36 Burst results for "Microsoft"

Fresh update on "microsoft" discussed on Balance of Power

Balance of Power

00:45 min | 9 min ago

Fresh update on "microsoft" discussed on Balance of Power

"The Bloomberg business app and at Bloomberg quick take. This is a Bloomberg business flash. From Bloomberg world headquarters, I'm Charlie palette. We've got the Dow the S&P and nez stack all in the red again today's stocks are falling some of the world's largest tech companies leading losses as treasury yields climb. We've got the ten year now yielding 3.72% with a two year at 4.46% that has stacked 100 index full of those big tech names down by 6 tenths of 1% as stacked down 50 now dropped their of 5 tenths of 1%, S&P lower by 11 down three tenths of 1%, the doubt down 53, a drop there of two tenths of 1%. Apple shares down 1.9% Microsoft tumbling a 7 tenths of 1%. Amazon down 1.7% shares of alphabet parent of Google ups down 7 cents a 1% meta platforms pushing higher by about 6 tenths of 1%. Spot gold up $9 the ounce to

Bloomberg Charlie Palette S Apple Microsoft Amazon Google
Why Web Pioneer Legend Brendan Eich Founded Brave?

The Bad Crypto Podcast

01:48 min | 5 d ago

Why Web Pioneer Legend Brendan Eich Founded Brave?

"Today, we have the CEO and cofounder of brave Brendan Ike is joining us right now. We're going to talk about all kinds of things. Brendan, welcome to the bad crypto podcast. Don't forget that. But most important micro unity. Yeah, he's got quite a background. You were the CTO, then CEO of Mozilla. And you helped launch the Firefox browser and you're also the inventor of JavaScript, which is the world's most popular programming language. So that little thing happened and then, of course, you founded the brave browser. So why found brave? Go ahead and tell us your reasons, especially after having launched a successful browser and Firefox that you thought we need brave. Right. So when we did Firefox, we were not as conscious about privacy as we are now. And we did this search deal with Google, which at the time was a great search engine and hadn't become a big Alphabet company full of all sorts of different businesses that all seemed to be lost leaders for the ad exchange business, which is the main revenue Lake of Google. We also in Firefox, we let the privacy conscious users build extensions for themselves and then grow those extensions. We call them add ons back in the day. So I sat for a long time thinking about two big problems. One is that browsers, if it gets successful, tend to be captured by a big tech company like a search company, which is really an ad exchange, like Google, or in the 90s, by an operating system company, which is really a word in excel office suite company. That was Microsoft.

Brendan Ike Brendan CTO Mozilla Google Microsoft
We Are Living in a Society of Minority Privilege

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

We Are Living in a Society of Minority Privilege

"Although we hear AD nauseum about white privilege. The fact is we are living in a society of minority privilege. Now, minority privileges too broad a term because not all minorities are included in minority privilege. Jews are a minority, but they don't have minority privilege. Asian Americans are a minority. In fact, they're a smaller minority than either a blacks or Hispanics, but they don't have minority privilege. Minority privilege is reserved for a really three groups. Blacks. Native Americans and Hispanics. Now, universities claim that they have to engage in racial preferences. Because that is the only way to produce roughly proportional representation. What the Harvard lawyer told the Supreme Court. He wants a Harvard that looks like America. Not a Harvard the things like America, not a Harvard that reflects the intellectual diversity of America, not a Harvard in which let's say Republicans and Democrats are equally represented among the students or on the faculty, not a Harvard where there's religious diversity, and so for example, there would be evangelical Christians represented, let's say at their purport. No, no, no, no, no. Harvard's concern basically is on primarily the race front, but they're also big, of course, into gender and sexual orientation. Now, why is it important to have a Harvard that looks like America? Let's think about it. You've got a lot of areas of American life that don't look like America. There are parts of America, Silicon Valley doesn't look like America. If you go to Silicon Valley, you have a huge number of Asian Americans. In fact, by and large, if you look at all the different types of restaurants and companies like Microsoft, it seems like this is just like little Asia. You got like Chinese restaurant over here. You've got Indian restaurants over there, Japanese sushi over here, reflecting the population of people who work there.

Harvard America Supreme Court Silicon Valley Microsoft Asia
Fred Humphries Discusses Microsoft and Competition

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:11 min | Last month

Fred Humphries Discusses Microsoft and Competition

"Unfortunately we've seen the attitude sometimes at big is just bad. If you're big. And I don't subscribe to that. I know y'all don't subscribe to that. Yeah, but there's also a market where there can be some issues. I know Microsoft is supporting there's a bill called the open app markets act. Which all of us are dealing with now. Talk to us a little bit about that and Microsoft's involvement in a competitive marketplace. Absolutely. And I want to talk about it from a lesson learned perspective. When I joined Microsoft over 21 years ago, I joined when we had and I trust issues. We don't like, we don't talk about that a whole lot, but we had a lot of market share. On Windows. And one of the first responsibilities I had is I was a head of state government affairs was to work with the 20 state attorney general state attorney generals who, you know, coming after his son, alleging us being in a monopoly. And our market share. And I would just say that one of the things we learned from windows and then there was this called netscape and how it was alleged that we were doing things to make it harder for developers to be able to develop and things of that nature on our platform. And you know, through mistakes sometimes and things that what I call a teachable moment, you learn. And we reflected on, you know, that's all been wrapped up, settled out, done. Completed, and where we learned so much that where a lot of people is kind of important to make sure government or through a regulatory body that make sure that competition stays alive. And innovation stays alive. And I think that that's a lesson we've learned that I think that we've embraced as a part of us. And so then you fast forward and you think about app stores and the app market, right? There's not a whole lot of competition and then you want consumer choice.

Microsoft Netscape
Why the First Step Act Matters to Microsoft With Fred Humphries

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:57 min | Last month

Why the First Step Act Matters to Microsoft With Fred Humphries

"Stuff like the first step back, then also with fresh start, clean slate. And all these were helping people who do their time come back out and then be productive citizens. Why does that matter to a company like Microsoft? It absolutely does. And I just want to commend you on that, you know, when you with the first step, you know, that's about recidivism. And just what you did on that and you did it in a way that I just felt like it was just so, so important. Yeah, like you just said, right? So important to, hey, you know, bad people do bad things, you know, there needs to be accountability and that aspect. But then there's like, wow, okay, you've done your time. You're here to do reentry, right? And then, you know, all crimes are not necessarily all the same. And so they need to think about when you think about fresh start and clean start, you know, wanting to expunge a record for certain low level because I think this is really important to listen to because we're not like talking about like, hey, you've done this bad crime. You get to get your record expunged. Card aspect. But for nonviolent crimes, after a set period, to do something like that. And we Microsoft, you know, when we look at it, we have signed off the second chance aspects of one that come out there. It's important to just kind of, you know, no data in the sense that because data is key, you know, one in three Americans have a criminal record. One in three, right? You know? Nearly half the children have a parent with a criminal record. And so, you know, like a lot of things in life, you got to sometimes dig a little deeper of how can you make it reforms or do things to create opportunity.

Microsoft
Doug Welcomes to the Show Fred Humphries of Microsoft

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:09 min | Last month

Doug Welcomes to the Show Fred Humphries of Microsoft

"Happy to have Fred Humphries with Microsoft here today. As far as I'm concerned, he is Microsoft. I don't care who knows you see about everybody else. Fred is Microsoft to me. And we're going to have a lot of discussion about some things they saw in the podcast. But first off, Fred, welcome to the Doug Collins podcast. I am glad to be here, Doug, and I just want to be right back at you. There's a mutual admiration. I got to know you when you were in Congress and you embodied everything that you want in a member of Congress and representing Georgia, but also representing this country, your values, your great communicator, your smart, and you want to make a difference. You always have known your north star and I just want to say, you know, quite frankly, it aligned with my north star, but just whether it did and or didn't, you know, I always felt you spoke truth to power. And I just want to say, we miss you. We're glad you have a podcast. I've listened to some of them. It is a quite a cross section of which. And so I'm honored to be with you today and it's just great seeing you.

Fred Humphries Microsoft Fred Doug Collins Congress Doug Georgia
Microsoft's Fred Humphries Tells Us About His Background

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:23 min | Last month

Microsoft's Fred Humphries Tells Us About His Background

"One of the things that I've always done. Especially when I've interviewed a lot of folks who people know, I want them to know the people in my podcast and whether you have a public figure that is in the news all the time or someone who's never, but around I want people to know because when I hear so much and I have a lot of different age groups listening, I want them to know that if they put their minds up they can do it. So Fred, give us a little background about where you came from, how you got here, just let us know you a little bit. I absolutely will. I'm going to do I'm trying to do the short story. Aspect, I was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. But fast forward, I was raised in Tennessee, raised in Nashville, Tennessee, great place for good country music and when I was growing up, it was more on the production side than it was on the go see a show, you know, get some good entertainment and Nashville has changed. And went to morehouse college in Georgia and Atlanta, Georgia. My wife of 35 years is from Macon, Georgia. I get there making a fair amount to see my mother in law. Went on to temple law school in Philadelphia, came back home to Tennessee, and like yourself, I have a commitment to community. I have a commitment to trying to make a contribution to society. And I think one of the places you could do that is in government. I worked for a governor, governor Ned ray mcwhorter. For 6 years, I did something that I really enjoyed. And I think about this when I think about this podcast, I was on radio station LAC 1510 a.m. in Nashville on Sunday. I had a talk show Doug, you probably didn't know. And I only had it for a few months because I ended up moving to D.C.. I looked forward for every Sunday, but I would tell you, like you have to do, preparation for a talk show is like, okay, I got 30 minutes. I got to figure out what I would say. I had an open line, and then I'm like, you know, okay, you want to get callers. Oh my gosh. The amount of time I spent on that for the 30 minutes was unbelievable,

Tennessee Nashville Georgia Temple Law School Morehouse College Governor Ned Ray Mcwhorter Fred Pittsburgh Macon Pennsylvania Atlanta Philadelphia Doug D.C.
"microsoft" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:12 min | 2 months ago

"microsoft" Discussed on The Media Show

"But you're describing that as a possible direction of travel with the walled garden approach as you describe it. But here's a Microsoft statement saying, we're ready to work with the competition and markets authority. They go on to say we want people to have more access to games, not less, so it doesn't sound like their strategy is to ring fence these games only on certain platforms. No, it certainly doesn't know. I mean, if they're saying that officially, then I'm pretty sure you can rely on it. They're very talented and they're very technically savvy and they're very good business people. So they know what they're doing. Having said that, the competitors have their own restricted content. There's content that's only available on PlayStation. All you get time windowing as well. It's an interesting area there where the game might come out first on one platform and then come out on everything else later. So in effect, what you're paying for with the premium subscription is you're paying for early access to the same game. I think it's quite a technical technical issue actually for the consumer authorities to look at. But from your point of view as a games developer with a hit like sniper elite on your hands, if someone came along and said, we're going to give you an awful lot of money, but in exchange, this game is only going to be available on one platform. Would that be okay with you? Well, it would depend on the business deal and I have to say we have done that. So we released one of our games zombie army on the epic store first. They bought a window of opportunity, a window of one year before it was released on other platforms. And it made economic sense for us. There was a bit of a backlash from the consumer, as you can imagine, people disappointed they can't get it on their favorite system. So I can understand absolutely understand. Why people might be frustrated by that. And I can understand why the consumer authorities are going, is this anti competitive or not? Well, I think it's quite nuanced. The CMA and Microsoft sound like they're going to be having some conversations, both sides have said they want to talk about this. And Luis helped me understand the state of the gaming industry more broadly, evidently, Microsoft is sinking a huge amount of money into it here, but I'm just looking recent stats in the U.S. show revenue going up, 30% overall since 2019, but they've dropped over 10% in the last year, perhaps due to the fact that normal life has resumed after COVID. What's your analysis of the state of the industry and the degree to which it can continue to expand? The gaming industry is obviously huge. I mean, it's bigger than music and box office combined. It's bigger than the subscription video on demand, industry as well.

Microsoft CMA Luis U.S.
"microsoft" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:17 min | 2 months ago

"microsoft" Discussed on The Media Show

"What the main parties do, but I would reject this idea that we're just taking press releases from Labor Party headquarters Conservative Party headquarters and letting our readers decide which one is right. So that's how the FT is going about this, Sarah, you're the editor of the Manchester evening news. You've already shared some of the very difficult stories that you're hearing from your readers and that you're passing on to your readers. How do you view the challenge of not just reporting that accurately, but also to Miata's point offering your readers some hopes, root out of the situation they're in? Yeah, I mean, to pick up the attic point with, we've written a lot about how the national policies impacting particularly in areas like the north, whether additional challenges, we've also looked at how local leaders are handling it. But in terms of informational content, we've found that the most useful thing for us to do is to provide answers to the questions the readers are asking. So that is often about directing them to the places they can go to save money, explaining the different government policies and what it means for them and also using the experts we've got. We've got a fantastic parenting editor and she will guide people where to get cheap school shoes. Now this is the sort of content that is new for us and is being laptop and people are reading the droves in their hundreds of thousands because it's useful. It helps them live their lives and would part of that. So thank you very much indeed for joining us today. Let's say a list of the editor of the Manchester evening news. Thanks as well. To Sebastian Payne from the FT Antonia von bulow from the think tank, the new economics foundation. Now we're going to talk about gaming and Faisal you're staying with us because I learned something today. Apparently you used to write a gaming column you were saying. A long time ago, Ross, bit like your DJ. The digital culture column for the observer at the launch of the Lawrence of which was PlayStation was I went out to Japan and interviewed the father of the PlayStation in will have been 2001. All right, so that is that is a while back. Two thousand and one. Ken kutaragi. And I guess what was incredible was that was the moment it was going from niche. I think Sony had placed these machines inside nightclubs and they were conscious effort to try and make it mainstream and it obviously completely I think we can rocketed from there. I think we can safely say that went well because we're about to talk about a gaming deal that is worth 60 billion pounds. This is Microsoft seeking to buy the game's producer Activision Blizzard just to put that in contacts the furlough scheme during COVID cost 70 billion pounds, so not much more. Let's bring back in Jason Kingsley from the video game developer rebellion, but first of all, Luis shorthouse, you're a senior games analyst at the consultants ampere, analysis, help us out on this deal. How did it come about and why is Microsoft paying such a premium here? Well, I think that content is super important in the game space. So it always has been, but I feel like now it's become even more important. So with the rise of things like game subscription services

Labor Party headquarters Conse Manchester Sebastian Payne Antonia von bulow Sarah Ken kutaragi new economics foundation Faisal Ross Jason Kingsley Japan Luis shorthouse Activision Blizzard Sony Microsoft
Black Lives Matter Executive Accused of 'Syphoning' $10M

The Officer Tatum Show

01:37 min | 2 months ago

Black Lives Matter Executive Accused of 'Syphoning' $10M

"I got a list of them. They got all your favorite companies, PayPal, slack, we use slack our company. Comcast, Uber, a snap Shopify. We use Shopify on my ecommerce store. I mean, you go to Microsoft, Grubhub, DocuSign, DoorDash, I only want to talk about bumble 'cause none of y'all better be on the bumble. Go down the list, these major corporations, that's not even including celebrities. That's not they had so much influence around the world. And somehow black people found a way to mess it up. How in the work with that much power and influence, why couldn't a group of black people actually do something for black people? Why couldn't they clean up the inner cities, build the schools better, get kids a better education, somehow have a contingency of dads, community leaders, curbing crime in the inner city, they could have done something, they didn't do nothing but pimp y'all. Straight hoodwinked. Patrice colors. Step down until 2021. After they caught her, spending millions of dollars on mansions, then this dude, when she stepped down, she put him in charge. They claim that he didn't extract the $10 million from Black Lives Matter. In 2021, his company was paid $2 million.

Uber Comcast Paypal Microsoft Patrice Colors
Vivek Ramaswamy: U.S. Energy Profits Have Grown Faster Than U.S. Tech

The Dan Bongino Show

01:55 min | 3 months ago

Vivek Ramaswamy: U.S. Energy Profits Have Grown Faster Than U.S. Tech

"Not a lot of people know this Over the last four years the energy sector's profits have grown faster from June of 2018 through the end of last month in July The energy U.S. energy sector profits have grown faster than U.S. tech sector profits That's a fun fact but not a lot of people know But the stock prices of U.S. energy stocks actually underperformed U.S. tech stocks by a lot Why is that It's because of the ESG movement that mandates these companies and ties them up with handcuffs and says that you know what After 2030 there is going to be no fossil future There is going to be no fossil fuel usage after another decade or two And so what investors then say is they say that you know what even if those companies earning profits today they're going to trade at a lower stock price Well guess what I think that over the next ten years U.S. energy could become like what tech was over the last ten years if we take these ESG handcuffs off the sector and tell them you know what you can drill You can frack You can grow and you can be proud of it if the shareholders of these companies are no longer just the BlackRock state street and Vanguard ESG climate progressive message that tells them to constrain themselves But instead a new shareholder message that says your potential and drill and frack and do whatever you need to do then guess what Some of the I think some of the largest companies in the world could be American energy companies And you know what Some people may think that's a ridiculous thing to say when the largest companies today are for tech companies Apple Microsoft Google and Amazon But I'll remind you that actually as recently as 2013 the largest company in the world by market capitalization was actually a U.S. energy company And it's no accident that that was before these ESG movements began picking up in the late 2010s and early 2020s to put a wet blanket on American energy And so I

U.S. Amazon Apple Microsoft Google
"microsoft" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

03:21 min | 4 months ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Code Story

"Out about the opportunity? Yeah, super coincidental if you would. So I was doing a master's event to UC Santa Barbara. And they had this little kind of red building, which was their career center, and I was just curious, what is inner career center? And I just was kind of walking around, just kind of browsing around, and then it was like, oh, this company Microsoft is here, they are kind of interviewing. So I just put my name down on the schedule. And went back for an interview. And it turned out the interview went well, and I got invited back to Microsoft for an internship. That was an internship. That my intention for whatever three months or so, I was invited back to come do an interview for a full time, which was roughly three months after I had finished the internship and so got an offer and pretty much ended up joining Microsoft. Okay, so good rest right now. You are overseeing teams and computer networking storage. Is that correct? That's correct. We call it the Azure core group, which encompasses the three kind of big infrastructure businesses around virtual machines around storage and networking. So when you got the callback, the three months after the internship, did the interview join Microsoft. Was it in this group? No, there was no Azure 30 years ago. When I joined I joined Microsoft project. In fact, one of the things I had taught off was that I really want to work on applications. I don't want to work on systems. So it's ironical that now I'm managing a systems group probably well, it is the biggest systems group at Microsoft and financially, the second or third in the world. So it's kind of funny. How long have you been at Microsoft? About three years, right out of college. It's a good long tenure. So I imagine you worked for MS project. And now you're telling me you're leading groups and computer networking and storage. What was in between? What other groups did you work for? So I've had about I kind of say 6 jobs at Microsoft. And one of the cool things about Microsoft is you can get a variety of experiences like working for you can work for ten different companies, but still under the same corporate umbrella, everything is so different. So I had about 6, I worked on maxo project, I started as in development engineer, much like junior, and I grew to be what we call the dav lead, which is someone who manages a small group of people at that time. It was 6 or 8, and I spent maybe 6 years at Microsoft project and kind of grew that set of folks that I was going to managing, and after that kind of decided to just look around a little bit, put my head up, I thought I was working in the best group and the company turned out that while there could be more than one best group in the company. So I started on a project called team pages. It was an incubation project. Team pages kind of evolved and right now is the SharePoint business. So I kind of help start that. And that was as a development manager. So the development manager manages not only engineers, but also manages the leads. So that was my kind of a little bit bigger kind of management role at that point in time. And also incubation role. That was fantastic.

Microsoft Azure core group Santa Barbara
Ilya Shapiro on the Concepts of Libertarianism and Concentrated Power

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Ilya Shapiro on the Concepts of Libertarianism and Concentrated Power

"Is it fair to say that within kind of a libertarian point of view is they don't like concentrated power. And could you make the argument though that we have concentrated cultural cultural monopolies and we have financial monopolies and corporate ones. I'm not saying state power is necessarily the answer, but it seems as if the question of who is dominating our life is more than just the state. It's all these other instruments of influence. What are your thoughts? No, that's no doubt the case. And if private actors are oppressing you, the person feeling that oppression doesn't feel better that it's not being done under color of state law or what have you. The problem is the remedies are more difficult. You talk about concentrated power. Well, that sounds like antitrust or should we break up some of these places? Antitrust a very crude tool. By the time we went after Microsoft, it was no longer a monopoly or remember that netscape monopoly over browsers and things like that. I think we might want to learn, go back to the industrial revolution and there was kind of this conception, including among classical liberals, the modern libertarians, of a third space that are private entities that are affected with the public interest. And it wasn't about Teddy Roosevelt's progressive antitrust breaking up the trust, but it was thinking about this public private hybrid that's a, you know, it's a complicated sort of situation that we're not going to resolve during this conversation,

Netscape Microsoft Teddy Roosevelt
John Zmirak: The Left Is Purging People for Power and Money

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:19 min | 5 months ago

John Zmirak: The Left Is Purging People for Power and Money

"You have in this article at stream dot org. You lay this out. There are people who are waking up to this reality that the left no longer cares about truth. In other words, there was a time when you get a principled opponents. There were people on the left who said, well, I am pro life. Kirsten powers was one. There were senators, democratic senators, we have entered a new era. And it seems that the left has gotten really clear about the fact that they don't believe in the left is purging people like Glenn greenwald and Naomi wolf, who believe in truth, like Tulsi Gabbard. There's no more room on the left for sincere leftists. The left has realized it is all about power and money. It has that in common with big corporations with big pharma with Pfizer with Google with Microsoft. They are more and more openly simply the party of the 1%, the 1% is leftists because they figured out that's what is more profitable. That's what makes it easier to concentrate power

Kirsten Powers Tulsi Gabbard Naomi Wolf Glenn Greenwald Pharma Pfizer Microsoft Google
John Zmirak Describes the Left's Desire for a Hacienda Society

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:18 min | 5 months ago

John Zmirak Describes the Left's Desire for a Hacienda Society

"What is Starbucks, Microsoft, Google, the World Economic Forum, the Ivy League Pope Francis woke evangelicals, what are they all doing together, whether they are conscious of it or not. They are trying to unfound the United States of America as you and I know it and replace it with something that's sociologists call a hacienda society. Hacienda NDA. A hacienda is something in Latin America, especially, but in any society that's an oligarchy. The hacienda is represents the one to 2% that have all the money and all the power and all the influence, but in these societies, it also has all the real legal rights. If you're not part of that 1%, you don't even really have legal protection. You don't have free speech. You don't have gun rights to self defense. You don't have rights to assembly. You don't have religious freedom. You don't have any of the things in the Bill of Rights in the Bill of Rights, which are natural rights that God gave us. And the constitution was simply meant to guarantee. In a hacienda society, the only real false human beings are the aristocrats living in the hacienda and the guards working for them out in the guard. Okay, but if people can't remember the word hacienda, ladies and gentlemen, let's make it super clear. There are effectively two ways of seeing the universe. One of them leads to American style, self government, liberty. It is imperfect, but it can be beautiful and it has been beautiful and it can get better. And it comes out of a biblical worldview, the dignity of human beings, the respect for the idea of freedom for a real understanding of what liberty is, it's God honoring. The other view says effectively, there is no God. We can be as gods. It's all about power. We reject truth. We reject the God who claims to be truth. Both of these views lead in different directions.

Pope Francis World Economic Forum Ivy League NDA Starbucks United States Of America Latin America Microsoft Google Assembly
"microsoft" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:49 min | 6 months ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"I just encourage people to bet on themselves when they're ready. And when those opportunities come jump and like I said, every decision I've ever made on my career, I felt like a year or two earlier than I should have done it. And in hindsight, some of them were, but other people were making decisions to bet and all I could do was prepare myself as openly as I could and be transparent about my journey in that role. Yeah, I think that's really, really good advice. For what it's worth, I think I've had the same experience as you, like I feel impostor syndrome all the time, like what qualifies me to do the job that I'm doing. And I've always felt it from the time that I was a kid, but I also, I also have always had this, it's not even overconfidence. It's like just crazy curiosity. It's like, I just can't help myself, but go see what the thing is going to be like. And so I think whatever it is, that is what you just gave people is really good advice, like find that thing inside of you to overcome your impostor syndrome or your hesitancy or you don't feel worthy or prepared and just go do it. And I think it's so spot on and what I have found in your such a great example of this, like what, 5 years ago, I didn't even know each other. And now I consider one of my good friends here at this company. And everybody in every position at the base level is a human. And has human emotion about where they are. They've got friends and family connections that kind of are such a part of who they are and their makeup, their history, what they want to accomplish. And those feelings that you have as an individual about whether it's impostor, I'm not ready or we've all been in the same position. It might be even at that time. And I love how open we've been able to have it at Microsoft on these types of topics, finding a place where you can have safe conversations, I've also found is very helpful. Yeah. For sure. Like finding your people where you can just be yourself. Super important. That's right. And that's maybe goes back to that connection. Those might not be people that you work directly with every day..

Microsoft
"microsoft" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

05:19 min | 7 months ago

"microsoft" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"That's pretty good. We go across on product two and okay, well, product two, middle of the road, useful, pretty innovative. It is not an expensive to build by our estimation. We think it's going to be, it's going to take a long time and time to market. It could be good. So by going through and evaluating your ideas against these criteria, you're demonstrating that you can think through a problem through all these different angles. And this is something you're going to be doing a lot on the job. The sort of, how do you improve your product? That is your job. I know for me personally, when I first started at Microsoft, my manager's manager came in and said, hey, we need to improve the availability, the uptime of Azure. Go do it, right? So this style of thinking is applicable not only to your interview, but really it's effective as you create products in the wild as well..

Microsoft
"microsoft" Discussed on ACG - The Best Gaming Podcast

ACG - The Best Gaming Podcast

05:50 min | 7 months ago

"microsoft" Discussed on ACG - The Best Gaming Podcast

"Oh, wow. Yeah. Yeah. That's a fantasy game. Obsidian. Obsidian. 'cause I love pillars of eternity and I love that world and yeah, I'm excited. Everybody in chat. What are you hoping for for Microsoft? What about you silver? Is there anything? I know you don't watch these religiously, but is there anything from Microsoft in particular? Because you do have an Xbox, you do have a PC. Is there a game pass stuff you want to see? Is there a mod stuff for consoles you want? Is there something that's like hot and heavy? I'd love to see more of an expansion on flight simulator. Yeah. Oh, true. Yeah, that would be maybe something. Did you see the boat that a mod maker had made silver for that? No. Yeah, they made a boat. And it works because they modeled the water. So I was just like, wow. That's what I was expecting. So both simulator. Yeah, what do you think? Do they already have a bunch of helicopters in that game or any helicopters silver? Do you know? I think they made one helicopter, yeah. So what would you like to see overall performance or you looking for items?.

Microsoft
James O'Keefe: Feds Gagged Microsoft for Not Spying on Project Veritas

The Dan Bongino Show

01:56 min | 8 months ago

James O'Keefe: Feds Gagged Microsoft for Not Spying on Project Veritas

"You gotta hold of this Biden family diary and of course after that it appears you guys became the subject of a bunch of raids I mean this is the kind of stuff that you write in like a cheesy comic book and everybody laughs like oh no that wouldn't happen There's no way the DoJ could be so ridiculous to do that And it seems obvious they be covering for Biden What's going on with that Well that's the recent big story we did This Microsoft Corporation reached out to me We use Microsoft for our emails And there were legal documents that showed that Biden's Department of Justice was spying on us 9 months before we even heard about this Joe Biden's daughter diary This is January 2020 Secret warrants then were signed by magistrate judges to Microsoft for my emails and my colleagues emails and those warrants allowed them to get stuff going back two years ago This is crazy It was so crazy the ACLU issued a statement ACLU comments on this This happened about two weeks ago And there are troubled by the electronic surveillance orders requiring sweeping disclosure of all of our journalistic sources So the FBI and the Department of Justice targeting project veritas and the craziest part about this Dan is that the federal judge in New York in December said well James will keeps a journalist journalist at privilege ordered the special master over the FBI with what they did and raiding my home and taking my stuff And then the feds went back to Microsoft a month later and continued to try to gag Microsoft from disclosing the existence of the secret warrants Last month Microsoft drafted emotion good on them opposing the gag and the feds back down And then in March just a few weeks ago we found out about all this This is crazy This is the biggest at bridgeman on freedom of the press in the history of the United States

Biden DOJ Microsoft Aclu Joe Biden FBI DAN James New York Bridgeman United States
James O'Keefe Calls in to Discuss His Outrageous Ordeal With the FBI

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:53 min | 8 months ago

James O'Keefe Calls in to Discuss His Outrageous Ordeal With the FBI

"Scandal to erupt is against project very task and we are delighted to have James O'Keefe with us on the line. James, welcome to America first. We've only got a couple of minutes. Tell us what you found out this week with regards to the targeting of you and your employees. Well, Microsoft Corporation, legal documents show that the Department of Justice was spying on us and hiding it from a federal judge. They got secret warrants, this is the Department of Justice Scott warrants against project veritas obtained all of our emails from Microsoft and then put a gag order on Microsoft, which is just lifted this month. We found out about this. As you all may or may not know, I was the FBI rated my apartment back in November. This is about Joe Biden's daughter's diary. We looked into it. We didn't publish the diary. FBI rates my place, a judge in New York signs what's called a special master. A filter team because we're journalists and the side of the First Amendment. But the government continued to spy on me and hide from the judge and this is a really big deal on the ACLU defended us yesterday. What were you accused of? What crime did you commit, James? That's a great question. A transporting documents across state lines and these sort of ridiculous absurd things that they would never charge any journalists. By the way, I have not been charged with a crime. We have not been charged, but they cited those things on the warrant on the search warrant. And then for the secret warrants, they cited things like stalking and blackmail, which weren't even on the search warrant at my apartment. Have you been charged with blackmail James? No, no. Okay, no, that was even dropped from their own search warrant. So we don't know because they sealed the affidavit. We don't know what they told these match straight judges. And we don't know if what they told them was true or just made up. This is

Department Of Justice Scott Warrants Microsoft James O'keefe FBI James Joe Biden America Aclu New York Government
A Shocking Account of the Regime's Assault With James O'Keefe

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:33 min | 8 months ago

A Shocking Account of the Regime's Assault With James O'Keefe

"With us right now is James O'Keefe from project veritas who is in the middle of one of the most revealing stories I think in a generation when it comes to press freedom and government overreach James, welcome back to the program. Charlie, great to be with you. So James, if I'm reading the reports correctly and I've watched some of your media interviews, it seems as if the Department of Justice, the organization that has the power to lock people in jail for the rest of their life secretly and illegally access to your emails. Is that correct? That's correct, Charlie. They issued secret warrants against Microsoft and got access to our emails, including emails, 8 months prior before we ever heard out about this diary, this Ashley Biden, Joe Biden's daughter's diary, the whole pretense for this for all of this. It was apparently that we came in possession of the president's daughter's diary. This is the first time we've ever heard of the feds having jurisdiction in an issue involving an abandoned diary. And of course, as you all know, journalists have a right to receive information from a source. So source sends us the diary. We actually paid for the rise to it, but we never published it. For a couple of different reasons. So now we found out that the feds were surveilling us and spying on us and issuing this is crazy, by the way. I know it's hard to shock people these days, but this is the biggest of bridgman on freedom of the press in the history of the United States. The feds issued a gag order against Microsoft from telling anybody even after the FBI raided my

James O'keefe Joe Biden Charlie James Department Of Justice Microsoft Bridgman United States FBI
James O'Keefe: Government Silenced Microsoft to Inform of Spying

Mark Levin

01:26 min | 8 months ago

James O'Keefe: Government Silenced Microsoft to Inform of Spying

"Do you know to this day what emails were turned over to the government by Microsoft We don't know that we believe all of them They had attained all these emails And again 8 month prior to us even learning about the diary and doing some reporting again we didn't publish this Ashley Biden diary I thought the time I couldn't corroborate it But what's most troubling about this development And this is an extraordinary series of events for the Department of Justice to spy on journalists Is that after the special master was appointed by this article three judge in New York in December the article three judge cited journalistic privilege First Amendment issues then the government went back to Microsoft and tried to get a continuance on this gag order This is USC 27 O 5 to prevent Microsoft from telling us a journalism organization that the government had seized our emails So Mark apparently that the Department of Justice went behind the federal judges back to spy on journalists The only other precedent for this during the Trump administration they tried to do this to Google but they didn't try to gag Google So The New York Times could fight them This is unprecedented This is a fundamental abridgement of the First Amendment We've never seen anything like it in modern history And clearly project air tests must be doing something right for them to fuck it to me like this

Ashley Biden Microsoft Department Of Justice Trump Administration USC New York Google Mark Government The New York Times
James O'Keefe: Government Has Been Illegally Tracking Project Veritas

Mark Levin

01:02 min | 8 months ago

James O'Keefe: Government Has Been Illegally Tracking Project Veritas

"James seems like the government has been illegally well illegally tracking you guys explained to us what's going on here Yes Mark this is a bombshell report Microsoft Corporation legal documents released by project veritas revealed that the Department of Justice filed a series of secret warrants and orders in order to spy on project veritas And then they tried to gag order Microsoft from talking about it This is in lieu of this Ashley Biden diary matter that the FBI had rated me back in November And then the federal judge ordered a master over this issue but now we've uncovered Microsoft Corporation our emails are housed Microsoft Outlook The Department of Justice went to Microsoft got my emails and asked Microsoft to keep quiet about it and this goes back to January 2020 8 months before we even were made aware of this diary

Microsoft Ashley Biden Department Of Justice Veritas James Government FBI
Companies revert to more normal operations as COVID wanes

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 10 months ago

Companies revert to more normal operations as COVID wanes

"For the first time in about two years some major companies are bringing workers back into the office while others are dropping mask mandates with the latest by research easing to major employers have set dates to bring workers back in person Microsoft at the end of this month Facebook at the end of March Walmart Amazon Tyson foods and JPMorgan chase are allowing workers who are vaccinated to now did teach their face masks a stark reversal from the end of last year when the Omicron surge began even Disney world in Florida ends its mask requirement this week for vaccinated visitors except when they're inside includes transportation vehicles hi Jackie Quinn

Amazon Tyson Foods Jpmorgan Chase Walmart Microsoft Facebook Disney Florida Jackie Quinn
To highlight economic growth, Biden goes shopping for gifts

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 10 months ago

To highlight economic growth, Biden goes shopping for gifts

"Hi hi hi hi Mike Mike Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Rossi Rossi a a a a reporting reporting reporting reporting after after after after going going going going shopping shopping shopping shopping Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday president president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden meets meets meets meets with with with with CEOs CEOs CEOs CEOs today today today today with with with inflation inflation inflation at at at a a a near near near forty forty forty year year year high high high and and and the the the stock stock stock market market market slipping slipping slipping president president president Joe Joe Joe Biden Biden Biden meets meets meets with with with some some some of of of the the the nation's nation's nation's top top top CEOs CEOs CEOs today today today to to to pitch pitch pitch the the the benefits benefits benefits of of of his his his economic economic economic agenda agenda agenda that that that stalled stalled stalled in in in the the the Senate Senate Senate among among among those those those meeting meeting meeting with with with the the the president president president will will will be be be the the the heads heads heads of of of General General General Motors Motors Motors Ford Ford Ford Microsoft Microsoft Microsoft sales sales sales force force force and and and at at at sea sea sea yesterday yesterday yesterday Biden Biden Biden visited visited visited the the the gift gift gift shop shop shop and and and ice ice ice cream cream cream store store store to to to Capitol Capitol Capitol Hill Hill Hill neighborhood neighborhood neighborhood the the the price price price the the the food food food too too too the the the president president president said said said last last last week week week he he he will will will be be be getting getting getting out out out more more more and and and meeting meeting meeting with with with everyday everyday everyday Americans Americans Americans the the the president president president plans plans plans to to to visit visit visit Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh on on on Friday Friday Friday Mike Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Rossi out out out Washington Washington Washington

Mike Mike Mike Mike Rossi Ross Biden Biden Biden Biden President President President Biden Biden Senate Senate Senate General General General Motors Ford Ford Microsoft Sea Sea Sea Biden Biden Biden Ice Ice Ice Cream Cream Cream Capitol Capitol Capitol Hill H Ford Pittsburgh Mike Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Rossi Washington
"microsoft" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

06:06 min | 11 months ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"And then section two says it's illegal to monopolize or attempt to monopolize any part of the trader commerce by and among the several states with the same penalties. So the question is, is Microsoft buying Activision Blizzard? A monopoly or attempt to monopolize a particular market? Or a contract in restraint of trade? And the answer is, yeah, it almost seems like any action that makes you bigger is an attempt to monopolize. I mean, attempted murder. What is that? Well, that Nobel Prize for attempted monopoly. Excellent sideshow bob reference there. Well, that's right. So let's look at cases on attempted monopolization that Microsoft lost in the 1990s. And the first one and I have to tell you, I needed my recollection refreshed on this one was Microsoft's efforts to buy the company Intuit. Oh, I didn't know that. Back in the 1990s. So here's what happened. Microsoft grew up in an era in which you were actually developing business killer apps. Microsoft was the killer app for operating systems beginning with Microsoft dos, MS dos. And they were the killer app for basic that came on all of the 65 O two based personal computers of the 1980s. Those were almost all licensed versions of Microsoft basic that were tweaked for each of your computers. When you say they're the killer app, it's that like you want to make something that becomes so familiar that people don't use any other software for that type of thing. Is that what you're saying? Yeah, that's exactly right. And by extension, that it becomes the reason you buy that computer in the first place. And in particular, the reason I'm prepared to defend this, that people bought the IBM PC despite its outrageous cost at the time and minimal performance advantages and in many cases disadvantages versus way cheaper competition. And what specifically was that? Was it Windows? Or was it? It was a program called lotus one two three. Right, so excel precursor. Yeah, lotus one two three was the first spreadsheet. The first spreadsheet killer app, okay? So when we say all of these, they're not necessarily the first, but they were the first one to become synonymous. And so lotus one two three was the excel of its day. It was the first mainstream spreadsheet. That was the idea. Word perfect became the first cross platform mainstream word processing program that would let you change your italicized words. It started to display them in italics on the screen. It displayed little codes right on the screen because, you know, we didn't really have the graphical environments, particularly the Macintosh. That had what was called wysiwyg, right? What you see is what you get. You take for granted now, but back then you had to memorize these codes in word perfect. And slash I anyway. The first killer app for personal household accounting balancing your checkbook was quicken, right? Yeah. Just still still a product today. Yeah. Multi-billion dollar market leader product today. I just love that you say killer app given the app did not exist. Like the word app didn't exist. Yeah. That's right. Well, I'm borrowing that from retro to make the gen zs understand what's happening. I'm hip with well done. Yeah. Thank you. And so Microsoft looked at quicken and they had two ideas. The first was, it would be really great to own the killer app for personal accounting. And the second was, and also, this is the early 1990s and also we're kind of thinking about online transactions and stuff. And by the way, if we get access to and own the killer app for personal accounting, we will own an awful lot of people's financial information as well. And we're not entirely sure how that's going to play out, but we think that could be super useful to us. And it turned out would have been had they known exactly how useful it would have been. Maybe the outcome would have been a little different. So Microsoft built a competitor to quicken to QuickBooks in 1991. That competitor was called Microsoft money. As you may infer from the fact that Microsoft money is not a part of your enterprise suite of applications, Microsoft money was not a success. I have a confession to make. I still use Microsoft money. Wow. Personal fun. Great. It has a feature that none of the other ones do that I can not live without. I still use what is there and what is that? It gives you a statement of cash flows in a way that I could not get any of the other ones to do. And I've been pivotal to my being able to manage my money effectively. I'm telling you, maybe there's a way to get the other ones to do it, but I couldn't find it. I tried a few other ones that went out. I think it lasted until 2011 I want to say. And then they just stop, they're like, we're done with Microsoft money, and I'm like, oh no, we're not. We're not done here. That's a great kind of addition to the story. So look, that was 91 when it was introduced. In 94, Microsoft announced that it was going to buy into it. And into its major product was Andy's QuickBooks, which yeah, quickening QuickBooks. Yeah, I use QuickBooks back when I was worked as an accountant. I love it. Wow, maybe I'm like it's the montagues and capulets here. I can reconcile both software packages. So now, at the time, in the market for personal accounting software, Microsoft money had 22% of the market share..

Microsoft Activision Blizzard Nobel Prize Intuit bob lotus IBM Andy
"microsoft" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

Telecom Reseller

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

"Method that wins a Genie. What about the ROI? The ROI is relatively similar. The pricing components tend to be a little bit more inexpensive from a monthly reoccurring standpoint on operator connect the one time fees and licensing costs seem to be a little bit higher than the record. And so it really just depends on the complexity of the solution overall. But the ROI seems to be a little bit better on operator connect and I think at the end of the day what customers are really looking for is how could I turn up the service rather quickly and operate or connect does deliver that somewhat faster than the workout? So does this open the door to other things too? It does. And that's one of the things that we like to provide to our customers again, going back to being a product company and being asked to actually a solution provider, we're all we're able to do with both direct routing and operator to connect this. We can add on different services. For example, contact center, with our partnership with 5 9 and then our CT cloud contact center, which powered by intermedia, we're able to provide those two within operator connect different things like working with emergency notifications with our partnership that we have with informer cast in case of any type of campus type of environments we could provide those emergency notifications pretty much to any platform. Obviously, Microsoft being one of them as well. And then different things like our CT cloud boost, which is our version of SD WAN. The fact that we're able to provide Microsoft Teams certified devices overall, even provide the Office 365 licensing the non voice component of it being a call tower is a CSP provider within the Microsoft stack going back to 2013 since the inception of the program. What it does is it really just helps drive that overall seamless integration for customers that they know they can come to one provider really for all of their UK students. You kind of get the one support the one implementation and get all these different thousand whistles added on that realistically become a necessary evil. I mean, different things even analog devices when you're looking at overhead paging. In fact, and build buzzers. Those are things that just become kind of normal in our world and it's something that Microsoft won't even have, but with call towering with leveraging some of the other platforms that we leverage our medicines for able to integrate that into the team's experience to really drive the full length solution. So this available now, it is available now. We've been putting customers on for the past few months for the past three or four months, which again is just the inception of the program over all the program was announced back in the April time frame, but customers really didn't start to come live right until the middle of September. So it's been about two and a half months or so or three months going on that we've been in customers on there and the good things that we've been putting substantial amount of customers on there, not just new, but also existing customers that we've been migrating over from their recording to operator connect. For one reason or another, but slowly but surely that's where the world is moving overall. So it is available now and where I think one of their top providers, it's not their top Microsoft provider in operative connections. So it sounds like there's been a lot of buzz about this since it was released. It does. And Microsoft with their latest conference at the head and a night in September, they made the big press release that we were headed to their operator connect providers, no pun intended or as an operator as were called. So there was a lot of backend work that had to go into that for several different months as far as testing, as far as making sure that the networks were correct. And one probably major change that a lot of customers don't realize is that when now you're dealing from a support standpoint, call tower being a gold pardon with Microsoft. We kind of have a different escalation path within Microsoft has things happen or if there has to be some investigation for our customers design. But in addition to that now with operator connect, you're kind of on a separate 14. And what that actually means is that you don't go, you're not talking to the same individual that's trying to fix your excel spreadsheet or your worksheet. If you have an issue, you're now going to specific group within Microsoft and is focusing on voice. So the lead times and the result times of cases and so forth that are open, especially with call towers influence on Microsoft seem to be resolved a lot quicker than what tradition was on the record, which I think is a big selling point or a big thing for customers to realize that they really like and leverage a company like call Tyra that could do that one. William where can we learn more? You can go to our website or a website is very informal. Just go just go to call tower dot com. We have a whole section on operator connect. We have a whole section on our ccas. Model section on Microsoft Teams. We're at about 6 thousand cities globally that we could provide the services, depending on the country we get port and most countries as well. We could also set up the emergency services and most of those countries as well. So just go to a call power dot com and you have a lot of good information there. And we have a couple of links there that you can actually contact and will put you in touch with one of our solution architects to answer any questions. Well, again, I want to thank you for joining me today giving us an update on call tower and also on operator connect for Microsoft Teams. This has been interesting. I hope we get to get a bit of an update on this and some other things in the early in the coming year, but for now, thanks very much. God, it's always a pleasure. I always love our conversation.

Microsoft ROI UK William
"microsoft" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"That's absolutely not what's happening. And the incredible thing is that this entire time Microsoft is paying a substantial dividend buying back tons of shares. It's almost like they can't create they can't get rid of the capital that they're creating fast enough. This is an amazing amazing business. That was going to be my last question before we move on is where do you think they go from here in terms of acquisitions? Because we and others were raising our eyebrows at the prospect of what did they pay for LinkedIn? 26 billion, something like that. Do you think there are large acquisitions in Microsoft's future? Or do you think that their capital allocation strategy looks more like what we've seen over the last couple of years? They absolutely have had a capital allocation strategy of build and buy. And I think that we will see that see that continuing, particularly in the areas of artificial intelligence and as bolt on since they really try and get into the metaverse through the Xbox platform and other places. I think by and large, Microsoft is more comfortable building, but they'll buy in a heartbeat if there are targets out there. The thing is, and maybe gone on unmentioned in your question is that as a $2.3 trillion company, it has to be a big company for them to buy to really move the needle. If you are one of those investors who feels bad about missing out on Robinhood's IPO in July, good news. I got some good news, 11% and basically treating where they were on day one. Third quarter revenue came in much lower than expected because crypto trading volume was much lower than expected. Down 78%. The revenues were down 78% quarter to quarter, which is a staggering loss. And these are highly profitable revenues for Robin Hood. So Robinhood to me is a company that is that is a bit of a mess. It is possible that it will work out and we have described it in the past as being a mutant company because it really did change. It changed the game for brokers everywhere. You know, a lot of these brokers were not going to move to free trading until until Robinhood came along and forced the issue. So it's absolutely a credible company, but they have massive regulatory risks facing them. They have massive. I don't even know how you would describe it. In fashion, in clothing, they call it fashion risk. I almost say you would say they have meme risk. They have meme risk at Robinhood. I mean, any type of risk off scenario and Robin Hood shares, I think are in big, big trouble. One of the things the company said was barring any change in the market environment, the headwinds that they're seeing right now are going to continue the rest of the year. I'm not trying to pick on them on a day when their stock is dropping more than 10%. But go ahead. Go ahead. Here's the question though..

Microsoft LinkedIn Robin Hood
"microsoft" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"It's Wednesday October 27th. Welcome to market foolery. I'm Chris hill with me today. Good to see you. Hey Chris, how are you? I'm doing well. I'm doing well. We got the latest from Twitter. We got the latest from Robin Hood. We are going to start though with big tech getting bigger. Microsoft's first quarter profits were higher than expected. Revenue grew 22%, which is the fastest growth since 2018. Shares of Microsoft up 5% and hitting a new all time high. 5% is a lot. 5% is a lot for any company, but we were doing the math. That's a $100 billion. Hundred $1 billion, just conjured out of thin air. Yeah, Microsoft, it's crazy how good this company good this company is operating right now. That is not just massive gains this quarter. That's 17 straight quarters of double digit revenue growth, and it's been accelerating. It's been getting faster and faster and faster. They are growing at a rate that the tiniest of startups would kill for. And it is a $45 billion revenue per order company right now and growing really, really quickly. Beat every estimate Azure is going great LinkedIn is going great this company is just firing. I know we talked about this on the show recently. There was the news about LinkedIn being shut down in China. Or I should say Microsoft saying we're shutting down our LinkedIn operations. We don't need to rehash all of the reasons why. But to me, the headline was less that they were doing that and more that Satya and Della came out. And said, yeah, LinkedIn is contributing more than $10 billion in revenue every year, which I think was, I know it was a surprise to me. I think it was a surprise to others as well. Yeah. You know, when Microsoft bought LinkedIn, it was one of those transactions where I think most of us said, I'm not sure that I really see how this fits into their suite. But once again, I don't think we were right about being skeptical about it. The results would suggest that they knew what they were talking about when they brought LinkedIn into the fold. Agree a 100%. I think the most generous of expectations at the time was, well, you've got all the money in the world, and you can buy that thing if you want to. That's right. And if it works out, it will take years. My memory of the time is like, well, yeah, I suppose that can work out. It's going to take years. I don't think anyone expected it to be contributing in this way on a relatively soon basis. In fact, Chris, there was a theory that was batted about perhaps by me, but by others as well that LinkedIn was being that was being acquired that Microsoft was taking it out so that they didn't have to compete with it in some way. You know, one of those things did you hear? Well, we're the deep pockets. This is something that is perhaps a threat to us. Let's just buy it. But that's not what's happened..

LinkedIn Microsoft Chris hill Robin Hood Chris Satya Twitter Della China
"microsoft" Discussed on Anything But Idle

Anything But Idle

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Anything But Idle

"So the goal here is to is to increase that level of productivity and what What i understand is that microsoft. While they're talking about the microsoft authenticated app is being the way in which you authenticate into it remember. This gets rid of the password. Altogether there is no password after this happens. So you're using either a one time You know a one time Password or time based password. Kind of thing And so. I'm curious as to whether or not they'll allow say google authenticate or some other Application for those purposes as well So we'll we'll see what happens but this will work on both your microsoft account as well as windows so you know I'm i'll i'll be curious. I know the article that we put in the show. Notes says that Other authenticated apps like google authenticate work But i'm presuming that over time. They're going to have to support them. They will open. I'm over although gustavo. I think that this is a great move toward what we need in the world which is to in as many places as possible. Get rid of passwords. There there really is and a great need And anyone who's interested. Look at the scroll project which is s. l. The school project. That steve gibson has put together. Look at these other options for basically getting rid of passwords generally so that authentication identity management across the web becomes something that is both trivial but also highly secure and we need to basically You know apply pressure on our software developers on our major technology companies and it takes us also. It behooves us as well to go win. And a set up these tools so that we don't have that that includes password managers like last pass on one password and daschle and otherwise that really gives us control over making highly secure passwords that we cannot recall and that the password managers themselves just basically inputting takes care of for us but also applies these secondary layers of security like a second factor multifaceted factor authentication perspective multi factor typically being a password plus location identification or location Biagio location plus a one time password or time based password perspective so all of these things together allows us to be able to protect ourselves from malware hackers and whatnot but ultimately i think we need to go closer toward this perspective of just getting rid of the password altogether the password is a relic of the past and we need to have some other mechanism for verifying that we are who we say we are and going from there..

microsoft google gustavo steve gibson daschle
"microsoft" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"I'm yes exactly. And i mean i think that ties in so well with what peter does the work he works on because it is research it's incubation is about innovation and you're going to have those things worker that don't but if you weren't willing to try you weren't willing to fail. Think about all the things that we wouldn't have accomplished in this are yeah. He made this really good point as well at this anecdote which geoffrey hinton and the researchers that early in his tenure at microsoft were showing him where showing him. The new deep. Neural networks stuff for doing speech recognition. And you know it's another aspect of this sort of failure mindset like watching people do something that is against the norm then is unusual and near and sort of saying look. These are really smart. people. I'm going to trust them to let them potentially fail in the attempt at something interesting verses like oh i'm going to protect them from failure by shutting this down now like that is a very hard thing to do and it is. It can have catastrophic consequences for all of us. Just curtailing. These interesting new avenues of exploration. Yeah exactly i mean. I'm so glad that because of who he is he was able to let them do that. Because about the innovation in all the massive changes in the neural nets and in the speech recognition that we might not. Have you know if if they hadn't take those chances. So i love that so great. Yeah okay that's our show for today. You can send us an email anytime at behind. The tack at microsoft dot com. We'd really like to hear from you. Thanks for listening and stay safe out there next time..

geoffrey hinton peter microsoft
"microsoft" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Find a way to overcome it and you find out that you emerge as a better person for yeah. I had a boss a while ago. Who was running a part of a business that was responsible for just enormous amounts of money and so whenever you made an engineering mistake. In this part of the business it wasn't reputational loss. Or you know like your pride was wounded because something went down and then you had a tough time debugging it now like failures in the things that he was responsible for the meter started running on the dollars that were going out of the door and he invariably we made mistakes. It's impossible not to make mistakes. When you're building complex systems. He would be very calm and collected. Never made anyone feel bad about you. Know this colossal amount of money. That was You know just just being lost and yeah. He would patiently guide everyone through the crisis. And then you know at the end of it. Ask us like okay. What did we learn from this. It's like the real tragedy here would be to have experienced. This man not have learned anything at all like we let this crisis. Go to waste your reminding me. Also there's another way to fail. You know one way to fail is to make mistakes but another way is to be wrong about an idea. I think one of by most recent examples. That really can stop me. Dead my tracks. I joined microsoft. Research in two thousand ten in joined and i was doing a review of bunch of projects in there was one project that was in the speech recognition group at microsoft research. And you know in two thousand ten. Everybody knew that the way to do speech..

microsoft
"microsoft" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Find your ports Be able to grab those cables with with things like a lanyard tab for pulling out the kick stand This is all to make microsoft products more accessible coming later. This year They didn't they didn't talk about a price so i don't know if they'll just be given this out when you purchase something as an extra or what. The deal is But another innovative idea for making things more accessible by saying here let let let's actually take the device that buying from us and give you some ways to improve its accessibility. I'm curious people. I and i know you're out there The people who might make use of this is this attractive. Is this like yeah yeah no. This is something. I've wanted or not let us know feedback daily tech new show dot com in deed. Yeah this is instead of the Hey you need fewer cables than ever and everyone's like well but we wanted more ports type thing. Microsoft is like you're going to have lots of cables you can have watched reports. We want to help you. Identify all these things. That's that's helpful. And i love the concept of reaching behind. A computer of any kind and knowing intuitively because what i'm touching even though i'm not the target of a blind person trying to do this but knowing that oh well that's the that's my external drive cable. Because i know that because the way i'm touching it like that's really helpful when you're trying to move things around and do it in a quick way and maybe on the air even like shows we're doing and we want to quickly identify cable out. You got to do something a little bit. Well you might also love This new report coming out of nature..

Microsoft
"microsoft" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Risky Business

"And i think ultimately every chief security officer works with a chief financial officer and sometimes even a ceo who knows and might have extremely good relationship with microsoft so when it comes to demonstrating the return on investment you look at that five investment at. Oh we we're doing a bunch of things that are in that bucket. There's a bunch of their power. Bi we can take advantage of. Why don't you go look at that. Wouldn't replace nine or ten or fifteen tools. You're getting from other vendors like us. Crowd striker octa. It really is a compelling pitch at that level so at the level of the powerpoint. That's going to the cfo that's going to. Maybe even the ceo because of the size of the investment required that is something that every security leader has to grapple with to at least some extent with very very minor exception of those that have no microsoft products and for them. We are all very jealous. Okay devil's advocate for a moment. I mean you're talking about microsoft in that case for very much from the perspective of how they your problem right but like if you're the sea so like why is that a problem when you've got a suite of products available to you from the one technology provide You sign that big purchase order. And then you've essentially got a catalog of all of microsoft's offerings. You can mix and match them and whatever. So you know devil's advocate here. What's the problem with that. I would say the problem is relatively simple. And that is that some of the products. Don't work very well. I mean there is that right some areas and that's the and that's even before you continue. That is one of the issues with five right. Like say they've got they've done really well on endpoint right like all reports defender has become quite good right and the solution is quite good but then you get into some of these like more niche edge case kind of products and they don't really not very good. Yeah exactly and i would give a shout out to sentinel sentinels very good. I've seen a lot of people have some good results there. And especially when you're using it with defendant right so yeah no absolutely absolutely and a lot of that does represent progress when it comes though to just really officer. Sixty five and eighty azure so much of that has already been compromised by threat actors. They use it as their own infrastructure. At this point. I mean we published research recently fifty nine point. Eight million militias messages sent from microsoft gateways to our customers in just the last year of at. That's a shocking amount. There's millions of compromise accounts at any given point in time. So those are maybe debatably edge cases. Those are not the core things that works on. it's not office xbox or windows. But they're still big. I mean they do have a problem with a lot of compromised accounts..

microsoft
"microsoft" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

Unofficial Partner Podcast

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

"We're we're seeing the trend of rightsholders holding back more of their rights and bringing their content direct to their fan base. And so what. We're really focusing on doing his as they venture into that space. It's around helping them. With foundational technology that they can use to create the best most innovative most personalized offerings directly. So it's it's a slight nuance to what you asked at less about us. The distribution channel. I know that's not the case for for other tech companies. But in the case microsoft it's more about enabling the sports properties as they take hold of their own rights and distribute directly to their families. Interesting and spool can be of global is also can be very local and monitoring when you're looking across your portfolio this y'all can see their american and there there are beats around the world in terms of how you approach it. But how do you view. They view it as this one department covering sport for the whole world or all. You more localized than that. Weird predominantly managing our sports partnership from our corporate offices but working closely with some of our teams around the world in manifesting in activating. Because you're exactly right for is both hyper local as well as incredibly global and so you wanna make sure that when when when connecting with the sports property you can hit on both levels with them so it is a bit of a combination to it and it actually leads to cap portfolio approach that we actually take when it comes to developing our sports partnerships. We all know. There's a finite set of resources. And so how can we create the most effective and efficient portfolio of sports partnerships and oftentimes audiences one of those first pillars that we look at when we're trying to build the portfolio. It's what is the audience of the sports property. How does that index against our core audiences that were trying to communicate with so that's definitely the audience pillar and market obviously plays a big factor in that the second one is on the technology is we've spoken about. There's so many different scenarios in solutions that we would love to showcase across the sports industry. So we look at. How innovative is the the scenario or solution that we're talking about with that property..

microsoft
"microsoft" Discussed on Future of Agriculture

Future of Agriculture

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"microsoft" Discussed on Future of Agriculture

"And there's a gap in this intelligence narping affordable most famous white because acknowledges didn't exist so that's what led to the start of this project back. Twenty fourteen is when the first mammal that this is what we should be bidding at microsoft okay and so that was gonna be my next question. So is that how it works in microsoft at least in your role if you stumbled upon something that you viewed as an opportunity You could write a memo and then if kind of given permission pursuade is that right. Yes the different teams. Within microsoft's microsoft has been rebuilt products designed teenagers microsoft as people who are in the sales business or i was part of microsoft research back then even now backing by subject search might selfie so as a few hundred. Phd's looking in. Bbc has a computer science and electrical engineering and Some of the workday is curiosity has vote. In addition to some of the work is molded bond street impact products be the also. Think of things that are much ahead in the future so at research when it was established it was set with three goals. The goal was to advance the state of the art in computer science. The second was to make sure that any of these are stuck. We do ships as part of microsoft products and the third was the bill gates at put it back then was to make sure microsoft has a future towards that goal is five years they start this longer term project which might or might not work out by something which microsoft might not be doing right now but should be doing in the future so they can do thousand in five one of the projects in stock. It was on. tv white spaces. I started working back in two thousand ten. They started working battery sets. Two thousand. fifteen is a started..

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