30 Burst results for "Michigan Radio"

"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That white supremacy runs deep in the U. S Armed forces will get the history and talk solutions today. I'm the takeaway for Wednesday, January 27 2021 I'm Tanzi Know Vega also on the show. If you've been hearing confusing new advice about what mask to wear to protect yourself from Coburg 19 and where to get them, You're not alone will break it all down. Last President. Biden wants to fix child care in America, and I couldn't agree more. It's unequal, too expensive and all around broken. We'll tackle the big policy questions all that coming up on the takeaway after these headlines. Lie from NPR news. I'm Laxmi, saying President Biden's reversing Trump era policies that he believes compromise this nation's ability to confront the catastrophic threats off climate change. He signed executive orders today that whole new leases for oil and gas on public lands and offshore waters, mandate the federal purchase of more electric vehicles and boost investment in green energy. Is promising. This new path will lead to new training and jobs, including in communities with economies dependent on coal production. John Kerry, a former secretary of state, now serving a special presidential envoy for climate Says the president's actions today have global implications. We have a big agenda in front of us on a global basis. And President Biden. Is deeply committed. Totally seized by this issue is you can tell by this executive order and by the other Theo initiative getting back into Paris immediately. That's why he rejoined the Paris agreement so quickly because he knows it is urgent on his first day in office President Biden side in order to rejoin the Paris climate accord that his predecessor argued, put more burden on the U. S and other countries and hurt American workers. One of the men arrested for the alleged conspiracy to kidnap the governor of Michigan has pleaded guilty. Dustin Dwyer from Michigan Radio reports the man has agreed to cooperate with prosecutors. 25 year old Tigar been appeared in federal court in Grand Rapids and told the judge he wanted to change his plea in the kidnapping case. Garden is one of six men facing federal charges over the alleged plot. Eight other men face charges in state court marks. Khattala is Garvin's attorney. This is about our client, saying, Look.

President Biden President Vega executive Coburg Paris NPR Michigan John Kerry Dustin Dwyer Grand Rapids America Laxmi kidnapping Michigan Radio Khattala Theo attorney
"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The aging pipes leached into the water, exposing over 100,000 residents to high levels of the neurotoxin. Over the past few years, Charges have been filed against some officials. Some pled no contest and then in 2019, the remaining charges were dropped. Then, just last week, nine officials, including former Michigan governor Rick Snyder, were charged for their roles in the crisis. So what does this mean for getting justice to impacted residents? Joining me today is someone who has followed this crisis closely from the beginning. Steve Carmody Flint reporter for Michigan Radio, based in Flint. Welcome Steve to science Friday. Thank you. As I said, we're almost seven years out from the start of this crisis where these charges against the former governor and those other officials a surprise. The timing was definitely a surprise. Ever since the attorney general Ended original investigation and started a new one. Her office has been very quiet about what's actually been happening with the investigation. So when we learned last week that these charges had been filed, that was a surprise. Most of the people who are facing charges, though, had been charged previously in the original investigation. They're facing additional charges beyond what they were charged with before. And the big surprise was that the former governor was also being charged, although he's only being charged with two counts of neglect of duty, which is a misdemeanor. How are these officials implicated in the Flint water crisis? Well, for the most part, the people who have been charged in this our state officials, and it's important to remember that in 2014, the city of Flint was under state oversight. The governor had appointed an emergency manager to run the city. To correct a financial problem the city was having so the decision to switch the city's water was made by those emergency managers and two emergency managers are among those who've been charged in connection with the water crisis and several state health officials. Former state health officials have also been charged. With various things, including involuntary manslaughter charges that are connected to a Legionnaire's disease operate that took place at the same time as the water crisis. So it's the state's oversight of the Flint water crisis, which is highlighted by the charges that have been filed. Let's talk about the residents of Flint for a moment who are affected by this crisis. What are they saying about these charges? Since the very beginning, people in Flint have wanted state officials to be held accountable for causing the water crisis in their community, and at the top of their list was governor Rick Snyder. So when they learned that the governor was going to be criminally charged in connection with the crisis, there was a lot of excitement a lot of finally and that you were hearing around town. But Flint residents like Claire McClinton said, You know they were disappointed when they heard what the charges are actually going to pay. You know, for a minute we felt good, because that's one of the things we've been wanting it on the criminal side.

Flint Steve Carmody Flint Rick Snyder 100,000 involuntary manslaughter Michigan Claire McClinton Michigan Radio attorney reporter
"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR and W bur. I'm Callum Borchers. I'm Peter wrote down. This is here and now the former governor of Michigan pleaded not guilty today to two charges of willful neglect of duty nearly seven years after lead, contaminated water killed 12 people and sickened Many more in Flint. Rick Snyder is one of at least nine public officials facing criminal charges related to the water crisis that began after the city switched its water supply in 2014. Steve Carmody is a reporter for Michigan radio. He's been following this, Steve explain what it all means, who's been charged? What are they facing? Well the governor is facing as she said, two counts. They're two misdemeanor counts, and that's Very much. The least important charges filed there a couple members of former senior State Health Department officials who are facing nine counts of involuntary manslaughter. That's tied to the Legionnaire's disease outbreak, which occurred at the same time as the Flint water switch, and some experts believe was caused by the switch in Flint's water. There are also some other people close to the former governor man who was his chief fixer. Is charged with perjury and extortion. Both of those felonies so there are quite a few charges and we'll learn more about what the bases for those charges are as these criminal cases continue. Well, this was such a devastating event for Flint, and they've been dealing with the fall out. For years. You've been hearing from residents, here's Montana's Edwards. Made it hard on people who stay here and he just go out in the sunset. No, we want we want justice what he did. Sounds like he's not happy with those misdemeanor charges. What else are we hearing? A lot of people aren't happy with those misdemeanor charges there. You know. This has been seven years in the making since the city's water source was switched by the emergency managers appointed by Governor Snyder to run the city of Flint. And people have been wanting justice. They have wanted someone to have charges brought against them, and they're they're tired of waiting. And when they see that the governor who has been their main target of you know, the P person they wanted most to see criminally charged is on Lee being charged with misdemeanors. They're very disappointed in that. Will. Snyder's attorney says the charges were part of a politically motivated smear campaign. And this is pretty unusual to have AH former governor charge like this one of the political implications. Well, this is the first time in the history of the state of Michigan So we're talking 180 years since a former governor was charged with crimes connected to when they were in office. So this is a very rare event, obviously in the state of Michigan, and this is a criminal charge brought against a former Republican governor under a Democrat attorney general. So there have been allegations raised that this may have been somewhat politically motivated. We'll see how it plays out in court. Of Comedy reporter for Michigan Radio. Thank you very much. You're welcome. Oh,.

Governor Snyder Flint Michigan Steve Carmody Michigan Radio reporter Callum Borchers State Health Department W bur NPR involuntary manslaughter Peter attorney perjury Montana Lee extortion
Public officials charged in Flint water crisis, allegations

Here & Now

02:56 min | 1 year ago

Public officials charged in Flint water crisis, allegations

"The former governor of Michigan pleaded not guilty today to two charges of willful neglect of duty nearly seven years after lead, contaminated water killed 12 people and sickened Many more in Flint. Rick Snyder is one of at least nine public officials facing criminal charges related to the water crisis that began after the city switched its water supply in 2014. Steve Carmody is a reporter for Michigan radio. He's been following this, Steve explain what it all means, who's been charged? What are they facing? Well the governor is facing as she said, two counts. They're two misdemeanor counts, and that's Very much. The least important charges filed there a couple members of former senior State Health Department officials who are facing nine counts of involuntary manslaughter. That's tied to the Legionnaire's disease outbreak, which occurred at the same time as the Flint water switch, and some experts believe was caused by the switch in Flint's water. There are also some other people close to the former governor man who was his chief fixer. Is charged with perjury and extortion. Both of those felonies so there are quite a few charges and we'll learn more about what the bases for those charges are as these criminal cases continue. Well, this was such a devastating event for Flint, and they've been dealing with the fall out. For years. You've been hearing from residents, here's Montana's Edwards. Made it hard on people who stay here and he just go out in the sunset. No, we want we want justice what he did. Sounds like he's not happy with those misdemeanor charges. What else are we hearing? A lot of people aren't happy with those misdemeanor charges there. You know. This has been seven years in the making since the city's water source was switched by the emergency managers appointed by Governor Snyder to run the city of Flint. And people have been wanting justice. They have wanted someone to have charges brought against them, and they're they're tired of waiting. And when they see that the governor who has been their main target of you know, the P person they wanted most to see criminally charged is on Lee being charged with misdemeanors. They're very disappointed in that. Will. Snyder's attorney says the charges were part of a politically motivated smear campaign. And this is pretty unusual to have AH former governor charge like this one of the political implications. Well, this is the first time in the history of the state of Michigan So we're talking 180 years since a former governor was charged with crimes connected to when they were in office. So this is a very rare event, obviously in the state of Michigan, and this is a criminal charge brought against a former Republican governor under a Democrat attorney general. So there have been allegations raised that this may have been somewhat politically motivated. We'll see how it plays out in court. Of Comedy reporter for Michigan Radio. Thank you very much. You're welcome.

Flint Steve Carmody Michigan Legionnaire's Disease Outbreak Rick Snyder State Health Department Governor Snyder Steve Edwards Montana Snyder LEE
"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I think people are worried about like, how do we proceed? Where do we go from here? How do we live together his neighbors because some parts of the country may be able to separate into two Americas, but not in Michigan. Not in the eighth district. We gotta figure out how to come together again as Americans and that I think is going to be my mandate. Or this next second term for me, where a week away from President elect Joe Biden's inauguration. Are you concerned at all that these impeachment proceedings will interfere with his agenda? Sure. I mean, I think there's been real debate about this, and I think it's going to be important to just stay very, very focused on our priorities. The most important thing is that we helped get senior confirmed national security officials. Into their positions. I need a new secretary of defense. I need new the new director of Homeland security. We need to make sure that our security is our priority on and so I want that take precedence over everything else. And I can certainly see why the president of the new incoming president and lots of people would just want O kind of clean the slate on get working on his agenda, particularly because of where we are because of it. I'm just telling you that if you don't do something to hold people accountable when they use violence in our politics, it will happen again and again and again, and we just can't let our country go that way. Congresswoman. I just have under 30 seconds with you. You're a former CIA analyst. What more needs to be done at a federal local level to ensure security at the Capitol. Well, I think for security at the Capitol security in the country, we have to realize the events of last week where generational event like 9 11. The post 9 11 era is over where external threats outside the country are the biggest threat to the American people. The biggest national security threat right now, is that division among us Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin of Michigan. Thank you so much. No problem, According to multiple media reports, Michigan's former governor and other officials will be charged in relation to the Flint water crisis seven years ago, despite possible criminal charges. Ah lot of residents still question whether those officials will be held accountable. Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody reports nearly seven years ago, government leaders here push the button that switched the city of Flint's drinking water source from Detroit's water system to the Flint River. Here's the plan. Here's the flag. Yes, the intent was to save money. The result was a complete disaster. Improperly treated river water damaged pipes, which then released lead another contaminants into the city's drinking water. 18 months later, the water was switched back, but the damage was done. Blood lead levels soared and young Children people were forced to use bottled water for drinking and washing clothes. The city was forced to rip out thousands of old pipes while testifying about the Flint water crisis before Congress four years ago. Former governor Rick Snyder acknowledged the mistakes local, state and federal officials. They all failed. The families of Flint Snyder was not among the 15 state and local government officials who face criminal charges for their handling of the crisis. Half of them pled guilty to lesser charges in exchange for no jail time. And in 2019, Michigan's new attorney general dropped charges against the remaining defendants, citing problems with the original investigation. Investigation seemed over until yesterday when the Associated Press reported that several former government officials, including former governor Snyder would be facing new charges. If that happens, legal experts say it would be a difficult case for prosecutors. Peter Hammer teaches law at Wayne State University in Detroit, he says, despite possible difficulty getting convictions. It's important to bring charges, especially in an era where we're living where people are not being held accountable. This could be an important statement about the significance of the rule of law and that not even the highest public official in the state is going to get off Scot free. A spokeswoman for former governor Rick Snyder calls the reports of impending charges. Public relations smear campaign, saying that brought they would be meritless. Since and during 18 months of foul smelling dirty tap water that made them sick. Flint residents have demanded justice and compensation. Ah U. S District Court judge is expected to decide in the coming days if she'll give preliminary approval to a massive settlement agreement, resolving most of the thousands of outstanding lawsuits. Last year, the state of Michigan announced it struck a deal with attorneys representing Flint residents to pay $600 million into a settlement fund. A few months later, the city of fled of local hospital and an engineering firm agreed to chip in another $41 million. Nearly 80 per cent of that money would be set aside for plaintiffs who were young Children or miners during the crisis. They're the ones most at risk for suffering long term lead related health problems. But a growing chorus of critics say it's not enough. A group of Flint Civic and religious leaders, led by Pastor John McClane gathered Monday outside the city's water plant to express concern about the settlement. We believe that the proposed settlement as currently allocated Just as disrespectful as injury caused by the water crisis tragedy itself. In addition to tens of thousands of Flint residents, there are the lawyers, lots of them more than 140 took part in the zoom hearing with the judge last month. This is part of the challenge facing the judge how to divide a large pool of money without leaving some feeling victimized again. Flint's mayor says it's important. His.

Michigan Flint Rick Snyder Flint Snyder Flint River Flint Civic President Detroit Joe Biden governor Snyder Americas CIA Elissa Slotkin Michigan Radio secretary president Wayne State University
"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Where do we go from here? How do we live together as neighbors because some parts of the country may be able to separate into two Americas, but not in Michigan, Not in the eighth district. We gotta figure out how to come together again as Americans and that I think is going to be my mandate. This next second term for me. We're a week away from President elect Joe Biden's inauguration. Are you concerned at all that these impeachment proceedings will interfere with his agenda? Sure. I mean, I think there's been real debate about this, and I think it's going to be important to just stay very, very focused on our priorities. The most important thing is that we helped get senior confirmed national security officials. Into their positions. I need a new secretary of defense. I needed the new director of Homeland security. We need to make sure that our security is our priority on D. So I want that take precedence over everything else, and I can certainly see why the president of the new incoming president and lots of people would just want to Had to clean the slate on get working on his agenda, particularly because of where we are with Cove. It But I'm just telling you that if you don't do something to hold people accountable when they use violence in our politics, it will happen again and again and again, and we just can't let our country go that way. Congresswoman, I just have under 30 seconds with you. You're a former CIA analyst. What more needs to be done at a federal local level to ensure security at the Capitol. Well, I think for security at the Capitol security in the country, we have to realize the events of last week where a generational events like 9 11. The post 9 11 era is over where external threats outside the country are the biggest threat to the American people. The biggest national security threat right now is the division among us And thank you so much. Yes, we won't make it ahead. Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin of Michigan. Thank you so much. And I'm sorry. Have to cut you off. No problem. According to multiple media reports. Michigan's former governor and other officials will be charged in relation to the Flint water crisis seven years ago, despite possible criminal charges. Ah lot of residents still question whether those officials will be held accountable. Michigan Radio's Steve Carmody reports nearly seven years ago, government leaders here push the button that switched the city of Flint's drinking water source from Detroit's water system to the Flint River. Here's to plant the flag. Theo intent was to save money. The result was a complete disaster. Improperly treated river water damaged pipes, which then released lead another contaminants into the city's drinking water. 18 months later, the water was switched back, but the damage was done. Blood lead levels soared and young Children people were forced to use bottled water for drinking and washing clothes. The city was forced to rip out thousands of old pipes while testifying about the Flint water crisis before Congress four years ago. Former governor Rick Snyder acknowledged the mistakes local, state and federal officials. We all failed. The families of Flint. Snyder was not among the 15 state and local government officials who face criminal charges for their handling of the crisis. Half of them bled guilty to lesser charges in exchange for no jail time. And in 2019, Michigan's new attorney general dropped charges against the remaining defendants, citing problems with the original investigation. The investigation seemed over until yesterday when the Associated Press reported that several former government officials, including former governor Snyder would be facing new charges. If that happens, legal experts say it would be a difficult case for prosecutors. Peter Hammer teaches law at Wayne State University in Detroit, he says, despite possible difficulty getting convictions. It's important to bring charges, especially in an era where we're living where people are not being held accountable. This could be an important statement about the significance of the rule of law. And that not even the highest public official in the state is going to get off. Scot free. A spokeswoman for former governor Rick Snyder calls the reports of impending charges a public relations smear campaign. Saying that have brought they would be meritless. Since it during 18 months of foul smelling dirty tap water that made them sick. Flint residents have demanded justice and compensation. Ah U. S District Court judge is expected to decide in the coming days if she'll give preliminary approval to a massive settlement agreement, resolving most of the thousands of outstanding lawsuits. Last year, the state of Michigan announced it struck a deal with attorneys representing Flint residents to pay $600 million into a settlement fund. A few months later, the city of fled a local hospital and an engineering firm agreed to chip in another $41 million. Nearly 80 per cent of that money would be set aside for plaintiffs who were young Children or miners during the crisis. They're the ones most at risk for suffering long term lead related health problems. But a growing chorus of critics say it's not enough. Group of Flint, Civic and religious leaders, led by Pastor John McClane gathered Monday outside the city's water plant to express concern about the settlement. We believe that the recall settlement as currently allocated Is just as disrespectful as injury caused by the water crisis tragedy itself. In addition to tens of thousands of Flint residents, there are the lawyers, lots of them more than 140 took part in a zoom hearing with the judge last month. This is part of the challenge facing the judge how to divide a large pool of money without leaving some feeling victimized again. Flint's mayor says it's important. His residents have a belief in justice and developments this week may help with that. For NPR news. I'm Steve Carmody in Flint..

Flint Michigan Rick Snyder Flint River President Steve Carmody Detroit Joe Biden Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin governor Snyder Americas NPR CIA secretary Michigan Radio president director
Many In Flint Question Whether They'll Get Justice For Water Crisis

Environment: NPR

03:35 min | 1 year ago

Many In Flint Question Whether They'll Get Justice For Water Crisis

"According to multiple media reports michigan's former governor and other officials will be charged in relation to the flint water crisis seven years ago despite possible criminal charges. A lot of residents still question. Whether those officials will be held accountable. Michigan radio steve carmody reports. Nearly seven years ago government leaders here push the button that switch the city of flint drinking water source from detroit's water system to the flint river flag. The intent was to save money. The result was a complete disaster treated river water damage to pipes which then released lead and other contaminants into the city's drinking water eighteen months later. The water was switched back but the damage was done. Blood lead levels soared in young children. People were forced to use bottled water for drinking and washing clothes. The city was forced to rip out thousands of old pipes while testifying about the flint water crisis before congress. Four years ago former governor. Rick snyder acknowledged mistakes. State and federal officials failed the families of flint. Snyder was not among the fifteen state and local government officials face criminal charges for their handling of the crisis half of them pled guilty to lesser charges in exchange for no jail time and in two thousand nineteen michigan's new attorney general dropped charges against the remaining defendants citing problems with the original investigation. The investigation seemed over until yesterday when the associated press reported that several former government officials including former governor snyder. We'll be facing new charges. If that happens. Legal experts say it would be difficult case for prosecutors. Peter hammer teaches law at wayne state university in detroit. He says despite possible difficulty getting convictions. It's important to bring charges especially in an era where we're living where people are not being held accountable. This could be an important statement about the significance of the rule of law and that not even the highest public official in the state is going to get off. Scot-free a spokeswoman for former governor. Rick snyder calls the reports of impending charges a public relations smear campaign saying that if brought they would be meritless since during eighteen months of foul-smelling dirty tap water that made them sick flint residents have demanded justice and compensation a us district court. Judge is expected to decide in the coming days if she will give preliminary approval to a massive settlement agreement resolving most of the thousands of outstanding lawsuits last year. The state of michigan announced. It struck a deal with attorneys representing flint residents to pay six hundred million dollars into a settlement fund. A few months later the city of fled a local hospital and an engineering firm agreed to chip in another forty one million dollars. Nearly eighty percent of that money would be set aside for plaintiffs. who were young children or minors. During the crisis they are the ones most at risk for suffering long-term lead related health problems. But growing course of critics say it's not enough a group of flint. Civic and religious leaders led by pastor. John maclean gathered monday outside. The city's water plant to express concern about the settlement. We believe that the proposed settlement curly allocated is just as disrespectful as injury-cause by the water crisis tragedy itself in addition to tens of thousands of residents. There aren't the lawyers lots of them. More than one hundred forty took part in a zoom hearing with the judge last month. This is part of the challenge facing the judge how to divide a large pool of money without leaving some feeling victimized again. Flint's mayor says it's important. His residents have a belief in justice and developments. This week may help with that for npr news. I'm steve carmody in flint.

Steve Carmody Rick Snyder Michigan Peter Hammer Detroit Flint River Us District Court Snyder Wayne State University The Associated Press Congress Scot John Maclean Flint Npr News
"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"W B. You are I'm Tanya, mostly. I'm rather young. It's here and now states across the country are reinstating or ratcheting up coronavirus restrictions on businesses, schools and social gatherings as new covered 19 infection spread at the fastest rate since the pandemic began. California's governor, Gavin Newsom, said Monday he was pulling the emergency brake much of the state's reopening just as that state's said a single day record for new cases. Republican led states like Iowa and Oklahoma have imposed new restrictions. Iowa's governor reversed course to assure a new statewide mass mandate. And in Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced a three week stay at home order in that state, saying quote the situation has never been more dire. We're going to check in shortly in Texas and New Jersey, but first let's bring in Dustin Dwyer. He's a reporter at Michigan Radio, and he's in Grand Rapids. Welcome, Dustin. Thank you. Governor. Witmer said Sunday that Michigan is in the worst moment of this pandemic today. Just how bad is it there? And what does this new order beginning Wednesday Mean for Michiganders? Well, it is really bad here in Michigan, and it's not as if Michigan had an easy time in the spring, Detroit was one of the hardest hit cities in the country. Back then, thousands of people died. But back then most of the rest of the state and Michigan we don't see too many cases where I live in Grand Rapids. It was relatively calm, and that's what's changed. Now, Um, basically, the entire rest of the state is seen cases like it hasn't seen at any time in this pandemic. The state as a whole is now averaging more than 6000. New cases a day. There are more than 3500 people in the hospital. We expect in the current trajectory that will be a peak by the end of this week. We'll have more people in the hospital than ever during this pandemic. What's really frightening is that by the time the hospitalizations turned in the spring, there had already been in lockdown in place, and new cases had already started falling. We haven't seen that yet. And so now this new order which takes effect At midnight. It's going to close all indoor dining. It will stop in person. Instructions for high schools, colleges and universities, and the state also now wants people to limit their indoor social gatherings to no more than 10 people. And they say that should include people from no more than two households, which is important because a lot of people have been saying a lot of public health people have been saying that the virus has been spreading. Actually, in a lot of small indoor gatherings just between a few people. Yeah, we're coming up on the holidays. Governor Wittmer is a Democrat and his face backlash for her coronavirus restrictions in the past earlier this year, folks may remember the FBI arrested a group of men accused of trying to kidnap her. How are people in Michigan reacting to this latest announcement, and I have only 30 seconds with you? Yeah, the people who oppose the restrictions in the past or really still opposed to them. But there are a lot of people who support these restrictions and who will abide by them this time. That's Dustin Dwyer. He's a reporter with Michigan Radio and Grand Rapids. Thank you for this update. Thank you. Let's go to Texas, where officials have given no indication there, considering the kinds of restrictions were seeing another states even as Texas kind of more than 20,000 deaths. As of Monday, El Paso, the border city with 680,000 people Now has more people hospitalized with covert 19, the many states here's traveling nurse low Wanna Rivers in El Paso talking about the University Medical center there in the Facebook video a few days ago. So I saw a lot of people die that I feel like shit about y'all. That primal fear broke. I was put in what's called a pit and in this pit was eight patients. All Kobe positive. My first day of orientation. I was told that whatever patients go into the pit, they only come out in a body bag. No University Medical Center, officials said they couldn't verifies those claims. But let's bring in body Petri, a reporter for Texas Public Radio in San Antonio Barney's Bonnie start with El Paso inmates from the county's detention facility reportedly being paid $2 an hour to help move bodies toe. Morgue units. What's being done to help El Paso? Out. It's tough right now. You know, it's overwhelmed right now. We talked this week to a funeral director who had to turn off turn one of his chapels into a morgue. But refrigerators in the chapel because he just didn't have room for the dead anymore, And that's in addition to the Mobile Marquis we're talking about And the state has scented extra health care Workers. Air Force medical teams have been sent in. But as the search submerges the entire nation in the entire state and the entire nation, there will be fewer resources to go around. Of course, right, they can help each other Will. Texas has more than a million cases. That's the second highest kind of the country after New York. Second highest death count in Texas. You know what our public officials saying about? You know how this happened, And how does stop it? Yeah, So that's question right, So people let their guard down. Essentially, it's pretty easy to track mathematically wouldn't back in March after the nationwide stayed home orders, the governor started phasing, reopening and may case count started to rise. And before you know it, we had that summer search that was so hard The governor. It's two digit of ask Man date June and it's slow the spread it slow the rise of cases and they started to decrease it stabilize, Then you know school, some of them opened in person instruction. Many colleges did that we had contact sports and other activities. Halloween Case counts started to rise again and rural part rural parts of the state that had avoided the first search altogether. They started to get hammered. And now many people have real rural areas just wouldn't mask up all or take other precautions. So that's pretty much how we ended up where we are. Well, I mean, is there demand that there be changed? We know you're Governor, Republican Greg Abbott said there wouldn't be any new lockdowns lockdowns is a treacherous word. There's been hardly any lockdowns in the US It's mostly stay at home, you know and go out for food. And stuff, but even know stay at home. Well, The reactions are mixed to those you know, even in cities like El Paso that are so overwhelmed right now the county judge there who's the highest elected official in the county like a county executive order to shut down to try to a stay at home order to try to stem the rising tide of infections and takes the weight off the hospitals. But the mayor said, heck down, we're not doing that. No shut down and then I'll pass a business organization said No way too small business owners, of course, are for end of losing everything and barred assistance. The federal government, which doesn't seem to be forthcoming, people need to work, but they're also afraid of getting sick and is yes, the governor and the attorney general goes. The state fought that stay at home order, but the county has been allowed to keep it. And it won't remain in effect until December, 1st because they're just trying to get a handle on things before the holidays. Yeah, we'll stay tuned body Petri reported for Texas Public radio. Thank you. Thank you. Now let's go to the Northeast, where New York Governor Andrew Cuomo held a summit of governors over the weekend to coordinate a regional response. Attendees included New Jersey's governor, whose stricter restrictions on indoor gatherings went into effect today. Joe Hernandez reports on New Jersey State government for WH Y Y W B G O and Joe New York and New Jersey We remember they were the major hot spots Early on. They took fierce action song numbers fall, Then people began to gather indoors. So how bad is this resurgence in New Jersey? The resurgence is bad in terms of cases. I mean, we're having some of the highest single daily case counts since the spring, some of the highest period, But you know, part of the reason for that is that there's more testing now. So we probably know about more infections and also deaths and hospitalizations haven't risen to the same levels that they were in the spring. But but officials are are still worried about what's happening. They're lowering limits on indoor and outdoor gatherings. They're letting Some towns and counties put in stricter restrictions. But but schools are still operating there..

Texas Michigan El Paso New Jersey Grand Rapids reporter Dustin Dwyer Michigan Radio New York Governor Wittmer University Medical center Governor Andrew Cuomo Gretchen Whitmer Gavin Newsom Iowa California Tanya Kobe Oklahoma US
Judge rules against challengers in Detroit vote counting case

All Things Considered

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Judge rules against challengers in Detroit vote counting case

"The Wayne County judge says certifying balance in Michigan will move forward. He ruled the challenges toe how vote counting Detroit was handled or not credible, more from Michigan Radio's Rick Pluta. The judge denied several motions filed by Republican challengers who claimed they were stopped from doing their jobs on election night. But the judge said the claims were speculative and not credible. He also said delaying certification of the votes would harm the public interest and undermine faith in the electoral system. Judge Timothy Can you took aim at the fact that the GOP challengers skipped a walkthrough and training session at the counting center in Detroit, which he said might have answered the concerns raised in the lawsuit. This means Michigan results are on track to be made official on November 23rd. The state and its 16 electoral votes have been called for Joe Biden for NPR News. I'm Rick

Rick Pluta Michigan Wayne County Detroit Judge Timothy GOP Joe Biden Npr News Rick
"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The New York conversation. You're listening to the takeaway. I'm tan Xena Vega. On Wednesday, The Associated Press declared Joe Biden, the winner in Michigan, granting the Democratic front runner and additional 16 electoral votes, but that didn't stop a group of protesters, many of them White Trump supporters from gathering outside of a polling place in Detroit and banging on doors and windows to stop votes from being counted. The Trump campaign filed a lawsuit to halt the absentee vote counting process, claiming that members of the campaign didn't have quote meaningful access. To observe the ballot counting. But it's unclear at the moment how consequential that lawsuit will be in Michigan's final results. Joining me now to discuss where things are in Michigan, Zoey Clark, program director for Michigan Radio and co host of the show. It's just politics. So he thanks for being with me. Hey, thanks So much for having me. How did Biden's campaign approach campaigning in Michigan? Compared to say Hillary Clinton 2016? Yeah, it was really all about turnout. Turnout turnout. It's historically accurate that here in Michigan when more voters turn out Democrats win that was part of the issue with Hillary Clinton in 2016, As I've said, often before, it's not so much that Donald Trump won Michigan and 2016, but Hillary Clinton lost Michigan four years ago. So And so Biden was ableto Bring back some of that Barack Obama coalition that won the state in 2008 and Ah, in 2012. It isn't lost on me that the protesters who surrounded the polling place last night in Detroit were largely white. Detroit is a largely black city. What was black voter turnout like This year. Higher than it was four years ago. And that is an indication of just how important Wayne County the county in which Detroit is was for Biden. What happened four years ago is that some 40,000 did not turn out in that area. And so what we saw was voter turnout at some historic levels. We've heard from the city that that they're estimating that was between 53 55% turnout, which would be you know, close to what President Obama got in 08 and so comparatively thes sort of outstate. Rural voters who turned up in 2016. What we're still digging into is it looks like you know, the same number of Trump supporters stepped up again this year. It's just that Mohr folks who we're voting for Biden came out then they had four years ago. One of the most interesting things about this election is that people have been mobilized on both sides of the political divide here to come out and vote protests from Trump supporters about stopping the count. Where did those stand? Look. The secretary of State of Michigan came out yesterday and said This was a frivolous lawsuit. I can tell you that Michigan Radio had folks at TCF Center in Detroit. I'm going to quote our Michigan radio reporter Justin Dwyer, who's in Grand Rapids that's on the West side of the state. And he said, I was literally just in a room in Michigan were more than 59,000 absentee ballots are being tabulated, he says. There are Republican challengers in the room. Fully active in the process. The county clerk overseeing it all is a Republican who said in 2018. She supports Trump's policies. So I think in the end unless there is some sort of evidence or actual something that we can see, I I haven't seen any instances of voter fraud or anything like that in the state over the past 48 hours. We'll have more on the election in Michigan in just a moment..

Michigan Joe Biden Donald Trump Detroit Michigan Radio Hillary Clinton Trump Zoey Clark Obama Xena Vega New York Democrats Wayne County Justin Dwyer Mohr
"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Bringing in Dustin Dwyer, a reporter with Michigan Radio. Welcome to the show. Dustin. Thank you for having me what extremist militia groups are these 13 men affiliated with Well, according to the charges, they were affiliated with the group. They called the Wolverine watchman. That was a group that seems to have been created by this group of men because they didn't really fit into any of the other groups. I spoke to one Militia leader from a militia called the Michigan Home Guard. And one of the ringleaders of this. This group has now been charged with terrorism and kidnapping. He was in the Michigan home guard and got kicked out because his views were too extreme. Was too aggressive and he was thought to be an unstable person. And so he got kicked out of the Michigan home guard and then linked up with these other men and created the Wolverine watchman Doesn't How common are these militia groups in the state of Michigan? They're very common, and they have been for years. There are many different militias and people in the militias and Michigan are Been trying over the past week to sort of distinguished between this group and that group. You know you have groups in some militias coming out with statements condemning these these 13 men, But the militias were really all over the state in Michigan. What exactly is the distinction that these other militia groups are trying to? Ah, make here. I mean, these are obviously these air from my understanding these air folks who have deputized themselves to somehow Mimic law enforcement in many ways, but they're not officially deputized by any body to actually carry out any of the things that they say they want to do. So what exactly are these groups trying to Distinguish, how are they trying to distinguish themselves when you talk to them, so the way they explain it to me and and again, I talked to the leader of the Michigan Home guard, and he said, Look, we're really just about protecting our family were about arming ourselves to protect our family. And they say, you know, we're here to help the community. They talked about giving out water in Flint and responding when the dam collapse and they see themselves a sort of these private citizens who go out to help. Meanwhile, they're just carrying these You know, really large guns as they do so, so in their minds, at least there's there's a big distinction, and they've been trying to draw that distinction. Since since this all happened in reality, what a lot of people on the outside see is, you know these huge rallies that were happening at the Michigan capital. All these people were mixed together, side by side. I mean the people who have now been charged with terrorism. We're standing side by side with these other people in the other militias, who say No, They're the good guys. What happens now? Dustin to these folks, these air 13 white men I believe who were arrested in this plot to overthrow The Michigan government and also to kidnap Governor Whitmer. What happens to them now? Well, all 13 men are in custody. Six of them are facing federal charges. Seven of them are facing state charges. They will their hearing's on Tuesday preliminary hearings for some of them. On DH. They will be in custody, you know, pending whether they get a bonded out or something like that. But now it's a court case. It's it's you know, they're facing some pretty heavy charges here. Among those charges. I mean, how much time could we see these folks doing if they are, in fact convicted of the charges? It depends. I think it depends on the charge, but terrorism charges I they could be serving a long time in prison. But of course they're lawyers will come out and say, you know, not all 13, where the ring leaders here. Some of them had Different roles in this plot. And of course, we'll try toe negotiated down, but well, we'll have to see. Tell me a little bit. About what the senses in Michigan among the folks that you're talking to, You know, everyday Michiganders. How are they seeing what's been playing out? I think everyone's been shocked by here is well as you know, anywhere else. It's shocking, but in certain ways almost surprising because for some people, it confirms what they already believe. As I said, there were these demonstrations in April and again in May, where a lot of people were shouting things and holding signs that said nearly the same things that that has been charged in these documents. I mean, there was one man walking around the Lansing state capital with a A doll with dark hair, which looks like our governor, and there was a noose around its neck. So some of the imagery and some of the rhetoric doesn't seem surprising at all. But when you look at the details of how how far they got.

Michigan Michigan Home Guard Dustin Dwyer Michigan Radio Militia kidnapping reporter Lansing Governor Whitmer Flint Michiganders
"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"J f dot org's I'm Jen white. We're discussing the latest on the now mostly virtual campaign trail with Reid Wilson, national correspondent at the Hill. We're going to head to the Midwest in a moment, but first I want to check in on an important primary here in the East. Massachusetts State primary was yesterday Senator at Markey won against representative Joe Kennedy, making it the first time a Kennedy ever lost in Massachusetts. Why's this race? A big deal? Well, it's It's an interesting development here and unbelievable that a Kennedy has never lost a race in Massachusetts until now, But Ed Markey is a you know, he's been in office for a very long time, and Joe Kennedy challenged him as a way to sort of turn the page to a new generation. But strangely enough, Ed Markey became sort of an icon to the youngest set of activists that generation Z and millennial activists for his work on things like the Green New Deal. He's the Senate author. Of of that bill, and oddly enough, the old guy who has been there forever became the liberal insurgent If you will, in his in a race in which he was the incumbent, you don't see that very often. And it's an interesting example. Now that maybe the allure of Camelot is succumbing to the urgency of climate, a CZ one activist put it on Twitter this morning. And ah, remarkable race, one that in which Marquis was pulling behind until just the last few months, Andi, he came back and won a race that not a lot of people expected him to. Well, let's head over to Michigan, Michigan historically votes Blue, but the state gave Trump a narrow win in 2016 and now two key state in this year's election, So let's check in on Michigan with Zoey Clark. She's the program director at Michigan Radio. One of our across America partner stations. She's also co host of Michigan radios. It's just politics show Rizzo. It's great to have you here. Oh, it's good to be here, Jen. Thanks And we're also here with you. What's the mood like where you live leading up to 2020. You can comment on our Facebook page tweet us at one A or drop us an email at one A W A. M u Not orc. Now, Zoe. There are a lot of eyes on Michigan because of what happened during the last presidential election. Take us back to 2016 and tell us how it played out there. Yeah. I mean, it was shocking for I think both voters as well is the political pundits and the political class is Reed. You know, mentioned the Poles were off quite a bit, in fact that it looks like this was going to be a state that Hillary Clinton I don't want to say would easily win, but they're just the idea of Trump winning Michigan after six presidential cycles of the state going blue I was just sort of unbelievable. And yet it happened now. It was very close, though Jenn 11,000 votes less than 11,000 votes ended up being the margin of error, and I will continue to say that it was less than 2016. Then Michigan voted for Trump. But that Michigan did not vote for Hillary Clinton thie sort of coalition that Barack Obama had put together in a eight and 12 In 16 250,000 voters just in certain areas did not turn out for Hillary Clinton that it turned out for Obama in 12. So what are you hearing from voters on the ground this time around? Are they enthusiastic about either candidate? I would say The enthusiasm is about Trump mostly, but its enthusiasm either to vote for him or to vote against him. Now that's not to say that you know, Biden isn't a popular choice among Democrats or at least some Democrats here in Michigan, but but the folks that I talked to it is pure enthusiasm, either to vote for Trump again, or to vote him out of the office. And we saw that in 18 here in Michigan during the mid Term election. It was interesting Democrats who ran for Ah, election and 18 really didn't run against Trump. In fact, many of them didn't even really talk about the president. But it was very clear that for voters it was sort of about sending a message right to D. C and we saw a Democratic wave here in Michigan in 18. And AH lot of smart folks are predicting that same kind of democratic motivation and enthusiasm will be seen in November. So what are Republicans trying to do to keep the state red? Yeah, It's a great question, And it appears right now that they're sort of taking. You know what President Trump is doing right? This idea of of safety and civil unrest and talking about You know, being unsafe in the suburbs. I was talking to a very, very smart pollster Rich Uba, and I've got to just quote him because he said that he thinks every time that you know Trump is talking about the so called, you know, terrible rioting, inner cities, he said. He quote things of Regina, George and Mean Girls saying, Stop trying to make fetch happen. It's not going to happen. That you know that this is just sort of a one note rallying cry right now, and what he sees is he doesn't think that's gonna work. And so we'll see whether you know Republicans here in Michigan decide to continue to do that. You know, the issue is sure there have been protests in Michigan like there have been, you know, throughout the country over the past months, but you know, we haven't seen what we have in other states and certainly don't think there's a huge fear of Of violence that is, you know, pulsating through our state right now, What is November 3rd looking like for voters at this point in terms of casting their ballot, is there Ah, clear message about how people can cast either by mail or by going to the ballot bags. What are you hearing so far? Oh, you went there. So let's open this Pandora's box of of drama. So in 18, Michigan, voters passed a constitutional amendment saying that we would be able to You have no reason absentee voting. So before that you could only get an absentee ballot. If you were over a certain age or you were going to say, you know, I'm gonna be out of the state in 18, a cz part of sort of the swell of voter turnout. This thiss amendment was passed. And so in August we saw the highest number of absentee ballots and we will likely see the same In November. And it's putting some stress on clerks on city county clerks and ballot counters of the day of because there's some laws still in Michigan that haven't quite caught up to the fact that this many people are likely going to use absentee ballot. And so the frustration among many is this idea that Ballots can be counted until the day of and so there's consume concern that a state like Michigan, which appears to be in play, that really could be, you know a deciding factor in this presidential election, that there's a possibility we may not know if it's close. You know who won Michigan for possibly days? Can you imagine that they were already concerned about sort of What's gonna happen in terms of ballots? Security? Imagine, you know, a state is important as Michigan. You know us going Well, we knew that we need a little You know, we need another day or two. I mean, it's it's pretty fascinating to think about that happening. What's the latest you've seen in polling for Michigan voters? Yeah, I mean, it's it's definitely tracking with what appears sort of nationwide, right? And that is, you know, upper single digits for Biden. But you know, the polls notoriously have been so much squishy. I think that was the word actually learned from Eugen, somewhat squishy. You know, I will say that in 16. You know Hillary Clinton was up 20 points in a poll in the primary, and Bernie Sanders ended up winning the Michigan primary. So I mean, I could tell you what the polls say..

Michigan President Trump Ed Markey Hillary Clinton Michigan Radio Jen white Massachusetts State primary Joe Kennedy Midwest Biden Massachusetts Reid Wilson Senate Twitter Facebook Jenn 11,000 Barack Obama
"michigan radio" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Don't know the ball hits off a bad. I mean, maybe A. Of a ninety I guess throw a few miles an hour fastball again, it's. It's. It's because people. I mean, a lot of it's because people on their cellphones not paying attention. In the ball gets hit, ricocheted off a bad hits them in the face. One of the reasons why get off your phone again, I'm not trying to. Make, anybody. Having to be politically correct and go. Oh. Defend position. But I'm just saying like baseball's existed for a hundred years. Right? Netting behind home plate for his been there. But the home put the netting. You know what's changed. In, the last ten fifteen years at necessitates putting netting all along the entire field to protect every fan in state. Attorneys there. Yeah. But there's been attorneys. TV, attorneys. Yeah. I mean it's just seeing all cell phone, but it's an example what I'm talking. Yeah. Whatever the reason. They should take it down, but I'm saying that's another example. Another example we can sit here. If we want to spend all show talking about it, that's you'll. This is that's what I'm talking about those and. Sanitizing. Game. With the nets going up around the sides now you never imagined people just on the field with a rope saying don't step across. It's. Such a different world, I've actually got photos photos in the second book that shows a policemen on horseback on the view, the fan. Fantastic quota. All proud like you know like a total. You know like a real bleeding. All the guys know looks like a nineteen thirties policemen man, he's rugged. Horse back. Horses looking tough too. So yeah. I I can imagine that that there was a handful of games from when they clinched it to to the world series. That was just those games were all just tiger main. Oh Yeah. You know what else has? Four So it really the next component I wanted to talk about was With in relations to the fans is is not just like what it was like to be there whatever. But SOM-. The impact of this season like sort of on the fans of Michigan in Detroit, and because the impacts of the season, there are profound. There are so many different illnesses are important. This is a rare rare opportunity to talk about something. That's like sort of just gets overlooked. Discussed, which is the is this season is what made Michigan a Tiger nation right? Before nineteen, thirty, four, nineteen, thirty, five, The tigers were a Detroit team, right. If did the people that one wash, the Tigers were detroiters and that's not to again, it's not to say that there wasn't fans from all over the everyone will come in from other areas of the state to wash the Tigers. I'm sure there were. But to bring the entire state in the entire state, basically like a universal tiger nation, that is what happened. That's why this. This season was so key and one of the main triggers of that having happened was arm w XYZ radio station. Okay. So nineteen, thirty, four, this is. So this is the Michigan Radio. Now, this is the This is the a one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, bringing in Harry Heilmann Okay Harry. There's two major names like in the world of early Tiger Broadcasting Tie tie. You can't even mention Harry Heilmann Lot beginning beginning sort of the story with ty Tyson, who is who was the WJ WW J radio announcer, basically the local, DETROIT? Broadcaster the announcer and he'd been he'd been with the Tigers and really doing detroitsports elements since since one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three, and so he's like one of the things that he broadcast the first University of Michigan, you'll Vam football games and when he wanted to broadcast one of those U of M Games the the. U., of M. Coach coach Jan was his famous famous guy. The He anyways, he um I'm probably going to get a comment saying, what's your comment below? What's what's the Michigan Coach at that moment? anyways. Nine, hundred, twenty, three. So anyways. He he he wanted to broadcast a University of Michigan game in the net coach was like now because it's going to make people wanNA, buy less tickets to come to the Games because they can get it for free over the radio. Year one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, three. Yeah. So I believe it was twenty three when he actually happens. But but anyways, so he so they still let them do they let them. So they let tie Tyson broadcasts at University of Michigan game in then and then like the next week, it was like a sellout crowd they'd had not like don't not sure what their attendance was, but there was a noticeable. Difference when them broad the when they broadcast the game on the radio on, they've made people want to come to games, and so that was like you know you're talking about the infancy of broadcasting over the airwaves, and so that's why they're like, oh, my God like it actually had the opposite effect, it made more people come to the Games. On joost feeling. Thank you. Thank you. It was his twenty third. He was a superhero. That's what I'm saying like I'm almost embarrassed forgetting that name I mean my God but. anyways. So anyway. So that was so that you know there's leads this. This idea that radio actually has an impact on bringing attendance in this, and the idea is, is that what you're doing is you're engaging the fans in the story of your products. Right? You're changing the fans in the story of this team is so the especially when they're hearing on the radio to like. Like ALMAC and hear the crowd going wild I wish I could see this person. It makes them want to come to the game more is a similar effect was on was on Frank. Navy for the Tigers. When the Navy, the same Guy Tyson's like talking to him about let's broadcast the tiger. Games to and Naven. Initially, they're like, well, you're, GONNA, lose money on attendance, and they were saying the same thing like, no, he builds a fan base really does in naven actually. Letting him broadcast even in the thirties they were. You know people were telling him frank. You'RE GONNA lose tennis. He was like he didn't even really care about the fact that it was gonna add attendance. That's not even why did he did? He let them broadcast because like I mean literally like he was like, well, the are fans can't afford to come to the Games anyways like it's better. When they can afford to come and pay money they will you know, but we want to keep them engaged with what we're doing. So you know frank kind of knew that already frank was frank was a highly intelligent baseball owner. That's what I'm saying like. Of, all the all the Pantheon of legends in Detroit Sports History, Frank Navy, and it just seems like he like all a lot of times whenever whenever he's mentioned in any book, it's always he was this kind of Nerdy bookish owner who lake was never gave ty Cobb, the amount of money. He deserved that that's always kinda how he's up the pictures. But. He was a highly intelligent owner, one most well respected one of the most well respected like owners in the entire game of baseball, he was huge Zilz, the tiger. So vintage troy selling us the jump from thirty three to thirty four. There was three hundred and twenty thousand attendants around in thirty, three, an and thirty four. Thousand Nine hundred, twenty, thousand, and then. Travel million tripled thirty, five is over yeah. So, anyways. So the so the radio is like you say, the two big names Tyson was already an established presence in Detroit. He broadcast over W W J over over the to the city to the city's fans. But then it was a w XYZ comes on the scene and they set up a misdemeanor radio network in that come in the in the T and Harry Heilmann, who was a hall.

tigers Detroit Frank Navy Harry Heilmann Michigan baseball ty Tyson Michigan Radio University of Michigan ty Cobb Tyson M Games coach Jan nets Navy Guy Tyson joost Naven
MLB Marks The 100th Anniversary Of The Negro Leagues

All Things Considered

03:42 min | 1 year ago

MLB Marks The 100th Anniversary Of The Negro Leagues

"Baseball is marking the anniversary of the Negro leagues created 100 years ago. The league's showcased black baseball players players who couldn't play on the major teams because of the color of their skin. Only a few members of the leagues are alive to celebrate the centennial Michigan radios, Doug Tribute spoke to the only surviving team owner and others about the legacy of the legendary leagues. In 1920 owners of independent black baseball teams from the Midwest gathered in Kansas City, Missouri. At that meeting they created the Negro National Leagues had no idea they were making history. They didn't care about making history. Bob Kendrick heads the Negro Leagues Baseball museum there, he says. Faced with segregation, black owners and players kept pushing for organized baseball. These athletes never cried about the social injustice. They went out and did something about so you won't let me play with you and I create my own And they did today. Stars like Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard and Satchel Paige are enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame, but thousands of black and Latino players endured bigotry and racist taunts. It was Tear before the players at that time. Many Forbes owned the Detroit Stars from 1956 to 1958. She lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan, that players try of them. They had nowhere to stay because of the discrimination, so they slept in the buses. And they couldn't go in places to eat so one person would go to the back door. When get food for all the players. Pedro Sierra pitched in the Negro leagues for several seasons in the 19 fifties. He grew up in Cuba and says it was tough to adjust to segregation and racism he saw in the US It wasn't easy to see all the problem with the raise. I know all about it, herb artist. But I hadn't experienced today. Sierra lives in New Jersey In 1954 he signed with the Indianapolis clowns at the age of 16. His salary was less than 5% of what white players were earning dollars a month a month, $100 a month. And I look back and say, Oh my God. Jackie Robinson played briefly in the Negro leagues. Then, in 1947 he broke baseball's color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers in Cleveland, Larry Doby became the first black player in the American League. Coming seasons brought many more signings. But many Forbes sympathizes with the many athletes who were good enough to play in the major leagues, but never got a shot. Unfortunately, some of the good players by the time the time Came. They were too old to play. The last league folded in the early 19 sixties, the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum estimates there are about 100 former players still alive. Forbes is 88 worries about being one of the last left to tell the story. And I just want a if I'm worthy of represent and speaking about the Negro League because When I got involved, things was easier for me. Then it wass father one before me. Many Forbes will keep sharing her stories with younger generations and others will to Major League Baseball has a day to honor the league's set for next month. The museum has pushed back its year long celebration of the centennial to next year and renamed it Negro Leagues. 101

Negro League Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Baseball Pedro Sierra Major League Baseball Forbes Baseball Hall Of Fame Bob Kendrick Michigan Midwest Kansas City Missouri Doug Tribute American League Grand Rapids Jackie Robinson Josh Gibson Satchel Paige Detroit
SiriusXM (owner of Pandora and AdsWizz) buys Simplecast

podnews

02:26 min | 1 year ago

SiriusXM (owner of Pandora and AdsWizz) buys Simplecast

"Sirius XM has a client podcast host. Simple cost simple concepts, says nothing changes for their current customers, and no terms were given your find some analysis in our episode notes and our newsletter today. Kim Kardashian West to signed an exclusive deal with spotify report. The Wall Street Journal the Verge says she'll do a show with podcastone criminal justice reform. No terms will give them. They're either. Rob Greenlee has been confirmed as chairperson of the PODCAST Academy in a press release writing for poured news. Greenlee says the becoming chairperson was not something I asked for even lobbied for he focuses on the benefits of being involved in highlights to free webinars today to learn more. The reports that fifty two percent of at buyers plan to spend more on podcast ads during the second half of two thousand and twenty, only fourteen percent plan to increase their spend on radio. PODCAST. Production Studio audio up has announced a number of signings to their executive team including David Herve's from NBC. Crystalline eat from the history channel, actor and musician Dennis Quaid, Hey, pm and Minnesota public radio are to lay off twenty eight staff members John Mos- podcast. hilarious world of depression is also a casualty of the conce. The company lost fourteen staff members last month and has made a number of additional cost savings. audio boom has announced a set of new shows including real life stories behind movies and new weekly crime show and look at America in the run up to the two thousand and twenty presidential election get vocal is a new platform that combines the potential live video technology with the storytelling and community building power of podcasters, according to its CEO and podcast movement is planning virtual. Meet up on June the twenty fifth the. The Times mean that it works in the US, and also in Australia and impulse 'cause news telescope is exploring. The black lives matter movement in a special run from new episodes this week. The current episode features the relationship between social media, the pandemic and the anti-racist protests and kids. These days is a new podcast from Michigan Radio by Teens fourteens offering insider perspective on what it's like to be a teenager today.

Rob Greenlee Podcast Academy Kim Kardashian West Sirius Xm Dennis Quaid Spotify David Herve New Weekly Michigan NBC John Mos Minnesota Executive United States CEO America Australia
Flint Residents May Now Sue Government Officials Over Contaminated Water

All Things Considered

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Flint Residents May Now Sue Government Officials Over Contaminated Water

"The US Supreme Court has dealt a victory to people in flint Michigan who are seeking damages for the city's contaminated drinking water the court's action last week clears the barrier that residents face trying to sue government officials but as Michigan radio Steve Carmody reports some in flint fear they are still a long way from getting

Us Supreme Court Steve Carmody Michigan
UAW ratifies contract, ending weeks-long strike against GM

Special Programming

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

UAW ratifies contract, ending weeks-long strike against GM

"Rank and file members of the United auto workers union have ratified a new contract agreement to end their strike against General Motors Michigan radio Steve harmony has details are forty day strike is now over shop chairman Walter workers at GM's assembly plant in flint Michigan that they will soon be headed back to work the new four year contract contains bonuses and other benefits but some UAW members like Sharon Eckels wanted more I think we

United Auto Workers Union Steve Harmony GM Sharon Eckels General Motors Chairman Michigan Forty Day Four Year
"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is a reporter with Michigan radio and she's been attending those contract meetings she joins us now hi Tracy hello what's the deal look like well there's things in here that people said that they wanted to see there's definitely something in here for temporary workers they actually get a weeks paid time off for the very first time and they have a past a full time job after three years the folks who were hired after two thousand seven get a lower wage to start out in it it used to take them eight years to get up to the full pay of the other workers and now they reduce that by half so it will only take four there's also a really big a signing bonus if they do ratify the contract of eleven thousand dollars I I can't recall a bigger signing a strictly so is not enough to do it I mean is there enough in there for workers they have to get on board with us well all the problems here are that in this contract there's no mention of you'll you'll plant over here in Michigan you're going to get this product and you over here in Texas you're going to get this product you're gonna get this card to make so that's unusual so people are thinking where is my job guarantee if I don't know for sure that they're giving me a card to make and and then they also GM also closed for plants this year and only one of them is going to get a new product the other three are gonna stay closed at something people did not want one of those glances Lordstown high have you have you heard from workers there yeah Lordstown Ohio folks came out to the meeting yesterday in a really large numbers to advocate for rejecting the contract they didn't get what they wanted obviously I talked to a few of them I am I talked to a Mr de Bernardo John de Bernardo and he was really depressed about his plans not opening this is this is what he told me my wife she can't lose I'm she works at a university and Chester mom here is older my mom's older also but you know they can't move so will be a part I've been there for twenty five years so I am at least five more years left so it's tough huh so I guess if the deal goes through if he gets approved what's that going to mean Tracy for future union deals with other carmakers as it can set a precedent yeah it generally does they'll go either to Forder fiat Chrysler and they'll say for example Hey General Motors agreed to keep health insurance exactly the same no changes we want that from you they also agreed to do to help out the temps we want that from Gil so that generally is the way that it works depending on which company they so far Tracy Sam attend a covering it all with Michigan radio we appreciate it Tracy.

UAW Strike Against General Motors Enters Its 4th Week

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:22 min | 2 years ago

UAW Strike Against General Motors Enters Its 4th Week

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by almost fifty thousand General Motors Workers Begin this week still on strike it is the auto industry's longest strike in decades and the union the UAW says talks with management over the weekend left the union further from a resolution. Michigan Radio's Dustin Dwyer is covering the story from Grand Rapids Michigan Hey there dustin temporary workers this is essentially tempts who are being hired in a way that they're actually permanent workers but they're just not paid the same and not protected the same way as as a full-time bills for many of them they're in a tight spot financially but most people I've talked to are still very committed to the strike say that this is something that needed to happen good morning what went wrong over the weekend well the information we're getting as you said comes from the UAW specifically comes from UAW vice president Terry did for GM basically didn't respond at all it just reiterated its previous offer and didn't address anything that the UAW had brought up so they seem to be at a stalemate it seems US said this time that in fact they had taken a step back and the Union could not be more disappointed in GM and what he explained happened was that there was an offer on the table scene and heard when you go out and talk to workers well workers are now being forced to live off of two hundred fifty dollars a week in strike pay that is not enough to cover many of their would make and temporary workers can basically fired at any time they don't have long term protections and so what the rank and file members that have that have more permanent status have higher wage than contempt for two years or more and that's really what the rank and file members are fighting again and said listen we just need the flexibility yeah the auto industry is changing everyone it's like things are not going well right now okay so we have the unions version maybe a little bit less from GM side but in any case no doubt that they don't have a deal and people are still on strike so what have you they say they want protections for temporary workers and they're willing to hold out at least for now And so that's what I'm hearing on the line I WANNA make sure that I understand this argument about that Zayn you know the strike is dragged on for three weeks going on the fourth week now and this was one of the first signs that there had been progress but by Sunday had completely changed and Terry does the things are changing and they just WanNa be flexible so that they can change as well dustin thanks very much for the update really appreciate it thank you Steve That's Dustin Dwyer of Michigan

Dustin Dwyer UAW GM Union Terry Grand Rapids Michigan General Motors United States Michigan Radio NPR Steve That Vice President Michigan Two Hundred Fifty Dollars Three Weeks Two Years
"michigan radio" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on Here & Now

"That's on NPR's rough translation. some General Motors auto workers are back out on the picket lines. Today it's Day two of a nationwide strike of nearly fifty thousand united auto workers for more or than fifty. GM plants across the country GM and the U. A. W. are back at the negotiating table as well. One of the biggest issues for striking workers is GM's tiered wage system which allows some workers to earn more than others based on a number of factors. Let's talk more about this with Tracey Samuelson who covers the auto industry for member for station Michigan Radio Hi tracey although can you explain for us this tiered wage system at GM dictates how much someone makes what kind of benefits it's they receive and so on yeah that's right There was a little shade of a before two thousand seven. You'd hire in it about twenty one dollars and really quickly work your way up to the top wage of about twenty eight dollars three years but after twenty two thousand seventy three were hired after two thousand seven that changed dramatically so now you hire here in about seventeen dollars an hour and it takes eight years to work yourself up to the top wage which is about thirty thirty one dollars an hour and the benefits are are different. Also you used to be eligible for a pension upon retirement and now it's a 401k retirement account so it's it's pretty dramatic difference yeah and temporary workers earn fifteen dollars an hour with no vision or dental benefits yeah yeah and they don't have that contractually mandated dated way to Sorta work theirselves up to a specified higher wage okay. This might become an in other industries like tack we we. We know that this is a system. That's that's in that industry but it's pretty new for. Gm Win in y you mentioned that it was around two thousand seven but why the company implemented this system well it was in the contract of that they did during the bankruptcy so it sorta looked back to two thousand seven but this started and about out two thousand nine hundred. GM was in bankruptcy and everybody had to pitch in to keep this company from going out of business including the rank and file so to try try to sort of get their labor costs in line with foreign automakers. They came up with this two tier system to to make the labor cost GM much much lower than they were before yeah. You're saying everyone kind of decided to to go in on this to save the company including the Union yeah yeah now what kind of dynamic has has the system created though now among auto workers at these plants what impact has it has had on morale it. It hurts morale. It creates resentment and not just on the part of the lower paid workers. You know it's a real culture shift here for the Union where used to be. We all do the same work for the same. Pay and you know now. You might be working alongside side. Somebody who's a temp. WHO's having trouble paying their bills or maybe it's your buddy. WHO's getting the lower our wage and you know it just creates unhappiness amongst everybody to sort of know. That differential is there. Have you had a chance is to speak with the U. A. W. Addressing how they're addressing this tiered wage system and this negotiating process so the Union is being pretty Eddie close about what's going on in the negotiations but they are very well aware that the rank and file thought that the two tier here system was going to go away at some point. They really thought these concessions were temporary and that were eventually going to get back what we gave. GM to to keep them out of bankruptcy and now now starting to look like those things were not temporary permanent that they may be a permanent part of working for for the company. Yeah Yeah it's been reported that the GM CEO Mary Barra makes upwards of twenty one million dollars that was last year. That's two hundred ninety five times more than the average. GM employee has come up as a sticking point for any of the workers are union members that you've talked to. I'm laughing because if you go on on a any facebook page of any person on the picket line right now that's like the number one meam on their facebook page how much Mary Barra is making compared to you know what the rank and file make and it's really hurtful in a way because they know that bars compensation insulation is tied to investor sentiment and investors like a company. That's lowering. Their labor costs so her pay is not necessarily going to go down. If therre pig goes down she may in fact be rewarded. Yeah you know you mentioned the morale folks right next to each other working right next to each other making vastly different salaries what other things have employees told you about some of the things they want the union to bring to the table well they've read the same stories that the rest of us are reading that GM's I offer may have been we want you to pay not just a little more or but quite a bit more for your health insurance and health insurance with only about a four percent you know sort of copay situation is almost the holy grail for for people who work in the auto factories. They have really good insurance and they don't have to pay as much for it. Let's say someone out there in working for another kind of corporations so the average for somebody in the US is paying maybe twenty eight percent of their overall health insurance costs and like I said at the for a union worker it's about four percent and we do not want that touched yeah last. We heard the union. GM were very early in contract negotiations. They had gone through about two percent of some of the issues that they were dealing with. What have you heard so so far since then oh about like. How long will this take? How long will this take so. That is the crystal ball question. I asked everybody anybody a interview. That question and I don't even think the negotiators no so my gas and I stick with this estimate anywhere from two days to two wakes. That's me well. Thank you so much. This is tracey. Samuelson reports from Michigan Radio talking with us about the ongoing. GM Auto Workers Strike. Thank you so much sir thing so. Have you seen them swarms of dragonflies so big. They're showing up on weather radar last week. People in Indiana Ohio and Pennsylvania had sightings. What's what's up with dragonflies aquatic insect expert Christine Goforth is on the case she works at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences runs. An online citizen science project project called the dragonfly swarm project shows as a blog so Chris. This is a thing dragonflies swarms. What are they yes. Oh jagged place. Worms are big groups of dragonflies are typically feeding on little prey insects and so you can get anywhere from a dozen to millions even billions of dragonflies flying together in these big groups well and is there anything going on showing up on radar. We'll have pictures at here. Now Dot Org anything unusual unusual about that. It's not particularly unusual. This is the season of the year where the dragonflies are starting to migrate so the migratory species are starting to move from the more northern parts of North America software and so you have a whole lot of dragonflies that are on the move right now and every time they stopped flying they need to eat and so they form these big groups wherever there's a lot of little insects in a local area to feed on and that's why you're starting to get this worms and they do this pretty much every fall. They can do it throughout the year but you see a lot more of the now than you would earlier in the year will you've also said that there might be a spike in the kind of insects that the dragonflies feed on and.

GM Union Tracey Samuelson General Motors Mary Barra Michigan facebook US North America North Carolina Museum of Natur Christine Goforth Eddie Chris Michigan Radio Indiana Ohio Pennsylvania
"michigan radio" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:53 min | 2 years ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on KCRW

"This morning hi Tracy hello let's go to the negotiations that were taking place why did they break down waiting to this I think this of the strike was probably in the making of for a while Gee I made the decision to close for plants in the US and the UAW raised its strike pay in March General Motors wants to reduce its labor costs the union wants to increase benefits for the workers and it's basically a perfect recipe for an impasse and the the strike that's happening right now. I I know you've been talking to some workers is this as this starts we heard from the vice president the union they're saying this is a great sacrifice it's it's great courage what what sort of impact or are we talking about what people telling you well it is it is definitely a sacrifice you know the highest paid workers are going from making about twelve hundred dollars a week to about two hundred and fifty dollars a week they're gonna have trouble paying their bills as long as the story goes on but they're they're young nursing a really long grievance here they helped save the automaker from bankruptcy in two thousand nine they made a lot of concessions and they feel with GM being as profitable as it is right now it's time for the company to come back and help them out. Tracy Simonton reports for Michigan radio Tracy thanks so much really appreciate it happy to be here thanks I want to bring in another voice here it is Kristin Zetec she's vice president of the center for automotive research in Detroit and is following all of this either Kristin good morning to talk to me about the the state of things at GM right now and and how much pressure could this Drake exert on the company and and how much pain might it because for the company right now. well it depends on the length of the strike right now GM has a sufficient inventory to last quite awhile and you know if the strike is over within a week or two the impact will be fairly minimal it goes on much longer than that it could be quite devastating and you know we don't yet know how who help me out or really just how far apart they are at the table. one of the things that the union is demanding of the company is for GM to re open some shuttered plants it is that something that's even feasible for GM to consider. well the plants are closed and nothing is closed ever until the union agrees to close the plant GM announced that they were not going to put product in for plants in the in the U. S. two of them power train two of them assembly and you know GM has it seems to have offered that they would put products in one of those assembly plants put some other operations near one of the other assembly plants and they haven't mentioned anything about the power train plant. I'm this strike is only second GM at this point but of course it's it's just one of the three the big three automakers sinned and there are two others Ford fiat Chrysler I am assuming these companies are watching this very closely but what does this impasse mean for those companies going forward. while they are watching it closely because the UAW of course represents workers at all three companies and they do something called pattern bargaining IGN the first up this year they'll reach an agreement hopefully a tentative agreement to become the contract at General Motors over next couple weeks they will then take that pattern to fiat Chrysler and Ford to try to enforce the same terms of of the labor agreement with them so they are of course watching it very closely and it's not out of the of. the possibility that we may see labor action at those companies as well if they return path. I think some people may think about G. anything about one factor in particular in Lordstown Ohio president trump tweeted about the plant back in the spring urging GM to to make sure that it stays open what what happened to that plan. well so we took the broader three million units of under utilized capacity across the whole entire US industry GM on the million of that and about a little over four hundred thousand of those units of under utilized capacity sit in Lordstown Ohio so you know it does GM need to keep a million units of under utilized capacity around that's why they that's why they acted in November two on allocate products to these plants it is a big plant it's a very important plant but your General Motors has found other jobs for the people in Lordstown many of them were involved people having to move outside the community so they have relocated a lot of folks but it is a big star on that community and relocating obviously even for keeping a job is is something that they can be pretty painful for for people and families it can be rid of you has negotiated terms for that and they do get some compensation for making moves across the country. anything we can take from the fact that the strike is happening right now anything it tells us about the auto industry in in twenty nineteen yeah there's just so much that unknown about the auto industry right now you know. facing much higher cost of health care then that's when the contentious points in this in this negotiation but also you know the trade impacts are costing them money they don't know what the new terms of trade will be in North America because US MCA has not yet passed we're waiting to see if there's going to be new terrified imported cars and parts into this industry we don't yet know the fuel economy rules for twenty twenty one there's a lot of uncertainty in this industry and you know this negotiation is looking for certainty for the next four years for these workers Kristin the check is vice president of the center for automotive research thanks so much you're very welcome. remember those old wanted posters on TV westerns offering rewards for turning in someone wanted by the police well now some families of crime victims are making their own it wanted posters offering to pay the rewards themselves NPR Cheryl Corley has the story yeah. yeah yeah. yeah on a street corner in Maywood Illinois a suburb west of Chicago a crowd of relatives friends and activists home pictures of nineteen year old eyes a Ascot and fires that offer a five thousand dollar reward Scott was shot and killed last March shortly after you talk on the phone to his girlfriend about going to prom he died right here that's mother quiches Stansbury says she raced to the parking lot of the dollar store after she saw her son dying on a lot of social media feeding Stansbury says the reward is for information leading to an arrest of the killer she says there's word on the street about who that person is and she says he posted threats to keep other kids afraid to quiet any is shameful that I would have to call back thousand dollars out there for somebody to do what is right. that was the most horrific thing I ever been. to watch which.

GM vice president Tracy Simonton UAW US March General Motors Kristin Zetec General Motors Gee Chrysler Ford Detroit Michigan Drake twelve hundred dollars five thousand dollar thousand dollars fifty dollars nineteen year
"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:54 min | 2 years ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king in Washington DC and I'm David green in Culver city California this morning auto workers are lining up on picket lines for a nationwide strike against General Motors is are members of United auto workers at GM and they're walking off the job after contract negotiations fell apart their decision is expected to halt production across the U. S. with facilities in Texas Missouri Indiana Ohio and Michigan all impacted Terry did this the vice president of the union says the decision to head to the picket line did not come easily we do not take this lightly. this is our last resort it represents great sacrifice and great courage on the part of our members and all of us want to start with Traci Selten she covers the auto industry for NPR member station Michigan radio and she's with us this morning I Tracy hello let's go to the negotiations that were taking place why did they break down waiting for this I think this of the strike was probably in the making of for a while Gee I made the decision to close for plants in the US and the UAW raised it straight pay in March General Motors wants to reduce its labor costs the union wants to increase benefits for the workers and it's basically a perfect recipe for an impasse and the the strike that's happening right now. I I know you've been talking to some workers is this as this starts we heard from the vice president the union they're saying this is a great sacrifice it's it's great courage what what sort of impact or are we talking about what people telling you well it is it is definitely a sacrifice you know the highest paid workers are going from making about twelve hundred dollars a week to about two hundred and fifty dollars a week they're gonna have trouble paying their bills as long as the story goes on but they're they're young nursing a really long grievance here they helped save the automaker from bankruptcy in two thousand nine they made a lot of concessions and they feel with GM being as profitable as it is right now it's time for the company to come back and help them out. Tracy Simonton reports for Michigan radio Tracy thanks so much really appreciate it happy to be here thanks I want to bring in another voice here it is Kristin Z. check she's vice president of the center for automotive research in Detroit and is following all of this either Kristin good morning so talk to me about the the state of things at GM right now and and how much pressure could this Drake exert on the company and and how much pain might it because for the company right now. well it depends on the length of the strike right now GM has a sufficient inventory to last quite awhile and you know if the strike is over within a week or two the impact will be fairly minimal it goes on much longer than that it could be quite devastating and you know we don't yet know how he'll be out or really just how far apart they are at the table. one of the things that the union is demanding of the company is for GM to re open some shuttered plants it is that something that's even feasible for GM to consider. well the plants are closed and nothing is closed ever until the union agrees to close the plant GM announced that they were not going to put product in for plants in in the U. S. two of them power train two of them assembly and you know GM has both it seems to have offered that they would put product in one of those assembly plants put some other operations near one of the other assembly plants and they haven't mentioned anything about the power train plant. I'm this strike is only fifty GM at this point but of course it's it's just one of the three the big three automakers sinned and there are two others Ford fiat Chrysler I am assuming these companies are watching this very closely but what does this impasse mean for those companies going forward. well they are watching it closely because the UAW of course represents workers at all three companies and they do something called pattern bargaining a GM is first up this year they'll reach an agreement hopefully a tentative agreement to become the contract at General Motors over the next couple weeks they will then take that pattern to fiat Chrysler and Ford to try to enforce the same terms of of the labor agreement with them so they are of course watching it very closely and it's not out of the of. on the possibility that we may see labor action at those companies as well if they return path. I think some people may think about G. anything about one factor in particular in Lordstown Ohio president trump tweeted about the plant back in the spring urging GM to it to make sure that it stays open what what happened to that plan. well so we talked with broader three million units of under utilized capacity across the whole entire US industry GM owns a million of it and about a little over four hundred thousand of those units of under utilized capacity sit in Lordstown Ohio so you know it does GM need to keep a million units of under utilized capacity around that's why they that's why they acted in November two on allocate products to these plants it is a big plant it's a very important plant but your General Motors has found other jobs for the people in Lordstown many of them were involved people having to move outside the community so they have relocated a lot of folks but it is a big star on that community and relocating obviously even for keeping a job is is something that they can be pretty painful for for people and families it can be rid of you has negotiated terms for that and they do get some compensation for making moves across the country. anything we can take from the fact that the strike is happening right now anything it tells us about the auto industry and in twenty nineteen yeah there's just so much that unknown about the auto industry right now you know. facing much higher costs of healthcare then that's when the contentious points in this in this negotiation but also you know the trade impacts are costing them money they don't know what the new terms of trade will be in North America because US MCA has not yet passed we're waiting to see if there's going to be new tariffs on imported cars and parts into this industry we don't yet know the fuel economy rules for twenty twenty one there's a lot of uncertainty in this industry and you know this negotiation is looking for certainty for the next four years for these workers the check is vice president of the center for automotive research thanks so much you're very welcome. remember those old wanted posters on TV westerns offering rewards for turning in someone wanted by the police well now some families of crime victims are making their own wanted posters offering to pay the rewards themselves NPR Cheryl Corley has the story. yeah. yeah on a street corner in Maywood Illinois a suburb west of Chicago a crowd of relatives friends and activists home pictures of nineteen year old eyes a Ascot and fires at all for a five thousand dollar reward Scott was shot and killed last March shortly after you talk on the phone to his girlfriend about going to cross he died right here god mother quiches Stansbury says she raced to the parking lot of the dollar store after she saw her son dying on a live social media feed Stansbury says the reward is for information leading to an arrest of the killers she says there's word on the street about who that person is and she says he posted threats to keep other kids afraid to quiet it is shameful that I would have to put five thousand dollars out there for somebody to do what is right. that was the most horrific thing I ever been. what's the traffic is less reps on Facebook Snapchat they got him on a Gurney on Snapchat. hands very says in large part the reward money comes from parishioners at a church led by activist Chicago.

GM vice president NPR General Motors UAW US March General Motors Tracy Simonton Michigan Culver David green Washington California Traci Selten Texas Gee Terry Chrysler Ohio
General Motors could face first strike in 12 years

The Splendid Table

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

General Motors could face first strike in 12 years

"Members of the United auto workers union are expected to go on strike against General Motors now that a midnight Saturday contract deadline has passed Michigan radios Tracy Sam Walton explains the UAW says significant differences remain with GM on wages healthcare benefits temporary employees job security and profit sharing Michael fixes a manufacturing expert at Ball State University he thinks a strike is likely and it could be a protracted one in part because the you. an increased strike pay earlier this year you're digging deep into their their their pocketbook for that so this they're trying to set this up as the bell weather of bands of twenty nineteen the union has told Sunday shift employees to report for work so if there is a walk out it will likely happen Monday

General Motors Tracy Sam Walton UAW Michael Ball State University Michigan
September 11 terror attacks remembered 18 years later

NPR News Now

04:35 min | 2 years ago

September 11 terror attacks remembered 18 years later

"Events are underway in New York City at the Pentagon and near Shanksville Pennsylvania Nia on this eighteen th anniversary of the September eleven terror attacks president trump spoke at the Pentagon this morning. NPR's Greg Murray reports on on a warm sunny morning. President Trump honored the nearly three thousand people who lost their lives in the Al Qaeda tax eighteen years ago he also cited developments in Afghanistan a stand including a Taliban bombing last week in the capital Kabul. We had peace talks scheduled a few days ago. I call them off when I learned that they had killed a great American soldier from Puerto Rico and eleven other innocent people. The president said the US is now hitting back Jack the last four days. We have hit our enemy harder than they have ever been hit before. Trump did not discuss his longer term plans for Afghanistan Greg Mary. NPR News Washington General Motors announcing a major recall Michigan Radio Steve Carmody reports sports. The automaker says millions of pickup trucks and SUV's could have a problem with their breaks. GM says a pump and the power assist breaks can put out less vacuum back in power the needed increasing stopping distance and the risk of a crash. GM says the problems occur rarely in mostly at low speeds. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in has been investigating the brake problems last year the recall covers more than three point four million vehicles including Chevrolet Silverados GMC Sierras Cadillac escalades leads GMC yukons Chevy suburbans Tahoes between the two thousand fourteen and twenty eighteen model years for NPR news. I'm Steve Carmody. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is facing more resistance today. Scotland's highest court says his suspension of parliament is illegal ruling. It was motivated by the improper the purpose of stymying parliamentary debate over brexit the panel is not ordering Johnson to reopen the legislature but some Scottish legislators including Joanna Cherry are now for every moment parliament remains paroled the British government are breaking the law so we as politicians are calling for parliament to be recalled. The case goes to Britain's Supreme Court for full hearing next week. The Arab League is condemning Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Benjamin Netanyahu's vow to annex a large swath of the occupied West Bank if he wins reelection next week. Israel captured the West Bank in the nineteen sixty seven war Palestinians want it as part of a future state Arab League foreign ministers meeting in Cairo say the move would undermine any chance of peace between Israel and the Palestinians Saudi Arabia calls it a dangerous escalation this is NPR North Korea says Kim Jong UN has supervised the test of a new weapon systems. Pyongyang state news agency calls it a super large multiple rocket bucket launcher. The statement comes a day after South Korea said Pyongyang had fired two projectiles into the sea the Kremlin says the US is pursuing suing destructive policies after the trump administration sanctioned to Russian law enforcement officials as NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow the the State Department says the two officers were involved in a crackdown on Jehovah's Witnesses in Russia two years ago Russia's Supreme Court designated Jehovah's Witnesses as as an extremist organization leading to a series of arrests raids and interrogations across the country dozens of Jehovah's Witnesses are awaiting trial on criminal the challenges and in February one church member. A Danish citizen was handed a six year prison term. Amnesty International has designated jailed Jehovah's Witnesses as prisoners seniors of conscience on Tuesday State Department banned to Russian investigators from entering the US saying the torture Jehovah's Witnesses during interogations President Vladimir Putin's spokesman called the sanctions absolutely unacceptable and said that Russia will respond appropriately Lucian Kim NPR News Moscow China says its exempting some US industrial chemicals from the tariff hikes it imposed in response to president trump's tariff increases creases on Chinese imports but Beijing says it'll maintain penalties on soybeans and other major U._S. exports. This is N._P._R.

President Trump NPR United States Greg Murray Parliament Supreme Court Steve Carmody Afghanistan Lucian Kim Npr Prime Minister Benjamin Benjam Boris Johnson Russia Pentagon Silverados Gmc Sierras Cadilla State Department Arab League Donald Trump New York City
Israeli Government, Michigan And Israel discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:59 min | 2 years ago

Israeli Government, Michigan And Israel discussed on Morning Edition

"The Israeli government says it will allow Michigan democratic congresswoman proceeded to leave to visit her ninety year old grandmother in the Israeli occupied west bank Israel's interior minister describes this as a humanitarian visit Michigan radios Tracy Sam Walton reports to leave had said Israel's earlier decision to bar her entry to the country at president trump urging was a quote huge error rushing to leave is a Palestinian American one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress and a harsh critic of Israel's treatment of Palestinians as well as a harsh critic of president trump she's become one of trump's favorite political targets on Twitter and in rallies Israel initially agreed to allow her to visit as part of a congressional delegation but reverse that decision after pressure from the president it's a really disservice to all of us the continuation of kind of silencing people like myself that comes from a different perspective to leaves grandmother who's in our nineties lives in the west

Israeli Government Michigan Israel Tracy Sam Walton Donald Trump Congress Twitter President Trump Ninety Year
"michigan radio" Discussed on Daily Detroit

Daily Detroit

12:23 min | 2 years ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on Daily Detroit

"<hes> resonated with you. I'm like Oh yeah. She's doing projects for Wyan die deadline dot municipal services. I my first thing after I'd gotten left gun. I'd never been let go by the way yeah <hes> which is rare in that business I'd never had that experience was tough. <hes> I will say in credit to credit to the managers at greater media. The decision was made back in Boston. We don't want to do this morning. Show and the local folks executed that decision with compassion <hes> even to the point where the day that I came into sign my exit agreement. He took me to breakfast general manager I for she's Nice. Thanks that was nice it was. I'm sure you've got a severance trying to you know if it was it was something but it was it was not I was not ready to not be making money sure and I was not mentally ready to not be doing that. Whereas now I met a point where I'm very ready to step away so I was more just knocked off my moorings but so that first job now that I did for wind up municipal services was back like my t._v.? Reporting days so I found out okay the brain still there can right and then I did a bunch of projects for <hes> Beaumont Hospitals Cancer Center Cancer Cancer <hes> programs and then that dovetailed into a nice the chance meeting with my former general manager the one that brought me back to W._N._y._C. in nineteen ninety nine is a lovely man named Steve Schramm who was the V._p._n.. General Manager of Michigan Radio Yeah Yeah Yeah so that's how I wound up in public radio right right so that was twenty twelve when you caught on with Michigan Radio previously you had been exclusively on the commercial radio side I had so what was that transition like terrifying. Why such Smart Smart Smart people are part of that team and even though I've been doing it for decades get your coming in as I saws as the new kid who had all this commercial experience but what St wanted was a bit more of a commercial sound to stateside he said don't sound like the Saturday night live N._p._r.? V was stateside an existing program. It had been a program for a while under a couple of host Todd Mont had done it and charity Nebi had done it but it had been shelved and I and Steve had been thinking about I wanNA revive a local purdue locally produced program that focuses on Michigan so he'd been toying with who would be the person and so they took it off the shelf when he and I cross paths I did an audition and it fit I I had to grow in my own mind to the person that could run with this team. 'cause they're pretty amazing on the other hand. I'm in the business because of all the radio <hes> when I will cat out of college I was working for the American Cancer Society. I was a health educator and I was driving to and from the office and coming home. I would never missed this show on W.. D. E. T. called all things considered and that was back in nineteen seventy seven seventy eight and then oh my goodness there's a morning warning version. It's morning edition so I would that that pulled me into how magical radio could be in radio storytelling could be so. I felt like I was home beyond the obvious things you know. Commercial radio has advertisements commercials public radio does not have underwriting in writing drives and funds right but I mean so beyond those obvious things. How are the two formats different well for me <hes> having been in a world where I've been told you have a sixty seconds to do headlines weather sports traffic reports to traffic to accidents? That's all you can do and you have sixty seconds or you have a minute fifteen to do it all to come into an environment where I can do eighteen minutes for a full segment interview it's worth it will go eighteen minutes that is like the whole section of the paper instead of one little column in the front page of the paper <hes> so that has been you walk away satisfied. You don't walk away thinking I left so much that we weren't able to get to. It's great to walk away satisfied. <hes> <hes> so that's that's to me the biggest thing in public radio you have a place to be able to create the Maroon and time is is it a little harder more work. Yeah I will say that <hes> these seven years it's a different kind of work about. I have worked very very hard instead of being in the news truck <hes> like I was for so many years when I was at <hes> U._p._N.. Fifty that was Fox fifty first and then Fox left in W._k._B._D.. And we went to U._P._N.. Eventually but I was on the ten o'clock news on Channel Fifty so as opposed to rolling around in the news truck looking for where you're going to do that nights live shot this is more. This is a lot of homework to you and I I could be at home in my P._J.. So there is that but reading because you have to be up on everything and I get prep material for every interview but I do five to eight interviews day right. I heard you said that a prep. That's how much like you get some help. Though from your producers the producers will yeah so. Let's just say I'm going to interview <hes> Somebody who's a tech entrepreneur. Who's just gotten a lot of seed money to start a terrific new A._I.? Company in Ann Arbor I will have gotten gotten a form that tells me what the focus is that we want to get to. Maybe talk about what kinds of developments they're doing an A._I.. And also yeah and also what's the what's the ecosystem for entrepreneurs so in Michigan so that might be the pig there will be appre interview notes because one of our interns of pre interviewed the person most likely there will might there might be some links for <hes> Meteo read so stories that have been written about them and sometimes people will do a few suggested questions because they like to get creative a two and and and it's great for me to see an angle that I hadn't thought of but then ultimately I got to digest all of that I craft all the leads and I craft the the questions that <hes> that you here and the lead writing is is an art because you WanNa make it something thing. That grabs you that isn't too long but helps people understand what it's about so I do a lot of that writing. Who are some of your favorite like interviewer people people in the business like do you try to emulate anybody? Oh interview people. I thought you make guests. Like actual interviewers you know like people are asking the questions you know it's interesting. I dive in and out and especially as I'm driving home so I might be listening to <hes> M._S._N._B._C. or C._N._N.. Do I listen to a lot of radio interviews. I don't you know why because it's coals-to-newcastle so when I'm driving home on probably listening to <hes> the Broadway channel. I'm listening to Radio Classic so who you've had enough talk. I kinda have my brain gene is just pooped and it knows it's going to be doing work at home so I've got my playlist going with music so I tend to not do a lot but I'll hear like I happened to really like Nicole Wallace on M._S._N._B._C. Because I appreciate how she's made this transition into T._v.. T._V. Journalism and she's got a lot of she's very natural. Well Susan Steinberg. I mean going right back. Terry gross to grosses. She's the alleged <hes> Diane ream because of the I I like that tone of civility and that any point of view is welcome and that's really what we try to actually I had the pleasure of sitting down and interviewing her about her most recent book about her husband's passing and <hes> interesting yes and she has people who adore her. We did it at Hill Auditorium and it was is full of adoring actually not hill I think it was even bigger than that. I forget we were in somewhere on campus and she has people that adore her and for good reason so people like that that articulate a respectful I cannot stand shouting. I can't do people shouting outing at each other. Your persona on stateside is you come across his very friendly and approachable. Maybe that's from your time on <hes> and I see in that. I think it is and it's who I am. I'm not aggressive interviewer. WHO's GonNa pick you up and slam you again wall? That's I I just I that's not me and it never has been right but at the same time you've interviewed lots of politicians governors presidential candidates <hes> you recently had Justin Amash the less Michigan Congressman Tea Party member who just I defected from the Republican Party cleared his declaration of Independence on Independence Day so I mean we're in the hyper partisan political era I mean is. Is it tough to do those kind of interviews. Now I try to step back and I'm not there to carry water for listeners who are unhappy that we're talking to whomever or for the person I'm there to ask the questions to let them put their ideas out there so that everyone listening can say here's a purse here. Here's a set of ideas you decide for yourself. If you agree or disagree like I've noticed with many of the social media comments with Justin Amash are <hes>. I hate the kinds of things that he was doing when he was before it was the Freedom Caucus it was tea party already and it was a people's people say I disagree with decisions he may but I respect what he did here. Put in the country before the Party and stepping away so you see that and I'll get people going. What did you ask this and ask that because it isn't I'm not I I don't see myself as the one to smack them around? We will ask and ask again and if somebody won't give straight answer. There are a lot of politicians who are very good at not answering questions I felt he answered directly thoughtfully and his his message was an interesting one of we need to look each other and the I we need to stop demonizing each other for believing or FAA believing different things and he said we need love each other a little more which I don't think is had message in nineteen gene. <hes> Meghan re Pinot the star of the Yes of Women's World Cup in the U._S.. National team just said Yes as the victory print yeah. Isn't that interesting love to be a fly on the wall with you know coffee between the two of those people. Will you know I have this little the thing that I do after I've had an interesting guest and I'll come in and I'll go. There's another one for the Dream Dinner Party and that's what I'll do people that that I find really interesting and I just personally connect with and I agree. Wouldn't it be great to get people together of a lot of different different backgrounds in serves some wine and some good food and just see what the conversations like actually a great idea for for podcast show or something yeah the Dream Dinner Party so who are a few people that would be in that party. Wow let's see I'm GonNa Start and these are guests that I've had on stateside that I'm just always light up. When I see their names Charlie Ballard Michigan State University economist the guy that can make economics interesting because he brings such energy glee? He's got a book that has on my list I long time all these great. <hes> gleams Whitney leaves Whitney used to be a speechwriter for John Engler and he is now at Grand Valley state where he's the Hohnstein Center for Presidential Studies director so he's are kind of presidential historian and since I was a history major I get excited Debbie Dingle. I just find she has so much heart and I always I was and admired. <hes> greatly the public service career of the Dean of the House of John Dingell <hes> Congressman Dan kildee Congressman Fred opt-in. I always enjoy talking to him. I would now put Justin Amash on that after having talked with him I that somebody I'd like to to kind of explore the conservative point of view with one of the things I enjoy about that list though is that although there's some names aims at some people would no it's not like a default to the big stars and personally when it comes to conversations I feel like although sometimes larger names bring in audiences or drive-by audiences to me. The best conversations happened with the folks a little bit layer quote unquote below that or don't have as much attention they are willing to have more candid an interesting conversations that I feel like the audience values more yeah and then I love being able to tell stories and help I would bring a gentleman right now. I'm having a a senior moment <hes> and his name is John and he was one of the longest serving exonerate sees in U._S.. History and he went away in Michigan prison in nineteen sixty seven and he just got out a year or two ago and he was unjustly convicted and he's now been exonerated and this man has become an artist and I'm hating that him for getting his name. I can see his lovely phase and I've had him on a couple of times. Oh I'm kicking myself..

Michigan Justin Amash Congressman general manager greater media Boston Michigan Radio Wyan Beaumont Hospitals Cancer Cent Steve Schramm American Cancer Society Fox Ann Arbor Diane ream U._S Hill Auditorium Terry gross Whitney Nebi purdue
"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hi. This is Ashley Harding from Saint John's Newfoundland Canada radio lab is supported in part by the Alfred P Sloan foundation and handsome public understanding of science and technology in the modern world, more information about Sloan at WWW dot Sloan dot ORG. Hi, this is Mitch Leto from Kalamazoo Michigan radio is supported by progressive insurance, offering snapshot device designed to reward safe drivers earn more at Progresive dot com or one eight hundred progressive now. That's progressive. Hi this. Jason stood still in Seattle. Washington radio is supported by noon, offering personalized weight loss program. That uses collagen small goals and technology designed to help people change habits and keep the way off for good at Neum N O M dot com. Next time on asking other we're in Nashville for the fines roadshow music city's ever seen, and we're joined by two country music, legends singer, songwriters, trace Adkins and carlene Carter, plus the return of our favorite Nashville game. You're the only Tennessee so join me off your Eisenberg on asked me other the answer to life's funnier questions today at three on ninety three point nine. FM. WNYC. WNYC is supported by long. Lost a new play by Donald Margulis directed by Daniel Seligman and estranged. Brother comes back to his family from out of the blue, but they.

alfred p sloan foundation
"michigan radio" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"michigan radio" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"But many freshman admit that unity might not last forever. Things might change when they start talking about controversial details of what defines border security moderate members from areas once held by Republicans like max Rosen New York don't support the same policies as the outspoken progressives. Who were also just elected in solidly blue districts rose says the unity over the first step of opening. The government is simple that shouldn't be news. I just want to see people get paid navigating bigger policies will come later. Kelsey snell. NPR news the capitol. Michigan State University has a new president again. It's the school's third leader in less than a year. Interim president John anglers stepped down last night after making insulting comments about some of the abuse survivors of former USA gymnastics, doctor Larry Nassar. Michigan radio's Kate wells reports kailua Laurenz just wants to be done done with coming to these Michigan state board meetings done with trying to get the university's leaders to own. The fact that for decades one of its sports doctors Larry Nassar sexually abused hundreds of women and girls like Lawrence, even though some of them had been reporting at to MSU for the last twenty years. Lauren says John angler at the school's interim president never seemed to get that, you know, they announced his resignation. Immediately tears coming to my eyes. I think like. I think the after everything we've been through. I think it's finally time that I can be positive and optimistic and I'm so excited about.

Michigan State University Larry Nassar interim president Michigan max Rosen Kelsey snell John anglers president kailua Laurenz NPR New York Kate wells USA Lauren Lawrence twenty years
Officials Hope Date Change Will Drive More Visitors To Detroit Auto Show

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:15 min | 3 years ago

Officials Hope Date Change Will Drive More Visitors To Detroit Auto Show

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from a sauna Asana is work management software to help teams organize everything they do. So they can focus on the work. That matters most dry us on free for thirty days. Get started at a Asana dot com slash NPR. So it is the start of the thirtieth annual North American International auto show in Detroit. It is also the last time that show will be held in January. But once can't miss a vent is moving to the summer next year in hopes of regaining some of its lost glory. Here's Michigan radio. Tracey samuelson. The North American International auto show used to be a really big deal drawing almost every automaker big or small, but in recent years, it's often been snubbed especially by luxury car companies choosing to display in L A or the consumer electronic show in Vegas. Instead, it's tempting to blame the weather and Detroit and January dark depressing. Clouds, often, hide the sun, the cold his finger numbing and snowstorms can be. Just around the corner. The Monday of the auto show press days was always one of the worst days of my life. That's Tom Krisher. He's a veteran auto beat reporter for the Associated Press. He's driven to Detroit through black ice snowdrifts. And then you can't find your car when you come out at night because it's covered with snow and a bunch of other cars come in. So I'm extremely happy that it's going to be in the summertime, but it's not just the weather. It's the cost for automakers to display Detroit. Doug, north will be chairman of the twenty twenty show today. He's on the show floor watching preparations. What you see right now is by fifteen hundred workers that are working going to put this together, and then seventeen hundred semi trailer trucks that brought Whitman north says delays and overtime from Christmas and New Year's increased labor costs a summer show will cost a lot less automakers can also expand their displays outside many of these displays out here. Two stories have escalators, and they have vehicles hanging on the side of walls, car companies come back organizers trust media will to media attendance was about half, its usual number this year auto journalist, Laura Burstein was among those who decided to skip Detroit. Because of what we consider to be kind of a dearth of news as far as new vehicles go bursting says, the trend isn't encouraging for Detroit or any auto show for that matter. Car companies are finding cheaper more exclusive ways to create buzz for new cars, take the m w which rented an airplane hangar a few years back. So then over several days, they invited dealers media VIP's and even to public to come see all of its cars, so they eventually had a captive audience immersed in a single brand for as long as they wanted to stay instead of having to worry about what's the other guy doing across the aisle on the other hand, many consumers still like car shows. And want to compare different cars side by side in the long run Detroit itself could benefit from a summer show because attendees could also check out that hip new restaurant downtown or taking a baseball game though. I'm going to bet the old timers will still swap stories about the show being snowed. In back in the day for NPR news. I'm Tracey Samuelson.

Detroit Tracey Samuelson Tom Krisher NPR North American International Michigan Associated Press Doug Baseball Vegas Laura Burstein Whitman Chairman Twenty Twenty
Federal Judge Strikes Down Kentucky's Medicaid Work Rules

BBC Newshour

03:53 min | 3 years ago

Federal Judge Strikes Down Kentucky's Medicaid Work Rules

"President trump has posted a couple of tweets this morning defending the government's chief immigration enforcement agency against calls from some democrats at ice be abolished also a statement from saudi arabia confirms a phone call between the king and president trump but does not mention a trump tweet saying that saudi arabia had agreed to raise oil production to perhaps two million barrels a day a federal judge struck down kentucky's plan for medicaid changes would have required work volunteering or training for some exchange for healthcare coverage plan was set to go into effect next week lisa gillespie from w f p l in louisville reports at kentucky medicaid recipients won't face any changes to their insurance for now the court said the changes the state maids it kentucky's medicaid program don't meet the intent of the program which is to support the healthcare needs of low income people this state projected that ninety five thousand people would lose access to medicaid under the changes kentucky state official adam meyer our wrote in a statement that the state plans on working with the federal government to resolve the issue he added that without prompt implementation the state will be forced to make benefit cuts the decision also has far reaching implications for several other states that are considering medicaid work requirements for npr news i'm lisa gillespie in louisville general motors says president trump's threatened tariffs on imported cars and car parts could harm american automakers michigan radio sarah swick gm's warning comes and comments submitted to the us commerce department the department is investigating imported cars and car parts as possible national security threat under direction from president trump but gm cautions that today's auto industry relies on global operations and global supply chains the company says import tariffs will eventually drive up prices for us consumers and retaliatory measures could hurt global sales gm says those tariffs could lead to a smaller gm and risk less not more american jobs for npr news i'm sarah swick in detroit and you're listening to npr news this is wnyc in new york i'm david i new jersey is inching closer to a government shutdown legislators ended negotiations yesterday afternoon without reaching a budget deal with governor phil murphy much of the disagreement comes from murphy's plan to raise taxes on people making more than one million dollars a year legislators proposed raising taxes on people making more than five million instead at press conference murphy said that didn't cut it and he suggested citizens call their legislators to tell them if folks out there watching think that attacks on folks who make five million dollars a year or more is a sufficient answer to what else i hope they've got their numbers as well if a budget deal is not reached state beaches and parks would be closed tomorrow and non essential services would be closed monday teachers throughout new york are receiving emails telling them to leave their union the emails went out just hours after wednesday's supreme court decision that ruled against public sector unions like the american federation of teachers the justices struck down a law requiring non union members to pay union fees the emails came from the conservative think tank mackinac center and provided public school teachers with instructions on how to leave their union colleen wilson a reporter for low hud spoke to white plains teachers who received the emails teachers were kind of they were outraged i think especially those that are really involved in their union you know they just kind of sell it as you know fueling fire the mackinac center advocates conservative economic causes such as deregulation and right to work laws it has received hundreds of thousands of dollars in donations from the foundation started by us education secretary betsy devos extremely hot weather in.

President Trump Five Million Dollars One Million Dollars Two Million Barrels