35 Burst results for "Michio"

"michio" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

04:25 min | 2 months ago

"michio" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"So much for joining me. My pleasure this has been clear and vivid. at least i hope so. My thanks to the sponsor of this podcast and to all of you who support our show on patriot. You keep clear and vivid up and running and after we pay. Expenses whatever's leftover goes to the all the santa for communicating science.

"michio" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

06:34 min | 2 months ago

"michio" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"It sounds like you're saying the mass of earth he's round already because the center of it is pulling it warped space around pushing the earth into a globe right and that curve space is also pushing me down onto the earth. I think you got it. that's it. The earth is warping the space around. You and that warps space in turn is causing you to be pushed into your chair. And that's what you're not flung out a thousand miles per hour which is velocity of us going around. The earth were not flung into outer space because the space around us created by. The earth is pushing us toward the earth. While it may be. You've made it possible for me to sleep tonight. I think you got it. No i think when we come back from our break michio kaku explores the idea that we exist in our universe only through an incredibly lucky break and he wonders about the chances of their being others in the universe who were equally lucky as well as whether our luck will hold. Don't forget if you enjoy listening to the fascinating guests. We have on clear and vivid. You can help. Keep the flame alive by becoming a patron of the show. Clear and vivid and the oldest center for communicating. Science are both nonprofit and your patronage of clear and vivid. Help support them. Both he can become a patron at any level and get early access to special videos at the highest level. You can get fun in sometimes weird benefits like my recording of your personalized voicemail. Message either with courteous dignity over the rambunctious among you a message with a certain amount of attitude. Take a look at patriotair dot com slash clear and vivid patriotic dot com slash clear and vivid. And thank you seems to me if you are what you eat then it kind of matters where what you eat comes from right. The wild alaskan company gets it seafood from alaska and the pacific northwest. And it gets it wild. It's never farmed or modified and contains no antibiotics wild alaskan company delivered this high quality sustainably sourced wild-caught seafood. Right to your door. He can choose from salmon whitefish or a combination and every month you can explore different specials. One hundred percents satisfaction guaranteed or your money back catching nutrition from nature with wild alaskan company. And just in case. They didn't mention it before. This fish is wild. And right now you can get fifteen dollars off your first box of premium seafood when visit wild alaskan company dot com slash older. That's wild alaskan company dot com slash older for fifteen dollars off your first box. Wild alaskan company dot com slash older. Make sure to use our url to let them know that we sent you. This is clear and vivid and now back to my conversation with michio kaku when you were talking about the effect of these discoveries on our lives every big revolution in understanding nature seems to have given us a benefit a change in their lives but it also at the same time as given us a challenge in every in every instance the industrial revolution. We're only discovering a couple of hundred years later is changing the climate of our planet. And unless we do something about that it will be severely damaging to our lives. I of the obvious. Threat of nuclear warfare is challenges. Well so my question is do you believe. Do you believe that science has a responsibility to think about the possible negative effects every time. A new discoveries made the way for instance. Jennifer dowden has cautioned everybody against misuse of crisper. Gene editing tool what. What's your feeling about that. Well is he. Science is a sword is a double edged sword. One side of the sort can cut against ignorance poverty disease in create wealth of society. The other side of the sword can cut against people. The key question is who wields the sword and for what purpose so this is where democracy comes in but damarcus you have to be educated. They can't simply wheel. The sword of science without understanding why is potentially dangerous or why is potentially great in terms of unleashing prosperity onto society. And so i think you're right. Everyone has to take take into account the fact that there could be a drawback to some of these technologies. Let me explain. When i was in high school. I was in the national science fair. And i earned the attention of edward teller. Edward teller was the father of the hydrogen bomb and he took me under his wing and he wanted to design haider's warheads well. I was offered a job designing hydrogen warhead. But i said no. I don't wanna design. How your warheads. We'd rather work on up to even bigger the big bane and even bigger explosion. I remember one thing. He told me he said that. Nuclear power plants are very very powerful. Very good but they are potentially dangerous so they do not belong on the surface of the earth. They belong underground in other words. If you have a chernobyl or fukushima or a three mile island you simply put the manhole cover on it and walk away because everything is underground and so it impressed to me. The fact that technologies are powerful but they have to be used correctly or else. You'll have tache affi. We have to have democratic control over these technologies or else handful of people will make decisions without realizing the social consequences.

michio kaku Jennifer dowden pacific northwest damarcus edward teller alaska national science fair haider tache affi
"michio" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

08:14 min | 2 months ago

"michio" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"Most of the matter of the universe is nothing but a higher vibration a higher vibration of the string and just two weeks ago two weeks ago. Big news from fermilab outside chicago. They found that maybe there could be a new particle out there. A new force a fifth force that they've detected with the with the fermilab detectors and that could be again another vibration of the strings and physics is therefore the harmonies the harmonies. You right on this over band. Chemistry is the melodies. You can play when these rubber bands bump into each other. The universe is a symphony of these strings. And then the mind of god that albert einstein spent thirty years of his life writing about the mind of god whitby cosmic music cosmic music resonating through hyperspace. That would be the mind of god so in other words by taggers two thousand years ago headed right two thousand years ago. The great geometry. Biogas said that music newseek is the paradigm rich enough to explain the vast variety of forms that we see around us. What else is rich enough to do that. Music he said but that theory never went anywhere. The roman empire fell apart and for a thousand years. We were thrown into darkness superstition and magic. But now we're reviving the all pythagorean idea that matt that music is rich enough to explain the diversity the rich diversity of matter that we see around us. But it's the music of subatomic particles so my questions about. This may not be answerable because the theory may not have delve into this yet but when you say it. The strings are like rubber bands. That mean they're always circular or do they stretch out some great lengths. Sometimes sometimes they break and in which case you can have strings connecting other other strings They have tremendous gyrations then. We're still trying to catalog. All the different possibilities and also a strings can connect with membranes. this is new The fact that membranes like a beach ball or an apple or sphere are also solutions of this equation. So meaning that we have a theory of strings and membranes and they've vibrate end eleven dimensions so these are not ordinary membranes. And our universe. Our universe could very well be a membrane. A three-dimensional membranes could be the most accurate description of our universe. So einstein gave us a picture that our universe is a bubble of some sort or a membrane. it's expanding we live on the skin of the bubble. And that's called the big bang theory string theory says there are other universes out there and when these universes collide that could be. The big bang are when they split in half. That could be the big bang. So we have a bubble bath of universes or membranes and they float they flow in a much larger arena. Children assigns museum. Say mommy daddy. If the universe is expanding what is it expanding into well. If our universe is a three dimensional membrane is expanding in a higher dimension up to eleven dimensions and so we think that the multi verse is a bubble bath in eleven inventions and that universities are being born even as we speak even as we started this conversation universes have been born. Big banks have taken place far far away. Fortunately far away. We don't want to be close. Well you've already got me stupefied. There's something in your book that puzzles me. As a matter of fact for day. I would go to sleep trying to understand trying to get a picture of curved space. That's ninety and finally. Finally i i. I realized i hadn't included time space time. And right around that point. I just became unconscious and i was able to go to sleep. Well i like to put it this way. Shakespeare shakespeare one said that Everything is a stage we are actors and actresses making entrances and exits. That's the newtonian idea. The newtonian idea is spaces. Flat unmoving uncurbed and we are actors basically on the stage of life. That's anatolian shakespearean way to look at things. The einsteinian way is that the floor. The floor of the stage is warped. And when you walk in a straight line you are pushed to the left pushed to the right because the floor curved so you might say there's a force a forest pushing you to the left pushing it to the right but there's no force at all. The floor is warped. That's why you have this force of gravity or another way is taking sheet a paper in crumple it and put some ants on when ants move on a cripple sheet of paper the ants would say there's a forest is a forest pushing me the left pushing me to the right but we know there's no force at all it's just a crumpled sheet of paper and so einstein set a ha that's what gravity is. Gravity is nothing but the effect of space and time being warped so the stage of life. The stage of life is warped and you cannot move in a straight line so that leads to the sentence from your book that gave me. No end of of consternation which is gravity does not po space pushes so if gravity is not there. What's making space curve. Well why does it push. Well why am. I sitting in the chair. Normally you'd say that gravity is pulling me down into the chair. And that's why i'm saying in this year right now but there's a second way to look at it. You can also assume that the space around me is curved and pushing me to push me into the chair so in that sense. Gravity does not pull because there's no such thing as gravitational pull this an illusion spaces curve and space could push me into the chair. So that's why you're sitting at share right now because the space around you is warped by the earth gravitational field and it's pushing you into the share. That's the part. We just said the part that. I don't get and i'm hoping if i get it. Multitude of people listening. We'll get it to if space only curves in the presence of some mass that we considered to be pulling us down. It sounds like it's pulling space down to its hits making space curved so that the guilty person and all of this is not the curvature of space it's what's making space curve which is the mass which is what we call pulling his down to earth and you. Can you unbend my mind on that. Well you got it right matter like your body okay is causing a distortion of the space around you. The earth being much bigger is causing the distortion of space around you in a much bigger way. So the origin of this curvature is mass but once it creates the curvature it then causes things to warp and so why does the earth go around the sun i the son warps the space around it around the earth. The earth then moves in this curve space due to the sun's gravity. So where did it come from. It came from the sun. The sun warps the space around the earth. And what happens to the earth. He goes in a circle. So why does it go in circle because it's being pushed by the bent space created by the.

fermilab Biogas Shakespeare shakespeare albert einstein chicago einstein matt apple sun
"michio" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

07:32 min | 2 months ago

"michio" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"To these other universes and then of course. I often get the question if there are other universes than is elvis presley still alive in another parallel universe and the answer is yes he could very well still be alive not an argument adverse but in another parallel universe he can still be belting out those hits hit after hit. That's michio kaku. Who has taken up the challenge that frustrated even albert einstein the challenge to find a theory of everything or is he puts it in his new book with his characteristic flair for capturing our attention to discover the god equation. Michio kaku was a major proponent of string theory the idea that all of matters made up of tiny vibrating rubber like strings and he believes the field is on track to reveal as he puts it the mind of god. This is so great to be talking with you today because you are so fantastic has a communicator. Your books are so so readable that i find myself going back over sentences just to see how you did it. Thank you did you. Did you find you had this talent or did you work on it studiously. Well you know I go back to what. Einstein one said that unless a theory can be explained to a child. The theory is probably useless. Meaning that every theory has a principal a picture a simple capitalisation that even children can understand so i try to strive for that i started to strive for being able to explain something such that. A child should be able to understand the basic picture because physics is based on pictures. Newton had ball's going around other malls. Einstein had lightning bolts and trains and clocks very pictorial. So i tried to in my writing us. That einstein phrase that it has to be explained to a child or you're barking up the right tree with me. Glad you i'm glad you following that principle Your latest book. The god equation talks about the theory of everything right then. Einstein spent most of the last part of his life. thirty years to figure out Yeah and and was apparently unsuccessful. What interests me about that is what will change if we do get a theory of everything of we figure out something that combines all the forces known to us in one equation what what's going to happen. What it'd be different wouldn't matter. Well when newton worked out mechanics analogue gravity that laid the foundation for the industrial revolution. Locomotives steam engines mills factories. All of them based on newtonian mechanics and then maxwell and ferte worked out electricity and magnetism and that gave us the electric age dynamos generators television. And then when i signed gave us equals. Mc squared that unified matter and energy and that unlocked the secret of the stars. You know why. This sunshine's however i'll be very blunt about this we're not talking about universes we're not talking about locomotives and engines and television anymore. We're talking about the universe itself so the immediate practical implication of the theory of everything is nothing is not gonna affect you very well. It's been nice talking with you. However it'll answer some of the deepest philosophical religious questions of all time was there a beginning What happened before the beginning before genesis or a black hole. Is there a white hole. That's on the other side of a black hole or are there other universes are there. Gateways are there. Einstein rosen bridges connecting our university. Another universe none of these questions can be answered using the old einsteinian theory. But you see that's where string theory comes in which is of course the subject of the book. It could answer these questions once and for all whether there are other universes whether there are gateways to these other universes and then of course. I often get the question if there are other universes than is elvis presley still alive in another parallel universe and the answer is yes he could very will still be alive night in our universe but in another parallel universe he could still be building out those hits hit after hit it another universe show. Let's talk about this theory that you've dedicated your life to in to a great extent. String theory the idea. And do i have this right in a nutshell that the tiniest things are not adams or particles even tinier than that our little things string like things that vibrate and when they vibrate at a certain frequency you get a proton at another frequency. You get an electron and so on that. Close my guide. You got it right. If i had a super microscope and could peer into an electron it would not be a dot. It would be a rubber band and when you twain either abandoned vibrates at a different frequency and it turns into a neutrino. You try it again. It vibrate the over ban turns into a cork. And so how many frequencies says orban have an infinite number of frequencies depending upon how you vibrated and why does it vibrate. At a certain frequency of the i can hold down a violin string at a certain point and shorten the string and make it vibrate by plucking it or drawing a bow across it. Who draws the bow. What draws the bow across celestial superstring or string of any kind. Well people ask the question What is a string made of anyway. You cannot answer that question because it is the thing out of which everything else is made of the closest you could come is a say there's a condensation of energy it is basically pure energy condensed into a string and it has energy energy means that it vibrates so. Where does the vibration come from. It comes from the fact that it is energy personified. It is the concentration of energy. It is that out of which everything else is made. And as pythagoras noticed they are an infinite number of vibe rations you can make on these vibrating strings and each vibration is a note a b. flat c. sharp and they are arranged in octaves. So we are the lowest octave of the string everything around us is music of the lowest octave but there are higher vibrations of the strings. We think that dark matter. For example which holes the galaxy together and invisible substance which makes up..

michio kaku Einstein elvis presley ferte albert einstein Einstein rosen Newton maxwell newton orban adams pythagoras
"michio" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

01:30 min | 2 months ago

"michio" Discussed on Double Toasted

"Call here again. That's not how your relationship works with. A publisher got robo dammit. Don't call here again. This is back advance bright. I said stop calling here. Mother bugging you michio contract and he went right to fucking go. Believe me off. Send this encyclopedia volume maybe books. Maybe write a book a quilt. We leave you. Ask the low right goddamn people but mainly mainly they dropping shit for drama. Oh well well you know what moment. I was on air because moment. I thought that that copy was going to drop that laptop. Glad that i'll fuck. You heard me..

michio
"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

03:30 min | 3 months ago

"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"High school millions of them. Great scientists say. I don't want to become a scientist is boring. it's just memorizing. The parts of a flower is regurgitating. Boring stuff that. I'll never use again. We lose them because we make science. So boring is all memorization that who wants to become a scientist scientists about principles concepts like evolution or the aerodynamics of flying. It has nothing to do with well something to do with names. You had to give names to some of these things. But that's not what science is but that's what people think sciences. So when i write a book i tried to put principles concepts. That'll stay with you for the rest of your life. Rather than simply giving names to the stars or names the planets that's not size also about creativity. Great divvy and the mysterious and the unknown. I signed says that was more important than knowledge is the unknown. The mystery of the universe. That's what inspires people not the names of the planets but the possibilities of unknown clients. That's what stimulates scientific investigation. Don't ask you about one. More thing that i'll let you go okay. Miss might just be betraying myself as as a total pessimists even after this conversation but are you scared of dying well. I think it's genetic that we have no choice but to be afraid of dying because that's what evolution says you have to survive. Have children have progeny. Help the next generation survive so there gene can propagate. But you know. Like i said i think digitally will live forever is none. Of course the biological you but something of you will live forever and your memories. Your thoughts desires. Your consciousness will live forever. When you're digitized and you'll be able to interact with other digitized souls as well so you see there's hope but you try not to think.

"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

01:54 min | 3 months ago

"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"Would you mind quickly just giving me the real dummies version of string theory. I've been reading about it for days. Now and i'm not totally sure i understand it yet. Well you know. The greeks like fagor fabulous wanted a paradigm a theme some way to summarize the rich diversity of the universe into a single picture and one day he was looking at aligarh string and he realized that the longer the lower string the lower the note then. He went to a blacksmith shop and he saw that the longer the piece of metal the lower the.

"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

07:44 min | 3 months ago

"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"Michio. Welcome to the look into the show. Thank you so much for doing this. Let the the show. I have so many things that i wanna ask you about. But you're the first person that i've talked to who has really dedicated. A significant portion of their professional lives to thinking about aging and how aging will change. Maybe you could help me understand. What do you think it'll be like when i'm when i'm seventy in terms of biotechnology. What is aging gonna feel like thirty years from now as one person said we are the last generation. The die that's depressing. Knowing that future generations. death may be an option for them because what is aging anyway. Why do we have to die is because of well with time. Errors build up. Skins begins to wrinkle muscles began to atrophy. Dna begins to have errors in it. And when we're young we can repair a lot of these mistakes but when we get older even. Those repair mechanisms began to fail. And that's why we get old in fact that's why we die but there are a lot of different kinds of theories now about how we may be able to reverse some of this stuff not just biological clock but the actual build of errors within dna and one day not in my lifetime. I figured that out. When i was a kid is not going to happen in my lifetime. But i think in our grandchildren's lifetime they may have the option of slowing down the aging process and maybe stopping. They made like thirty years of age for many decades to come. That is well within the laws of physics. And i think is a real possibility but unfortunately not for my generation. That's how you think this is going to manifest. Is you'll be able to pick an age and stop at some point. I think so. I think there are two ways in which will become immortal eventually and again. There's nothing in the laws of physics saying that. You can't be immortal. The first is digital immortality which is coming actually very soon already in silicon valley. They're offering to digitize everything known about you. Your signature. Credit card transactions all your instagram photographs in the future. We'll have a very good picture of your consciousness. In fact and for example. I would love to talk to einstein. I would love to sit down in a library to talk to a digitised version that contains every known piece of literature film writing of einstein. And that's my brewery the future. We'll have a library of souls so when we become digitize. We will be immortal so this is something that is very feasible. The process is beginning now. And i think in that sense will begin to live forever now. What about biological immortality. Well there's something called the second law of thermodynamics which in some senses death warrant things decay things fall apart areas. Buildup things rust. That's a law of nature. For example taylor. Murders are like a biological clock there at the end of the chromosome. And there's sort of like your shoestring when you tell your strew string often enough. They plastic tips began to fray and when they fray the whole shoelace begins to fray a chromosome. But you see the second. Thermodynamics only works for closed systems. But you see an open systems. The second longer applies in other words. If we from the outside can use gene therapy to fix those broken genes. then there's nothing in the laws of physics preventing you from living forever and already. Scientists are beginning to look at this process at the cellular level. Now don't believe the hype. Don't believe that we had found views now. But i think the fountain of youth credibly could happen in this century kind of blows my mind. I wanna ask you about both sides of that immortality equation that you just laid out both digital and physical. You said that you'd love to have a conversation with einstein and you have this long long history with that if you had the opportunity to talk to him. What do you think you'd say well. When i was eight years old. I had an inspiration. I saw a photograph of man's desk would just died and they. There was unfinished book on that desk by a great scientist. I was fascinated by that story. Why couldn't he finished that book. Why couldn't he has his mother. What's so hard. Well that man who died was albert einstein and that book was the unified field theory. And i said to myself. That's what i wanna do for a living. I want to help complete that book Einstein once said that unless a theory can be explained to a child. The theory is probably useless now by that he meant the great theories or not mathematics. Greece theories or principles. Dooby explain playing a child now. Einstein had to great principles. He hit a picture on the first try. That gave us the atomic bomb. He had a picture for the second. Try that gives us black holes and big bang but there was no picture for the third try and i would ask him. What pictures did you envision. I mean what kind of avenues that you pursue thanking. You could complete this grand scheme of a theory of everything What were the mistrials. What were the dead ends. And then i would explain to him. What string theory is all about. And i would love to get his reaction. What do you think it would be. I think he would be amazed that is in the spirit of the two previous theories however einstein hated the quantum theory shake. Theory is a quantum theory. Sorry about that. You can't get everything. So i think that would've been disappointed. That the theory of everything is a quantum theory eight year. Old michio in california. Sees this photo of this desk with an unfinished piece of work and decides. I'm going to pick it up right and then you actually do it. What do you do next. Well i like to think of this as a chess game. The destiny of humans is to over thousands of years workout. The moves of chess game two thousand years later we figure out how the ponds move in. How the bishop moves. But then one day we'll figure out all the rules the whole ball of wax the rules of chess and become grand masters that's the goal to become grandmasters of the chess. Game that i think is our destiny because every time we got a forest it changes world history when newton worked out the forest mechanics and gravity. That gay was the industrial revolution which changed modern history lifted us from poverty of agrarian society into the gene age then maxwell and verity without electricity that gave us the electric age and then the quantum theory gives us lasers and the internet and transistors and all the wonders in our living room. Think of it theory of everything we give you all those things plus answer the mystery of the big bang where you came from black holes was on the other side of a black hole. Time travel is time. Travel possible gateways. Are there gateways. Ultimately i think that the destiny of humanity will rest on this theory. We're not talking about the theory of tomorrow. We're talking about the theory of the universe itself. Yes about as big as it gets. Yeah that's right but for you personally. What.

einstein Michio Dooby silicon valley Einstein chess Old michio taylor albert einstein Greece california verity newton maxwell Travel
"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

01:31 min | 3 months ago

"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"I guess this week is michio. Kaku the co-founder of string field theory. I'm not going to try to explain springfield theory right now. The short version is that it's basically an explanation of everything away of understanding. How every single thing in the universe interacts with every other single thing in the universe. It's a big idea. And it's one that meets. You has been obsessed with since he was eight years old. When he read an obituary for albert einstein eight-year-old michio decided right there that he would finish einstein's work and then he actually did. I wanted to know what that felt. Like to accomplish your childhood dream and i was curious about what comes next once you do. How do.

michio Kaku springfield albert einstein einstein
"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

03:51 min | 3 months ago

"michio" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"Tracy clayton. I'm josh gwen and where the hosts of baggage back these into. And you can remember the name of our show back issue because we're back for season two and we have issue not wrong. We're going to be swimming in the soldier talking about all the things you think you remember but trust me. You don't let them. He's talking about whitney houston. Flutie's the love talking about your favorite forgotten singers of the ninety nine two thousand given some behind the scenes stories from music videos. You love ooh josh which causes into back as you to back in the habit back she sees them to to back to issues back issues season to the season. Two years back issue season two now. Seventy eight percent more looking back at it that gives us season two more issues than jet back to shoot season. Two two black and looking back beck issues. These into zanga stack of magazines is be whatever you call it. You can listen to back issues. These into on odyssey apple podcasts. Or wherever free. Podcasts are so i know this program is seventy over seventy but I really wish i were younger. I wish over seventy. But i am ready. I'm seventy two years soga seventy-five. Miraculously i m eighty three years. I am eighty eight years old. I'm here ninety. Two ninety four in may want all my neighbors trumpet space seventy one and on a new been cedar texas. What am i learned. Make it barbecue. Patients and respect barbecue is not fast food. You know it takes time to cook the pit that you cook on. You have to respect it me and the pit you know like we obtain if i peed right. Treat me right when i cook environment hugh. I wasn't feeding massive. I would come in early in the morning trying to put my phone. And i was trying to cook in our half when he working so one day. I decided that i was going to put my beep on the cook. Until i got ready to go home on the five and later start cooking and i went home so nick morning popped in my mind. I didn't take the beef off the bye really got. I was really sure you know. I was like oh man godly. I left deadbeat. You know drove on down there without the car pro. We're inside the pinto up. Flowers like thumb in the trash and nub reached in the pit hindering juicy. Oh yes they was. Firstly this is not a job is not no backyard saturday afternoon. This is a real job. But i'm thankful that i know how to do this. 'cause it's a whole bunch of people that think they can cook barbecue but they cannot. You beat their barbecue. You're kind of okay man. Yeah all right. Yeah you know you don't wanna tell them and it's probably be doing nothing barbecue to me is like It took me a while to perfect but now knows how to cook the best.

Tracy clayton josh gwen zanga Flutie swimming josh houston beck apple hugh texas nick
Anna Ploszajski: Crafting to Better Understand Material Science

The Guardian's Science Weekly

02:33 min | 4 months ago

Anna Ploszajski: Crafting to Better Understand Material Science

"This episode. I'm talking to dr anna. Precise ski immaterial. Scientists channel swimmer and stand up comedian about her latest venture. Writing newburgh handmade assigned to search for meaning through making. I wanted to start off with understanding a bit more about the material. I found the most fascinating in the book. Blas which as we all know to be solid actually has the molecular structure of a liquid. Could you tell me a little bit more about that. Ana yeah definitely. I think a lot of people would have heard of this of the rumor. That glass is actually very very very viscous liquid in the evidence that we have for. This is very old. Panes of glass in medieval churches are episode a thicker the button than they are at the top and intuitively. We think well that must mean that. This class has been flowing down to gravity over hundreds of years that for it must by viscous liquids while there's also a molecular argument for that as well because if you zoom into clawson and see where the atoms and molecules are inside they are. Bene- jumbled up mess they're very rigidly bonded to each other so they don't move that they their structure is what we describe as offices. Very kind of jumbled up this structural order to in particular infrastructure is very similar to the structure of liquid. If you were to have a look at water zoom in and see by the atoms molecules are inside than they would be kind of randomly tumbling over each other and in in no particular order as well. The structure of glass and the structure of bhutto's liquid is via similar. Now this is in contrast to what we describe him. It's your science. As a as crystalline materials and is is a good example of a crystalline material when water freezes if the molecules lineup in very neat rows and columns in a kind of three structural lattices. That it's very predictable. It's very ordered. It's very beautiful. And that's how we describe. The atoms inside material's crystalline site is is a good example of metals or crystalline. As well when you hate izhak from below zero degrees two zero degree celsius as the ice melts it melts at the very distinct melting temperature because its molecules are in this very distinctive crystalline ordered structure so zero degrees is enough energy to break all of those bonds between those molecules and allow them to slosh over each other emanating. The michio becomes liquid

Dr Anna Newburgh Blas Clawson Bhutto Izhak
SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

Daily Tech News Show

33:27 min | 10 months ago

SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

"You're unique and so are your taxes. Turbo tax live has experienced tax experts. Who listen to you. Learn about your unique tax situations and answer your questions and on top of all that they can do your taxes from start to finish. Maybe you started investing and want some reassurance from an expert that you're doing things right maybe you're now self employed and needs some expert advice on what qualifies as a home office deduction or maybe it rather have an expert file your taxes for you so you can focus on what matters most no matter what. Your situation is turbo. tax live tax. Experts can answer your questions. Give tax advice review your return before you file or even do it all for you. Turbo tax live. Gives you confidence that you're uniquely you. Taxes are done right into a turbo tax. Live file with the help of an expert or let an expert file for you coming up on how to clone someone security key roku by some qube and we'll make the apple cars. This is the daily tech news for friday january. Eighth twenty twenty. One in los angeles on tom. Merit and from studio redwood on sarah lane from studio colorado. I'm shannon morris drawn the top tech stories in cleveland. I'm lynn per nine. The show's producer. Roger j we were just talking about a cas product that makes you ice cream and ninety seconds whenever you wanted and why roger never cries wider conversation join our expanded show. Good day internet at patriotair dot com slash dpd s. Let's start with a few things you should know. Amazon has discontinued its prime pantry. Grocery and household item service products previously available in pantry will now be available like any other products on amazon. So it's not going away to gather but the service itself prime pantry launched in twenty fourteen offering reduced shipping on up to forty five pounds of household goods for a monthly fee. Amazon node vied prime pant pantry subscribers about the closure in december and then issued refunds the. Uk's competition and markets authority launched an investigation into google's privacy sandbox. That would block third party. Cookies in chrome regulator received complaints from the marketers for an open web coalition saying the plan would abuse google's dominant position in online advertising. So the investigations going to evaluate. If the privacy sandbox changes would concentrate advertising spending market share with google samsung launched the galaxy chromebook to a cheaper version of the galaxy chromebook at launched last year so instead of four k it has a ten eighty p lcd screen with less storage fewer cameras less ram. It's also heavier and thicker overall but it also now starts at five hundred forty nine dollars instead of one thousand dollars. That has a thirteen point. Three inch nineteen twenty by ten eight hundred sixteen nine. Lcd touchscreen with the dual core intel seller on five twenty five you upgradable to an intel core. I three ten ten eleven ten one. one zero. You eight gigs. Ram and one hundred twenty five gigs of storage for six hundred ninety nine dollars a shortage of semiconductors affecting automakers. Volkswagen said last month that they needed to adjust first-quarter manufacturing plans around the globe because of the shortage. Now honda says it will cut domestic output by about four thousand cars this month at one of its factories in japan nissan is adjusting production numbers for its note hatchback model and ford has moved up previously planned downtime at a kentucky plant for its sport utility vehicle factory to the jin chips all right. Well we're talking about cars. Let's talk about the the apple car. Yeah a lot of rumors as of late will really over the last few years. But but but the rumors had resurfaced recently and hyundais. Now talking to apple about kerr's so says the company hyundai representative told cnbc quotes. We understand that apple isn't discussion with a variety of global automakers including hyundai motor as the discussion is at its early stage. Nothing has been decided. Korean economic daily said that apple suggested the arrangements and hundred was reviewing the terms that involved e production and also battery development hyundai has had his own battery platform called e. g. m. p. going into production later this year. So might be saying what you're doing. Reuters sources say that apple would like to produce a passenger vehicle by twenty twenty four however might not be that date bloomberg's mark gurman reports in thomas e. v. from apple is five to seven years away and michio recently said he wouldn't be surprised if it takes until twenty twenty eight. Yes what's probably going on. Here is apple and i think this significant part has decided to start investigating how they would build. Whatever it is. They're going to build whether it's a whole car or an integrated platform and they're going to different manufacturers and parts suppliers and folks like magna including hyundai. And saying what are you got. How can you help us with this. And is a great company for this because they make parts they make systems. They make full cars. There's all kinds of services in the conday company that could play a part with apple so it may not be. That apple knows what they want from hyundai. It may just be that they're going and saying hey let's talk. You do a lot of the kinds of things that we think we're going to need. I'm pretty excited about this. I just got my first hyundai ever this year and my perception of this story was weight but hyundai currently uses android auto and a lot of their their cars. So i would love to see. How apple would integrate Hyundai's current technologies into something that is very useful for that apple ecosystem not just looking at e itself but also the The the systems inside of it the controls in how they would manage that four a driver and a passenger in the car. Yeah i mean. I think that's one of the big questions that i have is okay. Let's say let's say it's hyundai that that applet ended up working with with clearly not set in stone at least from what we know at this point. But let's say it's the companies for kicks. Let's imagine that that's what it is. Yeah it is. It is an apple car that hyundai produces a lot of parts for the way that works with lots of other companies to produce other hardware for apple. I mean that that's the loftiest kind of goal that we're looking at and maybe that would take till twenty twenty eight at you know if if apple was lucky. I think it probably has more to do with like you said shannon not that you know android auto wouldn't still be prevalent in a lot of passenger vehicles but maybe at some sort of it's a special relationship. It's it's a special kind of os inside a car that is supposed to you. Know i don't know move some merch because What apple is providing on the software side is is. Is that much more interesting. I really don't know if you look at that. Bloomberg article mark gurman sources are saying that Tesla people that apple has hired are working on things like interior exterior. Drive train stereo. Desist the kinds of things. You need when you're building a car not carting a software platform so then the question becomes is it the apple car period. Maybe hendaye makes it. Maybe somebody else makes it. And you know they'll figure out how to distribute it or is it the apple car by sunday and you go to hyundai dealership to buy it the way you went to an. At and t. store to an apple iphone but it's really apples car in cooperation with sunday. Are there multiple partners. I mean that's all the kind of stuff we're waiting to see but it really does feel like we have gotten to the point where this is no longer just yeah. They're working on project titan. They don't know what they're gonna do to. They have an idea. It's more than just software and they're working out the details. Maybe they don't even know that yet. Well i'm interested to see what happens but we also have some other news. Security among the systems impacted by the solar winds attack is the electron filing system. Used by the us federal courts at investigation is underway to determine if confidentiality of documents filed with the courts was breached and as a result starting wednesday confidential documents filed with the courts will be stored on standalone systems. Not uploaded big difference so these are documents sealed from public access because they contain sensitive information like investigative techniques identities of informants and a lot more other. Us federal agencies affected included the justice department the state treasury and energy departments as well solar winds has engaged. The krebs stay most security consulting group to help deal with this attack. That firm was formed by alex. Stamos the former chief security officer at yahoo and facebook and chris krebs the former director of the us cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency or sisa. So krebs was fired last month. By the president after finding no evidence of with voting systems in the twenty twenty election. Yeah stamos first of all brilliant for those two to team up and smart for solar winds to engage them for what they say is Helping with transparency with companies that are affected But this we we are not done finding out how bad this is. There are reports that there may have been other ways that this whoever is behind this intruded beyond just solar winds. They're finding evidence of that. They have not been able to root out the people that got into this vulnerability from all systems yet. They're still in there in a lot of cases. And you know this. This kind of confidential information is exactly the kind of thing you fear that someone would get intruding into a government system informants investigative techniques that you can now learn from to evade being prosecuted or caught yourself. That's that's crown jewel type stuff it's it's very interesting. In fact krebs spoke on record saying that it could potentially take years to figure out how deep the solar winds attack actually went and how many different kinds of infrastructure. You know brands and everything that it might have affected so this is not something. That's going to die anytime soon. I'm glad that they are reaching out. Craig's and stay most though because that i agree with you tom. It's excellent. excellent team roku made a few interesting announcements roku says. Npd data shows that the roku s was the top selling smarter operating system in the us and canada in two thousand twenty thirty one percent market share in canada. Thirty eight percent in the united states That's pushed the samsung's tizen number two. At least we don't actually know samsung's ties and was number. One in two thousand nineteen also announced a wireless soundbar reference design that uses wifi for its roku. Tv ready program remember. Last year roku announced the program which had a designed for wired. Sound bars. The program includes tcl. Pokemon on an element has just announced. They'll join as well with two point. Two point one ready sound bars roku tv ready to expand internationally later this year as well. But here's the big roku news roku has agreed to acquire exclusive global distribution rights to more than seventy five Shows documentaries some of which had not been released before qube shutdown. So there'll be some new stuff that nobody's ever seen after their exclusivity deal expires. That'll happen in a bit more than a year. Depending on the show roku will still have the rights to show the content just not exclusively until thousand twenty seven the content will have to be presented in original increments of ten minutes or less. The deal doesn't let them stitch it altogether. The content will be added to the more than forty thousand movies and tv shows already available. In the roku channel shows include from Be anyway punked. Murder house. Flip and dummy which stars anna kendrick. I never watched the new punk. I heard had its moments. The whole qube thing. It's really interesting to me because it was sort of like. It crashed and burned so quickly. And there's a lotta shot and friday around folks in the industry about it. And i think that's not because qube was doing things wrong. It was because the company had raised so much money time. Because you know. They had meg whitman. Jeffrey katzenberg who are you know. Heavy hitters and there was a little bit of like you are being to embassies and therefore you shall fail. The company did fail and the idea that some creators will have a new life on another platform shows. That just don't even saw but people still worked on. And maybe you're really good. I think this this makes a lotta sense and good for roku to get exclusivity for at least a few years so does roku have to wait at all in order to start showing this content or can happen immediately. I don't know when the start date. Whenever the deal is you know goes into effect. Then they'll immediately be able to to show it so you know within a month or so it would be my guess anyway but no they. They don't have once. The deal is actually in effect. They don't have to wait. What's going on here. is that the baby. Production companies own the rights to their own stuff but they have a two year exclusive for each one of their shows with qube and those two year exclusives are now being transferred to roku so roka will be able to have the exclusive for the remainder of whatever. The period was with quick. That's why it's more a year. Exclusively goes away then they still have the right to show it until twenty twenty seven but the production companies that made it can now start shopping at around to other places as well so the production companies do hold the content and remember this is just the content. Qube is still in a over. Its turnstile technology which is holding it up from selling its technology and i would expect once it resolves that lawsuit should resolve it in a way that they still hold their technology. They'll sell that to so this isn't the last you're going to hear could be selling off a part of it. I would imagine. Gotcha yeah that whole. The whole technology part of qube was again was an ambitious thing that was released at a very inopportune time in twenty twenty when everyone was like. We're just sitting at home like we don't need this like mobile phone technology. It's like cool that you can shifted around but you can't even cast thing. I mean the company did fix that pretty soon after allow about she was just. I mean it's just did. The timing couldn't be worse but that technology when you think of it in a variety of other form factors such as monitors that swivel talked about some of those yesterday. I don't know that qube or tiktok or snapchat or all of the stuff where we're like. Oh yeah that's the. That's the portrait view. Rather than landscape view. That works for certain apps is is is all that this is four. I think there's more to it So we'll see what happens and there's patents and things that are always valuable because you can use those to extract some concessions and money and stuff. So yeah expect that all to come join the conversation in our discord which you can join by linking to a patriotic. Can't get in there and talk about your favourite qube shows with all the other discord folks. Just lincoln to your patriotic out at patriotair dot com slash. Dpd s all right shannon. How do you clone a security key. Well i i will say please do not stop using your security keys because of this story i will explain it. Researchers from ninja lab published a paper on thursday showing how you could clone a google tightened security gate this is a two factor authentication key which is very similar to a you. Be key that you have to plug in or tap in order to access an account after putting in your username or your password credentials. Were both so in order to pull off the clone. You would need physical access to the key for about ten hours. Sometimes a minimum of ten hours just kind of depends on how good you are at this. About twelve thousand dollars worth of equipment physical equipment and custom software and some advanced skills in electrical engineering and cryptography as well. So you have to remove the chip and then take measurements of it at a being registered on each account that you went to attack the measurements observe electro magnetic radiation as the chip generates digital signatures that let the attacker slowly deduced the private key so measurements take about six hours per account. That's not including taking apart. The original tighten security key putting it back together. Then you need to seal the chip back into its case. You also need the targets password in order for this to work. So the reason it works is because of vulnerability in the security hardware chip residing within the google titan key and that is called an eighty seven hundred x by this company called. Xp if it's exploited in attacker could grab the elliptic curve cryptographic private key for the account and the same chip is actually found in other two factor. Authentication physical tokens as well like There's a ubiquity that it's found in but chances of attack or very very minimal given the scope of the attack so if you do all of this without the target ever noticing then they would never duplicated key but again given the scope given how much it costs and everything behind the scenes probably when it happened to normal user. The point of these security keys being the best way to use For two factor. Is that you can't even get at your private key right you. Nobody has to be able to get in there like the chip. Just doesn't make it available so the fact that they were able to get in there and get it is huge. You know the fact that they were able to do this is significant. But i mean if you're not a target of an advanced persistent threat. You don't need to worry about this. No one's going to go to the trouble to do this. And even if you're a target. I would guess shannon that most of them probably would be able to notice if someone took their key for ten hours or more you. You likely likely would especially since a lot of people with hardware tokens like google titan will stick them on a on their keychain for example like with their house keys or whatever wherever they keep all those personal physical devices that they don't want lost or stolen they keep them all on engaging so if somebody was to take one of these out of your purse out of your gym locker wherever it might be and remove it for like ten hour street minimum. You would likely know that this would have happened. the neat thing about these chips inside of these. Google tightened security keys. And any other cryptographic hardware tokens like these is that. Even the manufacturer doesn't know the private key so the fact that they were able to find vulnerability on these specific chipsets is really interesting. And i think that's the important bit of that. Is is even though the google titan like the end all be all of really excellent. Two factor authentication. There's always. The potential that vulnerabilities can be found. So i'm happy that this research came out. It's so fascinating and it's so interesting in this means that an x. p. and other security chipset manufacturers that sell these teeny tiny chips to google or whoever the company might be They can build on this. They can research and figure out what the next version of their chipset needs to entail in order to not be vulnerable to this again in the future. Yeah i mean this is really a good security story right. We finally figured out because there's always a way right. We finally figured out the way you get the private key out of a security key and guess what it's really hard takes a long time and now that we know it we can make it even harder and hopefully you know push that barrier out even further and even if somebody did have time to do this and you didn't notice i was reading the paper because i'm a huge nerd and they go as far as using fuming fuming nitric acid in order to get like melt the epoxy off of the original google titan. How are you going to put that back together. In order for somebody to not notice like there's a lot of intricacies with this attack in order for it to actually be pulled off so chances are very very slim that somebody would be able to pull off so again as i said at the very beginning. Don't stop using your google tightened security key if you have one keep using it because chances are you would never be attacked with this. Just just know if you haven't seen it in ten hours look together strange. This is going to be in a movie though. I'm calling that shot right now. We're gonna we're gonna see this movie. Where like i hope so. Somebody goes into surgery and they take his key and they go out and do all this and they slip it back in because ten hours later. He wakes up from anesthesia on something like that. I just hope they talked to the researchers so they actually show it off right. Yeah Sony tv and audio announcements Starting with details for its own tv lineup. Sticking with lead ravi x four k and k. Tv's will support four k at one hundred twenty hertz variable refresh rate vr as well as a l l m low latency mode and e arc. These are all things that are important. If you've got a ps five now you've got sony. Tv they can go. That sony also has an improved a chip that is going to improve the picture and sound positioning. So it aligns with what you see on the screen. Sony's master series. Tv's will come with a sensor that adjusts white balanced immense. Your ambiente color temp. You don't have to do anything they'll just do it. Also an aluminum heat shield. That will make for brighter. All the sets will support. Hdmi two point one. Another big one for ps five dolby vision hdr angle tv. Sony also announced. It's three hundred sixty reality audio platform if you're not familiar with three hundred sixty degree audio places instruments and vocals in a virtual sound field around your head but using just the one speaker so you can do this in an amazon echo or google. Home sony will start streaming video with three sixty audio later this year. Starting with concert from zara larsson on january eleventh. And somebody's gonna make speakers that support this. It'll be may supported by other speakers as well. But sony is going to put out the are five thousand and three thousand They've got that dark cloth. Surface that all these speakers seem to have these days with either bronze or silver accents. Work with google and amazon assistance and can connect to select sony abroad via. Tv's as well as supporting wi fi bluetooth. Spotify connect in google cast. The speakers do automated calibration to the room. They're in donut. The press a button for that. Either and we'll simulate three hundred sixty degree audio for stereo tracks as well. The five thousand cost five hundred pounds or five hundred ninety nine euros no. Us price yet on the three thousand two hundred eighty pounds. Three hundred fifty nine euros. This seems this. Seems like it's shaping up to be one of the trends. Is this the sort of three hundred sixty degree audio while you're listening to your black bank and it's just one speaker or potentially a couple of speakers ativan. Maybe yeah yeah already supported. Yeah there's less of kind of like What do i have to do. Five point one surround or at least get a couple of speakers and make them a stereo pair type thing. I really haven't heard this in. I don't know. I used to hang out at magnolia at best. Buy all the time. And just like geek out on stuff like this. of course. this technology wasn't around at the time. But it's really come on. Let's turn on some stuff and see the speakers. Do it works well. Then that's awesome my first reaction because i got rid of my kind of pants speakers some years ago because friend of mine needed them more than i did and i didn't have room in my apartment but i miss that i'm also an a. A permanent now that's smaller and kind of has a lot of weird angles and i find audio bounces off walls in wiz. That wouldn't if it was more of a square box broom So i'm not sure that i'm the perfect target market for this. You're the you're the one puts this through its paces and sees if it really works. Yeah if i could actually work as advertised again with some funny angles in a big old frame. Then i'm i'm really into this and i've always been. I don't have a sony. Tv currently sorry zony. But i was abroad. Bravi a person for years. Nears i think what the new bravi line is coming out with. Looks really nice. And i mean not totally in the market for a new tv. But i like the fact that i might get a new sony again paired up with a sony speaker. You got three six. Yeah already got all this stuff. It's going to be a messed anyway. You slice it. But i like. I like this to be sixty reality audio platform. What would you have set up in your house. I was straight up going to mention sonos because if if it doesn't have the connectability to be able to work with all of my other platforms that currently have invested in. Then chances are i wouldn't buy it. So i do have sono says in my house and i do have some issues connecting those with other speakers in the household to like like my google hub for example so the fact that this works with google and amazon assistant the speaker specifically The audio speakers. I think that's pretty cool. I like that. They are bringing that in and i am interested because i do live in a household. That has very high ceilings. How this would work in that kind of environment. So yeah. I'm very interested in the audio aspect. Well you might also be interested in what colour has come out. Oh yes the folks who make things like toilets and and sinks and lots of appliances however. Been a real. Cas mainstay for the last few years for some cool innovations and this year is no different. Even though we're not in vegas koehler has a new smart bathtub called the stillness bath. That lets you use an app or use your voice using google or amazon's assistance to fill up the water or perhaps set the mood by changing the color of the lights around the tab or even add some fog. You know you wanna kind of pretend like you're in the then present routines also turn on features in a certain orders if you wanna get kind of creative. that's cool. Yeah the certain amount of limitations with the base model and the base model is not cheap so temperature and depth control models alone will cost around eight thousand six hundred ninety eight dollars. That's right it's almost nine thousand dollar bathtub. If you want the experience tower that lets you activate fog and aromatherapy. That will run you just over ten thousand dollars. Both models are available in july. There are real things and if you want the version with lights and floor grades for overflow fifteen thousand nine hundred ninety eight dollars available. This october signed me off. I won't be buying those. Nope not even a little bit but we could have taken a bath at s in the new in the pre show roger was like. Why would you want fog. It's like this. Why does anyone want to be on. Yeah racist luxury suites in hotels for sure as well as apple's houses sure yeah something well. Yeah it's it's that like hey look at what my bath can do people go. Wow very fancy and then you know ten years from now will be like remember when we thought it was fancied to talk to your bathtub so that it would start filling up without touching it but Yeah it's it's somewhat silly because of the price. But i'm not really much of a bath person but they do look very nice all right. Let's check out the mail bag but ads do it. Nick wrote in with a pronunciation. Ramps own neck. You are not alone he says. Ac's rog is an initial list. Because it's our og like fbi or cia. People say ron yet. They're lower end gaming brand tough not initially them. It's an acronym like scuba or produce you f but pronounced off. It's like ace's can't make up their name minds. Then there's strict which is our subbrand strikes as a word it's a completely nonsensical made up word. But it's a word and you pronounce it as such nick as honestly as somebody. That buys a lot of hardware. Because i've rarely had a bad experience with them over the past twenty years. I am baffled by some branding decisions. The one the bugs me. The most is the strict subbrand. Sometimes acis makes the tricks products. The high end product in the product stock yet other times. It's a mid range product. Would it be too much to ask for consistency and product. Branding twenty twenty one. Yes apparently apparently we feel your pain. Nick i love the dichter's just like i just need to vent you guys. Let me let me let me get this up. Just we appreciate that. Yeah i mean i. i'm with you nick. Everyday is a fresh new hell when it comes to reading out some model numbers but what is not is shouting out our patrons at our master and grandmaster levels. Today they include christmas merton james and digression daniels and of course landon peralta back and illustrating the show. What have you drawn for us today. Len well you know. I'm really excited. Say that we've have the first image of the ample car the car. Which i'm that's what i'm calling it. I'm sure they're gonna take my advice. Coming around twenty twenty seven ish or so maybe You know you may. If you're a fan of richard scary busy world a you may be very familiar with the look of of the apple. Ii car I think it'll be a big hit with with fans of people who have kids So check it out. this is called meet. I car And this is available right now. My patriot on which by the way has to new levels. If lets me be your Let me be your teacher. Your mentor with your artwork. I can give you some help that way. And patriots dot com forward slash. Len plus i also just launched a new product called flip face max which is over at lend store dot com. And i i want to show you what that looks like. I did something special. for For our friend shannon for snubs. This is a this is what the flipping flipped. Face masks. looks like This is It's a little bit higher Higher end than the normal flip sister used to But those are on the front page story on pro dot com. But this is for you shannon. If people wanna see that because most people are just listening to this what should they do. Go to well right now. It's going to be on twitter instagram later. But just go to lend dot com. You'll see all the ones i've done over the past couple of weeks and including including shannon's so it's really lovely. Let it's yeah. That's adorable shannon morris First show of twenty twenty one certainly not the last. I know you're a busy lady at. Where can people keep up with your work. Oh my gosh. I have been busy. Youtube dot com slash shannon morse. Just like name. I just did at tech predictions video and it was so cool. I got like eighteen up and coming tech youtubers to their twenty twenty one tech predictions for the year. And there's some names in there that you that you definitely know. Aunt pruitt Miriam take rene ritchie. So i had a whole bunch of people joining and kinda give me their thoughts and It was very very optimistic. And i was really happy to see that. So if you want to see that video and the rest of mine check out my youtube channel. Hey folks if you need. Just the headlines. It's okay to skip eighteen s. Know you get busy. Check out our related show daily tech headlines all the essential tech news in about five minutes daily tech headlines dot com. We're live on this show. Monday through friday at four thirty. Pm eastern twenty one. Thirty e. c. And you can find out more at daily tech news show dot com slash lives. We back monday with chris. Ashley have a gray weekend. All this show is part of the broadband network. Get more at frog pants. Dot com club who've enjoyed this broader.

Tech Technology Apple Hyundai Hyundai Motor Mark Gurman Nissan Honda Cnbc Kerr Kentucky Ford Japan Michio Reuters Bloomberg Thomas Magna Google Roku Krebs Shannon Morris Sarah Lane Roger J Competition And Markets Author Samsung Shannon Sony Chris Krebs
"michio" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"michio" Discussed on Pantheon

"Choice. Believe they knew the words. I cannot believe that like the what is surreal moment. Think about too. Because how many times have you been on that side of it where you're singing back at the performer. And you're now in that seat and you're just like You gotta be kidding me. Oh true so true. And it's just like wow like you know the lake michio like we all like the song like of course like that's crazy. I like the song stu like. It's so it's so fun. Yeah but i. I wanna be in the now. I've put out so much new music. Since so i was going to perform at south by southwest obviously canceled And i put out so much new music since those shows and i wanna perform them live show by it would be so fun especially block your number like Like oh my gosh. Imagine washington saw. My shows are much pit is it totally is yeah i get those fourteen year olds maget an ideal but i so yeah. It's been really fun. I mean i. I missed that for sure. I can't wait to be sweaty body. Groom of and dancing out of rats to like to these new songs for sure. There's so much fun. That's such a common thread that i'm getting as i've been interviewing people. The last couple of months of i'm in right music throughout this. And i am so ready to go. Give it back to the fans and it's going to happen there were i know. I'm ready as a listener. I i used to go to shows like three or four times a week. And i'm ready. I'm over in the uk right now. And i just haven't been able to see any live music and it's such a shame to me. Yeah okay. we're gonna get these three questions that i'd like to ask people two of them. I ask everyone one of them's unique to you. If you had to listen to one band or artist the rest of your life..

lake michio uk washington
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Policy Technology Economics Science Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Policy Technology Economics Science Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Interview with Mitzi Okou

Revision Path

03:01 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Mitzi Okou

"All right. So tell us who you are and what you do. My needs is Michio Kaku ion in action in digital signer I N based in San Diego California and I currently work at HP. So we're recording this during this pandemic that seems to be the only thing everyone in two thousand, twenty years of dealing with together. How are you holding up during this time? Yes. That's a loaded question because I'm feeling a range of emotion. So I'm good in some sense where there is a her lining in this pandemic can learn a lot of things and take classes in really kind of dealt into things that I've been wanting to add to my skill set. But then there's the other side by you know I myself I'm an isolation. So I have to think about a lot of things in that can be super overwhelming. So I'm good but also super overwhelmed by a lot of things I would say yeah. But seems like in California for at least were able to tell by the news that seems like the State is going. Maybe into some other form of lockdown. Procedures are being rolled back is that is that the case where you're at? Yes. So we were at phase two for a little bit. So a few things happened like restaurants bend and then it rolled back to phase one. So we're all just in lockdown nothing's really open for just harks neighborhood parks beaches, and that's basically it's super strict. You can't really get any service anywhere without rain a mask so it's it's super super strict. Okay. Yeah. I don't know if that's going to really be the case. I was GONNA say nationwide it's still feels like there's so much. There's so many arguments around whether or not people need to wear masks. There's going to be mandates I mean even here in Georgia like I'm in Atlanta and the mayors like you have to wear a mask and the governor's like, no, you don't and I'm GonNa see you mayor for say that people have to wear masks like there's. Different places there's war just weird precautions around all of this but. It seems like until we all get on one just like one accord on all of this this is just going to have to be something that we deal with especially going into the fall. Oh Yeah. I agree and it's weird because of the beginning of this people were putting a time line they were saying, oh, we're going to be back in three months. Back in four months, two weeks, and it just feels like there's no end in sight especially with how things are being handled in the country. So it's really weird because when you are thinking about changing careers in changing. Location yet to keep all nine that okay we'll let this mimic how long am I going to be in isolation for and wouldn't allow me to go anywhere in things open up back soon or sooner than we thought how does that affect everything? So there's so many things to think about

California Michio Kaku HP San Diego Atlanta Georgia
Pico in Lockdown

Travel with Rick Steves

04:35 min | 1 year ago

Pico in Lockdown

"Start by checking in with friend of the show author Pico to hear how he's faring during this pandemic summer Pico was raised in England in southern California by parents who were both philosophers and religious scholars we caught up with him in Santa Barbara Pico welcome back travel with Rick Steves Real Delight. It's always. Highlight, to talk to you. Thank you know people used your life between California and Japan tell us how you are dealing with this crisis. Well I spent the first half of the pandemic in Japan and I'm almost embarrassed to say that things are quite beautiful and the sense that things look very much the same as normal as you know from your many trips, the people wear masks much of the time in. Japan anyway literally and figuratively to protect others. If you were in a bus in Japan in November, usually, there'll be forty percents of the people wearing masks. So that part was not different and as you also know, Japan has managed to avoid the west of the virus. So even in the middle of April I was playing Ping Pong every day with my neighbors eight year old men were diving across the hard floor of the wooden Jim to hit back at forehands and really looking around everything seems same as usual except, of course, no foreign tourists. And I think the other thing about Japan which is one reason I moved. There is as you know, they're very STOIC uncomplaining and resilient, and so they've been dealing with challenges for fourteen hundred years there, and they don't see these kind of crises is shocked sore in the south. So aberrations they think of them almost as the way life always is they used to earthquakes some Salamis forest five. So in that way to it was quite a complex to be. and. Then I flew back in the middle of the pandemic to Santa Barbara where I am now because my mother who's now eighty nine just come out of the hospital and I knew I had to have and California did look very different from usual but in certain ways, people seem thoughtful and focused and reflective kind and. In some ways. Conversations I had with people here on the telephone if I in is in the supermarket with Michio the they might be otherwise I'm lucky again in both places because I'm in. The small town of not as affected as big cities and. Towns of privileged. So everybody was most concerned about those without a roof over the heads with family nearby jobs I had a pretty lucky I. Think you know, Pico, you mentioned in Japan people are to wearing masks both literally and figuratively and I cringed at that because I don't want to have a world where we wear literal masks I would want even less to have where we all have figurative masks and maybe we'll have more literal masks in our future. But what you're saying is when you got back to California, people might have been wearing masks but they were being a little more honest and open with each other's is that right? Yes. That is right. I'm I think in Japan the FIGURATIVE MOSQUES Seen as a form of social duty I think you know as you know, the Japanese define themselves by the the whole unit, the neighborhood or the country or the company, and they feel everybody around me is suffering, and so my job is to make people feel better. I don't want to inflict my own suffering on people who already going through a lot. I want to offer them what I can in the way of help Williamson. And support, and so actually I like that quality about Japan essentially positive and and also they're not rattled by things sometimes very small things will come along and and other places. I'll see people get very shocked and caught up in the fight of the moment and Japan has much more level suffix, which makes it in some ways a calm place you're right that they're not good at facing up to some of the DACA places. The, dogs spots in history. But as a win a sort of social lubricant, I think it makes for at least a cheerful atmosphere and it's sort of related to being considered socially. Exactly, it's. It's. It's. It's a matter of thinking about the other person before yourself and then recalling if remember in the Nami two, thousand eleven, eighteen, thousand, five, hundred people died and when people watch the footage on TV they were surprised the Japanese was so quiet uncomplaining and I think that's because even though one person that loves to people right here at the house, she knew that everybody around her had losses also and so she didn't want to compound that. Grief

Japan California Pico Santa Barbara Pico Rick Steves Santa Barbara Daca Michio England JIM Forehands Williamson
AYURVEDA: The ancient Science of Self Healing and practical spirituality in the post covid-19 era with Acharya Shunya

My Seven Chakras

05:15 min | 1 year ago

AYURVEDA: The ancient Science of Self Healing and practical spirituality in the post covid-19 era with Acharya Shunya

"What's up action, tribe, heroes, hose and founder of my seven Jucker as my seven chocolate dot com, the shore we help you expedients, effortless healing, awakening and abundance in today's episode we talk about some really powerful and embroidered topics, including what roared as I read a play in healing, the true nature of self, the importance of cleansing, and so much more, but before that I'd like to remind you that I have recently released a twenty four page pdf outlining some of my favorite ways to raise my web rations and fien better almost immediately to get your free pdf was my. Joker does DOT COM forward slash? Feel better now. That's my seven juxtapose dot com follow today's feel better now all right, so let's bring on our special guest today. Who happens to be our second dime? Guest Ajaria Shuna so a CIA is a globally recognized spiritual leader and Wittig Lineage Order, who awakens health and consciousness through thick sciences of Ira Way Danta and Yoga, and she's a driving force behind noble and online, nor for profit wisdom, school and worldwide spiritual community, and the author of the bestselling book on the Reading Art of mind, body and soul, wellbeing and health I iradar lifestyle, wisdom, and forthcoming second book with sounds drew of Italy's in two thousand and twenty sovereign self so a Ajaria welcome once again. Are you ready to inspire I? Am Ready to inspire and thank you for inviting me back. I really enjoyed our conversation last time create. I did as well. And, so to begin our session today to begin our conversation today. What is your favorite or that? One Inspirational Court that is on your mind these days, and how you are of applying it in your in your life I'm really been condom leading on our food for word, Sanskrit statement by a teacher of non-relative duality from India Shankar up, and he had said them Jagan Michio which it really means is that. Everything I see is a lower order of reality and the theater in me is of a higher order of reality, and that is allowing me to be more within and give less importance to what's going on without me if you know what I mean. Wonderful thanks a lot for shedding BRAHMA MUSSET SUTTON JAN meteorite. Yes, which means that what you see around you? That is allusively at his transient at his changing. What is done is your true self, your eternal self, and that is something that you have to discover for yourself and then, but there are things that you can do to help you and facilitate that process. Of discovering their sovereign cells, and that's what we're going to talk about today so a Ajaria. What is a you're either? Because there's so many definitions right, there are so many connotations I grew up in India so I have a certain view of Irish. You studied Iowa and learn from the masters all your life. So, what is your understanding or your definition of I read? The description of IRA denial weight is or in the sketches. These, are you show V? The High Veda which means the Veda Veda means the knowledge off life is. And so I was a teaching from the ancients years, if India, which happily were men and women known as we. She's into Shaka's. was really a putting together a lot of wisdom. That connects SAS to life to the source of life. Rich may be make on Rana, or you know soul or consciousness ultimately, and how does it play out in the different containers of life, which is the body, the senses, the mind, the, and even the soul, which is really an Ospent of that super consciousness, a carrier of that universal consciousness, and so therefore I another at the Incheon sages who? Who gave us? Yoga will give us meditation. They also give Messiah that today. More and more people call it holistic medicine, which is totally fine, because it's way more holistic than any other medicine that I haven't gone to. At least or at least it's compatible to a lot of holistic ancient traditions from the word, it's no way behind it and be discreet. Discuss some of that in our previous. Discussion, but to. I would say that it's spiritual. Medicine is spirits medicine. That's why in India. Sometimes they call it. It's God's own medicine. And they ancient does Aj may have these celestial healers known as the Ashini Chimeras these are these twin brothers who care of the all the medical needs of the gods, and they are said to be the first I obey. The doctors apparant the living today in the heavens, so I love all these connections of spirituality.

Jagan Michio Ira Way Danta India Dot Com Ajaria CIA Founder Ajaria Shuna IRA India Shankar AJ Iowa Inspirational Court Yoga Rich Italy Rana
Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

Classics for Kids

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

"Johann. Sebastian Bach was the greatest member of a musical dynasty beginning in sixteenth century Germany. Three Hundred Years. Worth of box held jobs as town. Musicians organist and choir directors Johann Sebastian's. Father was a musician. His grandfather was a musician and his great grandfather was a musician. All the male members of the family were trained by their fathers uncles and older brothers to carry on the tradition. That's by no handsome. Asean box Uncle Johann Michio or John. Michael Bah his daughter. Maria Barbara Married Johann Sebastian. Who was her second cousin? I guess that made her Maria. Barbara Bach. Pa IN GERMAN WORD MEANS STREAM BUT JOHANN. Sebastian produced a whole ocean of box. He and Maria Barbara had seven kids when Maria Barbara Died Balk married. A singer named Anna Magdalena and had thirteen more children twenty in all J S. That's short for Johann. Sebastian Bach expected his sons to follow in his footsteps and several of them became well known composers. Box oldest son bill him. Freedom on or W. F. Baugh worked mostly as an organist. He never quite lived up to everybody's great expectations even though he wrote some Nice music the fifth child the third son of J S Baugh was Carl Philipp Emanuel Norse EP. Aw He was very successful. Cpi box spent years working for the flute. Playing King of Prussia. Frederick Great Frederick. The great never went anywhere without his flute. Not even into battle so. Cpa Bach wrote a lot of music both CPI and W. F. were sons of J s Bach's first wife Maria Barbara Anna Magdalena Baw. Second wife was the mother of his youngest son. Johann Christian J C Bach was the most radical member of the clan for starters. He left Germany and went to study and work in Italy in order to get a job at the cathedral in Milan Italy. This Bach did something. Nobody had done before he changed. Religion converting from Lutheran Catholic and J C Bach. Did something else. His father had never done. He wrote operas after Italy. He moved to one of the hottest cities in Europe for Italian opera and became known as the London Bach. That's right people in London. England were crazy about Italian opera even or especially if it was written by Germans. There's a man named Peter Shakily who claims to know about yet another box son P Q. According to Peter Shakily until he discovered P Q. No one wanted to admit that he existed. Peterson says that's because PD Q. Box Stole Music from other composers and came up with things so outrageous that they make people laugh because it makes people laugh. Peter Shakily keeps right on composing. I mean discovering music Cuba that's from PD Q. Bach piece called Kanaya in Brooklyn. That's written for Double Reeds. When a COMPOSER SAYS MUSIC IS FOR DOUBLE REEDS? He means oboe. Zampa Soons instruments that have double reeds sticking out of the top of them. Blowing into the reads is what makes the instruments sound but PD. Cuba wrote for double reeds without Hobos and bassoon. Attached the words pretty funny to watch it to us to be home you know moves run grounding knows

Modern Time Slips

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:27 min | 1 year ago

Modern Time Slips

"Today. Something a little bit different on this podcast. Generally science is acknowledged as something. Let's say a discovery of something and it can be replicated and therefore it is based in scientific fact and the pseudoscience is usually explained away as a simple single phenomena that can't be captured reproduced. So I have on this. PODCAST is a series of modern day. A or modern time time slips began with a white Ford pickup that pulled up to a cattle pasture near Pona City City Oklahoma. This was early in the fall of Nineteen seventy-one if stopped at the gate. Carl Marc and Gordon worked for cattle feed distributor. Were sent to this remote area to pick up a theater but they found their has kept them silent for forty one years. Carl says we opened the gate. which had barb orb wire with no locks and we entered? We went onto the property which was covered with grass up to in some cases over the truck. They drove through grass. Ask to the tank that sat close to Red Barn and got Outta the truck. We realize the tank was almost half full and too heavy to load. Carl said we. We decided to leave and drove around a Red Barn and there. We saw a large two story White House with no lights in front of us. The trio drove back to the cattle feed company and told the boss. He said he'd drained the tank and they could pick it up tomorrow. Carl says we went back to the location to retrieve the a tank the next night he said this time we decided to go through the old white big house on the hill and we brought our flashlights and shotguns. Just in case they they drove onto the property over the past. They've made through the day before they loaded the tank then they pulled around the bar toward the house what they saw burned into their memories. It was no longer there. Carl said we walked up the hill where it stood and there were no signs of demolition no foundation. There's nothing at all what we all seem to witness the night before was no longer there. We've talked to each other over the years but none of us can explain mine division. Did these men witness a time slip. Time slips have been reported throughout history and English women. Vacationing in France Franson one thousand. Nine hundred one claimed they stepped into the French Revolution. The two couples traveling in Spain in the Nineteen Seventies stated an oddly archaic. The hotel. There was simply gone on their return journey. Physicists like Albert Einstein Michio Kaku and Stephen Hawkins have have all said time. Travel is theoretically possible. Our science just can't achieve it but what if nature can another example the light in the sky shown shown white far from the Greens and the reds at Jigsaw during the Aurora Borealis of two thousand four visible in North America as far as the Lower Midwest West Jake fifteen stood outside his parents home in the lake of the ozarks Missouri around ten PM. Twenty eighth of May leaning against a truck rock looking at the lights. He didn't know his life was about to change a bright white glow suddenly filled the northern horizon this look nothing like the the northern lights the Aurora Borealis nor did it behave like that the lights move like the light of a copy machine. The single bar brightness move from west to east over Jake's head and disappeared. I thought that I should maybe go inside at this time and found myself. Unable to move he said Novenas grew in his arms and legs and he blocked out when he woke. He knew he'd been somewhere else. I felt woozy and almost dated. Said time seem muddled in my head. Had He walked into the House to find he'd been outside an hour. It took most of the night for him to tell us parents what happened. Most of the time I kept telling them that I thought the calendar was wrong. It should at least be after two thousand eight he said to this day. My mother remembers bits of this mainly because I looked at her and asked pointblank. Is that black man. Still President. What happened to j seizures psychological phenomenon or did did jake accidentally take a brief four years step forward from two thousand four hundred to two thousand eight Jake slip is just one in a long long line of stories from people who brushed against a different time such as an RAF pilots are victor good ard who encountered airplanes in nineteen eighteen thirty five that didn't exist until nineteen thirty nine one hundred year old Swiss watch found in a Chinese Ming Dynasty Tomb? People may I slipped like this all the time Duncan cal opened the door of his nineteen ninety nine Chevrolet s ten next to a convenience store gas pump trump in Springfield Missouri. Large man accosted him as I left the gas station. Some large melon-headed man dressed in a business suit yelled what year is this. Kel- set the man stood at a spot kill would've walked by when he left the store but he hadn't seen him demand wore dark black suit suit with a rough fiber texture. Kill said along the lines of things in the Teddy Roosevelt era. What year is this? The man yelled again. The the man was white about thirty five or forty years old clean-shaven normal but he asked an odd question. Carol said two thousand three CAL cal. Tolan the man's face contorted anger. What year is it? He screamed at yet cal again. I said two thousand three. The large man screamed the question. One more time I said two thousand three so he could hear me. Cal said then he quit asking. Kelly glanced away from the man as he slid into Swiss truck but safely inside he turned to get another luck and the man was gone. He disappeared from the front of the gas station. Cal said in the Second Institute held to slip into his truck demand simply vanished cal put. The man hadn't stepped inside the store the only place he could have gone in that short amount of the time he was gone.

Carl Marc Duncan Cal Jake Red Barn Missouri CAL Ford Nineteen Seventies White House Pona City City Oklahoma Aurora Borealis Spain Albert Einstein Michio Kaku France Franson Teddy Roosevelt North America Novenas Kelly
"michio" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"michio" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Once again Dr Michio kaku I don't talk to welcome back I bought in a lot of areas we really are approaching what a lot of people consider to be you know the creators arena of of things and I I take it that being serious here for second you really what stop yourself from proceeding for that specific reason you would rather do it because of real scientific danger and proceeding in some of these areas that's right when we signed to play god I think that in terms of theory like the Big Bang the unified field theory string theory is okay for scientists to imagine being god to create a universe out of our equations however equations can be recalled organisms cannot and I think that we've we create new life forms most the time they're gonna be harmless they will not survive and so there's no big problem but they mutate and I think we have to be extremely careful that one of these days just like the killer bees that escape from this be station in the fifties and the addition Harrelson's gonna get loose I think that something could get loose and I think that you in pristine something almost did get losing you alluded to is a world class side name you know can't really talk that much about it how much do you actually know do you know more than you can talk about we just know that FOR Dietrich outside Washington DC which of course houses much of the designer germs that we've been playing with even in spite of the nineteen seventy two bio warfare treaty that we signed with the Soviet Union that there was an incident that took place you know years ago where it almost escaped and we have many biosafety levels there the people there look like people from a space movie with all these gloves and space suits to protect themselves from germs right and it only takes one mistake one careless mistake for some German to escape from that laboratory and that's the price we pay for for planning tinkering with germs like you ball and rift valley fever dengue fever and different kinds of germs for which we largely don't have cures you're about this Nance little thing going around on cruise ships as Norwalk thing it's a a puzzling it does seem to be affecting cruise ships on again and again and again with despite all the scrubbing and everything is on there we just keep hearing about these new ships coming down with this Norwalk thing and well apparently one hundred as little as one hundred particles of the virus are enough to set off this nor work like the illness and you can't even see a hundred viruses and that's all it takes two to be placed in the nose of a test subject to induce the symptoms are to inject it into your stomach so I think we're talking about something that is very common it's one of the most common illnesses in the United States but it doesn't propagate very far because most people don't spend how weeks at a time in a cruise ship I could ship is the and ideal incubator for these things also there's some I was going to bring up a cruise ship is like a little in closed environment protected in the long run by nine miles and hundreds of miles of salt water it's just isolated out there on the water and why something it would be almost the height deal place to test something wouldn't it that's right in fact you know when European cities got off the ground you know five thousand years ago that provided an ideal environment for ancient illnesses that we've always lived with you know these diseases are millions of years old to to propagate in cities because of the close contact that we've had was I'm not saying they're doing kind of course I'm just saying edit glee it would be in the in flight yeah well I think it's natural I think that the pasted to a few individuals they came on board with the illness this and everybody else it just takes one individual to infect the entire ship and I think that that's the price you pay for for being in this confined environment which is ideal for turns and they propagate like crazy I handshake a sneeze fecal matter anything in the air could could set this thing off you know you're not talk a lot about black holes before and here's an interesting Associated Press science article in it is the headlines as telescope sees black holes merging are in a looming collision of giants to supermassive black holes are drifting toward a violent merger and an eruption of energy that is going to war the fabric of space it.

Dr Michio kaku
"michio" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"michio" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Again Dr Michio kaku I don't talk to welcome back I bought I mean a lot of areas we really are approaching what a lot of people consider to be you know the creators arena of of things and I I take it that being serious here for second you really what stop yourself from proceeding for that specific reason you would rather do it because of real scientific danger and proceeding in some of these areas that's right when we find his play god I think that in terms of theory like the Big Bang the unified field theory string theory is okay for scientists to imagine being god to create a universe out of our equations however equation can be recalled organisms cannot and I think that we we create new life forms most the time they're gonna be harmless they will not survive and so there's no big problem but they need to eight and I think we have to be extremely careful that one of these days just like the killer bees that escape from the space station in the fifties and Rio de Janeiro some is gonna get loose I think that something could get loose and I think that you cannot use our overseen something almost did get loose and you alluded to is a world class side name you know we can't really talk that much about it how much do you actually know do you know more than you can talk about how we just know that it for Dietrich outside Washington DC which of course houses much of the designer germs that we've been playing with even in spite of the nineteen seventy two bio warfare treaty that we signed with the Soviet Union that there was an incident that took place you know years ago where it almost escaped and we have many biosafety levels there the people there look like people from a space movie with all these gloves and space suits to protect themselves from germs right and it only takes one mistake one careless mistake person germs whiskey from that laboratory and that's the price we pay for for plain tinkering with germs like you ball and rift valley fever dengue fever and different kinds of germs for which we largely don't have cures you're about this Nance little thing going around on cruise ships as Norwalk thing it's a a puzzling it does seem to be affecting cruise ships on again and again and again with despite all the scrubbing and everything is on there we just keep hearing about these new ships coming down with this Norwalk thing and well apparently one hundred as little as one hundred particles of the virus are enough to set off this Norwalk like the illness and you can't even see a hundred viruses and that's all it takes two to be placed in the nose of a test subject to induce the sometimes hard injected into your stomach so I think we're talking about something that is very common it's one of the most common illnesses in the United States but it doesn't propagate very far because most people don't spend mile weeks at a time in a cruise ship I could ship at the end ideal incubator for these things also there's someone is going to bring up a cruise ship is like a little in closed environment protected in the long run by miles and hundreds of miles of salt water it's just isolated out there on the water and why something it would be almost the deal place to test something wouldn't it that's right in fact you know when European cities got off the ground you know five thousand years ago that provided an ideal environment for ancient illnesses that we've always lived with you know these diseases are millions of years old to to propagate in cities because of the close contact that we've had because I'm not saying they're doing kind of course I'm just saying theoretically it would be in the in flight yeah well I think it's natural I think to the pasted to a few individuals they came on board with the illness this analytic reacted everybody else it just takes one individual to infect the entire ship and I think that that's the price you pay for for being in this confined environment which is ideal for germs and they propagate like crazy I hand shake his knees fecal matter anything in the in the air could could set this thing off you know you're not a total loss of about black holes before and here's an interesting Associated Press science article in it is the headlines as telescope sees black holes merging in a looming collision of giants to supermassive black holes are drifting toward a violent merger and an eruption of energy that is going to war the fabric of.

Dr Michio kaku
"michio" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"michio" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Well, known physicist Michio Kaku joins us to talk about things that are happening in the next hour and Djelic attendance right in the middle of a major severe thunderstorm in Saint Louis, we've got all our systems clicking along keep our fingers crossed. Here's what's happening. Health officials reporting that more than seven hundred people now have been infected by this year marking a twenty five year high for this infectious disease, the centers for disease control and prevention said that the cases have been recorded in twenty two states still mostly affecting unvaccinated children. They say the power struggle between the embattled Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro and the opposition opposition leader met its most bold action. When one Gaudio called for military uprising to also. The socialist leader. Let's check in with Dr John Curtis online columnist dot com. John is is this coup going to happen? What do you think? One hundred percent. No, it's not happening. It's fake publicity stunt, basically by a last ditch effort by Guadagno who has zero power. They're hurling rocks at the end molotov cocktails and they're being mowed down. The with, you know, Arnold, armor personnel. Square almost a water cannons and tear gas and the military, you know, the claim that there's been military defections. They're negligible in terms of the military defecting to Guido's position. And then you hear John Bolton today giving misleading possible. Interviewed a depressed at are. So be knighted in terms of their understanding. What's going on there? George the Russian military is in Venezuela right now, they have hundreds of military advisers, there's hundreds of Cuban advisors. They're right now, they're not even close to surrendering power. And the Trump administration is absolutely blowing smoke right now that somehow, you know, the pro democracy movement is inevitable. When you hear the speeches by pants and by Mike Pompeo, it's just pure propaganda. There's nothing to it. And that Madero if anything is more firmly entrenched in power now than he ever has been would be. Russian contingent and the Cuban contingent there in Caracas, that's really where it stands perspective. John. Thank you, totally different from what we're hearing on the mainstream media, Dr John Curtis online, columnists dot com. Call it a freak accident or pure, bad luck. But Zona mother suffered more than thirty beast after Gusta win blew a beehive off a tree causing it to land on her head. Oh my gosh. The woman said that she was walking to an elementary school in Tempi to pick up her son when the beehive fell on her head she's lucky that you didn't have some reaction. That's a horrible situation. Nassar administrator Jim Breitenstein is sounding the alarm that an asteroid strike is not something to be taken lightly, and is perhaps earth's biggest threat. We're hearing a lot about these things lately. Let's check in with Dr Steven Cates. Dr sky on this Stephen they know something we don't, you know, George, I think they're on the right path here and honestly. I don't really know the answer to this. But here's what I can add to your conversation about this speak so often as we do this for so long have been doing it. So long talking about these potentially. Hazardous asteroids is about nineteen hundred and sixty seven of these George that are sizable enough. But when I find out about this simulation exercise that both the European Space Agency, and of course, conducting, but here's some of the interesting parts about this. They're doing a simulation. They must know something the simulated S nineteen PDC fictional get a of this supposed to strike the earth again in this fictional this test only only test, we think we think it's a test, right, right? April twenty ninth of twenty twenty seven one in five hundred chance of a hit. But here's the goal. They're trying to track ninety percent of the asteroids that are within a hundred and forty meters in size and Georgia's we've been talking about so much. The event that happened in February of twenty thirteen just to get people to perspective on this. It was sixty seven feet in diameter alleged with four hundred forty thousand tonnes of the energy of TNC. If it actually it struck the earth in a little different angle. We know the more of the so-called casualties sad as they were from the direct impact. But from a supersonic shockwave. So here's something interesting. Just to leave everybody wondering to answer your question. Yeah. They must know something they're trying to be prepared. All they can really do George. This is the big thing that's coming out of this conference deflect or evacuate and just a really brief way of talking about small, but real chance of these particular hitting the earth the next century thirty two hundred faith on is to three point two miles. Diameter? Twenty-seven teaneck. So too was three hundred feet in diameter. These are asteroids that theoretically have a chance of twenty seventeen Wisey one. And then the one that really is gonna do some more research on his. Twenty eight to UAE if it were to strike the probability is extremely low. But still a chance get a little bit three thousand two hundred megatons of energy allegedly about half of the world's nuclear weapon power. So we've got to take it seriously as always, George if you have got questions out there, folks, we've got answers Email me, Dr sky, the IRS kY show gmaiLcom. Thank you so much. Thank you, Dr Scott, and we'll talk to you and your regular Monday appearance on coast to coast up next one of our longtime regular contributors to the programme physicist Michio Kaku joins us next on coast to coast AM..

George John Bolton Michio Kaku Dr John Curtis Dr sky physicist Nicolas Maduro Gaudio Dr Steven Cates Mike Pompeo Saint Louis President Caracas UAE Dr Scott Trump Djelic European Space Agency Venezuela Guadagno
Google's sales swing and miss (The 3:59, Ep. 552)

The 3:59

04:43 min | 2 years ago

Google's sales swing and miss (The 3:59, Ep. 552)

"The. Welcome to distribute tonight Chiang, I'm offering Google's parent alphabet reported first-quarter revenue. The missed expectations earnings were hit by one point seven billion dollar e you find for practices. Amid all contras of what's interesting here is amid all the controversies around Google right now between their staff between ethics issues. They've always been able to count on their business. But even in this first quarter revenue did miss expectations and got slammed for it. Yeah. I think the big chunk of that are all of these controversies. But I also think it's interesting that no one's paying attention to their push into smart homes like making their own gadgets have their right made by Google branch with the pixel phone. They mentioned that they didn't sell as well as they had expected to either. No, that's a great point. They Samsung also reported last night also felt the same pressure particularly in the premium phone market is you're saying he's expensive phone. They aren't catching on with consumers because I don't think it's the controversies to be honest because Facebook undergoes these same controversies and yet they their earnings were up. Right. Yeah. So I don't think it's it's the controversies. I think it's pushing the hardware that's hurting their pockets. I think you're right. It's a really good point. They did teas. That there'd be more hardware coming for Google next week were expecting at least Michio pixel three phone. So maybe an affordable phone that affordable pixel phone that the consumers would actually wanna buy. Yeah. I mean, that's kind of how they found their hit with the Google home mini. I mean think about how Google home wasn't really doing that. Well, stacked up against the Amazons device for really long time. And then the mini kinda struck out for them. Yup. And keep in mind that before this whole pixel lineup. There was the next phone line franchise and those next phones were much beloved for the fact that they were Ford -able, also like amazing phones. All right next up while ways in the headlines, again, this time Bloomberg reports that Vodafone a back door vulnerabilities in some of his equipment far back as twenty eleven. This comes amid escalating tensions between the US. And while way and the CFO is still incarcerated in Canada awaiting extradition. What do you think? Yeah. So last week, the u k there was another report that the u. Hey would be allowing a way to build non-core parts of its infrastructure, but the officials from the department of homeland security at an event that I was at had mentioned that the still be a risk even though its non-core perhaps the UK government feels like they have found a manageable amount of risk because everything's gonna come with some level of risk. But you know, these reports like this don't really bode well for national security concerns surrounding wall way, a lot of security officials worry that you know, way is to close if the Chinese government and would be able to use that on five G networks to as a back door to spy on other countries. And the reports were interesting that, you know, Vodafone initially found some of those vulnerabilities while ways said, okay, we got this all fix and then they went back and actually look and those lower abilities were still around so deadly calls suspicion to the company. Lastly, can we talk about the sonic the hedgehog trailer? This looks awful. It's unfortunate that this is a podcast, and you can't walk. Watch this trailer as being unless you're on our livestream broilers. But yeah, I hated every single part of this. I mean, there was right down to the music choice gangster's paradise playing when sonic was running around. And it's just it's so weird to me because sonic has such a like conic, you know, low soundtrack. Yeah. Also. Yeah, why go with that song? When there are so many songs from like the sonic like discography honoree mino-, right? Where I say. But like there are two like poke Amonte like detective Pichu used like songs from yoga on the right? Hanukkah minute us like Coolio for this. Yeah. That's I mean. A love this is just contactable looking in. You know, Brian was saying this could be the next. Mario super. Mario brothers disaster. Yeah. I mean, honestly the coolest thing about this whole trailer was Dr robotic played by Jim Carey, right? I felt like they should have went the route of Sony when they did venom. Or I forgot what studios. I don't know if you're using venomous as a prototype as good movie. No. But like my point is is that they should focus on the villain store. Stay as a standalone movie. Joker sort of a background character. Yeah. Yeah. Don't give me live action Sonning doctoral robotic that's a cool. Like like, Jim. Carey looks the coolest. I don't know if there's a market peel for Dr Nick, I mean, look, I don't think song should be made it alive, actually. Yeah. It's just it's just weird. All right. More of these stories because on CNN and Roger Chang, I'm African thanks for listening.

Google Jim Carey Vodafone Chiang Samsung Facebook Sonic Ford United States CNN Roger Chang CFO Dr Nick Amazons Michio Chinese Government Coolio Canada
"michio" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"michio" Discussed on 600 WREC

"It it's hard to. But I try to stay on the middle because I wrote a book on the topic. And it is my position when I do these books Vos like that the death to present the evidence socio dairies so that the reader can make his own decision. I don't necessarily swayed them one way or the other simply because we do not have a definitive answer. Nothing surprises me. Now. This is only twenty nineteen I'm interpreting account correctly. We we need to be at least open minded to the possibilities of what this objective. Experience implies is real tangible. Is it meaningful or the number ration- Luger be listen. But there is evidence that suggest that there is impossible to give separation conscience from the brains. Not not all or none not absolute in nature implicit but significant enough. To warned ones questioning of whether or not there is in fact, an alternate round that coexist with that was and if we look at scientific principles regarding the string theory quantum mechanics among other theories, the individuals who oppose the series who are heck of a lot snows, and I like Stephen hawking Michio Kaku among many others.

Stephen hawking Michio Kaku Vos
AirPower dead: What's the story behind Apple's doomed wireless charger?

Food and Wine

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

AirPower dead: What's the story behind Apple's doomed wireless charger?

"Apple is scrapping. The idea. Apparently of developing wireless charging mad for its mobile devices. Here's dean, Michio. The device was announced in September two thousand seventeen and premise the charge. And apple watch iphone an air pods. All at the same time. Apple concluded airpower will not achieve its high standards. There are reports of the company's engineers were having problems with the device overheating and being able to charge multiple products at the same

Apple Michio
Dow posts huge reversal as bond yields plunge

CNBC's Fast Money

03:01 min | 2 years ago

Dow posts huge reversal as bond yields plunge

"We start with a big reversal for stocks today. The Dow swinging more than three hundred points as the bond market continues to wreak havoc on Wall Street, the ten year yield sink to its lowest level in fourteen months as the yield curve continues to flatten even the bond proxy sectors. Like utilities falling today. The should you shake off the growth fears, and what is safe to buy guy? Well, again, welcome back day to day. We I know you're playing hurt so Kudo, thank you. So you thanks for looking at mom. I'm pointed out for the growth mirrors. Were blown while. We talk about him a lot. But are they overblown will no not at Vicks at fifteen and that when the s&p five hundred within four percent of the all time, high we made back this fall. So I think although there talked a lot about the market doesn't seem all that concerned yet. But what I will say is this, you know, the fact that we continue sort of seem the roll over this twenty eight hundred level has to be somewhat concerning. I think the vix is too cheap given this environment. And I do think stocks come under some pressure with that said to answer your original question. I still have time by. About quitting. Waiting for. About that. Obviously not hurt. And I think Tim would agree with me on this. When I still think energy could be bought and specific areas big cap energy, Exxon Mobil, at some of the names, Tim, Michio. They Devon and capital. For example, is a by. And I still think healthcare goes higher from. So I would agree with that. And I would just take my glass half full to the half empty the what's going on with the ten year. Also, maybe this this some of this. Today's news, not not the entire move in the tenure, obviously we been wrestling with growth fears, but Stephen Moore, you know, do we have a loose cannon the pen wants to cut rates the rumors out there, another fifty basis point cut. There's no he said, well, okay. So but the rumor that the fed would actually go through and do this. You're right. I mean, people are contemplating whether the fed cuts once or twice the fact that we're even doing that is very different than we were a month ago. The things I'm encouraged about first of all today's trade data indicated exports were not only up, but they are up significantly to Europe for everybody. That's looking for a rebound in at least some response to. Hey, I think we're through the worst of the growth fears. I think that's something. Some of the risk indicators. You could be looking at Dalian X fine US levers loan index X fine US high yield X fine. The places where you really get concerned emerging markets and Sammy's have been battered over the last five days you could pay caution there. Sorry, dad as long as rates though, remain low and at the top of the conversation, doesn't it puts somewhat of a cap on on the rally it might do. But I think at this stage of the game with rates going the way they are from the tenure yield above three and a quarter just what six months ago to where it is. It looks like it's going back to two percent. That's not particularly bullish in my mind for. It just I. Well. Okay. So he has he's the one. Here's what want. So the last time we had this situation was was late two thousand fifteen early two thousand and sixteen and we really did have a serious global growth. Fear about deflation about rates just go in there. This is when we started to see a lot of sovereign debt.

Sammy United States FED TIM Exxon Mobil Kudo Stephen Moore Europe Ten Year Fourteen Months Four Percent Two Percent Six Months Five Days
"michio" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"michio" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Just having Michio a few times and talk to you on the phone a few times you are pumped. Yeah. I there's no reason not to be God, I've been working hard getting trained training. All the some of the stuff. We were talking earlier about on Facebook. I saw some of your training, videos and stuff. Yeah. Dude. And rightfully so climbing Mount Everest, you are working hard you. I mean, come on. How did you change this this training from last time? Well, I get the impression you're doing. Something different. Yeah. I'm doing a lot different. So I turned on my training over to a company called uphill athlete, and they specialize in training eight thousand meter peak climber, so is big endurance climb. I kind of went in the last time with a little bit more strength. So they leaned me out and. I've got plenty of strength. But I think the biggest thing is I've got my endurance has really gone up. Remember last time you were talking about you know, when you're down in Antarctica. Yeah. I was just crushing new kind of. Yeah. Yeah. It's it's it's really based on heart rate and performance. And so it's really designed to burn fats. You know, we can't get enough carbs in the sustain and energy Somali convert everything over to fat before we go any further. Did you put this on the bed? Yeah. Right now. Matt's gear all of this is a this is a fraction say right out my basement, right? I mean, again, people can look on my Twitter here. Just describe quick with some of the things you you guy here. Yeah. I brought a couple three really important pieces. The number one piece. Here's my down suit. So those are very specialized piece of equipment we use above can't one. We'll both spend a good part of a month in that suit. It's kind of one of your lifeblood that keeps you warm. So we'll be in that thing twenty four seven above can't one. And then of course, I brought my climbing boots. Those Ben Oliver was bad ass. That looks like. All right. Light. But then, but then it's obviously very very warm. Look like they weigh twenty five pounds, but the free light. Now, they're light. But they I mean, they do they do the job. They're they keep your feet warm that keep them safe. But you know, they got an extra wide soul. So you're really working on your foot workup their big things your foot work. And of course, I've bought me crampons and used them. And so Matt you're talking about camp one where we talking altitude wise they're so camp so kept ones at nineteen thousand in. It's kind of the first way station above also the big thing is you're going to be a base campus seventeen five and then you work your way through the icefall, which really is kind of the really most dangerous part of the mountain and some really on the lower lower end of it. But but then once you get it once you get to the icefall. You know, then you got can't one camp to recant force. So now, obviously, you're doing this all your gear is important. But like, what is the one essential thing? If you had a dump something at the end of the day was the most important essential thing. Is there one thing? I don't I don't can't say there's one thing. There's so many pieces that go into it. I mean, I do a lot of redundancy. Something breaks or something fails, you know. I mean, it can mean the end of your car, and you jump run over to dick sporting. You say you're climb. We're talking to your life. You drop your glasses. I good example. You know, if you're if you're up high, and you drop your your your glacier glasses snow blinds. Gonna get your like within thirty seconds. What what is known by feeling? So you know, the earth the sun reflects about the snow reflects about ninety five percent of the earth's race. And so this two sons Ray, so when you're up even closer to the sun is that much brighter. So what happens is if you know we wear specialized glasses, and if you drop your glasses or leisure glasses. They get knocked off your head within matter. Just seconds. I mean, the the brightness from the, wow, we'll we'll blind. You friar is fries. And so we wear goggles and goggles provide extra wind protection. But they're also more secure around your head. Right. So you know, I'll have a couple of pairs glacier glasses. I'll have goggles with backup lenses. Have several pairs of gloves. Hats off to hats anytime, anything you can think of to keep you warm and protected you want to of right yellow that's also part of this little l'ensemble. You brought in here. Those gloves. Look bad. Yes. Those are high altitude admits. Yeah. Yeah. There's there's aren't totes. That's what I forgot to get on quicker on mount, Vincent. I should've had him on earlier and I put him on on the summit ridges, minus thirty five. Matt Matt Davis story where you had like a gear failure where you're like you had to act pretty quickly. And I lost my headlamp on on the climb one time about three in the morning. It was pitch dark and like a dummy. I didn't change my battery out. And so I'm on a fairly steep side slope in the route we were roped in. But I didn't you know, my light went out. So I didn't have any. Wow, light here wasn't so now, and like a dummy, I got my pack on so now, I got a clip my pack into the rope. Get my pack off rummage through my pack. Get my spare batteries, and I'll change that on this slope. Terrible. Nobody was happy with. Really? Nobody on our. Makes him. Hey, guys, three in the morning. Everybody's freeze. And we're trying to get to the top by eight or nine in the morning. So we can get the hell off of their sudden. Oh, Matt mats headlamp goes out. So mad Brennan is our guest. He's getting ready to climb out average. We'll come back with you here. In a second mad talk about. You gotta.

Matt Matt Davis Mount Everest Facebook Michio climbing Twitter Ben Oliver Brennan Ray Vincent eight thousand meter ninety five percent twenty five pounds thirty seconds
"michio" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"michio" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Reading this article by Michio Kaku. You know, who Dr Michio Kaku is. Yeah. Play shortstop for the dodgers. Anyway, he said that the the mass below Yellowstone is starting to rise. Now think of this is about a four hundred and seventy five million tonne massive rock rising. And they can actually see that the ground level is coming up. Well, the last time that blew that was a category eight explosion Michio Kaku. Doesn't miss a beat. And he says your instead of fifty United States. There'll be thirty. And I'm going holy crap. That's a yeah. It may not happen for one hundred and fifty years, but they're starting to measure the mass of the volcano below Yellowstone. But he did it wouldn't sound this tariff. Look look what man has done now. Oh last. Gone with their plastic straws. Difficult to drink through a paper straw. Oh my God. The people who they've come up with a new straw. That's made from corn in it in it disintegrates. It decomposes is drink, and it's a plastic type. Thank goodness. I'm Tony what it's miserable miserable for my grandchildren in Florida because kids like to bite their straws, and those are the paper ones. Just don't come back. Well, what the corner they'll get their vegetables. Yeah. Little round up on that straw. So so. So we were brought to you by Michela. I haven't even started the program. Yeah. Okay. So we're still here still in show prep. So we were doing our little we did a little dolphin tour on the boat. I sent you guys the cool God, we should put that we should post that they feel about our surge in the wake, you know, they run of that that pressure differential and underwater there you just let.

Dr Michio Kaku dodgers Yellowstone Tony Florida seventy five million tonne fifty years
Endometriosis: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Radio

00:59 min | 3 years ago

Endometriosis: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, I'm Vivian Williams. Endometriosis is a condition in which tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus grows outside the uterus. It can cause a lot of pain and for some women fertility problems. What causes an atrocious? Dr tat Newburn net. Says there are several theories probably the most widely held theory is that we know that eighty ninety percent of women actually meant straight backwards through the flow can tube. So that probably deposit some enemy chill cells in the pelvis now, not all women experienced symptoms. But when it comes to treatment, Dr Bernard says, you can manage the symptoms with medications or their surgery medications don't change the disease in a fundamental way. So most experts now or recommending that we excise Michio says that means cut it out where we find it. For more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Dr Tat Newburn Mayo Clinic Vivian Williams Dr Bernard Michio Eighty Ninety Percent
Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas Had a Second Engagement Party

The Morning Toast

03:40 min | 3 years ago

Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas Had a Second Engagement Party

"Priyanka Chopra ended Jones had a second engagement party last night and it was led. Honestly, I don't care about that one. I care about the one in India that those are the pictures were surfacing Nick. Jonas fluted India had a traditional practice. Straightly correctly. Roca ceremony, which is a traditional engagement ceremony in India in Mumbai, and then they had another gauging party last night in LA which was like thirsty and like Saudi. But right. The meaningful one was in. In Mumbai, and I just can't. I, therefore I tell you, I thought, Sarah, their fake relationship. Why are they like clearly it's fake because they're protesting so much who has to. I mean, I guess culturally, yes. Have the the one by I'm I'm full. actually, I guess I just find then you would have with your friend, right? Because you're gonna be like, hey, come to India kit, make it right. They did like a low key one. And then the comedians little come from? No, this whole thing. How do they meet? He is the most boring person I've ever met in my entire. Even if you've been went it serious, I interviewed him, but when he was out of Jonas brothers and he was like Evan artist solo, and he was like, so I can't even say to cool for school because cool was nothing apart of it. Right. It was just like you are. So thank God. Boy, you can sing because you was here. Issue is Heine little some to, honestly, he's not my type of much mortgage yoga when you were kid. 'cause I'm lesbian when you work at though and you loved the joints, brothers, Michio, and you will love the Jonas brothers who was like your brother. I mean, I don't know. I I was more like in college where they were like big. So I guess like tall Jones that was with Camilla Belle for Joe media. I love him. Okay here my thoughts because when I saw these pictures, it's like this. Literally, nobody could tell me any differently. This relationship is a farce. It is a PR stunt. It's an we blinds so online. Like that's everyone says there's no doubt in that this is the famous fucking relationship out there. First of all, they've known each other for two months, second ball. There's just so not compatible in any way. Like I don't see them getting along. She is like an intellect, she's like a serious actress like she made the transition from Bollywood to Hollywood, which is really hard.

India Jones Jonas Camilla Belle Heine Mumbai Priyanka Chopra Sodastream Jackie Joe Media Turkey Geico Michio LA Sarah Nick Hollywood One Percent Two Two Hundred Thousand Dolla
Police search for motive in Texas school shooting

Science Fantastic with Michio Kaku

02:27 min | 3 years ago

Police search for motive in Texas school shooting

"This is an abc news special texas high school shooting from abc news headquarters here is correspondent aaron katersky they're holding a single rose or maybe a candle at a vigil underway after ten people were shot and killed at santa fe high school outside houston a junior at the school using his father shotgun and pistol opened fire for an as yet unspecified reason tonight dimitrios pa gorgeous is charged with capital murder a judge denied bond after a brief court appearance a pastor is leading the assembled in prayer around us getting darker we have hope that the light of jesus in us we'll be more visible the darker the world gets as well levers we come together to lift up those that are deeply hurting to lift up the families of those who lives were lost to share hope it's not tragedy that brings us together today it is hope in the face of tragedy that brings us together today let's pray another community course to come together in prayer after another tragedy at another school in the united states of america rome schubert lived at firsthand he was shot in the head this morning when this shooting happened and yet he did not know it kafelnikov over the wall and it started running towards the parking lot and it turned around and saw my friend they're laying on the ground and it went over to check on him he said he was all right and then came up to me and i was like i got a lot of blood that somebody's blood get all over me and he said now you got shot in the back of the head and i was like i had no idea and there's board running down my shirt rome schubert was there so was decoder in that school and quite shaken buddy events of the day i just heard the largest and everybody ran out yelling ryan i you know all we heard was run brian and next thing you know we hear boom boom lemon everybody's just started running try to make it to the safest place i could as fast as i called my mom right away she couldn't breathe asthma attack i didn't even know where to find her she was in a field and i i just i can't even begin.

Aaron Katersky Murder Bond United States Brian ABC Texas High School Santa Fe High School Houston Ryan
Alfie Evans, sick British toddler at center of legal battle, dies

Science Fantastic Live with Dr. Michio Kaku

00:50 sec | 3 years ago

Alfie Evans, sick British toddler at center of legal battle, dies

"A terminally ill british toddler who's case drew the attention of pope francis has died despite a highly contentious legal battle in the intervention of the pope twenty three month old british toddler alfie evans died after his life support was turned off against the wishes of his parents they were backed by hundreds of thousands of facebook supporters known as alfi's army the child had a rare degenerative brain disease his parents wanted him to go to rome for treatment but his doctor said he would never recover and the courts agreed announcing alfi's death is father says mike gladiator laid down his shield and gained his wings larry miller cbs news london now to the box office where another marvel superhero movie is knocking it out of the park avengers and finicky war earned ninety five million in forty three countries the.

Pope Francis Alfie Evans Alfi Mike Gladiator Facebook Larry Miller Twenty Three Month
The Latest: Minneapolis airport reopens after blizzard

Science Fantastic Live with Dr. Michio Kaku

01:18 min | 3 years ago

The Latest: Minneapolis airport reopens after blizzard

"And creating treacherous road conditions minnesota twins home game against the chicago white sox at target field snowed out the centers for disease control says a multistate e coli outbreak that has sickened nearly three dozen people across eleven states is linked to lettuce grown in arizona no deaths reported agencies not identified a common grower supplier distributor or brand you're listening to abc news all money managers may seem pretty much the same but well some money managers may recommend high commission investment products fisher investments avoids them some money managers may have hidden and layered fees fisher investments never does and while some money managers are happy to earn commissions from you whether you do well or not fisher investments fees are structured so we do better when you do better in other words we're structured to be on your side maybe that's why most of our clients come to us from other money managers talk with us and find out why so many experienced investors are switching to and staying with fisher investments fisher investments clearly better money management investments in securities involve the risk of loss visit us at fisherinvestments dot com.

Chicago White Sox Arizona Minnesota Fisher Investments
15 killed, 14 injured as truck plows into bus carrying Canadian hockey team

Science Fantastic Live with Dr. Michio Kaku

01:38 min | 3 years ago

15 killed, 14 injured as truck plows into bus carrying Canadian hockey team

"Four firefighters hurt and fire in an apartment on one of the upper floors of trump tower in new york city wcbs reporter ethan harp fire was pretty well could cain although it was obviously a very tough fire to fight not only because of the fire itself but how high it was fifty stories of course ladders can't get up there commissioner dan niagara talk to us about the challenges not only fighting what would already be a tragic fire but a challenging one because of course this is the president's personal home no members of the first family were there at the time of president trump tweet of the fire was out before it actually was mr trump had said earlier that the fire was very confined because the building was well built canadian police say the death toll on the crash between a truck and a bus carrying a hockey team has risen to fifteen or twenty nine people on the bus which was carrying the humboldt broncos a team in the saskatchewan junior hockey lee curtis a block he's with the royal canadian mounted police this is a very involved investigation and due to the large amount of evidence information and the number of victims this work will take some time no official details yet on exactly what caused the crash central american immigrants traveling through mexico and a caravan that drew comments from president trump or protesting in mexico city it's the final stop for the migrant caravan that left from mexico guatemala border late late last month to draw attention to immigrant and refugee policies migrants taking part of begun to disperse in recent days is they receive temporary papers from the mexican government some plan to remain in mexico while others will travel to the us border and request asylum outside of hospital in munster germany there was a long line of people waiting to give blood after.

Ethan Harp Germany Mexico Guatemala Official Saskatchewan Hockey Dan Niagara Commissioner Cain President Trump Reporter New York City United States Mexican Government Mexico Royal Canadian Humboldt Broncos Mr Trump