14 Burst results for "Mick Sullivan"

"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

The Past and the Curious

08:02 min | Last month

"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

"Because he knew that she had a vision that no one else did 1896. A scientist named henry beco- discovered that uranium salts emitted rays there was power radiating from the uranium that could be observed. No one thought that the rays of energy coming from uranium could just be coming from the uranium. The idea might have. I don on henry when a glass vial of uranium salts that he carried around in his pocket turned his skin. Becker was able to prove that energy radiated from this iranian though and a few years later marie us some peers equipment to understand this even more clearly. Her discovery showed that the radiation becker l. Measured was actually coming from the atoms contained in the uranium. This was revolutionary and this work founded the field of atomic physics she also coined a new term to describe this atomic activity. Radio-activity radio activity next marie. Now a young mother began experimenting with a mineral. That contained uranium called pitch blend. This mineral was found commonly in silver mines and miners. Hated it so much that they called it. Bad luck rock. It was useless to them but they always had to deal with tons of it in order to get the silver that they were really after when. Marie asked one mine in austria. They could spare some they were like. Yeah you want pittsburgh and tell you what you figure out how to move it from here to there and you can have as much as you would like. It's useless to us but it wasn't useless to marie. Pitch blend like you and your bananas is radioactive. But that's the bad kind of radioactive. Of course no one really knew that at the time she quickly realize pitch blend was more radioactive than becquerels uranium after countless weeks days and hours of reducing the mineral through heat brute force constantly stirring huge cauldron and other more delicate scienc- marie was able to reduce the mineral to its basic part and what she discovered was a brand new element. She called it polonium after her real non-russian home of poland and it really through scientists for a loop not long after she and pierre isolated and discovered another new element also highly radioactive which they called radium in one thousand nine hundred. Three pierre curie was noted that he henry becker were awarded the nobel prize for their work and discoveries. Related to radiation. Pierre found this absurd and with the support of many others and formed them that none of it would have been done without the true visionary. Marie i mean she practically invented the term right. They agreed and marie was awarded the nobel prize becoming the first woman to win the coveted scientific award but when the end for the award ceremony came the curies replied. We are too busy and we come those a bold move. Pierre was tragically killed in an accident. Just a few years later but marie continued on and in nineteen eleven. She won a second nobel prize which had also never been done before. This one was the chemistry prize for her discovery of those elements polonium and radium. All of this work with radioactive materials. Took a heavy toll on her body. She was often weak and racked by headaches or worse slowly she realized that exposure to radium was bad for one's health and she advocated for the safe use of it but for many years. The public wasn't going to listen to that trust science. Y'all it's crazy to think about now but radium the very dangerous substance that keeps researchers from touching marie journals. Today was once added to products to make them more attractive to the buying public radium. Water was sold as a health drink and in germany there was a chocolate bar with radium and because it could glow it was used on the dials of watches so that they could be read in the dark. It was even put in makeup and lipstick so that women's faces could glow in the dark during a wild night out on the town. Sometimes beauty is fatal. Lots and lots of people got sick and died from working with or using the material but it wasn't all bad radium is used in treating cancers and has helped many people over the last decades none of that would have been possible without murray's hard work. Marie died in nineteen thirty. Four from complications brought on by all her time spent with these radioactive materials. And today she is buried with pierre and francis pantheon the national mausoleum and her body rests inside an iron container as her body still bears the radioactive contamination of her lifetime. Just like her books. It's believed that the radiation levels of her books and journals will slowly drop as the radium contamination deteriorates. If you need to read them in person they should be safe enough to touch about fifteen hundred years until then you'll need to sign that waiver and wear protective clothing. Marie curie was awesome. And this story doesn't even touch on her work with the x ray machines during world war one which is another important part of restoring one other interesting thing that i want to share about. Her family is the wild number of nobel prizes that they can boast marie one to peer was awarded. One their daughter irene. Also scientist was awarded a nobel in chemistry in nineteen thirty five and the man married to their other daughter. Eve won a nobel prize when he was the head of unicef a humanitarian group that provides aid to children. So if you're keeping track that's by nobel prizes in one family that that's a record that will ever be topped. Well all right there. You have it episode. Fifty nine which is mostly about books is in the books. Yeah the books. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for listening. Hope you enjoyed continue listening. I've got more episodes common And some some interesting exciting news that will have to share Soon and speaking of thanking people are also have some patriotic people to thank as lee boo boo. Thank you so much for your patriots sponsorship. And if there's someone else that i should say out loud for your family then you just let me know. I'll be happy to do that. But thank you and thank all of you. Also eva from a story new york back yeah being from hysteria. That's about around that's around nineteen thousand. Nine world's fair was so how about that got episode of your neighborhood And why it will from atwater village. Which if i'm not mistaken near dodger stadium in l. a. and We did an episode about that too. So how cool is that sophia from australia. Bfa i'm so glad that you join such a sweet note that you said and i'm so glad that you were listening in australia. We have so many australian listeners. So thank you l. o. To all of them as well. Tt and theo thank you very much. I'm glad that your ears are out there listening to td. And the oh and last but not least martin. Thanks martin appreciate you supporting the show as well. If you'd like to support the show you can join patriot on. You can also just tell people about our show with your mouth at twit your mouth. That's telling people about the past and the curious sometimes eating an alternative to telling people with your mouth is telling people with your fingers you can subscribe on all of the platforms. You can share it to your class. i don't know just tell people all right. That's enough for me. Zombie going nowhere. Thank you so much. We'll be back next month. I'm excited about next month. Show i say that every time. But i'm always excited so hope you are too. This has been the past. The curious i am mick sullivan. Thank you very much..

marie henry beco Marie pierre curie henry becker Pierre pierre treating cancers Becker francis pantheon national mausoleum austria henry pittsburgh poland headaches lee boo Marie curie murray germany
"mick sullivan" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

04:08 min | Last month

"mick sullivan" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

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And it's <Speech_Male> creatures <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> even <Speech_Male> though the i may tonight. <Speech_Male> I are going to relax <Speech_Male> on me. Eyelid <Speech_Male> for the summer. <Speech_Male> Doesn't mean we're <Speech_Male> going to stop exploring <Speech_Male> and learning. <Silence> Isn't <SpeakerChange> that right. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Of course <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> there's so many <Speech_Male> other creatures on the <Speech_Female> and the shore <Speech_Female> to investigate <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> everyone <Speech_Male> who joined us <Speech_Male> our maritime <Speech_Female> adventure today <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> remember <Speech_Male> that there is <Speech_Male> always something <Speech_Male> new to <SpeakerChange> explore <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> learn about <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Music> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> a ton of fun <Speech_Male> we should let <SpeakerChange> pirates takeover <Speech_Male> our podcast more <Speech_Female> often <Speech_Female> when they made <Speech_Female> us walk <SpeakerChange> the plank. <Laughter> It was fun <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> fun. Swim <SpeakerChange> just for the <Speech_Female> few sharks. It's <Speech_Female> like a diving board. <Speech_Female> What's the big deal <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in case. You didn't <Speech_Male> recognize the voices <Speech_Male> are pirate. Captain was <Speech_Male> mick sullivan of the past. <Speech_Male> And the curious <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> his trusty. I <Speech_Male> mate was erica key. <Speech_Male> From what if world <Speech_Male> there among <SpeakerChange> our favorite <Speech_Female> kids podcasters. <Speech_Female> If you want <Speech_Female> to hear more from <Speech_Female> eric and mic. <Speech_Female> Check <Speech_Female> out their podcast. <Speech_Female> What if world <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> the past and the curious <Speech_Male> subscribe <Speech_Male> to their shows wherever <Speech_Male> you get your podcasts. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanks again to mick <Speech_Male> sullivan. Eric o'keefe <Speech_Male> hadley jevon <Speech_Male> awesome summer. <Speech_Male> Intern wrote the script <Speech_Male> and produce this episode. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Sarah roberson lenz <Speech_Male> made the episode art <Speech_Male> in is <SpeakerChange> our head of partnerships. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm lindy <Speech_Female> patterson. And <Speech_Female> i <SpeakerChange> edited <Speech_Male> this episode <Speech_Male> and i'm marshall <Speech_Male> ischemia. <Speech_Male> Thanks for listening <Speech_Male> and stay tuned for more <Speech_Male> stories <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> of science discovery. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanks so much for listening <Speech_Male> to that super <Speech_Male> long episode. <Speech_Male> Now it's time for <Speech_Male> some birthday. Shout outs <Speech_Male> disease zeke. <Speech_Male> Happy birthday on. <Speech_Male> August seventh nature <Speech_Male> lover love <Speech_Male> mom and dad <Speech_Male> happy birthday <Speech_Male> to marley on august. <Speech_Male> Eleventh stay curious. <Speech_Male> Marley <Speech_Male> on august <Speech_Male> fourteenth. Happy birthday <Speech_Male> to percents schmitter <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> on august fifteenth. <Speech_Male> Happy birthday charlotte. <Speech_Male> Keep learning <Speech_Male> and asking questions <Speech_Male> about the world around <Speech_Male> you. I have no <Speech_Male> doubt you'll be a great scientists <Speech_Male> someday day in your <Speech_Male> mommy loves you <Speech_Male> and finally <Speech_Male> happy birthday. To <Speech_Male> zachary on august <Speech_Male> sixteenth. May <Speech_Male> you always be <Speech_Male> curiouser and <Silence> curiouser <Speech_Male> thanks <Speech_Male> to all of you and to everyone <Speech_Male> who supports <Speech_Male> tumble unpatriotic <Speech_Male> to

mick sullivan nikki Sarah roberson lenz erica Captain eric patterson Eric marshall charlotte
"mick sullivan" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

Feedback with EarBuds

08:13 min | 4 months ago

"mick sullivan" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

"Girls. And who is the intended audience. Yeah so Rebel girls began as a book series. Called good nights stories for rebel girls. It was created in twenty sixteen and from that book series We've now put out several chapter books and we've also put out a couple of different volumes of good night's toys for rebel girls. The most recent one being good night stories for rebel girls one hundred immigrant women who changed the world and then in twenty eighteen we decided to launch. A podcast is a little bit before my time but they decided to launch a podcast also called good nights stories for rebel girls where we take those amazing stories from the book and we build them out into like a fully sound designed really immersive native piece of content. That tells the incredible stories of like one rebel woman at a time. And then we tap as narrators. Another incredible rebel woman. Who can help us bring that straight to life with their beautiful voices rebels. A mission driven company and our whole mission is to inspire and build confidence in girls all across the world and so the podcast is meant to do that. Exact thing so we try and tell stories from all different places from all different perspectives. We try and create a universe of content where little girls can find themselves no matter who they are they always feel sort of represented and shown up for. I love that mission. And you also are able to gather such star power to narrate these. I mean i think that this is of a testament to a the the company that was that has been built. You know. I mean he make really beautiful books and make really beautiful. Podcasts and people want to be a part of it. And i'm thrilled and honored by that. You know that we can reach out and say hey ilana glazer or jamila demille or you know any one of these incredible women and say hey. Do you want to come and give your time to this experience and help to inspire these girls around the world and people say yes the thing that i that i really love what we always try to do aerial on every episode. It's fine those perfect points of connection so the people are reading a story that they feel really closely connected to so we have an upcoming episode based on the story of she best dida who is a young climate activists in new york city and we tapped danny washington who is fellow podcast and a and a science communicator to read the story and she had like met xi abyss data and she had attended this event that share the studio was part of putting on and so she had dislike deep connection to the material and i think whenever that's the case it shows up in the content like when there is this moment of these like points of connection. They just bring that to life. I think the same was true with one of my favorite episodes which is nor at night. Read by frida pinto. It's just like she loved the story and loved the woman and wanted to tell it and it was just Just captured that like lightning in a bottle and we I hope we do it every time. What attracted you to the mission of this and rebel girls and general. Well it was a lot of things. I think that the first and foremost i'm a mother. I have two children once a rebel boy but like honorary fine. But i'm a mother. And i have two kids and i wanna make i want to make content that they want to hear and i want to put stuff out in the world that i want my kids to access and i wanna tell the stories. I think that people need to hear need to be paying more attention to you. Know like the mission point of the company as well was to tell the stories of women that just don't get told in so often so often these like wild amazing women their stories. Just get lost in history. You know. there's like that old saying behind every great man is a great woman. And that's bull you know like in front of every great man. There is a great woman in those are the stories that we need to be putting out there. And i i want. That was something that i wanted to be a part of like making sure that my kids hear these stories my kids in contributions that women have made to the worlds of science and art and literature. And you know all of this stuff your kids and if so. What's the schedule for them. Do they listen in the car bed so my kids do listen. I should say one of my kids. Listen my daughter is. She's one of those. Like i only want to delay youtube right now. She's like very much youtube world But no my kids definitely do listen. They listen when i'm doing the final. Listen through and i think that they get really excited because they know that they get to hear it before anybody else does a the only time they wanna listen get exclusivity that's right. They want the exclusive content so a few weeks ago. We had mick sullivan on the show. Who is with kids. Listen so kids listen. Their a collective of podcasts. Four kids sometimes bhai kids. It's a really great network of shows and mc was telling us about the future of kids audio and how apple. Podcasts is kind of creating a division. Where they're going to prop up kids audio so i'm wondering from your experience in the space where you see kids audio going and where you see rebel girls being part of that. I think that is a great question and a lot of it unknown. At this point. I think that there is just a ton of upside to serve be explored in the world of children's audio. I think that there's like not a ton in the space. And there's not a ton of diversity in the space either. And i think that that's part of what we need to explore more of when i think about where children's audio is going. I think that there's like a million exciting things that could happen. I think that there's a lot of work that can be done in know bringing more voices out there telling more stories i think. Also there's like some fun technology things that we can and possibly should explore like you know. There's definitely been some movement around. Choose your own adventure and stuff like that. And the different ways that we can include voice in children's audio. I think that stuff is very exciting. But i think really if i had to say where i thought kids is going. I think that the first thing we have to do is like major education around for instance. I think that a lot of people if you're like hey does your kid listen to a podcast like no. They're nine you know. And i and i think that we need to sort of educate people about what's out there. Right like not every podcast. Is this american life right. Not every podcast is the joe. Rogan experience laying god. There's yeah exactly Baldo i wouldn't. I wouldn't hate those numbers i if i'm nobody would know not only thing that's the only thing. Yeah that's spotify deal so yeah for for me. I think that that. I think about what's next in kids audio. Think that there's gotta be some education going on and then. I think that it'd be really fine. I in the whole world of audio to be thinking about what we can do with technology. We have access to. I agree with that. And i see that you have always been deeply interested in. How technology affects stories. Yeah you tell me a bit more about that to me. It's just like the why factor of the whole thing like. There's so much that we can do that. We don't do. We serve stories in a very sort of like audio is an incredibly immersive experience and can be an incredibly immersive experience. But i think that we can take that a step further. We just have to play around with what's out there. You know like we do have dynamic audio technology that we can be utilizing in different ways. We do have voice activation technology that we could be utilizing different ways. I think it's just an exploration a moment of exploration so like if we have this technology why.

danny washington ilana glazer frida pinto jamila demille youtube two kids two children dida apple twenty sixteen spotify Baldo twenty eighteen nine Four kids new york city mick sullivan first few weeks ago one hundred immigrant women
"mick sullivan" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

Feedback with EarBuds

14:31 min | 6 months ago

"mick sullivan" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

"A little more about mick sullivan. So as i said mick is currently serving as the co chair of kids listen. The mission of kids. Listen is to build. Community advocate for the growth of the medium and create standards and ethics that serve as best practices for development production and modernization. Kids listen is creating platforms for producers to share ideas and publish data and information relevant to creators consumers and supporters of podcasts for kids. Here's my conversation with mick sullivan. Welcome to the show mick sullivan how you do in this morning. I'm great. i'm great. Thank you for asking. So let's just jump right in. I would love to know how you first got into audio. Well i'm a. I'm a musician originally and picked up audio production skills that way. and then. I'm also an educator. Our public education at a museum in louisville kentucky of decided to marry those two things. Why made you go. In the direction of an audio collective will kids listen is an organization that I'm a part of a happened to be co but it existed about six months before i actually joined it yet. My show is is a history. Podcast kids that's kind of what i do in my professional life extended curious though past curious. Yes anyone knows. vin diesel. Send them my way but kids listen is really Is a group that has existed since two thousand sixteen and the idea originally was to just to create a group of people that could share ideas but also advocate for children's programming In the podcast format. Because at that time there just wasn't it was hard to find things and to a degree it still is but also just to guarantee that there would be Someone advocating for quality approach to that And spread the word and in two thousand sixteen. Were you apparent yet. No i was not will actually My son was born in two thousand sixteen. Actually the same on that. Watch the podcast which is kind of crazy. How were you thinking. I wanna make something that eventually. My kids will listen to totally. But also i work with kids every day so i kind of knew what worked. I wanted to make something that they would listen to. Also give me an example. What is an episode of the past and the curious like it's broken into two parts so there will be a theme so the theme for last month. Both it was two stories about women who were pioneers and flight. so first story was about. Toby blanchard the second story was about will the browns Soviet land charter is a french. Balloonist and willa brown was the first african american woman to earn her pilot's license in america from kentucky. Run from says ended that and sometimes the stories are are biographical sketches. Sometimes there's depending on the story like our again like a humorous little skit kind of pushes. The story along. Which kind of those whenever that happens obviously dialogues But then in in between those. I'll do something called quiz time. I do a segment called. You have thirty seconds where kids will sit in their audio recordings of a story. They wanna tell the past but they have to do thirty seconds which is really fun and then i usually have a song at the end too. So it's kinda like a little brighty show for kids built around history a theme at super superfund and now that you have a five year old is your five year old listening Yeah he listens a bit We listen to noodle awful lot which is just no some joke. Tell me about noodle love. It sounds great. it's awesome He's a member of kids listening to his name. Dan anthrax. It's a it's a music education podcast so there's a lot of leg call and response singing. But he's super goofy incredible musician. Does everything is black history month. Like grades song around that you know super. It's it's wildly creative. I love it. that's awesome. I guess while we're on the subject. Tell me a few other kids. Podcasts or kids audio initiatives. That that you love or that you want to tell people about well i mean. Listen what. I'm most excited about right now. And what chirping. About as co chair of the organization. This year is We just released last week or two weeks ago. The the findings of our second study so the children's audio market is not something that people have really done any studies on an obviously. There's privacy issues with with my kids and whatnot but this was a really we did. We did one in two thousand sixteen or twenty seventeen which was the first study of the market and there were some really interesting things that we found like. My favorite fact was that kids parents would report. That kids listened to an episode that they liked. Who knows how many times five six seven eight tile interesting. Yeah you don't think about that but like you know. When we were kids we would watch. Tv show i watch. I watch barney concert like ten times in a row Right so you know you know it inside out and and kids are doing that. Podcast but The newest survey which we released Is a it's available on our website kids. Listen dot org In addition to the so. There's a top graphic report. It's like eight or nine points. But there's a full like seventy eight page thing available to you know we. We found all sorts of interesting things like how people listen like when they listened. What times of days like what parents are doing when they listen. So it's really interesting from a from a podcast perspective to of understand what the audience is doing but additionally we hope that it'll kind of validate kids programming in the eyes of advertisers and those sorts of things. Because you know what we found. Was that parents that we surveyed and we had like almost seven hundred responses. We listened with the kids. It's not like they turn it on and tune out or turn it on and walk out of the room like a lot of the shows that our kids listened friends or creating are so good. That parents wanna listen to him too so just some really really remarkable findings through there and at hope people will will take it seriously and go have a look at it. Because it's it's enlightening. Yeah absolutely parents definitely gave us that feedback that they love that. It is screen. Free time. And i mean part of that is also like it's something to do in the car on the way to school. That's engaging or you know people can do together So there's that aspect of it but the other thing that we found both through the survey and also just through talking with amongst you know we've got one hundred thirty members in the organization and also kind of knowing our audience at talking with our audience when the opportunities arise is that we found. It's it's a no brainer. When you think about it but kids listen up. So like if they're reading level of second or third grade they can listen to content at a fourth and fifth grade level and and learn from it and get something out of it or enjoy it. Whatever the case may be As long as the content is appropriate so audio is a standalone. Saying i think a lot of the people in the organization are also of them have spun into books. I mean there's a natural correlation there it works on a level like a literary level as well if done properly so that's awesome but you know yeah it is. It is essentially screen free time. We we also found that kids will turn it on. Most kids parents reported would just turn it on and listen but others will do art while they're listening to it or maybe it inspires activities based on what they heard even hear heard stories of kids. You know acting out. You know a dramatic coach. The what they're hearing on the thing. So i mean yeah works on so many levels. Yeah that's really cool and that kind of brings me to. I was looking at your website. And i see that you have an activity. Podcast yes can you tell me a little bit about that. That's an initiative that we started so The co chair. The that i'm blessed with this year is allie wilkinson. She is the host with her kids. So she's she's actually one of our podcasters who co host with her children. She has show called colfax about animals. And it's super fund and this was her idea and it was it was right when the pandemic hit so it was. It was march of twenty twenty and schools were shut down parents were scrambling when we do with our kids. We figured out. We have so many people what we would do. As as release originally was daily shows allow ask so most of it would be like an episode that someone had already released. So you know a show that i released that no one else. No one else has audience at her. Do it would be released in the feed. And then we would pair that with an activity. You know a lesson plan or some sort of activity that would fill listen to the show and do the activity would feel hours. Where the time was the goal so we did that through the end of the school year. Put it on hold during summer And then when the school year started up we did it again but we just went to weekly. But it's great. It's a great way. It's a sampler for kids. Listen shows but it's also you know a valuable thing for families because you know you can really make an hour worthwhile by using it. Yeah and then you get the auditory and kinesthetic learners involved. Yeah totally so. Let's go kind of more towards the broader podcast. Space here What do you think the future of kids audio holtz That's wish a new question. I mean we. We've had conversations with people at apple and and again through our own observations and a lot of the feedback through the study that it's growing. I mean kids. Audio market is growing. Discover ability has always been a problem just this week. Apple announced a partnership with common sense media who has advocated for a lot of kids. Listen programming in the past that they actually will have a a a landing page on the front. Page of of apple's how maybe like monday or tuesday like hopefully things will will develop an of change a bit because a lot of the people that were featured are affiliated with public media networks like a lot of independent creators are not there. Which is you know that. That's a little bit alarming. Because that's where kids audio comes from. There's there's just not a lot of corporate support for that right now and sometimes the people that are doing independent stopped are doing the most creative because they have the most control over their stuff but there's also not a huge amount of diversity in offerings right now so so we're hoping that that will change. It's the first week and we're eager to see. I think there's already been some some talk back and forth about that but yeah i mean who knows that. There's been a lot of kids. Listen shows in a lot of kids. Podcast general that have able to spend into some book. Series often caspian ailing. He's got released third book in the series and they look so great other totally awesome. Yeah so tell me. What are you currently listening to whether it is kids focused podcasts or an adult focus podcast. Yeah on the kids. I said listen to noodle oath with my kids. They're just the right age. There's audio broken on the different age ranges. so that's that's just a sweet spot for me right now on to my kids are goofy like music so perfect beyond that Actually every thursday eagerly waiting three them. It's paul tompkins dob. I've always been a huge. Paul tompkins fan. I mean for twenty years since we was on mr show. I like comedy a lot. I also like starting at about history staff. Noble blood has been really fun to listen to I think she does just a terrific job. She's a great storyteller love that where can people find you find kids. Listen and interact with all your things. So i'm at the past Dot com and on all the follow the social media channels. and wherever. You get your podcasts as they say And then kids listen. You can start at kids. Listen dot org and actually right there on the landing page right now. You'll find the stuff to the clap. Clap that's our kids. Listen to jets of just use gone shorthand terrible thing to say and then the top shelf or the top lines of the survey is right there on the main page to and then there's a link to get you to download for the full seventy two or seventy eight page report. Whatever it is if you allow see. That's very cool anything else. You wanna say parting words about kids audio. it's growing. It's an amazing thing. Like i if you have kids and you like podcasts. I hope that you're giving them the opportunity to engage with audio. Stop to there's hundreds of really great shows and we're committed to helping you discover more and more of them so thank you and then houston. Let let me be here right. Yeah of course thank you so much. Nick have a great rest beauty. Another huge thank you to mic for joining me in the virtual earbuds studio powered by squad cast for this interview. Really hope you enjoyed this week's with next week with another interview featuring passionate podcast related person. Did you know that we have earbuds clothing now. Our shop is at t public and the way it works is that we upload the logos and you decide what piece of clothing that you want that logo to go on. We'll have a link in the show notes of this episode to our shop on t. public if you want to support earbuds podcast collective and because e with a sweatshirt maybe you wanna wear a hat. Maybe it's a hoodie. Maybe it's a mask. Maybe you need a new mask get yourself some swag from earbuds podcast collective. There are a few ways that you can stay in the earbuds loop between newsletters and episodes of this podcast number. One you can curate a lists for us. Anyone can curate a list. There's a link to our curator's form in every newsletter that we send out so get subscribed to our newsletter at earbuds podcast collective dot org number two. You can write a blog post for us. Do you have a hot take on something to do with the podcast industry. Send us an email and we love to publish it. You can find us at earbuds. Podcast collective at gmail.com number three. You can join our facebook group head on over to facebook and search for earbuds. Podcast collective we post discussion questions and links and so much more while you're on the internet make sure you're following us. On all of the socials were on earbuds. Podcast collective on most platforms feedback with earbuds is written by. Maya ruben. admit it's hosted by me. It's mixed and put together by daniel whose work you can find at robots slash dot com and our newsletter is edited by the amazing Until next week stay safe and happy listening..

Apple allie wilkinson paul tompkins thirty seconds america Dan anthrax mick sullivan last week Maya ruben twenty years apple daniel two stories next week second story two parts Paul tompkins Toby blanchard facebook monday
"mick sullivan" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

Feedback with EarBuds

08:13 min | 6 months ago

"mick sullivan" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

"Today. We want to tell you about abi bite a newsletter where founder jason bradwell breaks down marketing strategies and tactics for b. two b. leaders into fun size actionable chunks. This could be sharing some ideas on how to use clubhouse in your content marketing strategy or what it takes to build a brand that the modern day business are actually cares about whatever it is. It won't be dull jason's on a mission to make be to be better than boring. Sign up adb's to be bite dot sub stack dot com today in your inbox. You'll find an email from us with the subject line magical stories. This week's theme comes to us from steve. French host of a podcast. That will hear more about in just a minute through. This week's theme will laugh will cry and we'll be inspired by the magic. That is storytelling. After this week's podcast. Recommendations from steve. Were bringing you a chat between me and mick sullivan. One of the co chairs of listen. Find out what's going on in the world of kids audio and why parents are loving it. Hint. it has something to do with less screen. Time more on mic and kids. Listen later in the show first. Let's talk about this week's podcast. Picks from steve french. Here's why. Steve chose this theme. Each of these podcasts feature stories whether they're storytelling podcast for not sharing the human experience is often how we find common ground. I love telling stories and listening to stories and find that what makes them so magical is different ways. They allow us to hold space for ourselves and for one another the way we share our own experiences and the experiences of others is an incredible form of vulnerability validation and connection more from steve. Here my name is steve. French and the theme i chose is storytelling. Chose this theme. Because the entire reason. I became an actor in the first place in eventually voice actor was that i love stories. I love telling stories of listening to stories and i love that. There are several ways we tell stories right there the stories that we tell our experiences and there are the stories we tell others experiences. I think there's something beautiful about both of those things when you're vulnerable enough to share your experience and hopefully find connection and help other people through your own war when you are affected by someone else's experience and you want to share that to try to either find closure for them or to let people know that this person existed whatever it might be storytelling the most important things we can do here are. This week's podcast picks chosen by steve. The first episode comes from the podcast unsolved mysteries which is hosted by our lovely curator. Steve hi steve. The episode is called the haunting of ball. Cemetery here's the description. Unsolved mysteries was originally an american mystery. Tv docu series. It's been around for over thirty years in some form or another. It was recently picked up by netflix's so you can catch it there. If you're interested in a little thriller but anyways the creators also made a podcast so now you can get that terrifying yet. Addicting murder mystery fix on the go and invoice form. It's really well produced and see french. Who you just heard from narrates the show. So you know it's going to be a good time. The podcast description reads all new mysteries from terrifying deductions too bizarre paranormal encounters. Heinous killers and unexplained deaths for every mystery. There is someone somewhere who knows the truth. Perhaps it's you so maybe don't listen at night. The next episode is from higher learning with family thin and rachel lindsay and is called the importance of the nationwide protests over. George floyd staff. Here's the description quote. I wake up everyday feeling heavy and with panic and quote. This is one of the first lines from this episode. And i'm not gonna lie to you. It's a hard episode to listen to the hosts vivid descriptions and political commentary on what happened during george. Floyd murder was definitely tough but truly truly truly important to listen to. You can hear their voices strain as they discussed the scope and importance of the protests and as they share their own experiences protesting in la and miami respectively through their descriptions and political commentary. You almost feel transported back to june. Are curator steve. French writes about this episode quote at one point van late then gives one of the most eloquent speeches i've ever heard on racism and it's cancer like effect on society. I've never forgotten it and quote next. Step we're listening to the podcast. Add to cart with kula villa. Sock and su-jin pack. The episode is called five pounds of gummy bears and other budget buys. This episode is hilarious and important. It's two comedians talking about consumerism. And what it does to us and how what we buy says a lot about who we are. It's a true original in concept and execution so definitely check it out the also get into what they're spending habits are like and give little reviews about what's worth it and what's not in this specific episode. It's all about budget. Wise cool op ensued jin dive into how growing up in immigrant and refugee families still impacts the way they think about buying new things throwing things out and accepting samples plus they respond to listener deums and suggests there goto budget items so all in all a good time and a good way to laugh and actually learn something. The next recommendation comes to us from the podcast s town. It's been a while since i've revisited as town and we're focusing on the first episode chapter one at our recent fourth anniversary party for earbuds. Someone introduced themselves on zoom as p. s. post s town in regards to win. They got into podcast listening. I'm more of a p s. Being post serial kind of person. I came in right after cereal. Came out but i still do love. S town very much and it's still impact me to this day there's really nothing like it. It's a storytelling pod that proves to you the magic of creating story specifically in audio form when asked to describe the series are curator. Steve wrote quote. It's a story about how life is beautiful ugly horrible and uplifting all at the same time all the time the last moments of the show had me in tears and quote and the last episode recommendation of the week comes to us from the sustaining creativity. Podcast it's called brittany jeffrey. This is an interview style. Podcast where different perspectives on creativity. Tips tools and creative experiences are shared explored and digested in this episode baker slash actress slash sugar cookie decorator brittany. Jeffrey explains that creativity is her survival skill. She shares how. It's brought a real sense of balance into her life and she fed what she calls her creative inner monster something that she believes we all have. It's a roughly thirty minute. Listen to help you. Disconnect and get inspired. I'm also very interested in the job title of sugar cookie decorator. We'll have to see about making that a thing for myself. Those are the podcast picks for this week. Thank you to steve. French for creating. Can't wait to check them out and to hear from you earbuds about what you think about this week's theme in addition to our weekly five podcast picks we also like to spotlight a podcast at the bottom of our newsletter. The idea is that if you have no interest in that week's theme you can still check out the spotlight for some audio content and podcasters you can apply to have your podcasts spotlit in our newsletter on the homepage of our website and spoken about right here in this section of feedback with earbuds. You can do that all on our website or in the application length. That'll be in the show notes of this episode this week. Spotlight is on lemonade. Media's good sex podcast each week take your seat for the sex ed. You never got but you always need it. Join experts and lay people who have sex on the brain a no femmes about going there in just ten minutes each week which is ideal for.

Steve Floyd Jeffrey Today jason brittany steve mick sullivan jason bradwell rachel lindsay ten minutes netflix today This week two comedians George floyd both one thirty minute first episode
"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

The Past and the Curious

04:16 min | 9 months ago

"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

"Charles baggage would dream up the analytical engine which most people agree was the first automatic digital computer famously. His friend at a lovelace was considering badges computer when she published what was basically the first computer program now. The actual computer wouldn't be created during their lifetimes but they're well planned ideas. We're enough to change the world. Don't get me wrong. You wouldn't have been able to play minecraft or among us or even solitaire on a computer like this or anything but it was a pretty radical idea and like many young people who go on to do great things. Babich was inspired by some pretty creative people. One man in particular comes crashing into mind when he was a young boy badges mother wishing to nurture his curiosity and fascination with mechanical things took him to visit a short older and quite unusual man. John joseph merlin. Now if you live in england and your name is merlin people might expect you to be some sort of wizard and while this merlin contrast spells or shape shift and he had certainly never counseled any mythical kings like king arthur. He was a wizard in his own ways. By this time he was approaching the end of his life but he had remained pretty famous around england for decades. You have a hard time finding a man who had created quite so many unusual inventions. And you'd also have a hard time finding a man who knew how to make an entrance and get noticed in quite the way that merlin could first off. He was an inventor of automata but he was also one of the most prolific inventors in all of europe. If you've listened to our episode mechanical monsters you probably recall the basics of what goes into an automaton. If you haven't listened to that episode well. It is our most popular so consider this an invitation in short an automaton is a mechanical device often resembling a living creature which through years and finely tuned pieces can create movements that mimic something like life. Think of it like an early robot. They were wildly popular at the time and they didn't even really do anything they were just like cool to look at in some ways. People never change and they love good amusement and automata were the pinnacle of impressive amusement in the seventeen. Hundreds one of merlin's earliest creations was a collaboration with a mentor of his. It was called the silver swan and unlike many of the automata from the seventeen hundreds. This one still works the shiny. Silver swan bobs. Its head on. Its long neck cranes over its shoulders and ultimately catches a fish which it appears to swallow before nestling back into its wing to watch it now and consider all of the mechanical movements and all the time spent making each articulated piece still amazing in the seventeen hundreds it would have been mind blowing and these sorts of things. Slow badges young mind during this. Visit the world changer. To be sought some of these enlightenment era robots but also saw invention after invention mechanical curiosities. And some of merlin's favorite creations. Instrument's it was obvious to merlin that. This boy showed an aptitude. He dripped with potential and he burned with desire to understand more so the man suggested to his mother that they all visit his private up which was not something. The general public got to cast their eyes upon. This must have made quite an impression. Because years later after merlin at passed away his collection was sold and the now adult badge bought a few of the eccentric. Man's unfinished atop and finish them himself in sort of a tribute to the genius. Who showed him kindness and knowledge at a young age. Of course this meeting was towards the end of merlin's life when he was a younger man he wasn't so famous and he didn't have a museum filled with his creations

merlin Zora Joseph merlin candle wick victoria bond zora neale mick sullivan ac gilbert Mr eric charles baggage Babich John joseph merlin england zora scott lovelace romania king arthur john alania
Meet Stagecoach Mary

The Past and the Curious

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Meet Stagecoach Mary

"A No! That's what I'm saying like. The Postman only rang once. What. What Oh, oh, Hey, we're on! Hello, everybody! My name is Mick Sullivan and welcome to the past and the curious. This is episode number forty six, and we've done an episode about male done episode about trains, and we're kind of talking about both of those things again, but it's two completely new stories. One of the stories you're going to hear is about owning the dog. And I need to think friend of the show Michael. Fleming for his great reading on that one. The other store you're going to hear is about a woman who was generally known s stagecoach Mary, or at least that's how the history books remember her, but her real name was Mary Field and she was a very interesting person. Helping us with that episode. Doing a bit of dialogue is my friend Molly Victor from well. She's the creator of stoop kids, stories, which is an awesome podcast. Part of kids listen highly recommend. Check it out. Be sure to stick around for some songs at the end and patriotic shoutouts and a little bit of fun hiding out there promise. Let's get started. Robbers didn't scare fields. Wolves didn't scare her either. She had held her own against many even deadly cold weather was of little concern to her. Actually for that she had developed a little trick to stay warm and not freeze during these particularly perilous nights to keep her blood pumping, and your temperature up Mary would pace around her wagon all night long to keep from falling asleep. She figured if she did fall asleep in the cold, she might not wake up. A night without any sleep was definitely better than a morning. That never comes as you can see. Mary took her job seriously she had made an oath to the United States Postal Service and had become the very first black woman to have a postal contract and a carrying route with her wagon and team of horses she was responsible for hauling mail and freight through remote areas of Montana, meeting the train and cascade and navigating to Saint Peter's mission. This is how she earned her nickname stagecoach. Mary the fact is she didn't take that horsedrawn wagon to get mail and freight until she was well into adulthood. For most of her life, she wasn't stagecoach Mary at all, but instead Mary, fields. She had been born on a plantation in Tennessee around eighteen, thirty two was never sure about when her birthday was. Like the rest of her family Mary had been enslaved. Forced hard labor in the field was the fate of many enslaved men and women at this plantation. And Mary grew up to be a powerful young woman who worked beside the powerful men. She was tall over six feet by most accounts, and she had a broad, incredibly strong. Now, eighteen sixty five brought an enforceable end to enslavement in the United States, and while many emancipated men and women stayed near their families and friends. Mary immediately left Tennessee in search of work. She I found it on the river during Poker Games and bull sessions later in her life. She liked to tell the story of her job on a riverboat. The Robert E was a steamboat named after the confederate general on which Mary worked in eighteen seventy, there was a famous steamboat race down the Mississippi River from Saint Louis to New Orleans between her boat and another steamer called the NACHOS. Nearly, everything moved at a slower pace in the eighteen hundreds. So it might be hard for us to understand the excitement of a race travelling at an average of fourteen miles an hour and stretched out over several days. Wasn't a slow as molasses, but it wasn't far off. Nonetheless, Americans paid attention. The plotting pace of the race lent itself to the. Of the day, as the steamboats paddled in pushed their way down the river, small towns with Telegraph, the time, each vote passed by two newspapers, print and several daily editions. As exciting as it might have been to track the progress in the morning and evening editions of the newspaper. It was certainly more exciting to be at Mary Shoes, which were on deck or at sometimes below deck by the boiler of the League. She were called the crew feeding the boilers with anything. It would burn to keep the steam earning the paddle wheel. They ran out of wood for the fires. They'd stoke it with other things broken up furniture old clothes, even somebody's desk. What ever it took to win the race? She said to that end. They actually through a whole side of Bacon in the fire. That greasy smoke may have been the key. The League won the three day race by six hours not long after this through the connection of a passenger. Mary went north for a different, even slower paced work. She arrived in Toledo Ohio for the job. At the Ursuline Convent of the sacred heart she served as groundskeeper Gardner, and handled any other jobs for the community of nuns who lived there. In exchange, the nuns gave her a room board and a paycheck Mary definitely stuck out amongst the backdrop of Solomon religious ladies, sharing space nothing about the holy environment could stop Mary from yelling at them or anyone else. Who messed up her meticulously kept landscaping.

Mary Mary Field Mary Shoes Mick Sullivan Tennessee League Ursuline Convent United States United States Postal Service Molly Victor Fleming Mississippi River Michael Bacon Toledo Ohio Poker Montana Gardner Saint Louis Robert E
"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

The Past and the Curious

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

"Oh, oh, Hey, we're on! Hello, everybody! My name is Mick Sullivan and welcome to the past and the curious. This is episode number forty six, and we've done an episode about male done episode about trains, and we're kind of talking about both of those things again, but it's two completely new stories. One of the stories you're going to hear is about owning the dog. And I need to think friend of the show Michael. Fleming for his great reading on that one. The other store you're going to hear is about a woman who was generally known s stagecoach Mary, or at least that's how the history books remember her, but her real name was Mary Field and she was a very interesting person. Helping us with that episode. Doing a bit of dialogue is my friend Molly Victor from well. She's the creator of stoop kids, stories, which is an awesome podcast. Part of kids listen highly recommend. Check it out. Be sure to stick around for some songs at the end and patriotic shoutouts and a little bit of fun hiding out there promise. Let's get started. Robbers didn't scare fields. Wolves didn't scare her either. She had held her own against many even deadly cold weather was of little concern to her. Actually for that she had developed a little trick to stay warm and not freeze during these particularly perilous nights to keep her blood pumping, and your temperature up Mary would pace around her wagon all night long to keep from falling asleep. She figured if she did fall asleep in the cold, she might not wake up. A night without any sleep was definitely better than a morning. That never comes as you can see. Mary took her job seriously she had made an oath to the United States Postal Service and had become the very first black woman to have a postal contract and a carrying route with her wagon and team of horses she was responsible for hauling mail and freight through remote areas of Montana, meeting the train and cascade and navigating to Saint Peter's mission. This is how she earned her nickname stagecoach. Mary the fact is she didn't take that horsedrawn wagon to get mail and freight until she was well into adulthood. For most of her life, she wasn't stagecoach Mary at all, but instead Mary, fields. She had been born on a plantation in Tennessee around eighteen, thirty two was never sure about when her birthday was. Like the rest of her family Mary had been enslaved. Forced hard labor in the field was the fate of many enslaved men and women at this plantation. And Mary grew up to be a powerful young woman who worked beside the powerful men. She was tall over six feet by most accounts, and she had a broad, incredibly strong. Now, eighteen sixty five brought an enforceable end to enslavement in the United States, and while many emancipated men and women stayed near their families and friends. Mary immediately left Tennessee in search of work. She I found it on the river during Poker Games and bull sessions later in her life. She liked to tell the story of her job on a riverboat. The Robert E was a steamboat named after the confederate general on which Mary worked in eighteen seventy, there was a famous steamboat race down the Mississippi River from Saint Louis to New Orleans between her boat and another steamer called the NACHOS. Nearly, everything moved at a slower pace in the eighteen hundreds. So it might be hard for us to understand the excitement of a race travelling at an average of fourteen miles an hour and stretched out over several days. Wasn't a slow as molasses, but it wasn't far off. Nonetheless, Americans paid attention. The plotting pace of the race lent itself to the. Of the day, as the steamboats paddled in pushed their way down the river, small towns with Telegraph, the time, each vote passed by two newspapers, print and several daily editions. As exciting as it might have been to track the progress in the morning and evening editions of the newspaper. It was certainly more exciting to be at Mary Shoes, which were on deck or at sometimes below deck by the boiler of the League. She were called the crew feeding the boilers with anything. It would burn to keep the steam earning the paddle wheel. They ran out of wood for the fires. They'd stoke it with other things broken up furniture old clothes, even somebody's desk. What ever it took to win the race? She said to that end. They actually through a whole side of

Mary Mary Field Mary Shoes Tennessee Mick Sullivan Montana League United States Ursuline Convent United States Postal Service Molly Victor Fleming Mississippi River Amadeus Michael Poker Ahmed Bacon Saint Louis Toledo Ohio
Deliveries!

The Past and the Curious

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Deliveries!

"Oh, oh, Hey, we're on! Hello, everybody! My name is Mick Sullivan and welcome to the past and the curious. This is episode number forty six, and we've done an episode about male done episode about trains, and we're kind of talking about both of those things again, but it's two completely new stories. One of the stories you're going to hear is about owning the dog. And I need to think friend of the show Michael. Fleming for his great reading on that one. The other store you're going to hear is about a woman who was generally known s stagecoach Mary, or at least that's how the history books remember her, but her real name was Mary Field and she was a very interesting person. Helping us with that episode. Doing a bit of dialogue is my friend Molly Victor from well. She's the creator of stoop kids, stories, which is an awesome podcast. Part of kids listen highly recommend. Check it out. Be sure to stick around for some songs at the end and patriotic shoutouts and a little bit of fun hiding out there promise. Let's get started. Robbers didn't scare fields. Wolves didn't scare her either. She had held her own against many even deadly cold weather was of little concern to her. Actually for that she had developed a little trick to stay warm and not freeze during these particularly perilous nights to keep her blood pumping, and your temperature up Mary would pace around her wagon all night long to keep from falling asleep. She figured if she did fall asleep in the cold, she might not wake up. A night without any sleep was definitely better than a morning. That never comes as you can see. Mary took her job seriously she had made an oath to the United States Postal Service and had become the very first black woman to have a postal contract and a carrying route with her wagon and team of horses she was responsible for hauling mail and freight through remote areas of Montana, meeting the train and cascade and navigating to Saint Peter's mission. This is how she earned her nickname stagecoach. Mary the fact is she didn't take that horsedrawn wagon to get mail and freight until she was well into adulthood. For most of her life, she wasn't stagecoach Mary at all, but instead Mary, fields. She had been born on a plantation in Tennessee around eighteen, thirty two was never sure about when her birthday was. Like the rest of her family Mary had been enslaved. Forced hard labor in the field was the fate of many enslaved men and women at this plantation. And Mary grew up to be a powerful young woman who worked beside the powerful men. She was tall over six feet by most accounts, and she had a broad, incredibly strong. Now, eighteen sixty five brought an enforceable end to enslavement in the United States, and while many emancipated men and women stayed near their families and friends. Mary immediately left Tennessee in search of work. She I found it on the river during Poker Games and bull sessions later in her life. She liked to tell the story of her job on a riverboat. The Robert E was a steamboat named after the confederate general on which Mary worked in eighteen seventy, there was a famous steamboat race down the Mississippi River from Saint Louis to New Orleans between her boat and another steamer called the NACHOS. Nearly, everything moved at a slower pace in the eighteen hundreds. So it might be hard for us to understand the excitement of a race travelling at an average of fourteen miles an hour and stretched out over several days. Wasn't a slow as molasses, but it wasn't far off. Nonetheless, Americans paid attention. The plotting pace of the race lent itself to the. Of the day, as the steamboats paddled in pushed their way down the river, small towns with Telegraph, the time, each vote passed by two newspapers, print and several daily editions. As exciting as it might have been to track the progress in the morning and evening editions of the newspaper. It was certainly more exciting to be at Mary Shoes, which were on deck or at sometimes below deck by the boiler of the League. She were called the crew feeding the boilers with anything. It would burn to keep the steam earning the paddle wheel. They ran out of wood for the fires. They'd stoke it with other things broken up furniture old clothes, even somebody's desk. What ever it took to win the race? She said to that end. They actually through a whole side of

Mary Molly Victor Mississippi River Mary Field Mary Shoes Mick Sullivan Tennessee United States United States Postal Service Fleming Michael Montana League Poker Saint Louis Robert E New Orleans
"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

The Past and the Curious

10:49 min | 3 years ago

"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

Babe Ruth Jackie Mitchell baseball New York Yankees Lou Gehrig Chattanooga Lou Gehrig Lou Chattanooga lookouts Louisville Heine Bros. Mick Sullivan Heine Liu Coffey Naini CLYDE Barfoot Lucy ISAACs Steve Reich h. e. i. m. e. b. r. o. s. c. Kelly Moore
"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

The Past and the Curious

10:49 min | 3 years ago

"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

"Here's Coffey Naini hiney hiney others copy any at work at home or on the road. You deserve great coffee, Honey, brothers, coffee subscription plan gives you top quality, organic, fair, trade coffee delivered right to your door or office automatically. Others dumpy. You select the frequency, the quantity and the variety of copy and Heine brothers will take care of the rest shipping. Included also makes great yet so order online at Heine Bros. coffee dot com. That's h. e. i. m. e. b. r. o. s. c. o. f. f. e. e. dot com forward slash subscription and use the offer code the past Heine for five dollars off any scripture. Others copy any. Hi everyone. My name is Mick Sullivan and this is episode twenty two of the past. And the curious now every so often we get a request for theme and since I do nearly everything for the podcast, well, it takes me a lot of time to get that complete. But I got one completed and this is four, Lucy my good friend, Lucy ISAACs who along time ago said that she wanted to hear some stories about baseball. Now, if you don't like baseball or you don't even like sports, you're still going to love this episode. It's got spies. It's got a seventeen year old girl with incredible courage. And it also has a recording of amber estimate and myself performing summertime. In this episode, you're going to hear the voice of Kelly Moore and Bailey. Music newboys Bailey is the curatorial specialist at the Louisville, slugger museum and factory right here in my hometown of Louisville, Kentucky. It's a great place. If you're baseball fan, we're grateful and excited for her help as well as inspiration. From PJ Shelley. It was nineteen thirty one and the official baseball season had not yet begun at the very beginning of April. It was still the time of year when teams played exhibitions or unofficial games and the New York Yankees were doing just that in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The people of Chattanooga didn't get to see the likes of Babe, Ruth and Lou Gehrig very often. So when two of the greatest baseball players came to play a game, it was not to be missed the Bronx bombers as they were nicknamed had won the World Series in twenty seven and twenty eight. And the two stars always seemed to be setting new records with their powerful Louisville, slugger baseball, bats, no one, not even the local fans really believed. The minor league Chattanooga lookouts would pull out a victory against the Yankees, but it was certain to be a data. Remember either way there was talk of a new pitcher making debut for the lookouts this game, and it has. Happened sooner than people expected. You see the starting pitcher, a man named CLYDE Barfoot gave up a single and a double to the first two hitters with no outs in the first inning. The score was already one, two zero. Never a good way to start a game. So the manager sent poor CLYDE to the dugout and cold for a relief pitcher to take his place pitching to the next better. The men named Babe, Ruth. Babe was a legend already by this time, and though he was towards the end of his career, he was still an incredible hitter that season. He would go on to hit forty, six home runs and one hundred sixty two RBI's. If he got a hold of a pitch, he was likely to send it over the fence and the Yankees would be up three to zip before the lookouts got their first out. So the new pitcher on the mound had to be careful. The first pitch came towards Ruth all one. Then the second pitch this time he liked twenty so and he took a swing at it. Steve Reich, one another pitch. Another swing. Another miss St. right to when the fourth pitch came across the plate, babe just stood there. Apparently believing. It was not a strike. The empire. Obviously disagreed strike three. You're out the hometown. Crowd cheered. Exuberance for the debut in pitcher, the rookie on the mound was a young lady named Jackie Mitchell. No more than seventeen years old. They couldn't believe it. She struck out Babe, Ruth and from several reports at the ballpark, neither could Babe Ruth himself. Jackie was just a young girl when her father had put a baseball in her hands and quickly. She developed a love for the game as well as basketball despite being relatively small, she was exceptionally coordinated fast and strong. So when a neighbor. So her throwing baseball, he knew she was someone special. This was fortunate for Jackie because this neighbor was future baseball hall of fame pitcher, das- events, dazzling new thing or two about a fastball as he led the National League. His vision of the majors in strikeouts seven seasons in a row. Does he spent time showing teenage girl, the finer. Points of throwing a baseball. And before long she was throwing well enough to get the attention of the owner of the Chattanooga lookouts while a few women had tried no woman had successfully and truly broken the barrier into a professional men's baseball league. Perhaps Jackie would be that person despite claims that this was a gimmick. Her contract would indicate that she was considered a full part of the roster. Her mother was even planning to join her aboard the team bus when they went out for road games when Jackie got word that she'd be pitching her first game against none other than the fearsome Yankees. She immediately took to the field for practice with great determination, and she overdid it when game day arrived. She was laid up with a sore arm according to the paper's. Luckily she would be saved by the rain which delayed the game day and gave her enough rest to spend a short amount of time on the mound. So there. She stood before crowd of four thousand, you'd think you might feel a sense of relief after just striking out Babe, Ruth, but Jackie did not have that luxury because batting after babe was Lou Gehrig Lou was younger than babe and a star on the rise. He'd go onto hit just as many home runs as babe that season and lead the majors in RBI's to boot. Now, though they were on the same team. There was definitely some competition between Liu and babe, sue with babe striking out. Lou really had a chance to stick it to him by getting a hit off of Jackie. But of course, Jackie would have the final say in that matter. She took a deep breath, look towards the catcher's mitt and ready yourself to pitch curveball strike one curveball strike to curve ball, right three and that was it. The crowd went wild in seven pitches young Jackie Mitchell struck out two of the greatest hitters in baseball history. When the next batter wound up on bass, Jackie was pulled from the game and went to the dugout to rest. Her still sore arm hearing the applause as she made her way from the mound as expected. The gang keys would win by ten runs that day despite the loss, Jackie packed up her stuff and headed home satisfied and her day's work. Oddly, though the press were more interested in interviewing Ruth and Gary than the seventeen year old young lady who had struck them both out. As it would turn out the league was not in favor of a woman being allowed to play in a men's baseball league, and she would not suit up for the lookouts. Again, she continued her career on a number of barnstorming teams, including one that is often described as the Harlem Globetrotters of baseball. But Jackie didn't really care for the antics and tricks they performed for the sake of the audience instead preferring to focus on pitching. By nineteen twenty eight. She had retired from baseball and joined the family business of selling lenses and glasses. Now, we want to point out that many people have claimed that this notable event in nineteen thirty one was simply a stunt and the teams had arranged for Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth to strike out. You can believe what you like. And there is evidence for both sides of the story. People believing it to be a stunt often point out that if it hadn't rained, Jackie was supposed to have pitched on April first or April Fools day. Also, the lookouts owner often attracted attention by pulling stunts like giving away a car at a game, bringing elephants to the field, even trading a player for a Turkey. However, we would like to remind you that as good of a hitter as he was Babe. Ruth was also famous for the incredibly high number of strikeouts in his career. Additionally, he and Liu batted left handed, which is hard to do against a left handed pitcher, like Jackie. It was also uncharacteristic of the Yankees manager to have allowed such a thing to happen. No one on the team was looking to embarrass themselves under any circumstances. Eddie Kenna the man catching Jackie's throws that day had gotten to know her pretty well. And he was quoted as saying, I was impressed with Jackie skills. She's twice as good as I'd imagined her sign in with the lookout certainly isn't a joke. Some people think as for Jackie herself, there was never any doubt in her mind until the day. She died in nineteen eighty seven. Jackie was certain that her curveball had stymied Babe, Ruth and Lou Gehrig fair and square. When she was just seventeen no less no strain. To the people of Chattanooga, Jackie did return to the mound. One more time throwing out the first pitch of the season in nineteen eighty two at the age of sixty eight.

Babe Ruth Jackie Mitchell baseball New York Yankees Lou Gehrig Chattanooga Lou Gehrig Lou Chattanooga lookouts Louisville Heine Bros. Mick Sullivan Heine Liu Coffey Naini CLYDE Barfoot Lucy ISAACs Steve Reich h. e. i. m. e. b. r. o. s. c. Kelly Moore
Watermelons are Related to Vegetables

The Past and the Curious

10:49 min | 3 years ago

Watermelons are Related to Vegetables

Babe Ruth Jackie Mitchell Baseball New York Yankees Lou Gehrig Chattanooga Lou Gehrig Lou Chattanooga Lookouts Louisville Heine Bros. Mick Sullivan Heine LIU Coffey Naini Clyde Barfoot Lucy Isaacs Steve Reich H. E. I. M. E. B. R. O. S. C. Kelly Moore
"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Combat Jack Show

The Combat Jack Show

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"mick sullivan" Discussed on The Combat Jack Show

"Like stops right now and it's like wow people really love what i'm doing there's some people that hate what i'm doing they're super smart and i'm kidding but there's there's some people that just a lot of people that really like what i'm doing if i stopped now and just gino keep doing what people want that sort of like an intellectual surrender for an artist adventurous and keep on making nike pushing the boundaries and leaving your unique to work out a record company and have you put feces on a canvas yet you'll feces know anyone else's feces no any animal feces at all no okay so you still got things at you bless us to do list right i i'd love for this episode to feature your art if that's okay with you guys we're to canvases and ian is going to draw one drawn wanted them and make a design and then later i'm going to bring it home and i'm gonna fill it in with acrylic paints and blend them because that's what i do i blend acrylics and we're gonna do a collaboration piece for the first time ever and it's going to start right now oh that's amazing as ing irish okay yes mick sullivan sullivan yeah good good irish boy good honestly michael sullivan first guy that called me a nigger same bart doing well mike that's just turned out i i know you didn't he in michael sullivan did he's still got that list.

michael sullivan gino ian mick sullivan mike
"mick sullivan" Discussed on What If World

What If World

09:18 min | 3 years ago

"mick sullivan" Discussed on What If World

"Vert if kids. Me. If you live travel back inside. Welcome. It is. Hey, there folks and welcome back to what if world, the show where your questions and inspire off the cuff stories. I'm Mr. Eric, your host and today I am joined by my good friend, Mick Sullivan, hey, Eric, hey, make. I'm so happy to have you on my show. I've been looking forward to this for a while now. I'm really excited to I. If you don't know, Mick is the host of the past and the curious it is a history podcast for kids. It's really funny actually, mixed gonna talk about it more at the end. Some of you, some of you might have heard me. I was actually on that right mic. You were that was the last episode is about the statue of liberty. It was awesome. I had so much fun and you're hilarious. Thank you. It was just a joy to do something a little historical. You got to hear this guy's Frenchaccent well, you won't hear it today, but unless we throw in Lafayette now too late. Anyway, folks, we were so excited about teaming up that we decided to do a historical question together, which is why I've been asking my listeners for some historical questions. Let's play the first from Caitlyn. And. I mean. His clothes and my question is flooded Alexander Hamilton allied as a vampire. Wow, Lynn, what a great vampire eleven. As soon as I heard that question, I thought Alexander vampire ten and story just all started coming together, but we did get an email Pistore question from grace, and I'm just gonna read that for you folks really quickly so that we can get right into our story. Grace asks what if George Washington had Fred vizo maybe dog for a pet. Let's so wonderful mic. I think these kids are probably excited for their story and I'm excited to get into it. All right, let's yeah, let's go. Once upon a time. General. George, Washington was planning for a battle of the revolutionary war. He was in his tents. He was looking over maps and charts and realizing that he just did not have a lot of troops. He did not have a lot of food. It was logistically a nightmare. I'm going to need some help if I ever have a hope of winning this war at that moment a little dog sniffed his way into the tent schooled me Mitha watching Penn. That's general Washington addendum Benton. Do you have any like scraps the little extra hard tackle any of that good stuff? My goodness. Are you Assam be dog a hug. Add guilty as charged. I have never seen something so cute and all my life. You stink really bad your tongue so long. I not too long for my mouth that the whole thing at that moment Alexander. Hamilton also entered the very same tent. Knock, knock, it's tend to flap you. You don't have flip flap lap. Oh, Mr. Hamilton? Yes. Come on in how do you do George? Well, Mr. Mr. Washington, I'm sorry. It general Washington general, Washington. I'm sorry. Oh, no, I'm I'm great. I, you know, I was really worried about this more. I thought I needed some help planning it and then whip. Is that what is that? What's wrong with that dog? Is that what the pug and then and then I got the stick in me and. Anyway now Massamba but I just sticks. It's okay. Okay. Okay. Never met his dog before you. Listen, I I need help planning this war and I think that you are. Yeah, I'm your guy. Sorry. I wasn't. I wasn't talking to you. I was talking to Fred the Kerr. Go on, oh, I couldn't totally help with this war. If you got like a little bit the meatballs or like a really good steak. Actually those on my favorites are can help a work for sticks to. All right. Is long as you're comfortable working under Fred the Kerr as they say, living his easy. Zombie is hard at my first or the. I think that we should collect all the stacks like you see that big stick that all the soldiers got slung over their back the they're all carrying sticks yet. They got sticks on straps. I think they need those. Those are. I think those are rifles all, but my taking orders from you dog. I mean, I'm giving the orders. It's your choice if you want to follow them or not, if you're my superior superior zombie dog. Sure. So you're gonna go get those rifles stick thinks I think that would be a very good threaded. Chief just get all the stickers and wingham and in a big pile. All right. I'll go get the. Sticks. This is awfully unorthodox. Alexander Hamilton was why confused by all this, but he did is he was told, can orders from Doug and collected all the rifles from all the soldiers, like pickup sticks and put them in George Washington's tent think this is all the rifles I do another run through, but this is like two or three hundred of them maybe more at it, I lost count. Yeah, that we good. But Fred didn't seem to be paying much attention to Mr. Hamilton. He seemed to be enjoying his sticks. Angang anger gung that one went off that allows dick. This zombie. He's tireless. He's just strategizing old through the night. I guess being Zone B, he never needs to rest. So convenient. Mr. Hamilton, you, you are dismissed. We will see how this wonderful strategy pays off. Well, I am not as AVI and I need to get some sleep, so I'm going to go to my tent and think about this strange occurrence as Alexander walked back to his tent, everyone in the camp seemed to be talking about Fred, those on be dog. How did you that great dog yet? I thought it was awesome. That's a super cool dog tongue like really long tongue, man, that dog totally showed you up. Was he talking to me? You don't talk to Alexander Hamilton like that obser-. You just must really wish your his on be right now because then maybe you'd be getting all the attention like him. I can. I can eat sticks. It's what's the big deal, but you're not as cute. There's just something about that zombie dog look look, how long my tongue is. When I was a kid, they called me Alexander Hamilton. That's funny man, but, but you know, Fred the Kerr, he's just. Effortlessly funny everything. He does spend make me laugh. He just ate sticks all day. I don't get. I don't see what you see in that dog. Alexander Hamilton was frustrated. Everyone seemed to just be listening to Fred the dog and watching them chew on sticks and bringing them more rifles to chew on woes me. Alexander Hamilton, just alone, kickin cayennes people talking about me behind my back think my just beg my pardon and take my leave and Alexander Hamilton digest that. He left the front lines, but before long he found himself in front of Anjelica Elisa and Peggy van piler well, Hello. What are you all? Oh, Alexander my receiving feeling of jealousy from you been eating some peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Yeah, it's at dog. You fear. Is it not? It's a smelly dog with big long tongue eating sticks. There might be something that we can do for you. If you need to be as ambi- like him. We just happened to be the van Pyla sisters as I'm be me. I don't know, sort of like a vampire. It's it's on head. It's in the same fan. Good sign up. Wow. I didn't think it would be that easy which is bite your neck once and then you're a vampire. Why here. Yeah, pinches. Okay. Well, here you pull my hair back, you know, got long, long locks. There you go and with one little nibble from the van piler sisters, do. Alexander Hamilton became Alexander van.

Alexander Hamilton Fred Alexander Mr. Mr. Washington Fred the Kerr Washington George Mick Sullivan Alexander van Mr. Eric van piler van Pyla Lafayette Fred vizo Grace Frenchaccent Lynn Assam