8 Burst results for "Mickey Katz"

"mickey katz" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

07:42 min | 2 months ago

"mickey katz" Discussed on Unorthodox

"All day just while you got the article to learn it reaching all the teaching I've been helping my father know about bourbon Nell was a 15th century finance minister to Queen Isabella of Spain. And instead of Barbara and we had a bar banal. So schlock rock, by the way, I named it schlock, because schlock and yiddish mean second hand or almost like junk. It's a derogatory name. And this was secondhand rock. I was taking rock songs, making them secondhand changing the words. Now, believe it or not, I was actually following other parody artists, some of them in the secular field like "Weird Al" Yankovic Tom lehrer, Alan Sherman, and some of them in the Jewish field, the rejects and country usi and the steeple hoppers. I don't know if you're familiar with any of those guys. But those guys were before me. And of course, the first one was Mickey Katz. Mickey Katz from the vaudeville days. What would happen to be Joel Grey's father and Jennifer Grey's grandfather. So Mickey Katz was a big yiddish parody artist just to FYI. Anyway, so 86 comes and I have now 11 song parodies and I decide. You know what? Let's go into the studio and make an album. So I get my Friends together. We didn't really have any money. I used $6000 of my own money and I borrowed money from my father and my uncle, my music teacher, and I go into the studio and the studio was 39th street music, which was where Ashford and Simpson, the solid as a rock, Chaka Khan, the song came out. It was a regular top of the line, music studio in 1986, 85, 86. So they say to me, it's a $180 an hour. And I say, I don't have a $180 an hour. They say, well, you could work from midnight to 8 a.m. for $60 an hour. And we will give you an engineer and assistant engineer and a slave, a slave. Yeah, I said, what's a slave? They said the slave you send out for coffee at four in the morning. So I said, okay, I'm there. And we did this album learning is good. Schlock rock learning is good. I put it out on cassette only. We didn't records were already gone. So I put that put up this album and three months later, it starts to catch on. And I get this letter from a lady in Florida. My brother hates Judaism and he's listening to your cassette around the clock, keep up the good work. And then another letter like that. And then I got a letter dear mister Solomon. If the barbanel would know what you did to his name, he'd be rolling in his grave. The good Jews hated you and the bad Jews loved you, basically. Yes, in the beginning, the rabbis would come up to me and say, what is this? What are you doing? I said, this is fun. It's rock and roll. It's Jewish, it's educational, but I didn't really know what I was doing to be honest. What I was doing was I was just following my gut, which is what this whole career is, which I never, I never anticipated in a million years that I would become a Jewish rock and roller. I actually have a degree in accounting, and I worked as an accountant from 82 to 85. Now, in 85, I left the county, and I went into music full-time, and I become the music director of the Jewish public school youth organization, which has public schools where you go in and you sing songs and they're expecting to hear having a Gila, and I go in and I play born in the USA, now I'm making a two day I had all these songs I had original songs that I had parodies and that's what I use this curriculum schlock rock. I used it as curriculum. I did a hundred shows in the public schools and by 88 after the third or fourth album, I was starting to get calls for concerts. And from 88 to 96, I did a hundred shows a year all over the world. Do you miss accounting? Well, I still do a counting for myself. Like I do my own books. Believe it or not, accounting and music have synchronicity. The math and music are on the same level and I enjoy math. I enjoy the concept of balancing out getting to a zero balance, but no, I don't, I would never have wanted to do it for my whole life, which is why, after one year of doing accounting, I already had a midlife crisis and I'm a huge weird Al fan. I think he's probably American Mozart. I think he's probably one of the greatest musical geniuses we have. It seems to me however, like there's a certain kind of inherent disrespect paid to it rather inflicted upon musicians who use humor in their work because somehow we got into this groove of thinking that if you're really, really funny, if you tell jokes, if you do parodies, you're not a serious musicians. You're not rock and roll, man. And it seems to me like our kind of getting it a little bit backwards. Where do you stand in this issue? Do you agree? Well, first thing is, I think that weird Al is a genius. I mean, that guy, the lyrics that he has written. And the way he writes it and the way he parodies a song. It's incomparable. That's what I shoot for when I'm writing a parody. I write to be as witty as him. By the way, insane that he's not Jewish. Let's talk about that. Not a drop of Jewish blood in him. Unbelievable. You know, but he is a genius. And yes, he's disrespected that the whole parody industry is disrespected as a gimmick. You know, it's like a gimmick. And it's a shame. It's a shame. I think because it's shtick. You know, there's a lot of shtick to this. Like, for instance, there's a band out there called guns and carrots. You know, whenever you hear a very, very clever name, which is a take off on something else. You think, I'll give it, gimmick gimmick. So that's that's what it is. It'll never change, but I have given a lot of people many, many hours of enjoyment. That's for sure. So when you are coming up as a Paradise and as a full-time musician, when you finally made the transition left behind your beloved accounting world, you know, initially you were getting pushed back from some rabbis from people who thought this was heretical and wrong. My sense is now that any OU and CSI modern orthodox camp is excited to have you. That that is all gone. Am I wrong about that? Are there so people who feel like this turns kids away from the true path to put some on a different Derek than just true piety? I mean, where are those lines drawn now? Who still doesn't like you? The rabbis eventually came around that took them around three or four albums. And when they came around and put their stamp of approval on it, what do you think happened? My age group dropped dramatically. Like all of a sudden, instead of playing the high school kids, I'm looking in the audience and I'm seeing 7 year old kids, 8 year old kids, 5 year old kids, four year old kids. And I'm thinking to myself, my lyrics are getting more and more complex. And my age group is dropping. And I thought to myself, can you believe this? And it was only one explanation. The explanation is that the rabbis put this down. You had the hex check. Yes. But I didn't. I didn't get the heckscher from the really right wing people. And as far as NCS Y goes, and I love them, they don't really hire me so much. You.

Mickey Katz bourbon Nell Alan Sherman mister Solomon barbanel Queen Isabella Joel Grey Tom lehrer Jennifer Grey Jewish public school youth org Chaka Khan Al fan Ashford Barbara Spain Simpson Florida
"mickey katz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:15 min | 3 years ago

"mickey katz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That about a man like him nothing about a man like him nothing about him that one of the things up every six months takes me six months to write one line sometimes like pick each word individually that's one I wasn't talking he wasn't we are will be on the set I'm talking to to Donald Sutherland you know is an imposing figure for Philip Kaufman was guiding us and I remember us improvising a little bit that wasn't exactly in there I wasn't even talking to was I'm not talking about a man like him very bad kid I think I put some of that stuff in there and that part and the way I'm sort of half hopefully you know unrecognized unacknowledged you know those I knew some about that I saw Donald Sutherland in a movie called Joanna look that up you won't know that movie was a British little arch offering I think was it maybe his first thing and so I did this movie with them and then I saw a mash of course and then did the Altman film part of the Altman six family a little little bit do having done those couple of movies and then so by the time I did this is seventy eight I said yes Donald forecaster and I I don't think I ever told you the story Donald about seeing you in Joanna an ad cetera etcetera you know so the trees and was I've been pretty pretty little case I think that at this point in your career I'm going to stipulate that you have reached iconic status and you know being an icon is partly about you know you're here Kerr extraordinary guests you know your your juried art that you've created it's also in a way that could be difficult about like you know icons are simplified and I wonder but I got I wonder what that's like for you as somebody who is an actual human being well you know I don't take too seriously it's all coming going everything is fleeting and you know so six through this too shall pass away we need good too upset about one thing or another but this is all a lucky occurrence and I'm in a cycle of current attention of a you know from one place or another but and I know what you mean and I've always you know ostensibly my posture has been and still is that I want to do a variety of parts and and be able to break out be creative and and and do all sorts of things but it's also true I don't feel and the the the the headline here the upshot is that I don't feel any particular did tension or difficulty or burden by any of what I think you're referring to and part of that may be because the stuff that people seem to enjoy our that's become you know repeated or whatever you you call it has come out of might nothing that's been calculated or has been been designed to make an impression or to create some kind of cartoon figure or you know sketch of myself but it's it's come out of something that I might call authentic we have five not breaking my good armed in order to Pat myself on the back to see outrageously because I'm not really the I'm just saying that I'm enjoying myself and that I do stuff like this that because of that I think is something that people seem to enjoy and I do other stuff in this vein where I sort of you know along with an incomplete pre and just sort of under unload upload the the extent of my pleasure of you know is being you know doing whatever I do whether it's playing music because there's a lot of good aspects that playing music which I like and playing with people I do have a genuine I guess it comes from that original mais durch technology to some of my animation comes from just letting myself alone really at least that's what I've tried to do but I think I've you know I've I've done it to one extent or another and and put my and got interested in other people sometimes or something outside myself and then there I go and I'd gives rise to whatever I seem to be doing in an on calculated way so whatever comes out of it is kind of this okay with me it doesn't seem false or not part of me or not having come out of me and what do I care anyway even if it's not even if it puts me in a corner I say nobody puts baby in a corner and what movies that from yeah it's from dirty dancing exactly exactly thirty days only recently learned that that that I had never seen dirty dancing until about two years ago I have no idea that was a reference to a character whose name is baby Jeff yeah Joe every not on a surprise Jennifer grey yeah that's right you know Joe agrees father was way who is Joe grey's father Joe grey's father Jennifer great grandfather was Mickey Katz you may get a kick out of looking up for some of your listeners may get a kick out of looking up Mickey Katz we had a record when we were kids cats puts on the dog and it was all his novelty songs that he would saying that are delightful for one reason or another and every time I run into the few times I've run into Joel grey we sing them to each other yeah Mickey Katz well we're we're far off the course and I've already taken up too much of your time so all Jeff Goldblum thank you so much for taking the time to be on bulls eye it was so so nice to get to talk to you I can't thank you enough and so nice to talk to you I call this show the area entertainment for the young one we used to call it to the sound of young America sound of young America bull's-eye bull's-eye and bulls eye we hit the bull's eye or we went far.

six months thirty days two years
"mickey katz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:25 min | 3 years ago

"mickey katz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At nine eight central on PBS this is fresh air and if you're just joining us we're talking about the ongoing Yiddish production of fiddler on the roof in New York my guesser Joel grey who directed it he also as you know is most famous for starring in the original Broadway production and the movie of cabaret and also with us is Steven sky bell who stars in this production as to have yeah and there's a cast recording that will be released soon I'd like to hear a little bit about your family stories to the extent that you know what of how and when they came to the United States Mike my grandparents came separately and met in Cleveland Ohio and I said to my grandmother who never really learn to speak English very well I said what year was it that you came she says was given I get AC Schnee she said there was a big snow that's how she remembered when she came by yourself on the boat you think how hard please how scary and then they they found each other in she came to be with her cousin and she met my grandpa and they had five daughters and I'm Mary Kay they found a managed care and they were safe they were killed and then your father Mickey Katz he spoke Yiddish an English and he was a performer he sang with spike Jones's band and then he started his own band and sang sung parity's that were part English part Yiddish and you won the wilds of the land sea street home of get filled the vision kosher meat and it with the knife hairs on C. he flicked him a check noon then he was only three of a of a truck and so we took the most American hero and may diminish hello that was the theme for the Davey Crockett TV show or that did he did the other party version so right so it so your father knew Yiddish and you sign with him so you could sing the energy but apparently you didn't necessarily know what the words meant no I didn't know what I was talking about much man I certainly couldn't speak it right fortunately I wish I had never too late well here I am right you know I'm in the middle of it so Stephen what do you know about how your family came to the US and where do they well on yes my father's father came from a small town in north east Poland called through Volsky and it it it was before the first World War it was they they all of his brothers came over one of the time to avoid conscription into the army they were just apparently pulling into our US history that's right and so my grandfather came over when he was sixteen again it's like can I cannot even imagine getting on a boat when you're sixteen and going you know maybe he thought it was a bit of a an adventure but it has to have been more than that anyway he met my my grandmother who was that lived in Chickasha Oklahoma she had a kosher she was the daughter of sort of the towns elected rabbi he really wasn't a rabbi but everybody went to him for decision making and they kept kosher in Chickasha Oklahoma and she somehow met my grandfather and when my great grandfather her father met my grandfather he didn't believe that he was Jewish because he didn't have a beard and so he shoved a Yiddish newspaper in his face and said read that and my grandfather dead and thankfully he did because that's why I'm here on my mother's side of the family was a little more city dwelling from Warsaw Poland and so they came to Chicago and I don't know much more about that except I do know that some of my grandfather my father's father's family might and uncle Sydney and regain a did not come over early and they ended up in a work camp in Siberia and then they came later and so and their children actually saw our fiddler on the roof and I was very touched that they that they came and saw it but there they were the closest to the Holocaust for me but they it was a success story in that they made it over one of the most famous songs from fiddler on the roof the sunrise sunset which is a song that has been sung at countless Jewish weddings for generations and I I took children Harnick this I really so strongly disliked the song for so many years because my parents were among the parents who played the cast album over and over and over and they were songs that just sounded so like schmaltzy to me and then when I started to really understand more about music and about lyric writing and about bahkan Harnick the composers of the score and how great and varied their shows you are yeah and it yeah and meaningful I realize like what a beautiful song that is and there's like jazz versions of the song you know instrumental jazz versions so I want to play the Yiddish version from the show and it can Stephen I'm going to ask you for what you thought about when you were recording this well I mean the thing that's interesting to me is that it's it's about the wedding cycles wedding but they chose to let it be voice through the parents of mostly the parents point of view which is a and it's about the passage of time is that the little girl that's the little girl how did the how to time pass like that and to me that's that's just so beautiful that that should be the musical ice moment is that life fleets by and the children become the adults and it's it's just laced with laughter and tears and so I I mean that that is not musical theater you don't recognize that kind of utterances a musical theater utterance but it's it is very meaningful and so much about loss yeah Stephen I'm gonna ask you sing a few of the lines in English for people who don't know the English version of the song and then we'll hear you can is this a little girl I can read is this the little boy at play I don't remember growing older when did the day beautiful let's hear the Yiddish version and the actress who plays your wife in it is singing with you and Jennifer Bobby Hauck yeah so here we go.

New York Joel grey
"mickey katz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:07 min | 3 years ago

"mickey katz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Concludes tonight at nine eight central on PBS this is fresh air and if you're just joining us we're talking about the ongoing Yiddish production of fiddler on the roof in New York my guesser Joel grey who directed it he also as you know is most famous for starring in the original Broadway production and the movie of cabaret and also with us is Steven sky bell who stars in this production as to have yeah and there's a cast recording that will be released soon I'd like to hear a little bit about your family stories to the extent that you know what of how and when they came to the United States Mike my grandparents came separately and met in Cleveland Ohio and I said to my grandmother who never really learn to speak English very well I said what year was it that you came she says was given that I get AC Schnee she said there was a big snow that's how she remembered she came by yourself on the boat you think how hard please how scary and then they they found each other in she came to be with her cousin and she met my grandpa and they had five daughters and I'm Mary Kay they found a managed care and they were safe they were killed and then your father Mickey Katz he spoke Yiddish an English and he was a performer he sang with spike Jones's band and then he started his own band and sang sung parity's that were part English part Yiddish and you sign with the wilds of the lands seas street home of get filled the vision kosher me and it with the knife hairs on C. he flicked him a check groomed and he was only three dove is tracking so we took the most American hero and may diminish hello that was the theme for the Davey Crockett TV show or that that he did that the others parity version so it so your father knew yet ash and you sign with him so you could sing at issue but apparently you didn't necessarily know what the words meant no I didn't know what I was talking about much and I certainly couldn't speak it unfortunately I wish I had never too late well here I am right you know I'm in the middle of it so Stephen what do you know about how your family came to the US and where did they welcome yes my father's father came from a small town in north east Poland called sue Volsky and it it it was before the first World War it was they they all of his brothers came over one of the time to avoid conscription into the army they were just apparently pulling into our **** that's right and so my grandfather came over when he was sixteen again it's like can you I cannot even imagine getting on a boat when you're sixteen and going you know maybe he thought it was a bit of a an adventure but I it has to have been more than that anyway he met my my grandmother who was that lived in Chickasha Oklahoma she had a kosher she was the daughter of sort of the towns elected rabbi he really wasn't a rabbi but everybody went to him for decision making and they kept kosher in Chickasha Oklahoma and she somehow met my grandfather and when my great grandfather her father met my grandfather he didn't believe that he was Jewish because he didn't have a beard and so he shoved a Yiddish newspaper in his face and said read that and my grandfather dead and thankfully he did because that's why I'm here my mother's side of the family was a little more city dwelling from Warsaw Poland and so they came to Chicago and I don't know much more about that except I do know that some of my grandfather my father's father's family might and uncle Sydney and regain a did not come over early and they ended up in a work camp in Siberia and then they came later and so and their children actually saw our fiddler on the roof and I was very touched that they that they came and saw it but there they were the closest to the Holocaust for me but they it was a success story in that they made it over one of the most famous songs from fiddler on the roof the sunrise sunset which is a song that has been sung at countless Jewish weddings for generations and I I have I took children Harnick this I really so strongly disliked the song yeah for so many years because my parents were among the parents who played the cast album over and over and over and over songs that just sounded so like schmaltzy to me and then when I started to really understand more about music and about lyric writing and about bahkan Harnick the composers of the score and how great and varied their shows either yeah and it yeah and meaningful I realize like what a beautiful song that is and there's like jazz versions of the song you know instrumental jazz versions so I want to play the Yiddish version from the show and it can Stephen I'm going to ask you for what you thought about when you were recording this well I mean the thing that's interesting to me is that it's it's about the wedding cycles wedding but they chose to let it be voice through the parents of mostly the parents point of view which is it and it's about the passage of time is that the little girl that's the little girl how did the how to time pass like that and to me that's that's just so beautiful that that should be the musical lysed moment is that life fleet by and the children become the adults and it's it's just laced with laughter and tears and so I I mean that that is not musical theater you don't recognize that kind of utterances a musical theater utterance but it's it is very meaningful and so much about loss yeah Stephen I'm gonna ask you sing a few of the lines in English for people who don't know the English version of the song and then we'll hear you can is this a little girl I can read is this the little boy at play I don't remember growing older land did today beautiful let's hear the Yiddish version and the actress who plays your wife in it is singing with you and Jennifer Bobby Hauck yeah so here we go my name the as beautiful joke ray did you give any directions for how you want to that song yes.

New York Joel grey
"mickey katz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:04 min | 3 years ago

"mickey katz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The moon concludes tonight at nine eight central on PBS this is fresh air and if you're just joining us we're talking about the ongoing Yiddish production of fiddler on the roof in New York my guesser Joel grey who directed it he also as you know is most famous for starring in the original Broadway production and the movie of cabaret and also with us is Steven sky bell who stars in this production as to have yeah and there's a cast recording that will be released soon I'd like to hear a little bit about your family stories to the extent that you know what of how and when they came to the United States Mike my grandparents came separately and met in Cleveland Ohio and I said to my grandmother who never really learn to speak English very well I said what year was it that you came she says was given I get AC Schnee she said there was a big snow that's how she remembered when she came by yourself on the boat you think how hard please how scary and then they they found each other in she came to be with her cousin and she met my grandpa and they had five daughters and I'm Mary Kay they found a managed care and they were safe they were killed and then your father Mickey Katz he spoke Yiddish an English and he was a performer he sang with spike Jones's band and then he started his own band and sang sung parity's that were part in large part Yiddish and you sign with the wilds of the land sea street home of get filled the vision kosher meat and it with a knife fo hairs on C. he flicked him a check wound and he was only three dove it so we took the most American hero and may diminish hello that was the theme for the Davey Crockett TV show or that did he did the others parity version so right so it so your father knew Yiddish and you sign with him so you could sing at issue but apparently you didn't necessarily know what the words meant no I didn't know what I was talking about much man I certainly couldn't speak it unfortunately I wish I had never too late well here I am right you know I'm in the middle of it so Stephen what do you know about how your family came to the US and where did they welcome yes my father's father came from a small town in north east Poland called through Volsky and it it it was before the first World War it was they they all of his brothers came over one at a time to avoid conscription into the army they were just apparently pulling into our **** three that's right and so my grandfather came over when he was sixteen again it's like can you I cannot even imagine getting on a boat when you're sixteen and going you know maybe he thought it was a bit of a an adventure but it has to have been more than that anyway he met my my grandmother who was that lived in Chickasha Oklahoma she had a kosher she was the daughter of sort of the towns elected rabbi he really wasn't a rabbi but everybody went to him for decision making and they kept kosher in Chickasha Oklahoma and she somehow met my grandfather and when my great grandfather her father met my grandfather he didn't believe that he was Jewish because he didn't have a beard and so he shoved a Yiddish newspaper in his face and said read that and my grandfather did and thankfully he did because that's why I'm here on my mother's side of the family was a little more city dwelling from Warsaw Poland and so they came to Chicago and I don't know much more about that except I do know that some of my grandfather my father's father's family might and uncle Sydney and regain our did not come over early and they ended up in a work camp in Siberia and then they came later and so and their children actually saw our fiddler on the roof and I was very touched that they that they came and saw it but there they were the closest to the Holocaust for me but they it was a success story in that they made it over one of the most famous songs from fiddler on the roof the sunrise sunset which is a song that has been sung at countless Jewish weddings for generations and I I took children Harnick this I really so strongly disliked the song for so many years because my parents were among the parents who play the cast album over and over and over and over songs that just sounded so like schmaltzy to me and then when I started to really understand more about music and about lyric writing and about bahkan Harnick the composers of the score and how great and varied their shows G. R. yeah and it yeah and meaningful I realize like what a beautiful song that is and there's like jazz versions of the song you know instrumental jazz versions so I want to play the Yiddish version from the show and it can Stephen I'm gonna ask you for what you thought about when you were recording this well I mean the thing that's interesting to me is that it's it's about the wedding cycles wedding but they chose to let it be voice through the parents of mostly the parents point of view which is a and it's about the passage of time is that the little girl that's the little girl how did the how to time pass like that and to me that's that's just so beautiful that that should be the musical lysed moment is that life leads by and the children become the adults and it's it's just laced with laughter and tears and so I I mean that that is not musical theater you don't recognize that kind of utterances a musical theater utterance but it's it is very meaningful and so much about loss yeah Stephen I'm gonna ask you sing a few of the lines in English who don't know the English version of the song and then we'll hear you can is this a little girl I can read is this the little boy at play I don't remember growing older when did the day beautiful let's hear the Yiddish version and the actress who plays your wife in it is singing with you and Jennifer Bobby Hauck yeah so here we go the hosts mine made the and the this as beautiful joke ray did you give any directions for how you want to that song to.

New York Joel grey
"mickey katz" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"mickey katz" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"Sure. But it rhymes with an it's to the tune of you know, green sleeves always doing elva. Funny thing because it's like, you know, there were always Jewish comics. God knows said like Marx brothers Benny burns Berle everybody. But the idea of someone just way you go that guy is a Jew like the others could have been anything. That's right. But it's like he came out, and it looked like some, you know, Jewish account owned it when Vicky cats, I really, yeah. Doing this doing it before he ever Mickey Katz was a clown. Yes. And Alan Sharon is a satirist. Although I Truman has one of my favorite singing voices like famously. He can't sing. It's great. But it's like a great. It's a great voice. But he he he he was doing something even Nichols. And may we're doing great funny stuff. And you knew if you're Jewish you know, that you know, that mother character is sort of but they weren't used. Zing or Jewish names. You know, he was just like. It was just as a maze. Ing American folk and British and European folk music, but we're now we're gonna take it, and we're gonna put Matsu balls in it. Yeah. And. Sheila. By zelda. She took body and ran Taylor took me years. Now, I'm listening to stuff at the age of ten I'm not even Jewish. So I don't get the the cultural reference. See that's the other thing. Belafonte the same who taught us who played that for us. Also, would we would all saying out of the fire sign book of folksongs, which was this kind of at the time kind of famous compendium of folk songs from around the world. So I know all these folk songs and some of them were the ones that Sherman took. So when I heard, you know, he was he was tramping through the warehouse where the drapes stored. Yes that was like. The best word play. I've ever heard great. So then again, there's a gold standard. He's a good writer too. Yeah. Because it's not easy to do that. I remember the songs on that album. No. It's not it's not easy. And and coming up with the idea of, you know. He aimed in any fired with his he he took careful aim with his trustee revolver that edited Edita I shot and he crumpled just like a piece Halbe. What you have to have firing to go there. I remember it little David SaaS kind. Please shut up. Please don't talk. Please talk me first. Then you talk. And that's that's not clever. Just perfect cadence of Jewish guy saying please shut up, you know, great. And the new said the cultural references to the time. I mean, Jackie Kennedy joke which just go over this Jackie Kennedy joke in my zone. How this no it's in downturn. As this one looks. It's it's address a that's it. See how this looks on me. Just like Jackie Kennedy and just your with the audience house. Go wild. Even like, and then you just expre- she ate, it's great comedies wrong with us that this is what you we were listening to when you were six, and I was. That's right in that time period was like they do the top five shown of the week. And they'd be like the Rolling Stones. And then they'd be Barbra Streisand. Fob Dylan and Frank Sinatra and in the in that would be Allan Sherman. Right. Sure. Sure. I think Ray Stevens doing doing a parody song or Umer song. I mean, I guess the first big Allan Sherman. Hit was Hello Mata Hella fodder. Yeah. Or maybe it was Sarah Jackman because there is there's a there's a story that that one they used to every now and then in the Kennedy in the in in Camelot, you know, you'd hear John Kennedy walking down the hall singing, Sarah Jackman now or something like that. How's your cousin Doris? She's with more feasible your Morris. He's nice to. If you have just to your listeners, just just go online, you got this thing, you got this computer now where you can just hear anything you want. Go to listen to Allan Sherman. It's it's the absolute some of the best stuff ever. And everyone agrees alley yankovic agrees talking about. Yeah. I mean, all of us who write funny songs. I mean, I write all kinds of songs, but funny songs are the hardest to right? That's that's one of the kings of it. And you do love play on words in your in your songwriting, which I which I appreciate thank you..

Allan Sherman Jackie Kennedy Mickey Katz Vicky Barbra Streisand Alan Sharon Truman John Kennedy Marx alley yankovic Nichols Belafonte Sheila Rolling Stones Berle Benny burns Doris David Taylor Ray Stevens
"mickey katz" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

07:01 min | 3 years ago

"mickey katz" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"He want to protect your children. She's done. Very well. She has she's got a beautiful daughter who sixteen and her husband's terrific, actor and director Clark, Gregg. Yes, sure. We just talking about him. Yep. Yeah. Colson? Yes. Did he write what lies beneath? Yes. I like that picture. Me too. Very good scared. The shit out of me too. Very sorry. I was alone. Yes. People know Clark, Greg Colson from from the vendors movies, I guess most popular, but he's also a writer director to to to be reckoned with you know, he's on shield agents of Sherry we-. Yeah. Someone to be reckoned with these great director. Yes, talented family. What else you got for this, man? He's gotta go. He's got stuff to do pictures to take a have to go to the museum of Jewish heritage. Give give us one more plug for four fiddler. It's coming to stage forty forty-two guess in February which used to be the little Shubert. Okay. February nineteenth. I think February eleventh is maybe the first preview have eleventh. Okay. Okay. So we're going to tell everybody to go. If you're in the tri-state area. Now, you gotta see it. We'll we'll we're going to see you should see it downtown. Okay. Not this production this production production. Yeah. Okay. The same beep. I will buy a ticket right after we get off the mic, sir. I think we can arrange for you to come. The publicist is waving not sold out. However, oh, I knew somebody. Now, I heard that it's also translated. Yes, they have the super titles in Russian and English. I actually everybody knows. Oh, they. Yeah. Everyone knows the word. So ready yet, they know that story, and it's. I find the the non Jewish audience finds their own ancestry. Interesting in what we're putting up there and our. Mesmerized by it and timely or the never. Yeah. As you. Yes. With all the Michigan. Today. Just looking at it today at Mexico and the anti-immigrant sentiment, and it's just rent your your grandmother came from Russia. And how did they end up in in Ohio? She had a cousin everybody had some by. Yeah. That came first. Yeah. And my grandmother never learned to speak English, and one of my favorite things is she used to drive a truck. In cleveland. And I said, grandma, how did you get a license? I gave demand a couple books. All right. We're going to tell everybody I'm Gilbert. And I are going to go see at first, but everybody needs to see fiddler on the roof in Yiddish directed by the great, Joel grey. I perk for personal reasons I want people to see men on a swing and buffalo Bill and the Indians and that night gallery episode, which is also which is also online Gilbert. And and I want to hear you saying another one of father showns. Okay. Do we have it? Do we have acute up you need music? No, okay. He's going to do without music. I get a hayme Mitha vibe Alicia chain with is sheep's, and it's from again Hoyas mid Gazon Takao boys when a couple hundred cattle to k- from everybody sing hayme hame. Come on in and building plenty of chain from sue Boyko spilled men pinochle employ. Dalton in my high Skillet often veins. The great Mickey Katz. He was Vicky would be proud performed by his son killed the great Joel Chris who our listeners fine. Mickey katz. The albums are out there. The videos are on YouTube, get them Joel this is my new favorite episode of our show. Two hundred forty seven or someone godly number. Thanks for schlepping out in the rain was. Very good. He's going to give you a sign off. Thank you. Are you, sir? Charming, and sweet you're very kind Gill. We've been talking to that great. Joel grey. That's it. Yeah. Yeah. That was let's could do. Joel Joel give yourself a sign off. Oh, could you do a little station ID for us? Yeah. No. If someone stood up in a crowd and raised his voice up way out loud and waved his arm and leg you'd notice him. If someone in the movie show yelled fire in the second round. Notice. And even without clucking like. Everyone gets noticed. Now. Unless of course, that percentage should be. Invisible. Inconsequential. It's been a few weeks. Faye? Salad. Fain because you can look right through me. Fine. Should have been. Mr seven. Right. A little resigned in

Joel Joel Joel grey Greg Colson Mickey Katz Colson director Clark Gilbert Gregg museum of Jewish heritage Fain Joel Chris Hoyas YouTube cleveland Ohio sue Boyko Dalton Faye Russia
"mickey katz" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

05:05 min | 3 years ago

"mickey katz" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"And they thought it was funny. They didn't understand yet. They were not Jewish and they put him on RCA Victor records. And that's how the beginning of his career as dialect Titian comedian. And that's how the public knew him from those records. What what was Mickey Katz and his crazy kittens? I love that. Betty Hutton was was was part of their he toured with Betty Hutton with you know, with the the troops right in Europe. Right. He was the band. Leader. Selling war bonds after shows? Yeah. At one point. Yeah. So when you're father started performing around with his songs was he in like was it vaudeville the Yiddish theater. There was no Yiddish theater for him because he was a musician. Yeah. And so he was sort of in the vaudeville world. Okay. The palace theater in Cleveland and big names. Play the palace theater. Very Earl Sophie, Tucker. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I used to sit in the pit and watch on my and I think that's where I kinda got a bug. And and you said, I think it was that your mother took you to you would take you to the theater. Yes at yeah. She took me to see. A proper American play at the Cleveland play house where they had no idea. What a Jew was. No, they didn't it was very very high class, and you know, major and. I sat down there. And I watched these children in this children's group of actors putting on a show. And I I knew in that moment I sent him. I wanna do that. I wanna do that at the age of eight nine nine was a little later. Well, well now, how did your parents react? Oh, good. My mother. She wanted to be a star, you know, an actress, but she had no talent for that. She became a painter. She became a painter great cook. She was terrific. She somehow have this idea that she was going to be a movie star because everybody was crazy about the movies than it was the beginning of you know, Hollywood stuff was Peter Laurie. One of your favorites. I found that in the research. He was I was great fan of him of his. Acting. I thought he was a great character. Have you heard Gilbert's, Peter Laurie Joel I'm ready? I'm closing my eyes three okay. No, he chew who brand. Hewitt. You're stupid that him to by catering the found out how valuable it was. No one had such an easy time. Getting it you done during fat head. Well. I didn't know I was going to be surprised like this. I wish our listeners could see the look on shoals face. He was delighted by that. Pretty good. Excellent. That's the best parent Laurie Laurie ever done. Who else? Do you do? He just didn't Greenstreet I'm closing. Kevin. You ought to characters. I I talking to a man, I said, talk brilliant. That is. Yes. Thank you. I can leave. Now, he's a great. He's a great mimic. We've done two hundred and forty of these Joe, and you wouldn't do you? Remember the character? Actor Jon macgyver. I do. Yeah. Listen to this is your ice. Oh to for seek bus spit the Kolding to schedule. We will have those markers of this company, the tight ship everything spent done, the colder. It's all of those. I like that too. You don't have to say anything. I'm just put on the show for you. I did like it. He's a great mimic. Yeah. We'll pull some other ones out later on the show before we jump off your data. I do when we mentioned this before we turn the mic on..

Peter Laurie Mickey Katz Laurie Laurie Betty Hutton Tucker Peter Laurie Joel Cleveland play house Cleveland Europe Earl Sophie Jon macgyver Hewitt Kevin Joe Gilbert