenge. You know the all of the training that we've given to customers to buy things cheap by things often and then dispose of garments. How do you see that whole fast. Fashion sector now. Top shop included with the addition of players like a sauce and boohoo. People calling them. Ultra fast fashion. It seems to me that it's this part of the fashion industry. That's most problematic as we think about this. Ten years left before we can get these carbon emissions under control industry that contributes ten percent of global carbon emissions. What's what's your take on that. Now while i you know a lot of people that have accused me of having been one of the False fashion and then sort of turned around and said a watch. Now it's it's not the right thing to do. But i. I never set to to create disposable passion. I says create something that was accessible to you. Know the great things are accessible to a lot of people and it's been on a journey myself in over the last sort of. I guess ten years. When i began to start feeling that this was moving in that. This was wrong that you know that we were that the fashion had lost its value. If you like that would just literally buying things in throwing them away wearing wants to moving because it was so cheesy do that i began to feel seriously compromised by that and began to build that i that i should leave the business and five because i couldn't i couldn't Begging apartment of such an incredibly damaging industry which which we now know that it is and to buffet and we didn't really know not Templeton fifteen years or so prior to that we did pass. We didn't know what we didn't think about it. And i think. I think it's it's very difficult and i always seems to me is certainly in young false fashion that the the they the customer base it is soon of splitting and that you have only sort of what the numbers but but it feels like this little v fifty percents Who recognized that. Passion is a real problem and have moved to depop hamilton. To buy vintage charter shots. Recycling up cycling read cetera. And and yet. I'm still two percent who are still buried addicted to is seriously mean. That addicted took Having things immediately. I think it's very hard to say those people. You can't have that. I think what you have to do is offer some sort of bad but alternative is as exciting or is as as tempting or whatever the sort of the yes away from from from. What is that doing. Because i agree with you. I mean it almost feels like we're coming to an end. Endpoint what. I do take what i am. Encouraged by is the fact that if you nonsense question about ten years ago i would have said that. Eighty percent people was with selected fashion. Maybe ten fifteen twenty percent. We're actually starting to realize that there was a different pop that could travel

Bennett Grain Roussel UK Moss Nelson Kate London China Mike Depop Hamilton
Interview With Megan Kang

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:31 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Megan Kang

"I guess today is making king and she is a doctoral student at princeton in sociology. And she first came to my attention because as i was scrolling through my morning news feed this headline jumped up at me about how this person had embittered themselves among stop the steel trump supporters and wanted to really understand. Just not only what they thought. Because i think a lot of us know what they think. But it's more like what's behind that. Why do they keep thinking what they think. So i immediately reached out to megan. And i said man i would love to have this conversation. I think. Our country after the inauguration of president biden and vice president harris and we're right in the midst of this impeachment trial as recording this. We're still hugely terribly divided as a country. And i just wanna thank you for your willingness. Come on talk about this. We don't expect you to have any more definitive answers than anybody else out there. But i think your experience of spending a month of weekends at an intersection in florida is priceless. And so welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for having me can so you kind of come from this approach from what i could glean from your article that you're not just looking at data you want to imbed yourself because you said either walking in the shoes or at least near the shoes of the people that you're studying is very different than just looking at raw data is that is that accurate. Yeah that is accurate. So i guess one thing. I should point out about the word in bed. I that that was a huffpost like editorial decision more nefarious than what. I think i was doing. You know like a click bait thing. Sounds very intriguing but really got me. Click we get the impression that you went deep undercover. You know it it was. I think i would say more naive in that. You know i. I saw this group of people that had been standing on a corner where i had been doing grocery shopping over winter break. I happen to be in florida staying in my partners family's house kind of on accident actually. I need to go home to southern california. Where i know you're from kobe. Rates had gotten so bad. And so i decided to just stay put in florida where things a little bit better. So we saw them there for a few weekends. I learned from the the grocer that this group had actually been out there for the past six months and it had transformed from from pro trump rallies to part election to stop the steel rallies. Right after who does the same group of people consistently there. Every saturday morning. I think like many americans like you said had been had been having a hard time grasping this divide that we've been seeing our country and feeling like i was missing perspective. And so like you say. I think the the method that i i am drawn to is just going up and talking to people and asking them and that's something that i'm i'm getting trained to do as a sociology. Phd student and particularly a method called goofy and we prioritize personal experience and getting close to the issues and trying to understand people who are living those issues experience making sense of them. I'm just trying to imagine that as you almost use the word infiltrate as you associated as you kind of dropped in on these weekends at this intersection. I'm imagining that. There weren't a lot of people that looked like you already. They're like the regulars weren't anywhere close to people of color sets to say that's right. yes. I'm a twenty eight year old korean-american woman who was raised in california and has lived in berkeley oakland chicago detroit and princeton. So that just gives you a glimpse of my political. Leanings have influenced my thinking. This is in south florida. Florida's a quintessential purple state. it voted marginally for trump. in the past two elections. I was in one of the blue counties but only marginally blue and so very different political environment than the ones that i've used to and the group of people that were there. I had seen them before. They were primarily middle aged white and hispanic floridians decked out fully and trump gear. And we're definitely looked very different and clearly have different perspectives than anyone. That i'm around

Princeton In Sociology President Biden Florida Megan Harris Southern California Berkeley Princeton Oakland Detroit South Florida Chicago California
The Isdal Woman

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

04:32 min | 3 months ago

The Isdal Woman

"Today story isn't supernatural in itself but the mystery is so baffling it borders on other worldly. It takes place in norway in the late fall of nineteen seventy it sunday morning november twenty ninth and a professor and his two young daughters go for a hike. They're headed for a forest outside of bergen. Which is a city on norway's southwestern coast eventually they start climbing up a hillside above an area called e. stolen. Which is norwegian for ice valley. It's this gloomy desolate place surrounded by steep rocky hills and it also has a strange history. In the middle ages. People supposedly came to ice valley to take their own lives and more recently. It's been the site of a lot of fatal hiking accidents with this morning. The families just enjoying the fresh air when the oldest girl see something. It appears to be a body laying in between some rocks on the hillside. And it's been burned from what they can tell. It belongs to a dark haired woman between the ages of twenty five and forty. But she's so badly mutilated that her facial features are impossible to recognize. Her hands and arms are raised up near her chest in oppose that often seen on burn victims and she's wearing regular clothes nothing appropriate for hiking it so creepy and shocking that the family turns right around and leaves. You gotta remember. This is nineteen seventy so there are no cell phones which means that they have to walk all the way back through the woods to report the body all wondering if whoever killed this woman might be following them but they get back safely and soon a group of police trekking up the hillside overlooking the valley as soon as they start examining the body they noticed something strange. Only the front of the woman is burnt. The back of her body is completely fine. There's a definite smell of burned flesh in the air so they know that this is the place where she caught fire. She wasn't carried here after the fact and later they find a drop of gasoline on a fur hat. That's laying underneath her body but other than that. There's no evidence of an actual fire no charred logs or fuel containers. It looks like she or someone brought a bunch of items along and set them on fire to. There's a couple of shriveled plastic bottles that seemed to have just contained water a plastic cover for a passport and a melted rubber boot. The only things that haven't been burned are the women's jewelry a pair of earrings. A ring these have been carefully placed beside her in an almost ceremonial way. And there are some pieces of clothing strewn around but all the labels have been cut off same thing with the clothes on the woman's body and when the police inspect the melted plastic bottles. They noticed the names on the bottom have been rubbed out the police. Keep the body on the hill overnight until they've finished all their forensic investigations and the following. Day november thirtieth. They bring her charred remains to a hospital in bergen for an autopsy. Then they go to the press they tell the papers that a body of a young woman with dark hair and medium build has been found and they ask anyone who might have seen her to come forward. Meanwhile the bergen police team up with the national crime investigation service in oslo called creep. Ohs to begin a full inquiry into who this woman is. They run her fingerprints through the national police register. But there aren't any matches so they turn their attention to any unclaimed luggage at railway or bus stations and on december second baguette. Lucky two suitcases have been sitting in a luggage room at the bergen train station for over a week. They were checked in on november. Twenty third so six days before the body was found and at first. The cops. don't know if these are hers. But there's a fingerprint. On a pair of sunglasses inside that matches exactly with the fingerprint from the woman

Norway Rocky Hills Bergen Bergen Police National Crime Investigation S National Police OHS Oslo Bergen Train Station
Destigmatizing Crohns With Clare Surette

The WoMed

06:02 min | 3 months ago

Destigmatizing Crohns With Clare Surette

"All right. Well claire. welcome to the woman. I'm so excited to have this conversation and very happy that you reached out to me in my dams yet. Thank you very much for having me excited clerk. Tommy a little bit about yourself. What led you kind of to the to the crohn's diagnosis. They got your symptoms. So i started getting sick right when i turned seventeen which i'm twenty five now. So eight years ago. It was around christmas time and as gang stomach aches and just a lot of intestinal issues. And i figured you know. It's the holidays on e. l. oughta swedes. It's probably just from that. It'll go away but Christmas came and went new years and months went on and it just got worse and going to the doctors. Every week blood tests all the time they couldn't figure it out until they finally four months later Sent me to gastroenterologist. And first time i saw him. He says rare doing a colonoscopy tomorrow. Something's wrong we need to figure out what's going on inevitably led to the diagnosis Were you frustrated at all that it took that long to just kinda get to get an answer like that to to do a diagnostic test. Like that or is very frustrating. I feel like the not knowing can make it even worse because you're dwelling on that and it's causing all this anxiety and i feel like i was really relieved when i finally was like okay. This has a name. We can do something but i had never even heard a crowns until before this. I didn't realize the road ahead of me what who would really entail. I thought okay. It has a name now. we can treat it. We're done yeah definitely. It was not the case. No i mean. I was just looking up to some more like fax and stuff is is what they krones pertains to in females and i read that fifty percent of women with crohn's disease are under the age of thirty five at the time of diagnosis. So yeah i couldn't really find anything about. Teenagers is much. But do you know the numbers on that at all. I don't know the numbers. I know when i first got sick and i've found that from what i've read. Most people get diagnosed either in the teams or in like early mid thirties around there. I believe l. But when i first got sick my doctors at the time social media was what it is today and the only resource. They could really give me was. Here's this book that this man wrote who like a middle aged man and his journey with groans. I thought okay. That's great. I respect but he's gone through a seminary night school girl. Yeah my told me how to deal with my prom. Dress amoud without fainting in Where i'm getting done and just like to do my soccer game like things. It wasn't relatable. And so i knew from then that i didn't know how but i wanted to somehow use my life my story to reach out just to help someone feel less alone because everyone i've talked to if it comes up in conversation and i say oh i have krones they always say oh my cousin has it or someone i know has it. So this prevalent then. Why aren't we talking about it more. Yeah and why wearing there more resources you know. That's what when you had reached out to me. I looked at your profile. And i was like. You're like a shining low beacon of light you know q. In this krones world. And i was just so impressed by you. Not only like you know. You have an austin money. You have beautiful photos in you know in bikinis sporting near to me and just like here is about us. Female who is taking back the narrative of krones. Thank you. i appreciate that. Yeah the awesome me. I've only had that for about ten months now. So it's still not brand new but still fairly new battle came about just when i started krones. My doctor mentioned like we can go through treatments or we can. There's a surgery option and at the time again because it's not talked about much my in my mind just thought a bag is a colostomy which that's it which is not the case i learned. There's ilyasova measor. Which is what. I have and luke an end in all different versions some can be reversed but anyway i went. I wanted to do work on taking medications. Because i wanted to avoid the bag. I don't know cost right through. How many years. Once i transitioned over to an adult. gi who. he's absolutely amazing. Him and his team at mass general in boston are incredible. But i had gone through every. Fda approved medication for crowns that was available and melt them all. And just whatever was going on with my case. Things just weren't working out. I wanna say twenty eighteen. Things started to really go downhill in my junior year of college and things i can tell things were getting worse and we just constantly trying whatever medications were left and just was not working

Crohn Tommy Soccer Austin Luke FDA Boston
The Blood Libel Accusation with Magda Teter

Jewish History Matters

09:53 min | 3 months ago

The Blood Libel Accusation with Magda Teter

"I'm jason leg. And i'm joined today by magden tater to talk about the history of the blood libel accusation and its continued relevance listen in for a wide ranging conversation about the history of the blood libel its origin in mediaeval europe and how it has transformed over the centuries and what it tells us about misinformation and how it spreads magdi. Tater is professor of history and the fiddler chair of judaic studies at fordham university. She's the author of numerous books. Most recently blood libel on the trail of an antisemitic. Myth which will talk about today. The blood libel is one of the long-standing false accusations against the jews. It is the myth in different variations and incarnations the jews murdered christian children and used their blood for various rituals. And it's obviously patently false but somehow people still believe it. And it has persisted. Across nearly a thousand years from medieval england to nazi anti semitism and beyond we can see the ways in which the imagery of the blood libel and it's false narrative persists even in new reconfigured forms like the conspiracy theories of cunanan as mark the these accusations across the centuries and different places and in different times became a vehicle for different anxieties about jews and about people's lives at large. And so we can see the blood libel in a certain way as a mirror of the fears that people had not just about jews but about all sorts of issues nevertheless the blood libel is not just a relic of medieval superstition. Or something like that. It's something which has changed with the times and which in many ways has piggybacked off of new technologies and new developments and this is one of magdi key arguments which is that. It's the printing press that enabled the proliferation and persistence of these false myths and disinformation which when published allowed them both to spread more widely. And also give these false accusations in air of quote unquote respectability because the existed in print in the first place and so this allows us to think deeply about the role of media technologies both image evil and early modern europe and also more recently with things like the radio. The newspaper even the internet as avenues. Not for the spread of information but rather of information. Thank you so much for listening in to this conversation. I hope that you'll check out. Magas book blood libel and also the accompanying web site the blood libel trail dot org where you can learn more about the book and also check out some really fascinating maps and other media about the anti semitic myth of the blood libel. Thanks again for listening. Hi magda welcome to the podcast. Hi jason thank you for having me. This is such an interesting topic. It's i think unfortunately very relevant to talk about bible accusations. Yes unfortunately i'm a scholar of premodern history and we always want to be relevant. But as i always said be careful what you wish for. Suddenly my book became quite rather than to although when i started. It was an academic exercise. Yeah i mean. I think that we are going to get to the question of the ways in which the historical blood libel accusation is still very relevant today but before we do that i think it might be useful for us to think kind of really brawley. What actually is the blood libel accusation manafort putting it into the context of thinking about how this is similar or different to other kinds of accusations that we see throughout history thinking about for instance the accusation of decide the accusation that jews had murder jesus and then also things like the accusation of the desecration of the host the totally kind of bizarre accusation. That jews would steal the the wafers from the church. You're right blood. Libel is one of a series of accusations against jews that emerged in the middle ages. And it's one that has relevance today decide was a theological belief and obviously accusation but became embedded as a believe and maybe then projected onto jews causing violence especially during easter. But it was so to speak a victimless crime. Every year whereas a number of other accusations emerged in the middle ages justice christianity catholicism where also solidifying certain and defining certain types of buildings and then there were also libels that emerged in moments of crisis such as epidemic. So poisoning of wells for instance. So blood libels one of the three medieval accusations. The so-called ritual merger. Acquisition are. Although i prefer to call it murder liable. But it's an accusation that emerged in twelfth century that claim that jews killed christian children to reenact the passion of jesus so that connects to the this site as it projection onto contemporary jews and reenactment that emerged in england and then in the thirteenth century it emerged in a new way on the european continent. And that's when it became blood. Libel that shoes killed christian children to obtain their blood. Although the very first accusation claimed of perhaps some other kind of form of cannibalism of eating a heart or something like that they reason why blood became so central is that this was the moment when the catholic church in the thirteenth century has affirmed the dogma of trans substantiation that is the communion wafer that was consecrated by a priest during mass turned into the actual body and blood of christ therefore blood becomes central motif in christian worship. So this is a moment where we have this both the transformation of the murder liable into blood libel of killing but the purpose of blood but also the emergence of not their occupation that you mentioned day host the secretion accusation that jews obtain steel by the consecrated wafer and then tried to stab it to obtain the blood of christ and both are connected in the sense that the blood becomes a even because jews cannot make their own consecrated way for they needed this blood of the innocent christian to be added to mater effectively making it into both the body and the blood of christ night but a accusation that jews stole the consecrated wafer then desecrated and blood flowed dot accusation kind of waned and disappeared after the reformation the blood libel and the murder liable kind of continued the life of their own. The reason for is is that they are related to deaths of children and to some perhaps victims perhaps accidentally killed drown children so it becomes a very intimate actually charge because it involves a death. Having a way for stabbed doesn't sound as unless you really believe what this way for means but accusing someone of a child. That may be found dead on sometimes. It wasn't even body that may have been somebody's child that becomes a very kind of an intimate accusation and very embodied accusation even that transformation from the murder libel that is of reenactment of the passion of christ which emerges at the moment when christians are beginning to liturgically focus on the passion of christ. So you think about jews and reenactment and all that stuff but the transformation to the blood libel shows you that this begins to be a very malleable accusation that can change depending on needs and the needs to came that connection between the new liturgy and the new theology of the blood and body of christ in the thirteenth century

Jason Leg Magden Tater Cunanan Medieval England Fordham University Tater Manafort Europe Magda Brawley Jason England
"middle ages" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

03:15 min | 5 months ago

"middle ages" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"That's exactly what. Well i wish you great success and thanks for coming and We'll follow up with you and we'll definitely keep promoting you and let us know when you have anything new out to you know where to find the snap. Yeah tang okay. Great dammit advocate day by for now this episode is brought to you by put me in the story put me in the story creates personalized books for kids by taking bestselling children's picture books and well up characters and allowing you to create personalized books that make your child the star of the story alongside their favorite characters. Save twenty five percent store wide when you click the link on my dog. Tv dot com and use the code save twenty five where else sponsored by the lovely lovely asia online stop for modern irresistible and affordable women's clothing. Never before has dressing yourself been so easy lovelies carefully. Curated selection of apparel accessories outerwear always on chan and always available at the best prices. Lovely is dedicated to delivering high quality clothing to women. That will make them look and feel their best. They believe every woman has the right to dress well and shouldn't have to spend a lot to love how she looks. They make it easy to wear outfits you love every day giving you the confidence to take on the world. Lovely dot com. Some fashion trends are now forty. Percents off dotting at just five ninety nine get an extra eighteen percent off when you click the link on my dog. Tv dot com and use the code. J. t. eighteen. We're also sponsored by vapor. Dna founded in twenty thirteen vapor. Dna is the premier online vape store offering an industry leading selection of electronic cigarettes e e liquids and accessories. they're friendly and knowledgeable. Customer service team is always ready to provide the best customer service experience to ensure. You find what you're looking for. They guarantee their products to be one hundred percent genuine and at the lowest possible price. They're so confident. In their selection and customer service. They offer their customers. Eight forty five day refund. Save twenty percent when you click the link on mine dog. Tv dot com and use the code orion. Cute boy doc. People dreams of a middle-aged man very cool stuff back i loved. I loved the fact that he's Comfortable in his own voice and enough to just deliberate lack seamlessly without without working at it. Just being authentic and real. And that's my big. Take away from this. I hope you enjoyed this program. And i hope you come back and i hope you tell your friends about it and subscribing and go to my youtube channel. Got dan go to mind on. Tv dot com and get on my mailing list. So you know when we have great guests on and questions and comments for me always info at my tv dot com before mind look tv dot com tonight at eight pm eastern. I have the comedian.

"middle ages" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

03:51 min | 5 months ago

"middle ages" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"And high on the right. This is total stieg mountains and their grays. And the gonna ride through them. You know what's best part went on dreaming motorcycle engine ever breaks and i never have to wonder it's gasoline. I need to take and the police won't stop you. Give you a speeding ticket. There are no traffic jams. No speed limits or photo surveillance and the weather's always nice and they're almost kato's in my eyes. I look young. 'un ham some country. I also don't pull the air while dreaming Meanwhile mine so liz. He dream so familiar. Ledge man dreams from middle age man cream sofa made a.

"middle ages" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

12:50 min | 1 year ago

"middle ages" Discussed on The Book Review

"And I think it's not just dont. Don't listen unpleasantness. But it's more that if we really get down to it. Many cultures during the Middle Ages have just simply far less sexy. A group of love standards Today in majority we're all about thrusting food revising the norm changing things because of his deep sense of future. It's kind of tangible especially in medicine right. Think about all the medical advances are. They're constantly talking about today. we talk more about medical advances than we do about medical miracles. The ideas I think Around medicine just knowledge in the Middle Ages often like you said slightly less maybe exciting modern standards there about preserving ideas ideas. I've centuries keeping ideas alive in spite of sometimes trying cultural circumstances and so you can see why that appeals to us less but why maybe less intuitive you organized the book by geography places where medical advancements were more pronounced or bye cronulla chronology looking at the way in which medicine and the understanding of the human body developed over. The course of that you know near one thousand was in your long period but instead you chose to organize your book by body part which is interesting and I'm wondering if that just was that obvious to you that this is the way way I'm going to do it or you could have done it by age. Could have looked at the body from birth through childhood adolescence into old age. Yeah they all sound like great books and I could definitely definitely thought about them but really I actually. The structure of the book took its cue from medieval medical writings themselves so often when a medieval physician so individual from that more learned scholastic me Especially saying that at Fourteenth Century in Europe sat down and in in other parts of the world sat down to write medieval treatise collected set of cues and theorising of how to treat the body from top to bottom dot is exactly how they they related out the phrase that in Latin they use our PTA count Cam literally from head to heel and so they would begin with us often if the head things. A headache boldness. You know these are kind of somehow trying together. Even though they seem very different from different parts of medicine in in our modern sense all the way running down through use news of the chest breathing the stomach of genitals all the way down to things like source on the bottom of your feet on your toes kind of thing. I'm I'm not seemed to me a really interesting way to structure things because it didn't do is necessarily privilege as you say a particular time or place it's very easy to then try trying say search out in the Middle Ages moments where we think of as involved modern standards but actually again if if the point is to try and not judge everything by our today but to think about how medicine in Kiel and also its survival material and kind of historical sources they might differ another thing that affects our understanding role in comparison to where actually it made sense to take the body itself this medieval Q.. As a structure. Gotcha and indeed. What I try to do is not just to give you know the medical understanding of from head to toe but to begin often with ideas of medicine yes and then he has killed but to show how she the body was a much brew a cultural generator in this moment? So when we talk about heads in the book we talk about yours for headache but I quickly start to move onto thinking about how the head was important in medieval constructions of a kind of a human centric world that mankind's inclines head was seen as one of its things that gave it dominance over the animal kingdom or to talk about relics of the head which occur in number of different religious cultures of the Middle Ages would talk about boldness and the hair and beauty and products and left end with one body. Part of your choosing perhaps a favorite or one that most surprised you in doing your research or you just think we don't really understand in the same way that we did back in medieval period That's really interesting. I often go and kind of talks about. This material teaches material a lot and often in my talks. I kind of 'cause we obviously don't have time to go fully from head to toe so what I do is I give people a choice voice. I sort of throw up three objects in the choice between this beautiful small ivory carving which is all about hands and activity and touching an image of the virgin which actually today in the Metropolitan Museum in New York which opens up. Its little shrine of the Virgin will have body opens up to reveal figures inside mattress. Godot a Russian doll. I say we can talk about ideas of reproduction and the womb which is a big part of the culture the Virgin but also a huge part of Medieval Medical Oakland sending or I should throw a picture of the head and which has little Dr Graham inside of the brain from a well. It's kind of more. The process of medieval thought as it was understood in the Thirteenth Century manuscript now in Cambridge in the UK. And I've never had an audience who don't pick the brain. It's something that people absolutely fascinated with. And I think that in some ways I is interesting to think about how many who people understood thought understood and written about and through a series of stages as which happen in different parts of the brain stretching from beginning in front of the brain with the census communist the Common Sense Mentally all of the census pool together data then through various processes. It passes through different cells one nine as the e mackinaw Ta the imagination less like the modern imagination but more image is that's right from from the medieval Latin imago which could mean image but also means something most spectral is the people use for ghost or kind of specter so the idea of turning these sentences into images and that these images are processed by reason and ultimately stored in the memory. TV in the memory which is at the back of the brain. And it's a literally. It's kind of discusses are literally spongey part of the brain onto which these images are literally imprinted which the course of time the image of the imprint fate which is why we forget all memory so it shows a really interesting conceptualization in a moment which various complicated social and other reasons you know this is before not to meet with the brain taking replace that. There's an understanding of still having this kind of quite beautiful structure to it. I think People apparently interested that structure in house understood in the past. But I think they're the one interesting because today even now even with all of the Aachen of newfangled technologies of this something the other ways in which we can look inside the body okay we can sequence on genomes we can find all sorts of kind of complicated ways of reading the inside of ourselves. We still don't know very much about the brain if feels like Kinda Kinda from ten for us something to aim towards and actually one of the reasons why I really like to hear about that with groups is is I think if we want to be seen sympathetically practically by cultures in five hundred eighty s time who looked back and. I'm sure we'll think of many things that we do. Today is deeply barrack and very kind of basic in medical klunder standing. Then I think we have to have just as much sympathy for people five hundred years before us all right Jack. You've brought me along. I am persuaded me. We are not that far apart from our medieval counterparts. Jack thank you so much for being here. Finally Jack. Hartnell is the author of medieval bodies life and death in the middle elitist. I I WANNA take a moment to tell you about a new series of events. We've created called book. Review live at each event will use books as jumping off point into larger discussions. That help us better understand our world kind of like we do here on the podcast. The first one is happening. The evening of January fourteenth at the time center in New York City will be welcoming welcoming Sheryl Wudunn and my colleague Nick Kristoff to talk about their new book. Tight Rope Americans reaching for hope they'll be in conversation with our critic Jennifer Salai the book. Lucas a story about the disintegration of America's working class as seen through the eyes of Nick Can Cheryl's friends and neighbors to dig deeper into the themes of tight rope. We'll also hear here for my colleague. Andrew Ross Sorkin watch clips from a new documentary based on the book and enjoy readings from a surprise guest you can buy tickets at NY TIMES DOT com slash book review live to see their our art director at the Book Review. Dorfman joins us now to talk a little bit about his job as the director of the book review but also an illustrator and designer liner. A book covers Matt. Thanks for being here. Thanks very much for having me. I see every day so not here in the studio many of you who listen to the podcast. Don't necessarily we see the Book Review Online or in print. But I would like to say here that. It is an object of beauty and that is largely due to Matt's skill as an art art director and being director of the New York Times Book Review. I have to say is a pretty sweet gig. We've had some really great art directors in the past. I'd it happened personally to think it's the best doctor position here at the Times although there probably some who might disagree with that assessment. But it's a pretty sweet job so matt tell us about how great it is in a lot of respects. It's it's kind of the only job. It's hard for me to conceptualize what else I would want to do. Only because I never really thought in my wildest imagination a nation that I would ever be given the keys to drive this particular kind of car when I was in college. There was periodic allusions to the idea of. Oh if you're lucky. The Art Director of the book reviewer. Somebody else at the Times will hit you up to do an occasional spot or you know heaven forbid somebody taps you let you do a cover something like that but it was never really put in your head that that was something that you could expect to do with any kind of regularity more let alone even be up for job like that. So I'm I'm still haven't really woken up from the fact that this is actually something that I have to come in to work every day and actually do matt is only allowed to say good things about view on this. Uh some other amazing. This is my fourth year. I think just crossed the threshold threshold into into year four. What's gratifying about it? And what makes it so consistently interesting is really everything that you guys bring to it. Because our section is named after the fundamental technology. But it's really just the craziest possible idea section and so having to bring all these wild and crazy ideas that are bubbling up in all these books and just to bring some kind of visual personality to every last tiny little component. It's interesting has to stretch me in every possible way. Because I've got to think about big things like covers and and even broader bigger interactive packages and these little bugs that go into print that people maybe might look at for maybe less than a quarter order of half of a millisecond you're working with various editors at the booker view on reviews essays or other kinds of pieces that they are working going back and forth with them. Looking at the sketches with me. You're primarily working on the cover. I'd love to talk a little bit about how you go about this. You get the review in we say okay. This is is going to be the cover. Your first thing you do is presumably. Read the review. Where do you go from there? I read everything two or three times. What's what's helping to do? This faster is that I'll read everything twice in tandem. And then I'll just begin writing. Briefs I don't have an idea in my head of I've what I think. These pictures should look like yet before I even start thinking about one more. Sign this to actually start writing. Actually I will begin writing briefs and giving this imaginary illustrator. Whoever I'm interested in hiring for this we'll give them like a broad outline of what I think? The general argument of the story is our with the main narrative sort of thrust is and I think if I can regurgitate that in written form that helps me make other decisions about who when I re pretty quickly after that so when you do go to the illustrator that you WanNa hire. You're you're sending that person both the review as well as the briefed kind of guide them. Yeah sending them both. And if I feel like I haven't really yet grasped. What what the most salient part of the story might be? I will also include like an Amazon summation or something like that or something that can render the book and like the Barest..

the Times Matt director Art Director Jack Medieval Medical Oakland Book Review cronulla New York Times Book Review Kiel Europe headache Metropolitan Museum Aachen UK e mackinaw Ta New York New York City Andrew Ross Sorkin Amazon
"middle ages" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

12:41 min | 1 year ago

"middle ages" Discussed on The Book Review

"How is the human body dead and alive handled in the Middle Ages? John Hartnell will join us to discuss his new book medieval bodies what goes into designing a book cover and the cover of the New York Times Book Review Our art director. Matt Dorfman will be here to discuss. Plus our critics will talk about the latest in literary criticism. This is the book podcast from the New York. Times I'm Pamela Paul. Jack Hartnell joins joins us now. He is normally at the University of East Anglia but he joins us from Pasadena much better weather there. And he is the author of a new book called Medieval Bodies Life Life and death in the Middle Ages. Jack thanks for being here. Thank you so much for having me. Let's just begin with the question of what was different about the human body and the way in which it lives in died in the Middle Ages compared with now. Well that's the big question. I guess the question that runs through the whole of the book I guess the first thing to say is that what we think of as the Middle Ages even just the terminology that we use to describe this period as a kind of sandwich he won one in seems to refer to time after what people and history of until after the kind of the chief of ancient Greece in Rome so maybe the period begins around the five hundred and something before the rebirth. The release on same ideas in the fifteenth century or the Sixteenth Century depending on where we're talking about in Europe so we're talking about the whole of the tanks in Europe the Middle East North Africa so basically the world around the Mediterranean for the best part of a thousand years so that's a lot of different people different cultures and a lot of different approaches to the body. Potentially one of the things that I think. It's really important when we talk about. This field is to acknowledge that the difference in in in fact what's happening say in Europe and this is potentially very very different conceptually to what's happening in other parts of the world as well so we try and be quite focused in what I think and write about but broadly speaking again one of the interesting things is where we go to try and learn more about what is actually relatively misunderstood moment in the past so also a different kind of written sources that we can turn to but one of the things I'm particularly interested in as an historian is he's the kind of other kinds of traces of the body and it's kind of a cultural prominence might leave in visual culture immaterial culture and also we might. Let's turn with colleagues Bioch- Eulogy to actual physical remains of humans to find also two different things so to answer your question what the body is or how people can see who it really depends on some ways way. You'll look. I'm looking right now at the cover of the US addition. And it's a really Kaushal. I put it bloodless depiction in a way of kind of gory. Amputation of a leg and a replacement presumably with a with a wooden lag as conducted by what looks to be religious men but also with the assistance of several angels one of sort of carrying the dead lower limb away and the fellow. This is being done to is lying. There is closed his head kind of wrapped wrapped up. What are we seeing here? And there's no blood there's no blood so it's a really interesting image and one of the reasons why we wanted to put on the cover of the. US Edition. Was it really sums up all of the many different complicated. I cost me so I was just talking about so the image is actually from an altarpiece so a large wooden panel painted in oil paint made in Spain probably the very end of the fifteenth century and sometime in the fourteen ninety S. We think it's actually in the wellcome collection in London which is an amazing collection of history of medicine. And as you say you have these two men seemingly go about an attention This isn't a normal amputation. Things that's really important to say. And this comes up with the end of the book this object in discussions of amputation in various kinds of medieval surgery array European medieval surgery. especially is that Hudson. Petitions were very rarely on taken. This is a moment in which medical the efficacy of surgery in particular Akilah especially what we considered to be serious surgeries things like I'm petitions. It's not something that's often attempted. It's known to be very dangerous and often very unsuccessful zestful and so in a sense. This imports the world of kind of ill health from a more secular world and places instead in a spiritual one so the two people who are undertaking. This miraculous surgery are in fact. Saints the pair of Dr Saints Cosmas and Damian who are often identified identified as a pair in European medieval Christian would actually in Byzantine just. Wow they're very popular science in the Byzantine world so in and around the eastern Europe and Greece in. What is today Turkey in the Middle East and they are two doctors who were became kind of early saints of the Christian Church and often figures amongst many other things biggest biggest who appealed to in times of heating and this is actually story that's taken from the miracle narratives which surround these two saints and the story goes like this guy has has some kind of problem with his leg? Some text described as a cancerous growth others as a much more kind of irritation of the skin of the see. It may be as Almost a kind of deadening of the leg either way is like is in trouble and he falls asleep one night and dreams that he is visited by these these two saints who take Lenk Im. PT With The kind of stories talk about golden instruments and kind of be useful very unscaled instruments. That's right delicate. Fine things with the assistance of angels and replace it with a wooden like as it does maybe seemed like but actually with the leg of an African man who had died the previous day This leg is miraculously grafted on. And surely enough the man awakes to discover that his leg has in fact been amputated and it was. It wasn't necessarily a dream or wasn't dream it's been made real upon waking and he goes and continues to pay homage to the saints in. Thanks so it gives us a really interesting idea All firstly the practicalities of some parts of medieval medicine. People are aware it's dangerous to do this kind of thing so the fact that is successful is in itself a miracle but the very idea that we're talking talking about miracles and medicine as being a spiritual concern. I think drools back to to thinking a little bit about how in some ways similar today but in some ways right differently today especially in the often heavily religious context of the late Middle Ages how healing could be seen kind of boldly health and sickness could be seen as the physical moral spiritual so one to which we tend to a doctor a real life doctor physician or surgeon or apothecary or midwife but also in the Middle Ages to our spiritual limits of curious. It's quite striking image and mom which puzzled as interesting things together in this in in this story the doctors are saints but not all doctors or people who we might consider. Doctors people who practice medicine as it was then understood would be saint like because they didn't really know what they were doing a lot of the time right. What was the? What was the state of medicine and I realize again? There's going to be variation between Europe and Retiro in Constantinople and other parts of the world. But I wouldn't say that they didn't know what they were doing. And I think that kind of is if you don't mind me saying kind of typical of our Morton attitude to this period bringing a twenty-first-century snobbery to it. I'm sorry -solutely well but also kind of natural thing. I didn't call out necessarily eight to kind of shame us in the modern well because you know that's what we do is what everyone in every time has done in. Some sense is is that you know. If the time before was terrible then means that we now enlighten them positive and kind of future spectator and these kind of wonderful being with my deputy and away. It's a very natural thing for us to this but really what are beginning. The book is the kind of strong suggestion trying to persuade the reader that we really need to revise impression of this moment because ooh though some of the technologies which were available to medics and healers if the policy but not nearly as sophisticated as our own there were still very very complicated details. Theoretical understandings of the body on its own terms so to come back to your point about who some of these heinous might be listening. That's a really interesting question because it seems historians of medicine who've looked carefully. This kind of material have identified the medical world in the late Middle Ages. Let's say in Europe. Just today was a very stratified. Potentially very stratified place With many different kinds of healers ranging what we might say as broad professional spectrum trim so on the one end we might place the figure of the physician and not necessarily exactly the same as the physician that we know today but similar in some ways these extremely extremely well read individuals who have really dug into the detail treatises host down from the classical world revise and the early Middle Ages. We talk about the fundamental makeup of the body. It's understood because some degree especially towards the end of the period awareness of of not emmy and certainly an awareness of different kinds behind some processes of cure these figures who are university trained now again universities in the Middle Ages emerging in the twelve thirteen th centuries and not the same kind of places modern universities as the not open to everyone their institutions for men only good Christian men that in the European context but nonetheless there's a kind of scholastic academic McCain universalising knowledge. And there's not really the same sense that of specialization. In a university medical degree in the Middle Ages a position in a sense is judged by his Ed of depth of knowledge across a range of subjects these really small learned individuals steeped in the kind of scholarly approach to medicine that we might range from those kind of all the way through to figures like surgeons at the price too many people that surgery and physician ship quite separated in many parts of medieval Europe. Must because surgeons practical he does people think of the words surgery and Timo Lachey here who will go back to. The Greek curious goes literally meaning hand and Work Handiwork. These people who physically manipulate the body and and actually being extremely carefully trained but not in necessarily learned literate sphere but in a much more practical way. These are figures who belong to guild. I trained in workshops are apprentices to master surgeons so they kind of have a much more hands on training much like say a medieval blacksmith or woodwork. Yeah and they we know from the OCU- logical as well as the written evidence of very good at a number of different prestigious. The setting bones for instance is something that we can tell from. Archaeological doc illogical excavations have medical skeletons. We can we can see the bones which will broken were reset very well Likewise he'd treatments if the skin it's actually in the fifteenth century we get some of the earliest accounts of successful plastic surgery so Things that might be done especially around the face. There's a bryner plastic for instance the resetting of and kind of growing skin around the nose is something that began to be attempted this moment likewise than we also have another range of heaters. Historians Often Coolum empirical people who again much more physically impracticably bound up with the body. Maybe are less interested in scholastic healing and more to do with what I guess we might call fo- keeling herbal healing. These might be wise older individuals of smaller rural communities of women likewise likewise midwives of the marriage professionalized indifferent complicated ways throughout the period. So there are two different people to you can turn each of whom have this quite detailed and focused training. I guess part of the problem is that when we talk about the period of the Middle Ages again in between this comes back to the whole the idea that people you know gives us the in some ways quite natural understanding. We'll send people nothing at least good. Excellent yeah yeah no I mean you just think about that time. The dog can't just really sums up Wa. I think he's a very common misunderstanding of the moment..

Middle Ages Europe Middle East Jack Hartnell US Greece University of East Anglia Pamela Paul New York New York Times Matt Dorfman John Hartnell director Pasadena Dr Saints Cosmas eastern Europe Bioch Turkey Wa
"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

46:21 min | 3 years ago

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Well i feel like if i robbed a bank because the when the police said what did he looked like they'd say he had gray hair people let's see after your certain age is that you have gray hair so early we played that linda evans clip about forty isn't fatal as long as you die your hair and we still have this gray hair thing going on of the way people perceive us what do you think you know i think that forty still has this symbolic meaning to people even though it's much earlier in the lifespan that it used to be you know the muhammed jesus fasted for forty days the israelites wandered that the desert for forty years you know that no matter where it is in the lifestyle span turning forty still feels heavy to me more yeah so you are a cancer survivor how has that experience impacted your view of aging i'm glad to be my age i'm glad to have survived i was diagnosed with non hodgkin's lymphoma when i was forty one and i had a three little kids and it was a i i was i was great title to survive that experience and i think for me it definitely deepened my appreciation for what i had it didn't want didn't make me want to change anything in my life at wanted me to just appreciate it all even more so talk about some of the other challenges at this point in life but maybe not maybe challenges to hardward but this experience that you have you know making your marriage last and keeping it strong and raising children as they grow bigger what do your experiences in your forties help inform those things well the philosopher arthur schopenhauer said that the first forty years provide the text and the last thirty provide the commentary and i think that's what the forties are in a way you look at your life you look at the same things you've looked at your whole life but you see them differently you see more and more in them you see new things so a friend of mine said every marriage is a remarriage and i think we.

linda evans hodgkin arthur schopenhauer cancer forty years forty days
"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Their lives no matter what they look like and no matter what you and it's you know they they are entitled to that just part of life so there and you see that there's really a difference in behavior if you look at fifty and sixty year old french women's sexual behavior compared to america women there's almost double the rate of sexual activity among fifty year old french women that there is among american women because we buy the story that our culture tells us about ourselves it affects our most intimate relationships all right although she wasn't a forty point yet when she made her journey author elizabeth gilbert inspired many when she spent a year traveling the world and she detailed that experience in her memoir eat pray love in this twenty fourteen event hosted by minnesota public radio gilbert talks about growing older and what she learned we're just taught like reinforced constantly like to fear aging on that it's the worst thing that could ever possibly happen to women when it totally seems to be the dead opposite it is the best first thing that happens to women and i i said this on twitter the other day i like don't fear getting older but i do fear that someday of wicked evil genie will make me go and live my twenties all over again because that would be the very worst thing that could ever happen in my entire life pamela are we fretting about the wrong period of our lives i don't think it's quite as black and white she would like to have it but i think there are wonderful things about being in your forties and there's a level of the we have the story about the midlife crisis and looking older and in fact there on a social level on sort of level of awareness we are so much more aware of what's happening now and able to interact with other people in the buddhist say that being aware of what's going around on around you is one of life's great pleasure it's the true source of enduring happiness and i think you have it in your forties but what you become aware of isn't necessarily positive i i sometimes described the forties as a.

elizabeth gilbert minnesota twitter america fifty year sixty year
"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And he told me what he really wants for his birthday is okay i'm just going to say this on the radio a threesome with me and another woman oh my and because i'm a journalist and i can't resist deadline i said okay let's do it and so thus began my journey into the forties i ended up writing about this experience for a women's magazine at one point i said a my being under contract to have three some of your fortieth birthday but it ended up being i as a kind of sexual experience it was okay but as a literary experience it was fantastic because i learned something that a lot of people learn in their forties which is how to be themself in my case on the page i stopped writing like this author taste of journalists to new everything and i just explained my own perspective very clearly about what had happened and and that that i still try to write in that voice and and try to have that level honesty with myself in about my own experiences and sort of related ly again to compare americans to the french is there a different approach to sex in general after forty that the french take as opposed to the way we think of it here well there's this idea to america that if you're not young and firm and beautiful you're not entitled to sex and then once your body no longer looks like it doesn't perfume advertisements then you then you have to kind of close up shop and in france there's this idea that all healthy adults have sexual relationships through.

france america
"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Awesome well pamela did read you book early on about their best so just want to give you shot out about that was on yes i look forward to reading this book i recently turned fifty and i just recall that going into my thirties and leo living the life and i was educated got my masters got the decent job i'm an educator you know and of course it was a challenge challenging time of course going through those forties but you know it's interesting turning fifty you know i clean my act up i started eating organically i got into mindfulness and yoga kind of when i was about forty three so the last seven years i even stopped drinking big step in life and i really have come to my own and now honestly things just fall into place when you really start taking care of yourself and you take care of your mind and you take care of your body and in a real positive the way you know things just really begin to become clear in life and i work with kids and you know kim told me yesterday sims deprez i like you because you're so young so young and i think that's the other piece you were just talking about not having fun as well in life i make sure i smile every day i mean sure have fun with my loved ones and my wife and people that are around me and i think that's what people need to understand another yeah thank you so much for that coal so we're talking about how we feel in the things that we do to make ourselves feel good but but pamela talk a little bit about how in our forties our relationships change whether it's with our significant others or even our friendships would factors come into play there well i mean i think the color is really onto something that you know in the previous part of your life you feel like you're passing through milestones on your preparing for real life and people are cheer.

pamela leo kim seven years
"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Years shown saying it kind of makes sense i like to bring another voice into the conversation someone else who has been thinking about this joining me now in studio is beth teitell features writer for the boston globe you can find a link to her story headline the new insult so calling someone middle age even or especially if they are at our website on point radio dot org beth welcome to on point thank you i'm delighted to be your i've so many thoughts of pay a couple of things one i was thinking why is actually an insult to be called middle age if you are this is what i realize it's as if turning middle aged is your fault like if you've been paying more attention if you'd had a stronger character you wouldn't have let things get so out of hand like house beth the she let herself go she's middle aged it's also getting to a pamela was talking about there's real distinction in this country there's sort of a war afoot it's war on aging and hostilities are escalating it's on one hand it's true that forty is the new thirty but it's not really doing any good because at the same time thirty is the new forty and it's never too early for a preventative procedure five it's like these days trying to appear young as a fulltime job their teeth to bleach anti aging hair mask to apply frown lines to freeze if you're doing things right you'll actually look younger today than you did yesterday and e even more youthful by tomorrow it's sort of mind boggling amount of work it takes to simply appear well rested which is a look no longer achieved through actual rest yeah ebola what do you think about this this mirror your your thoughts and your experiences i know exactly what beth means and that's why it was kind of a relief to see the french model they have both talks to they're definitely you know nobody minds if they look younger than they are but they have the same which is trying to look young is the fastest way to look old and i think that's actually true because you look a little bit panicked yeah i guess it's about feeling comfortable in yourself and not looking like trying too hard right right all right sunny is calling from baltimore sunny thanks for calling today.

features writer beth beth teitell boston baltimore one hand
"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Regular do they behave when they turned forty and and hit this quote unquote midlife stage to the way americans do well in america especially for women there's this idea that you should look as young as you can for as long as you can until when that fails you kind of blame yourself and give up and in france they have a slight twist on that that idea they say you should try to look like the best version of the age that you are and i really like that because it's a lot more realistic and it's a lot more calming you can kind of be in your age and a frenchwoman kept telling me that they aspire at least to be comfortable in their own age but they know that the nature beauty changes as you get older you're no longer this beautiful because you're unlined and perfect and firm everywhere you look in your forties and beyond like you have a story and the kind of french twist on this is to say well it's the story that makes you feel this one woman said to me we're not frozen we're alive you the beauty is to see who someone is and i think that's a big fem of the forties as you really have to become who you are in order to be happy in the forties and dress like who you are to judd appetizer wrote and directed an entire movie about turning forty appropriately named this is forty came out in twenty twelve and in the movie paul rudd and leslie mann who play husband and wife pete and debbie are both turning forty debbie is more resistant to the big birthday isn't it weird that birthdays the same week and then we're gonna have a party and it's just for me i don't think it's weird at all 'cause you're turning forty and i'm turning thirty eight come on do you really want to be one of those ladies who's just so insecure about their age and they lied and they got a for then they got to remember and against all you don't understand how it works i don't want to shop at old lady stores i wanna go to j joe and chico's and taylor loft i'm not ready yet any two more yeah.

france paul rudd leslie mann pete debbie chico america judd
"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"But you're definitely not young deer so i wanna readers to hear from you a little bit from this book there are no grownups in it you write about one of the first instances where you the character right with a character realizes she might not be as young as she wants was if you want to know how old you look just walk into a french cafe it's like a public referendum on your face when i moved to paris in my early thirties waiters called me man was l it was bowl show mademoiselle when i walked into a cafe and men was l as they sat down a coffee in front of me i sat in many different cafes in those early years i didn't have an office so i spent my days writing in them and everywhere i was mademoiselle the were technically means unmarried woman but it's come to signify young lady around the time i turned forty however there's collective code switch waiters start calling me madam though with exaggerated formality or a jokey wink it's as if madame is a game we're playing they still sprinkle in the occasional mademoiselle but soon even these jocular mademoiselle's sees and my madam's are no longer tentative or ironic it's as if the waiters of paris they're mostly men have decided on mass that i've exited the zone between young and middle aged and this is this is your perspective i said character but you're giving your perspective about this in this book i talk a little bit about that i mean madam versus mademoiselle is is a way to get into this bigger issue of how you perceive yourself yet that seemingly doesn't always match up with how other people see you how do how do folks at this age deal with that well i suspect that maybe i don't know yet but by your fifties or sixties you're kind of used to be treated as an adult as a grownup but the forties this transitional age as i write in the book like i still have jean all the jeans i wore as mademoiselle i still have like milk in my refrigerator that hasn't expired yet from my mademoiselle era so it's as if really the the way people treat you hasn't caught up at but things really.

paris madame jean milk
"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"middle ages" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"From you are boston and npr i'm kimberly atkins chief washington reporter for the boston herald and this is on point maybe you've bumped into someone in a grocery store who calls you ma'am instead of miss for you wake up to a new wrinkle that cemented itself on your face overnight or worse someone refers to people in your age group as middle aged yikes aging sneaks up on us whether we feel like grownups or not this hour on point a midlife coming of age story you can join us on air or online so now you're middle aged how does it feel do you mourn the days of your youth or enjoy this as a new phase in your life join us anytime at on point radio dot org or on twitter and facebook on point radio joining me now from washington is pamela drucker men she's a journalist and the author of four books including bringing up baby one american mother discovers the wisdom of french parenting which has been translated into twenty seven languages her most recent book is there are no grownups amid life coming of age story you can find an excerpt at our website on point radio dot org pamela welcome to on point high kim thanks so much for having me so as those of us who have had a fortieth birthday i will neither confirm nor deny that i have but we know forty isn't middle aged anymore but it is a unique age tuck a little bit about the inspiration for this book well when i turned forty i felt like nobody could define it for me anymore and it wasn't so much one big change as it was lots of little changes like why do i sometimes wake up hungover now even though i've had nothing to drink or you know why is there cellulite on my arms now who knew i could have cellulite there and lots of little things some of them good and some of them bad and i felt like i wanted to write a book that kind of asked the question what are the forties and you know what were they in the past and what are the modern forties what are they for women and men today how do you have to dress differently how does marriage change how do your relationships change why do i.

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