35 Burst results for "Michigan Economic Development Corporation"

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:20 min | 7 months ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Live it Give advocate volunteer Live United, Go to living on it. Daughter work brought to you by United Way in the Ad council. Financial relief is on the way to millions of Americans. Now the President Trump has relented and signed the bipartisan measure passed by Congress. But Elizabeth Buchwald, reporter of Market Watch, says it's all still a waiting game. Elizabeth What are these experts saying that you talked to but enough you're called back in March with the cares act jobless Americans were getting about $600 extra week and benefits on top of their state benefits. And at that point, about two thirds of Americans were receiving Maurin benefits than they did from working so very controversial the incentives and all of those effects that it was creating, But with $300, it actually turns out That it's about, on average what Americans were making working, so it takes away that incentive for disincentive from going back to work that people were complaining about. The sub headline to your story. I believe I said that some of this aid is keeping millions of people out of poverty. Is that right? That's exactly right. If there was no action taken whatsoever about 12 million people would have been cut off from unemployment benefits altogether. This new stimulus package reinstate some of those cares Act programs that would extend benefits, but People would literally be living on nothing. There was an interesting point in your story, where this particular amount of money. The $300 an extra weekly unemployment benefits is Different from before because people are also more likely to spend all of this rather than save some of it, like from the cares, act, right? Yeah, again with the $600. But we're seeing it because that was more than people were making when they worked. They had the ability to save some of that because you know, didn't align, but they're spending patterns and that's great that they're able to see. There's nothing wrong with that. But for retailers they would prefer people spend all of it so it could support existing jobs. $300. It's a lot less obviously, so they're going to be spending more, which is exactly why people are saying is, it's much better for the economy. You reference that, too. There's another major complication for gig. Workers here. Explain that. You're getting a crucial part of that character Actor program. It's called the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program, and normally they wouldn't qualify for unemployment benefits, But they did under this program. I was just expired looking like it's going to get extended before they were just kind of told to provide an estimate of their earnings. They didn't have to provide actual documentation. This new legislation is actually pretty hard on documentation. They want to know for 10 90 nines. They haven't exactly expressed what evidence they want of earnings, and it's going to be harder for some workers and others to provide documentation. We're speaking with Elizabeth Buchwald, personal finance reporter for Market Watch about her story entitled The $300 Extra in weekly Unemployment Benefits is a win win for the economy and jobless Americans, So when can people expect to get the money? It all depends on the state. I mean, every every single time they have to go and change anything of the state work for systems. It takes them a long time to re program. It So at a minimum 3 to 4 weeks, I had a Max. It could be 6 to 8. We just don't really know. And with Christmas and New Year's those air working pays better gone out the door so that could also slow things down a bit. I think I remember hearing from last time, too, about these outdated computer systems that states use. This is also a problem. I guess it's not just a couple of clicks and were often running. Yeah, that's correct. And and and we've seen the California lot of these states. They've gone after fraud, and then they're missing a ton of fraud, and there's just so much that they can't handle. You'd expect these systems to be ready for the worst. That's kind of what unemployment should be. And yet they get so overwhelmed by changes, so that's gonna all come into play. With any of these changes that we're talking about now. Thanks, Elizabeth Elizabeth buckled of market Watch. It's 21 minutes before the hour coming up the employer stance on vaccines. Today. I'm here with Josh Hunt, executive VP and chief business development officer at the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. Josh if I wanted to start a new business, what is it that makes Michigan so attractive? If you want to start a business in Michigan? We have unbelievable assets here in Michigan for our entrepreneurial community as well in terms of opportunities for growth through access to capital. Service, says great universities and then talented workforce that congratulatory those startup businesses here in Michigan. We've seen examples of companies grow from an idea Tomo to over a billion dollar valuation companies like dual security and others that have grown here through the strong ecosystem of support that we have for a tech start ups here in the state. You hear more of this interview with Josh Hunt from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, go to this morning with Gordon deal dot com and click on the M E D. C microphone. That's this morning with Gordon deal dot com. And click on the.

Elizabeth Elizabeth Market Watch Elizabeth Buchwald Michigan Josh Hunt reporter Ad council fraud Congress Gordon Michigan Economic Development Tomo President Trump California
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:11 min | 7 months ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The most important sandwich off the year on Magreb is back. But about participating McDonald's to lend e You know, the one in the clear jar with the five layers like pumpkin pie and layers like coconut chocolate cookie. Hello. That's still NT creamy gelato in a jar made with real ingredients pretentious, no indulgent, Absolutely. 20 Raised the job that has right Well, they've been problems the NFL in the past, A Z there have been with all sports league could have led to the development of their protocols over type on, so they've been Shifting their approaches. They've gone on in part because they've learned one things have gone wrong. The particles needs to be tighter. Speaking with Louise Radnofsky sports reporter at the Wall Street Journal, where peace is called the question vexing parents and the NFL. Is it allergies or Cove? It? Um, why? You know that's not too much really part of your story. But the NC double a here with college basketball and he feel for What we're doing, then the coming weeks is we get started here. We do have another story about a basketball tournament that is going ahead in South Dakota later this week. Sponsored by major health care system in South Dakota. Now the health care system is arguing that this is an opportunity to show how things could be done safely. The players will be In a bubble within South Dakota. That means they might as well be on Mars. Um, with the health system is also you know, according to the way it's been designed, but He helped her system is also inviting 850 fans. To their stadiums. What's the What's the games? Go ahead, which certainly has raised eyebrows from some people Healthcare system says they're hoping they can. Probably this could be done well in safely. They have. Good ventilation on. I guess, As of right now it is still going ahead. So we're gonna be watching very close to Cassie. What happens next? Louise Louise Radnofsky Sports reporter at the Wall Street Journal coming up next. Watching for holiday scams Christmas with you. Uh, So today I'm here with Josh Hunt, executive VP and chief business development officer at the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. Josh if I wanted to start a new business, what is it that makes Michigan so attractive? If you want to start a business in Michigan, we have unbelievable assets here in Michigan for our entrepreneurial community as well. In terms of opportunities for growth through access to capital services, great universities and and talented workforce that congratulatory those startup businesses here in Michigan. We've seen examples of companies grow from An idea. Tonto over a billion dollar valuation companies like do a security and others that have grown here through the strong ecosystem of support that we have for high tech start ups here in this state To hear more of this interview with Josh Hunt from the Michigan Economic.

Michigan South Dakota Josh Hunt Wall Street Journal Louise Louise Radnofsky Louise Radnofsky NFL reporter Michigan Economic Development Michigan Economic Magreb McDonald basketball Tonto NC executive VP
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:33 min | 8 months ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Suspect. Theo, Ohio police officer who fatally shot an unarmed man in Columbus on Tuesday, has a history of complaints and issues with excessive force. Columbus Dispatch, says 44 year old Adam Quoi has been a cop in the city for nearly 20 years, According to previous reporting by the dispatch, Mr Koy had nine complaints filed against him in 3 2004 of those coming in a one month period. He also received written counseling. On Tuesday. The officers shot and killed 47 year old man identified yesterday as Andre Maurice Hill at a home while responding to a complaint from a neighbor around 1:30 A.m., about a person sitting in an SUV and turning its engine on and off repeatedly. Neighbor, Joseph Stone immediately people got on there and said My husband is black. He works odd hours of the morning. He warms his car up. Can you please not report him? So you get shot warming his car up, Mayor Andrew Ginther said. Mr Koy and another officer who responded to the scene did not turn on their body cameras until after the shooting. It's 10 minutes now, after the hour on this morning, America's first news coming up next lessons learned from passage of the coronavirus relief bill. Today. I'm here with Josh Hunt, executive VP and chief business development officer at the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. Josh if I wanted to start a new business, what is it that makes Michigan so attractive? If you want to start a business in Michigan? We have unbelievable at that here in Michigan for our entrepreneurial community, as well in terms of opportunities for growth through access to capital. Service is great universities and the talented workforce that congratulatory those startup businesses here in Michigan. We've seen examples of companies grow from an idea, Tonto over a billion dollar valuation companies like do a security and others that have grown here through the strong ecosystem of support that we have for high tech start ups here in ST You hear more of this interview with Josh Hunt from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, go to this morning with Gordon deal dot com and click on the M E D. C microphone. That's this morning with Gordon deal dot com. And click on the M E D. C microphone. When you call a Del Technologies adviser, you're talking to someone who isn't waiting for their turn to speak. But who actually wants to hear what you have to say.

Mr Koy Josh Hunt Michigan Michigan Economic Development officer Columbus Dispatch Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther Adam Quoi Gordon Theo Andre Maurice Hill Joseph Stone Del Technologies Ohio development officer America Tonto executive VP
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:35 min | 8 months ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Up here, and he said his approach is actually pretty similar to it it how it is in past years where he always knows that people love no days in the winter, but they like him even more in the Bring when they're getting out earlier than their friends. So he is that, he said his approach really hasn't changed that much looking at it, even during a pandemic. Thanks. Felicia Felicia Genz reporter and producer. At the Boston Globe coming up next, how a tiny nonprofit skyrocketed. Today. I'm here with Josh Hunt, executive VP and chief business development officer at the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. Josh if I wanted to start a new business, what is it that makes Michigan so attractive to start a business in Michigan? We have unbelievable at that's here in Michigan for our entrepreneurial community, as well in terms of opportunities for growth through access to capital. Service is great universities and the talented workforce that congratulatory those startup businesses here in Michigan. We've seen examples of companies grow from an idea, Tonto over a billion dollar valuation companies like do a security and others that have grown here through the strong ecosystem of support that we have for a tech start ups here in ST You hear more of this interview with Josh Hunt from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, go to this morning with Gordon deal dot com and click on the M E D. C microphone. That's this morning with Gordon deal dot com and click.

Michigan Michigan Economic Development Josh Hunt Felicia Felicia Genz Gordon Boston Tonto executive VP development officer reporter producer
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Covert 19. You also talked about keeping your options open and seeking privacy. What would that entail? Yes, well, so a lot of times when we see the quarantine You know the typical approach to it. It's people that are at home, and they're reaching out through social media and privacy is almost the exact opposite of Social media. What we work. What we're going to see is we're going to see that future leaders are made during quarantine. And part of that is what were you doing on social media? Because if you Kept a sense of privacy and kept your professional demeanor on social media. Then there's nothing more to talk about. But if you were proclaiming to the world how you feel politically, or yo uh, really, uh, smashing somebody into the rocks, you know, on Facebook that that can come back to haunt you. Thanks, Chris. Chris Mansky again. The book is called the prepared Investor. Coming up next pets that have their own allergies. Today. I'm here with Josh One executive vice president and chief business development officer at the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. Josh over the biggest challenges for M E D. C from the pandemic mission was one of the hardest hit states by Kobe 19 and the Emily See what we did is we immediately began focusing on economic response measures from Kobe 19. Support our businesses, our communities and our workforce and every region of the state. The first closures of businesses here in Michigan as result of pandemic happened on March 16. And it was on March 19th that we launched our first financial tools to help small businesses never.

Chris Mansky Josh One Kobe Michigan Economic Development Facebook Michigan executive vice president development officer
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:56 min | 9 months ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"19. You also talked about keeping your options open and seeking privacy. What would that entail? Yes, well, so a lot of times when we see the quarantine You know the typical approach to it. It's people that are at home, and they're reaching out through social media and privacy is almost the exact opposite of Social media. What we work. What we're going to see is we're going to see that future leaders are made during quarantine. And part of that is what were you doing on social media? Because if you Kept a sense of privacy and kept your professional demeanor on social media. Then there's nothing more to talk about. But if you were proclaiming to the world how you feel politically, your you know, really, um, smashing somebody into the rocks, you know, on Facebook that that can come back to haunt you. Thanks, Chris Chris Mansky again. The book is called the prepared Investor. Coming up next pets that have their own allergies. Today. I'm here with Josh One executive vice president and chief business development officer at the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. Josh. What were the biggest challenges for M e D. C from the pandemic mission was one of the hardest hit states by Kobe 19 and the Emily See what we did is we immediately began focusing on economic response measures from Kobe 19 to support our businesses, our communities and our workforce and every region. Have to state. The first closures of businesses here in Michigan as result of pandemic happened on March 16. And it was on March 19th that we launched our first financial tools to help small.

Chris Chris Mansky Josh One Kobe Michigan Economic Development Facebook Michigan executive vice president development officer
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:53 min | 10 months ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Irrational investment decisions that can mess up your retirement plans, Plus how next door neighbors with opposing political views have stayed the closest of friends and 20 twenties Best wine counties outside of California. We'll have that story in about 20 minutes. Thiss portion of the program is brought to you by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. The businesses of the future are being built today and Michigan is where they start. Learn more by searching Michigan pure opportunity. There are ways Cos in schools cannot only adjust to the new normal but actually thrive. Tech analyst Rob Enderle, founder of the end, early group has looked at best productivity practices during the pandemic. Rob like what? Companies that were aggressive with digital transformation had put in place methods, too. Deal with employees in and mass were highly automated had had developed and deployed. I architectures, which is kind of automating the The machines were ableto flip toe work at home relatively quickly because everything was automated. And so the administrators could be pretty much into place. And employees could be pretty much any place. Um on on top of dot er, because we discovered a whole bunch of employees interaction issues. When you start moving people were moulding. Some people are self motivated. Some people aren't some people. I need a lot of people around them. Some people were fine without a hand. What happened was for those companies that had HR organizations that weren't just compliance organizations that were focused on the care and feeding of employees and already started instrument. The employees Also seem to do better, are they? They advance that instrumentation implemented programs where there were regular weekly made meetings between senior staff and the rest of the employees. And change the way that managers and employees interacted both in terms of of Of frequency and methods ended up and kind of created these distributed families of people that it's for some screwy reason are actually working better now than they worked on Promise a number of the company's heir now reporting. How significant increases in sales, productivity and efficiency with people working at home because those folks are not wasting time in a long commute. Not struggling with you. Okay. I got to be home for dinner. You're already home. Onda. While they do do have distractions at work those at now at homework now that they didn't have before, they don't have the destructions they had at work. When they came into the office, And so those two things have seemed up the balance and wipe each other out so that so the net impact on those firms that have on aggressive HR Department and work of already fairly Well, automated have been very positive about other schools from Rob. Well, so schools were a bit different. The schools there are differentiated by the fact that they tend to be understaffed. Underfunded. Um, and a lot of schools really struggled with this with this switch. Those that did best, however, were those that already had Ah, large remote. Student body either due to illness or disability, or whatever they'd already put in place the mechanisms to deal with Those students and schools were very aggressive with Rod Virtual ization. They candida deploy virtualized stops, opposes shipping out individual pieces of hardware or trying to support the students. Hard were already in the field. And, you know, I already said they were understaffed, trying to trying to deal with that level of complexity kind of sunk a lot of schools, but for those that had deployed virtual instances Desktops. Those instances just run on whatever. Whatever the students having those students, then you can go to whatever vendor they bought the hardware from for technical support. So that allowed the teachers Go back to teaching and not be technical support themselves has also been a big problem for a lot of schools on get the students and the and the and the materials. Um as a priority, so that stuff just simply worked. And that and the teachers could go go on with being Peter's. We're speaking with Rob Enderle. He's the principal and founder of the end early group, he's written a piece for computer world dot com called best productivity practices. During the pandemic. What else has stood out here for you? Right now, how? Well we've kind of adopted to this. The the back of his were doing this, um, attending del Technology world and and they're talking about the next steps. With regard to what we're going to go, particularly with education and blending a are augmented reality PR virtual reality. Anil and doing classes that are now worldwide is opposed to regional with things like automatic of translations. Are going on behind the behind the scenes. So you get your classrooms that can span languages that Khun spanned countries, um and uncover interesting topics all around the world in the students don't have to travel to the class. Thanks. Rob Rob Enderle, principal and founder of the tech advisory firm called the end early group. Coming up next irrational investment behaviors. Mom, I pissed all I found in the attic is cursed. No, its eyes are just very life Can What is its head keeps spinning bank. Oh, that is scary. You're like really scary to use mobile. You can manage it. Take a policy. Let's play with another doll waken. Just bury it deep in the ground. Happy guy going download the industry leading Geico app today. Now there's a natural way to take charge of your blood pressure. 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Rob Rob Enderle founder Michigan technical support Michigan Economic Development principal Geico California analyst candida senior staff Khun Anil Peter
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:45 min | 10 months ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The Michigan Economic Development Corporation. The businesses of the future are being built today and Michigan is where they start. Learn more by searching Michigan. Pure opportunity. The restaurant industry is holding its breath as we had deeper into fall after all the cold weather months or when patios were supposed to close and diners automatically move indoors. But as more evidence is compiled, a picture is emerging. That doesn't bode well for restaurants this winter. An association between indulging and long meals and indoor spaces and an increase in Corona virus cases. Now what? Here's Tim Carmen, food writer and columnist at The Washington Post, Tim Brutal times. For some, the news is difficult for restaurants, you know be the outdoor dining has really helped them in cities have been assisting them in this No, it open up, opening up streets and sidewalks to allow more capacity because obviously they need more space because they need more space between tables. No, it's it's been kind of. Ah, real godsend for restaurants to have this outdoor dining during the warm weather, but the cold weather pickling in the northern part of the country. It's gonna be really hard on them, and they're They're coming up with all sorts of creative ways. Tio, whether this because they feel like if they don't there's going to be as Andrew Zimmern mentioned in August in extinction event and in the restaurant industry at first, some is, I guess it's just sort of let let Let's see if we can hold on till a vaccine becomes available is that you know when restrictions were lifted. You know, it's tough for the restaurant industry because unlike a lot of business, they just don't have a lot of cash on hand. Unless they're a large, uh, you know, Okay. Unit Corporation, you know, like a chili's O R A T G I F Fridays. Most of them are just like hand to mouth. And so they don't have that kind of money to withstand it. Really a prolonged period of not having revenue and you know the revenues are down, depending on how creative they are, and how successfully I would take out the revenues are down. You know, I've heard as much as 80 to 90% of restaurants, and you just can't hang on that long. So you profiled this couple in Portland that owes this owns this restaurant seems that you know, pretty exotic menu, assume it's popular and successful. But we will put up the closed sign for the winter. Is that the plan or for good? Yeah. You know the owners they do kind of a Russian The menu and they were very successful with their their outdoor patio, and they decided to set it down where they're going to shut it down on October 11th, but but they're not going to bring people inside. They just don't believe that it's safe enough and you know, there's there are some recent studies that seemed to confirm that feeling so They're doing what a lot of people are doing. They're just trying to come up with some creative ideas on how did you take out there doing sort of multi course takeout meal that people can preorder during the week and then and then get it for the weekend. But they also have the benefit of having retail products, which I don't think a lot of restaurants have. They've got frozen dumplings, and they've got this new horse radish spot that they're bringing out and Let's bring in revenue. But how many restaurants have that kind of product to sell and can even get into stores? At this point? We're speaking with Tim Carmen, Food writer and columnist at The Washington Post. And he's written a piece entitled Outdoor Dining has helped restaurants avoid disaster. But winter is coming out of these pods and shelters that some are going after will help a little bit, I guess. Portable heaters, things like that. You know, it's a really good question, and I think the jury's still out on that. I think the portable heaters may help in certain climate. But you know the people I talked to in Chicago this idea that they're going to do outdoor dining in in the dead of winter. It seems a little ludicrous to some of them are many of them. You know, I just don't think a pod is going to be the answer for a lot of them. You've got An expense. And then what you gonna do with it? After the pandemic is over. You're just going to suck that expense. You reference to Washington, D C little milder than Chicago in the winter. What is D? C D. C has a program They had some money left over from the cares Act. And they're they're going to give grants out two restaurant owners that have outdoor permits, outdoor dining permits. They're like $6000, which You know, sounds pretty good, but you know, it'll help him a little bit. Try to, you know, get heaters and propane and maybe even sort of warmer outdoor furniture so people can do dining later into the season, but it'll be interesting to see how far they can go with that Nice. Tim Tim Carmen, food writer and columnist at The Washington Post. Coming up next taking back the fun that the Corona virus stole. I worry about lots of things. My finances. My Karan kids. If you're 65 or older, you have enough things to worry about. Pneumococcal pneumonia shouldn't be one of them. Even healthy adults. 65 older are at increased risk for this potentially serious.

Outdoor Dining Tim Tim Carmen writer The Washington Post Michigan Michigan Economic Development Chicago Tim Brutal Andrew Zimmern Pneumococcal pneumonia Portland Washington Tio Unit Corporation Karan
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"See bikini pictures of Jennifer no that's not true that's merely to see if you're paying attention pretty sure we took all of those down meantime it's time now for a business update brought to you by the Michigan economic development corporation the businesses of the future are being built today in Michigan is where they start learn more by searching Michigan your opportunity for you streamers apple TV plus launches today the company's entry into the streaming war unlike its rivals apple is starting though from scratch in the business of producing TV shows and movies Wall Street journal reporter John Jorgenson says there's an idealistic told that runs through the handful of original series that will introduce apple streaming service John take us through this new venture well there are kind of a day late jumping into the streaming television game you know years after necklace kind established the playing field and Amazon and Hulu politics valuable their problems coming in apple did me well back all that kind of that happening so apple big entry is starting and they're putting their own spin on it by really empathizing original shows that they have to stay in the yard to the screen that loading up a bunch of license stopped what Netflix did for the presenting a handful showed the movie to get Charlie left and then going to go out there it seems like a heavy lift to start from scratch yeah I guess they feel like they've got they've got to do it bay they want to sort of establish their their foothold in this world which is just growing and growing exponentially but they're doing a distinctly apple way you know these is that they're so known for their hardware things like that and they're just being kind of bland now extending that in the world of television film is the tricky business because you're so the leasing out of loading out your brand to tell makers that TV producers who have stories that their own so it's it's not something you see apple doing too much you know where they're kind of pushing putting their name what other people are making in other kind of loosening up to grab a little bit court TV and film with a very different business but it's interesting to see them experiment what what the idea of apple is attainable I saw a couple of shows you point out for all mankind explain what's going on in that program yeah that's that's some you know probably the broadest appeal made for all the shows I get to call the science fiction show but really worry I'll try three of the space race and it starts with an interesting premise what would have happened if it'll be it actually beat the Americans to the moon in nineteen sixty nine and apparently we know from how real letters that the Soviets were actually you know kind of close to doing just that so Ron Moore with the the creator producer of the show different shot exercise were like you know what how would you have reacted politically scientifically culturally to the Russian beating us with more on and so there's a top kind of chain of events where the U. S. as in kind of a catch up mode as opposed to a meeting not enough space for it they sell have an interesting premise and lead people for you know who might have an interest in history and what might have been at that time because John Jorgenson entertainment reporter at the Wall Street journal this piece is called if you love iPhones will you Love apple T. V.'s shows apple TV plus lunches November one Friday today well what about the what about the morning show with Jennifer Aniston that's probably the one that got the most broad because you have these massive stars and an estimate and we reach Weatherspoon who are producers of the show the crowd been a while you know you have been coming in a television in a big way of making Michele it's probably got the most attention out of all the apple shows because without power and it's kind of like for dealing with the mood that stuff going on a culture right now it would be two story why after many failed version of both nations scandal involving Matt Lauer so it's you know it's kind of a media story and sort of a drama that said about world you know the high stakes world on network TV and I don't know if it's personally I don't know if it's really like my taste but I think a lot of people sort of her going to try to build those stars I would see what they do in this world thanks John John Jorgenson reporter at the Wall Street journal so they got the morning show with Jennifer Aniston we've got this morning with Jennifer to shank I see what apple's doing twelve minutes now in front of the hour this human resources professional is a rock star thanks to Kronos and.

The U.S. is still exporting sensitive tech to China despite a White House clampdown

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:38 min | 1 year ago

The U.S. is still exporting sensitive tech to China despite a White House clampdown

"This marketplace podcast is supported by paychecks. Paychecks makes it simple for businesses of all sizes to pay and manage their employees they make payroll easy automatic and they handle benefits rams with paychecks they work with you the way you WanNa work learn more at paychecks dot com slash marketplace and by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation John Tom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time chat then see everything else intercom can do that's intercom dot com slash podcast

John Tom Dot Michigan Economic Development
Gun owners want smart guns on the market but dont want to buy them

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:55 min | 2 years ago

Gun owners want smart guns on the market but dont want to buy them

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for HR payroll and talent management learn more at ultimatesoftware dot com ultimate software people first and by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation John Kelly founder and CEO at airspace experienced technology gee says in Michigan Revolution is in the air find out what planet earth is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E. T. M. Dot com eighty percent of gun. Owners thinks smart guns should be on the market but they don't want to buy them from American public public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm molly would this week. Democratic presidential candidates are talking about the problem of gun violence but is there a technology solution that can make guns safer for decades gun manufacturers and even some startups have tried to figure out how to create a smart gun one that could only be fired by the guns owner owner and could be activated by fingerprints or a radio signal sent from the weapon to say a wristband gun researchers call these personalized guns but so far the tech hasn't gone anywhere. CASSANDRA prophecy is deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and research. I asked her what the barriers are. So there are two main concerns. I think that are driving down the potential market for personalized gums and those are cost and concerns about the technology technology and I think one of the challenges were trying to way is that over the last several decades we've had changes in the reasons. People people own firearms forty years ago. The ownership was predominantly for hunting. Now the predominant reason for gun ownership is self defense against other people and if you're concerned about having a firearm to defend yourself in that kind of situation than making sure the technology would work when you want to be able to use use it could be a significant issue when you look at the overall numbers of gun deaths how many of those could potentially be prevented by personalized guns. It's really when we think about the benefits of what types of injuries by fire him could be prevented with personalized guns. We're looking mostly at injuries among individuals who wouldn't be able to purchase firearms so teen suicide by firearm unintentional injuries unintentional deaths by firearm among children and then also the potential benefit to drive down homicide by reducing the ability to use a firearm that is personalized if it was stolen but when you look at the burden of firearm deaths and the potential benefit it's hard to make a really strong case that having personalized sliced guns is really going to drastically drive down our burden of gun violence in this country. So where would you like to see investment in research go I. I think that we could do a lot more to understand. Who's firearms are being used in suicide? Even though fire suicide is the leading cause of firearm mm death we have very little information on where those guns come from when they were acquired how they were stored in the home and I think that we could do a lot to to improve our ability to respond to and prevent suicide if we could get some better data to understand some of these precipitating factors. CASSANDRA prophecy is deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and research so far no smart gun has been sold at a gun shop anywhere in America and as to that question of cost CRA Fosse told us smart guns would potentially cost as much as a thousand dollars more than the dumb ones and now for some related links. There's a fascinating story in Bloomberg BusinessWeek from earlier this year about the long history history of attempts to create so-called smart or personalized guns and it includes this whole tale about a two thousand to law from New Jersey that said that his students sooner smart guns were sold anywhere in the United States then New Jersey's gun retailers could only sell smart guns within three years so oh no more dumb guns in New Jersey that of course caused an NRA freak out and death threats against a Maryland retailer who did want to sell personalized guns in two thousand fourteenth. That's at the entire effort back even more and over the years. No one has flight created a smart gun where the tech works perfectly in all situations. The Bloomberg story also includes a lot of details about how the tech industry has both tried to find an fund smart gun startups but also shied away from gun startups for fear that could lead to increased gun ownership and then of course there's the politics which is where we are going to end this podcast you can find the Bloomberg Bloomberg story on our website Marketplace Tech Dot Org. I'm Ali would and that is marketplace tech. This is a PM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Entercom Intercom. What's more of the Nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took a little chat bubble in the corner website and packed it with conversational bots product tours. NPS surveys all sorts of things that amplify your team and help you reach more nice people intercom customer unity got forty five percent more loyal users with intercom in just twelve months go to intercom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time. I am chat then see everything else intercom can do that's intercom dot com slash podcast.

Deputy Director Johns Hopkins Center P. L. A. N. E. T. M. Dot New Jersey Entercom Intercom Bloomberg Bloomberg Bloomberg Michigan Michigan Economic Development Founder And Ceo John Kelly NPS United States NRA Cra Fosse ALI Maryland America
States take on Google with antitrust investigation. This won't be quick.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:59 min | 2 years ago

States take on Google with antitrust investigation. This won't be quick.

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for HR payroll and talent management learn more at ultimatesoftware dot com ultimate software people first and by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation Evan Lyle Rush enterprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it. The future mobility is going to be decided right here in this state visit planted. 'EM DOT COM to find out why that's P. L. A. N. E. T. M. dot com. They are taking the fight to Google and facebook a lot of states a lot from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying demystifying the digital economy. I'm Jed Kim in from Hollywood this week. Attorneys general from forty eight states the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico announced their joining forces. They're investigating whether Google has engaged in anticompetitive headed behavior. Some of those ages are also part of another investigation into similar questions about facebook. The Google investigation will be directed at how the company's Search and advertising operations may inhibit competition the agee's are coming from both sides of the political aisle remembered bipartisanship and there are already other inquiries underway at the Federal Level Congress the FTC the Justice Department Stephen. Overly reports on tax check policy for politico. We asked him to give us a sense of what the stakes are in what state will be looking for one of the defining metrics for anticompetitive behavior if you're in the US is how it impacts the consumer and our consumers paying higher prices as a result of anti-competitive behaviour. That's trickier to measure with Google. Because most of us pay nothing to use. At least that's the conventional thinking but the argument that you've heard from some of these attorneys general is is that they feel. Google has a stronghold on digital advertising meaning. If you want to place ads online you have very few options beyond google to go to and so as a result these companies pay higher advertising prices and they pass those prices onto the consumer if the state attorney's find the Google all and facebook or did break antitrust laws what happens what can they do. One common outcome of these investigations is to require the companies to change their business practices practices and perhaps submit to sort of outside review to ensure that they have made those changes another approach could actually be to break up these companies for example facebook or Google might have to sell off a piece of their business or break off into two businesses. That's a pretty heavy undertaking There's not been a ton on of success with that in the past and so while these investigations are being announced and they're getting a lot of attention. I think it is a very a difficult legal road ahead for these enforcers if they're actually going to force change at these companies when my we actually see results of the investigation if if this investigation continues to mature and becomes a legal battle. We're likely looking at years of that playing out right now. I think it's clear these investigations are in the information gathering stage and so you know I think you'll start to see in the near future companies coming forward who who haven't already done so to make complaints against these companies and how they run their business. I should add that already. You know you're seeing some antagonise. UNISOM emerge in for example yelp on the review site has long been critical of Google and complain that they engaged in anticompetitive behaviour behavior news publishers have also long had complaints against Google and claim that it's advertising business has damaged their industry. Those industries have already started speaking out and I think you'll start to see more as these investigations mature. Stephen overly is a technology reporter for politico. Could anticompetitive behaviour savior also be seen in say facebook buying up instagram and WHATSAPP Stephen says maybe it really depends on the reasons behind the acquisitions and proving intention can be tough now here awesome related links. The aren't wasting time. They've already subpoenaed Google asking more than two hundred question than demanding record. The Wall Street Journal says some of the information requests get what I just mentioned about the intent behind some acquisitions like the buying of Doubleclick ad mob and add Meld Inc those are companies companies that helped build Google's AD business the only states attorneys general who are not yet part of the investigation into Google are those from Alabama and California in the latter's absence is pretty notable considering that it's a massive state home to Google with lots of resources and an attorney general's office. That's built a a strong antitrust team the AG Heavier Bezerra hasn't said why just that it needs to protect quote ongoing and potential investigations Gatien's the L. A. Times points out that but Sarah's political campaigns have received close to forty thousand dollars from Google related entities but then there are a bunch of other theories to the time reach out to get the opinions of a lot of experts. I alluded to the many acquisitions. FACEBOOK has made of other companies. It's kind of hard to know what the exact number is. The Wall Street Journal says that's around ninety tech wise put solicit just above seventy and tech wise has made an infant graphic. It got fifteen years of facebook shopping starting. Let's about-face which went for two hundred thousand dollars and going through rock style last February Price Tag egg unknown you can find links to all of this at our website marketplace tech dot ordered Seventy Hughes and Matt Pretty Produce Marketplace Tech Eve tro is our senior producer we had helped this week from Jody Becker Robin Edgar and serve regardless our our engineers are intern is hey seuss Alvarado. I'm I'm Jed Kim and that's marketplace tech this is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Entercom Intercom. What's more four of the Nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took a little chat bubble in the corner website and packed it with conversational bots product tours. NPS surveys all all sorts of things that amplify your team and help you reach more nice people in our comm- customer unity got forty five percent more loyal users with entercom in just twelve months. Let's go to intercom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time chat then see everything else intercom can do. That's intercom dot com slash podcast.

Google Facebook Jed Kim Politico Entercom Intercom The Wall Street Journal United States Michigan Evan Lyle Rush P. L. A. N. E. T. District Of Columbia Attorney Stephen Puerto Rico NPS
Its happening in Knoxville:  Time, money and marketing make smaller cities viable tech hubs

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:31 min | 2 years ago

Its happening in Knoxville: Time, money and marketing make smaller cities viable tech hubs

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation John Romanelli Finder and CEO at airspace experienced technology says in Michigan Revolution is in the air find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at platinum dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E. T. M. Dot com lots of cities would like to become tech hubs but it takes time money and these days marketing from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Jed Kim in from Hollywood. There are many reasons city wants a flourishing tech industry a lot of high paying jobs investments in the community community and cultural institutions of course when it grows too fast there can also be downsides like stratospheric housing prices gentrification but that's far off the radar of most cities that really want to court big tech remember the rabid fervor of the Amazon. HQ to competition for for cities that didn't get in early on tech developing as a hub is a long process with a lot of things that have to go right. Jim Biggs worked in silicon can valley for years before moving to Knoxville Tennessee where he's Executive Director of the Knoxville Entrepreneur Center which is a business accelerator he laid out the hurdles his city and others face access to capital from one though just isn't much free-flowing capital venture capital in particular that makes it into some of these smaller communities then the second is attracting and retaining talent you know I think people want to move to places where they see opportunity and where they think that that if this startup doesn't work then I've got one straight down the road that I can go to jump in there. I'm imagine there is a flip side. So what are the advantages manages well. I guess the obvious one is that the cost of living is substantially cheaper than it is. If you WANNA talk about San Francisco New York Boston that's been. I think the biggest selling point but what we found is that most of these smaller communities also have one or two unique strengths were assets that they're able to leverage in some way that aren't art being sort of replicated in places like the bay area and I think that's also been a strong driver of a lot of the the startup communities in these in these smaller regional economies finding access to investment can be an issue. How do you solid that problem. You do two things. One is you cultivate relationships with people in the communities where there is more capital and then you also also have to educate the local population about the value of investing in new business creation for a long time it it was more perceived as altruism than it was a sort of risky but potentially lucrative asset class and so you had people who had wealth in the community who were being persuaded to put money into things because there buddy was into it or because their kids brother's son was doing it which is great but then when that thing flames out and these do the you know the the responses man. I'm never doing that again and so you know a lot of people have come and gone from the the investor her community without being offered a more structured way to both do something that supports the community but also provide a return that they're looking in for Jim. Biggs is Executive Director of the Knoxville Entrepreneur Center. He says he did two things upon arriving in Knoxville one he started saying y'all to he filled his closet with orange close so he'd blend in at University of Tennessee Football Games and now for some links wired looks at the problems of brain drain from smaller cities to superstar ones like San Francisco New York Etcetera. It also looks at effort. Some places are undertaking to reverse the flow. The state of Vermont has been offering ten thousand dollar reimbursements for people to move there the air and work remotely similar program has been established for Tulsa Oklahoma. There have been quite a few takers in general smaller cities hold a salary advantage over larger cities when adjusted for cost of living techrepublic says the top ten locations are Justin. Salaries are all small to mid sized cities. These top spot goes to Brownsville Harlingen Texas followed by Fort Smith Between Arkansas and Oklahoma. My Hometown Toledo Ohio comes in at number five five. Go mud hens. The thing is this is true in general but not when it comes to the tech industry tech salaries after adjustment are still still five percent higher in large metro areas compared with smaller ones so how can smaller cities compete the Brookings Institution agrees with Jim. Big said about figuring out what unique benefits your city can offer and investing in them. That's what Syracuse New York is doing to build up as a center for developing unmanned systems tech. The city has a historical electronics industry as well as in sensors and defense that may give them a leg up on developing being drawn tech tech accelerator there has attracted many international companies. You can find links to all of this on our website at marketplace tech dot org. I'm Jed Kim and that's marketplace tech this APM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Entercom Tom. Intercom what's more of the Nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took a little chat bubble in the corner website and packed it with conversational bots product tour. NPR's surveys all sorts of things that amplify your team and help you reach more nice people intercom customer unity got forty five percent more loyal users with Entercom in just twelve months go to entercom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time chat then everything else intercom can do. That's intercom dot com slash podcast.

Jim Biggs Jed Kim New York Knoxville Entrepreneur Center Knoxville Executive Director San Francisco Oklahoma Amazon Michigan Economic Development P. L. A. N. E. T. John Romanelli Entercom Tom Hollywood CEO Entercom Michigan Brookings Institution Toledo
For U.S. Navy destroyers, old controls might be safer than new tech

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:19 min | 2 years ago

For U.S. Navy destroyers, old controls might be safer than new tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by harness wealth a digital platform that helps you find the best financial advisers c._p._a.'s and trust and estate attorneys for your unique needs visit harness. This wealthed dot com slash marketplace to learn more. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the michigan economic development corporation evan lyle of rush enterprises is a big fan of michigan as he put it. The future of mobility is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet them dot com to find out why that's p. L. a. n. e. t. m. dot com the when piloting massive navy destroyers old school controls might be safer than new tech from american public media. This is marketplace attack demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed kim in for molly would in june twenty seventeen the u._s._s. fitzgerald collided with the philippine containership killing seven sailors us then just two months later the u._s. Mccain collided with the liberian merchant vessel ten sailors died. Meghan eckstein is deputy editor for the u._s. News which is part of the u._s. naval institute she says the national transportation safety board found that the u._s. mccain collision was caused by a helmsmen and he was confused by his touchscreen displays. He meant to slow down the ship but instead made a sharp right turn. An investigation led to more than a hundred hundred recommendations to improve safety and readiness on ships turns out. The touchscreen controls for speed are not preferred by a lot of personnel. They want physical throttles instead. The navy has taken note for new ships and will roll out a retrofit to change existing ones. Meanwhile eckstein says it's not just the control screens but also deficiencies in training that have caused confusion. I think one of the challenges is simply that there's not a lot of commonality from ship to ship of the way everything is currently allocated to the fleet so if you're a sailor in your on one ship you served there for two or three years when you go to your next assignment it might it not have the same bridge controls and might not have you know you might be moving from a physical throttle to a touchscreen or you might be moving from touchscreens at touchscreen but they're not the same aim and all the same controls aren't where you thought they were so this kind of comes down to you know with these touch screens in an emergency everything's muscle memory and if you're not sufficiently trained on them and the buttons aren't where you think they are and it's not consistent every time. He used that system in emergency. You're not going to know how to do it right. Why and when did the navy switch to touch screen throttles when the navy goes through its shipbuilding programs and it's ship modernization programs it really doesn't specify a lot of detailed detailed requirements for the shipbuilders so and a lot of cases you have shipbuilding companies who <hes> when they're making their pitches to the navy they want the most up-to-date technology they want you know the latest and the greatest that they can provide to sailors and a lot of cases that has involved moving to more digital systems more touchscreen type systems <hes> and and so this really isn't anything the navy kind of intentionally went towards. It's something that was really driven by industry and just sort of this desire to innovate and incorporate the latest and greatest technology. Oh gee what are they doing with the touchscreen now. There's a lot of ways that the trudge screens can be useful for example. There are certain <hes> cruise with smaller followership. I'm sorry ships was smaller crews where it's actually quite useful to have so much control at your fingertip on touchscreen so i don't think the navy fully wants to pull away from those <hes> also with the combat systems having a fully digitize system means that you can update it faster. You can blast out software updates over satellite relate. Even if you have a ship that's deployed so there are some cases where having fully digitized touchscreens are really useful. It just turns out you have to do that with a purpose. This one of the admiral's told me this kind of falls in the bucket of we did it because we could and i think that's becoming clear that that's not a good enough reason to have touch screen ship controls. Meghan eckstein is deputy editor for u._s. News she says about sixty destroyers old and new will get the physical throttles hopefully starting next summer and now for some related links meghan epstein recently interviewed retiring navy admiral john richardson's he he had a lot to say about how technological advances played out during his tenure. Essentially the navy he left behind is very different from the one he inherited something. I i learned from reading it is that three hundred fifty five ships is the minimum fleet size the lead necessary for achieving the pentagon strategic guidance and he guesses how many they'd really like six hundred fifty three now. You're ready for jeopardy. An article in forbes looks at two different navy ships that are incorporating and bishop new technologies in their designs one. The author says is likely headed for a lot of criticism when issues inevitably arise because it's been touted as bad bad already when it launches the other is given more leeway on performance because military officials and lawmakers have been told. It's more experimental something to learn from an incorporate into future ships. Maybe a lesson they're on the importance of managing expectations matt pretty and stephanie hughes-produced marketplace tech yvetot is our senior producer server gear and robin edgar engineer the show our intern is hey shoes alvarado. I'm jed kim and that's marketplace. Take this is a p._m. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by entercom intercom. What's it's more of the nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took a little chat bubble in the corner website and packed it with conversational bots product tours n._p._s. Surveys all sorts of things that amplify your team and help you reach more nice people inner calm customer unity got forty five percent more loyal users with entercom in just twelve of months go to intercom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time chat then see everything else intercom can do. That's intercom dot com slash podcast.

Navy Meghan Eckstein Jed Kim Mccain Deputy Editor Michigan P. L. Rush Enterprises Evan Lyle Meghan Epstein U._S. Naval Institute Forbes Pentagon Molly John Richardson Producer
Teens on screens might be a good thing

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:43 min | 2 years ago

Teens on screens might be a good thing

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for h._r. Payroll and talent management learn more at ultimatesoftware dot com ultimate software people first. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the michigan economic development corporation evan lyle of rush enterprises is a big fan of michigan again as he put it. The future of mobility is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet dot com to find out why that's p. L. a. n. e. t. m. dot com. It is quality not quantity that counts was as up writing about screen time and adolescent mental health from american public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed kim in for molly. Would it feels like we're constantly bombarded with new stories race about how screens and technology are destroying our kids. Mental health turns out though when it comes to adolescence those negative impacts of screen time may be overblown own. Mike lynn johnson is an assistant professor of psychology at the university of north carolina at greensboro. She led a team that did a longitudinal study following up with a group of students over a couple of years asking how they're using tack and how they're feeling then they collected more than thirteen thousand observations on hundreds of those kids ads and the results were pretty different from a lot of the familiar headlines when it comes to kids and screens i would say i was a bit surprised but our findings are actually quite consistent. Stint with an emerging body of literature was suggests that these correlations that have been observed between technology mental health are actually quite small and those small effect sizes. Perhaps we're gleaned from the earlier studies when not all teams were using technology to the same degree in today's day and age where the vast majority of of teens are pretty digitally connected. It looks like it's more normal for teens to have a lot of engagement online and that perhaps it's not linked with negative mental health outcomes and there there are also some definite positives associated with screens and time spent online yeah so the broader literature has recently suggested that teens who are most needing support actually go online to get it in the form of social support or maybe searching for information about their mental health difficulties and actually in our study one one of the few significant findings that did emerge was that those teenagers who were the heaviest tax messengers who spent the most time messaging actually eight reported less depression than those teams who were less frequent tax messengers so that might mean that perhaps teens are using in these online tools so like text messaging and that it's serving as a strength a source of social support for instance you as parents we do have some tools rules to establish you know parental controls over what our kids are doing and seeing is that a good answer is being oversold. This study would suggest us that parental controls are based just on time so like the number of minutes that your kid can watch netflix and then it shuts off automatically. I don't know that that's going to be you. Are magic bullet for helping kids use technology in a way that is pro social and aids in their development if the parental controls were more nuanced johnston got out. The quality of what kids are doing online. Maybe but i don't know how effective those are at this point. I think my advice for right now where the technology's -nology stands is that it's important for parents to talk to their kids and that that doing the legwork is probably a better way of making sure that your kids stay safe and using technology in a way that's helpful not harmful to them rather than relying on a new technology that we're not quite sure yet how it works. Mike lynn johnson. Listen is a clinical psychologist and research psychology at the university of north carolina at greensboro. She suggests spending time with your kids watching the youtube videos they like or you even playing fortnight with them. Yeah they'll beat you but you can ground them for dancing over your corpse and now for some related links all about screen time you can judge for yourself how much you should fred over them. The guardian reports on how many the u._k. Teens are adhering to recommended daily activity guidelines. There are three get at least eight hours of sleep exercise for at least an hour and spend less than two hours looking at screens. What percentage of teens achieve all three less than ten percent. The exercise wants the real killer how why do american teams fair. I don't know i was too afraid to look especially considering. I myself fail on each of the goals. The independent is a story. That's a fun read trade. Even if i am a little suspicious of its scientific merit a survey polled a thousand nursery workers most of them believe screens are hurting kids creativity. Here are some relevant numbers fewer than half of them report that children at their daycare's have imaginary friends and seventy two percent of nursery workers say imaginary friendship is down from five years ago. I say who needs imaginary friends anymore. Hey siri. Let's go play in the magical forest. Sorry i couldn't find in the magical forest in your music. Never mind finally the website helpline has a story that tries to correlate teenagers i- problems with increase screen usage figure they quote says thirty five percent of thirteen to sixteen year olds needed glasses last year. That's a seventy five percent increase from twenty twelve. It says kids is are more susceptible to damage from light as a possible solution. The article suggests light blocking filters. You can put on your kids devices choices. I'm jed kim and that's marketplace tech. This is a p._m. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by intercom intercom. What's more of the nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took a little chat bubble in the corner of a website and packed active with conversational bots product tours n._p._s. Surveys all sorts of things amplify your team and help you reach more nice people intercom customer unity. He got forty five percent more loyal users with entercom in just twelve months. Go to entercom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time chat then see everything else intercom can do. That's intercom dot com slash podcast.

Mike Lynn Johnson Jed Kim Greensboro University Of North Carolina Michigan P. L. Netflix Evan Lyle Youtube Rush Enterprises Assistant Professor Of Psychol Johnston Fred Molly Seventy Five Percent Seventy Two Percent
The CES tech conference aims to improve its reputation with women

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:20 min | 2 years ago

The CES tech conference aims to improve its reputation with women

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for h._r. Payroll and talent management learn more at ultimatesoftware dot com ultimate software people first and by the michigan economic development corporation john kelly founder and c._e._o. At airspace experienced technology gee says in michigan revolution is in the air find out what planet earth is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com. That's p. l. a. n. e. t. m. dot com text biggest trade. Show is trying to fix its reputation with women from american public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm ali would we're months away from cis. The huge tech trade show that draws almost two hundred thousand people to las vegas every january in two thousand twenty for the first time sex tech startups will be officially included at c._a._s. and booth babes will not the conference has been criticized for years for not including enough women in it's big events and for letting exhibitors higher scantily clad models which is something many other conferences have banned and controversy peaked last year when the consumer technology association which runs the e._s. gave an award to a female focused sex toy company and then took it away saying it was inappropriate and then gave it back. Karen chapter is executive vice president of c._a._s. At the consumer technology association i asked her if the has had a bit of a double standard around sex tech one of the things that we did after the show is we really cleaned up our inconsistencies and said look we have to really set policies it make it kind of clear as to how we want to address these things folks but also there's always going to be something that is emerging tech that we're going to have to take a look at and determine whether it's this show or next show when his best to address it in so some of that was just there had been some inconsistencies and sometimes technology gets ahead of us. The show itself is all about new emerging technologies innocence and says sometimes james things do hit our desk that we're not quite sure how to categorize or how to put together <hes> and then tell me about the decision to get rid of booth babes of both genders. I'm not sure if i would say the decision to get rid of booth babes in as much as i think it's important to say that what we've done is we've clarified and cleaned up our dress policy for c. You know i say that because exhibitors i do higher booth personnel to come in and help supplement their fulltime staff at the show. You know it's an important role for the show. It's expensive to fly staff. Members vegas insists sometimes. It's is far more cost effective to bring in professional that you can train and who's used to doing this and interacting with people throughout the day and more importantly what the big step is for twenty twenty twenty is that we've also clearly put in a penalty so that if an exhibitor does crossed the line and if we go and we address it with them on site and they don't take care of the situation that we have a way of penalizing them going forward <hes> you know there's been criticism around c._e._a._s._e. Inclusion for a long time from myself and others whether it's women you know giving.

Michigan ALI Executive Vice President Las Vegas John Kelly Founder Twenty Twenty Twenty James
To get broadband to every American, you need to know the rules in all 50 states

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:48 min | 2 years ago

To get broadband to every American, you need to know the rules in all 50 states

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by guideline over seventy. Five hundred growing businesses have chosen guideline for its modern retirement plan that automates the heavy lifting involved in offering a 4. Sign up and get your first three months free visit guideline dot com for details and by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation Evan Lyle Rush enterprises surprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it. The future of mobility is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet dot com to find out why that's P.. L. A. N. E. A._T.. Dot Com if you WANNA get broadband access to every state you gotta know the local laws from American public media yeah. This is marketplace tech demystify digital economy. I'm molly would the digital economy as we like to call it over here depends pretty heavily on access access to the Internet and that is still not a solved problem here in the United States over thirty percent of Americans don't have access to broadband Internet which is defined as twenty five megabits per second or higher. That's according to research released Tuesday by the N._p._d.. Group the Pew Charitable Trusts has an initiative should've broad-band definitions like in Alabama for example broadband speed is defined as only ten megabits per second. If your network is busy that's barely fast fast enough to stream net flicks and hi. Def Katherine dewitt manages the Broadband Research Initiative for Pew Charitable Trusts. She told me state policy is a huge deal. When it comes comes to expanding broadband access state policy matters because lack of access to broadband is a national issue but it is felt at the local level and states states have taken a pretty aggressive approach to closing gaps in access particularly over the last five years we've seen a significant uptick in legislation since two thousand fifteen eighteen <hes> and what we can take away from this is not only do state policymakers see and feel that immediate urgency <hes> lack lack of broadband access? They're saying it's important to things like education healthcare and economic developments but they're also saying this. This is what we want our state to look like they're setting goals and then they're laying out a path and a framework for how to achieve those goals. Let's just dive into some of what is in the tool. Some of the different approaches does that states are taking like. Could you give me an example two totally different approaches that states might have taken so going into this research we knew that states <hes> face similar challenges oranges and increasing access to broadband <hes> but we learned that there are also taking similar approaches but adapting them to their needs. That's really where those categories came from. Those groupings things <hes> if you look at goals for example <hes> you have states like Minnesota and West Virginia where they're statewide broadband goals are focused. I'm border to border universal coverage thing you look at a state like California <hes> that has a goal to connect ninety eight percent of the population in each one of its roughly fleet twenty regions. How do you hope that a tool like this can help close the digital divide in terms of broadband access while this tool is actually the first step in <unk> are ongoing research on how states are addressing gaps and broadband access so for us this was about understanding that fifty state landscape of broadband deployment laws ause and it provides the basis for our next level of research which is a deeper examination of how states are addressing those gaps in access. What we hope so is that <hes> users will be able to use this tool to learn what other states are doing and how they're actually doing it. Katherine dewitt manages the Broadband Research Search Initiative for the Pew Charitable Trusts. We've got a link to that new tool and some analysis about spending per state at our website marketplace tech dot Org <music> for some related links so this tool is super new obviously and Pew hopes that policymakers and local governments will jump in and start creating some more analysis and comparison and of course. They'll be publishing their own pieces. The first one that I mentioned there is about how states let's fund their broadband projects whether it's grants or loans or general fund kind of things or some creative funding apparently Illinois makes Internet service providers providers pay into a special offer called the digital divide elimination fund and it uses that to pay for broadband buildouts and in Virginia a legal settlement. Element with tobacco producers is paying to build more Internet. Look I'm not saying this isn't a little walkie over here but it is interesting. Also I gotta be honest. I'm still hung up on that ten megabits per second in Alabama and probably some other states too. I haven't made it through the entire tool yet but Alabama's regulation also says I._S._P.'s can call their upload at speeds broadband at one megabit per second so basically if you're at home trying to upload some photos to facebook or anything to the cloud ever you'd be doing that at speeds ten times slower than the slowest four G. Cell Phone connection set it and forget it because it's GonNa take all night now. The speed question is so controversial that even though Pugh is using the twenty five megabits per second speed guideline which is set by the Federal Communications Commission Network congestion usually means actual actual speeds are nowhere near that fast and again a four g phone connection is faster than that on the best providers. It is such a big discrepancy that while Pew says says twenty one million Americans don't have broadband Microsoft put out its own map of high speed Internet access back in April. It said the real number of people people without appropriately fast Internet access for today's economy is more like one hundred sixty three million in the United States alone. I'm Hollywood breath and that's marketplace tech. This is a P._M.. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Oregon State University e campus pushing the boundaries of what's possible in online education a classroom that incorporates virtual reality check faculty members using augmented reality Yup a top ranked university known for Innovation and excellence. That's them see what a twenty first century education looks like at e Campus Dot Oregon State Dot e._D._U..

Pew Charitable Trusts United States Broadband Research Initiative PEW Alabama Katherine Dewitt Michigan Oregon State University Evan Lyle Rush California Hollywood L. A. N. Illinois Facebook
Celebrating the wisdom that comes with age, in a youth-obsessed industry

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:05 min | 2 years ago

Celebrating the wisdom that comes with age, in a youth-obsessed industry

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Scout. The world's leader and service assurance and security for data centers cloud five G. and more net scouts visibility without borders allows you to see things others can't get a clearer picture at net scout dot com and and by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation John Romanelli founder and C._E._o.. At airspace experienced technology says in Michigan Revolution is in the air find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at platinum dot com. That's P. L. Hey N._e._t.. M Dot com you is celebrated in tech but what about the wisdom that comes with age from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Hollywood. In the tech industry has well known diversity issues around gender and race. It's lesser known but still huge blind spot is age google just settled more than two hundred claims of age discrimination and the complaint is becoming much more common. The average age for an American worker is forty two according to the Bureau of Labor our statistics at the biggest tech companies according to job sites and research firms. It's more like twenty five to thirty five Cate Edwards works in gaming and was head of the International Game Developers Association for several years for our series evenly distributed looking at different elements of the digital divide. She told us how she came up with a way to celebrate experienced tech workers like herself with a list so my name is Kate Edwards and I've been in the game industry for Twenty six years so I am fifty four years old. The and one of the initiatives that I've been focused on is ageism and <hes> I came up early in twenty eighteen with this idea about doing a fifty over fifty lists just on a whim and I was like why can't we celebrate age. Why can't we celebrate wisdom and experience at the advice of one of the people <hes> which I won't name but they're actually on the list <hes> they said you know you might want to contact everybody and make sure they wanna be on this list because to have their name on a fifty over fifty lists that actually could double down on the ageism that they might be experiencing because there might be people around them who don't not they're that old? I reached out to them and I asked them. Are you okay with this. And of course I was super happy because one hundred percent or just like absolutely I don't care put me on the list. I think it's awesome. There's this general stigma or this misperception that older people they they get set in their ways. They're not into learning. The thing that I find interesting is in the fiction we consume so veraciously you see older characters actors all the time they serve very important role in the hero's journey. They serve a very important role in narrative that we love you know the Oracle in the Matrix movies and tie appear from wonder woman. They served a very valuable role as a mentor tour guide. Why is it that that that same value that we place in older people is just not there in reality at that disconnect is always been really at the forefront? When I turned fifty years old it was a week before the big game developers conference in San Francisco? It's so instead of having my fiftieth birthday at home. I deferred it to the next week so our Party became partially my Fiftieth Birthday Party and I did it for. For a point because I wanted people to know that I'm fifty years old and I'm not ashamed I mean I already know I'm doubly challenged because not only am I a woman in tech also over fifty now but they want that to be emphasized and I guess in a way that was sort of a kernel that led to me eventually creating something like the fifty over fifty list that's Cate Edwards creator of the Global Gaming Industry fifty over fifty list and now for some related links a little more on that Google story which just came out this week. The company was sued in two thousand fifteen by sixty something tech worker who was denied a job at Google it later turned into a class action lawsuit. Now a judge still has to approve the settlement but court filings say Google will pay about eleven million dollars to settle claims of age discrimination from two hundred twenty seven different people Google doesn't admit any wrongdoing. The settlement says it'll have to work harder to prevent age discrimination with manager training and a new hiring committee we work was also sued for age discrimination last month as it prepares to go public the Wall Street Journal reported that it's former vice president of construction said we work quote consistently treated older employees differently than their younger colleagues and that his job was taken by someone twenty years younger and last year IBM put the brakes on an internal program called the millennial selenium core after age discrimination lawsuits used it as evidence the company could be biased toward younger worker but while the age discrimination in Employment Act of nineteen sixty seven specifically protect certain applicants and employees age forty or older. Let's acknowledge that ageism Ken also include unfair treatment of younger workers like underestimating their skills dismissing their opinions. It's something that's come up a lot more around going to say the M word here.

Google Cate Edwards Kate Edwards Michigan Michigan Economic Development John Romanelli Wall Street Journal P. L. International Game Developers Founder Bureau Of Labor Hollywood IBM KEN Oracle Vice President San Francisco Global Gaming Industry Fifty Years
The U.S. is talking, and the EU is regulating. Is any of it slowing down Big Tech?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:31 min | 2 years ago

The U.S. is talking, and the EU is regulating. Is any of it slowing down Big Tech?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation Evan Lyle of rush enterprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it. The future of mobility is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet dot com to find out why that's P.. L. A. N. Any T. DOT COM. The U._S. is talking the E._U.. Is regulating is any of it slowing down big tech from American public media. This is marketplace tech. The miss define the digital economy. I'm I'm Ali would this week's congressional. Hearings on big tech covered everything. Everything from free speech to competition to privacy to Bitcoin but they did suggest that U._S.. Lawmakers might be moving closer to some regulation to try to curb facebook Google Amazon and Apple. Meanwhile Europe up is way past the talking stage. It's big privacy law the G._D._p.. Are Is legislating data collection at U._S.. Companies and just this week that you launched a new anti-trust investigation into Amazon and find qualcomm for predatory repricing. Let's dig into the differences in approach in quality assurance the segment where we take a deeper look at big tech story. Mark Scott is chief technology correspondent with politico. We reached him at the Dublin Airport I think D._C.. Right now is playing a game of cash up so we have gone in the last eighteen months from D._C.. Washington lawmakers frankly doing nothing and saying everything's fine to frankly this week. Multiple hearings on the hill an a day of reckoning. A Big Tech so from that perspective they are moving pretty quickly is just the Europeans have been doing this for desks. The Europeans have been doing this for decades. Do you think it's been effective. Though I mean here we still are with these companies just as big the short answer is no. It's not yeah but that does not mean multibillion. Dollar fines. Don't have a role to play the way the Europeans of messed up and I'm hoping the Americans will learn from this is it's not about the fine so when facebook finding jets it's five million dollars fine. Everyone has go. That's baked in and investors care will will really matter is if the F._T._C. lawmakers on the hill and the Europeans take a meaningful look at how these companies operate and force meaningful changes in how they make money from people like you. You what do you think are the odds of that happening either from Europe or the U._S.. In the shelter I cannot be the pessimist but I think that's also not going to happen pretty because regulators and lawmakers on set up so that they are more more willing to get the headline billion dollar fine and move on what would he takes his ongoing meaningful lasting deep dive into these business models and frankly google facebook apple Amazon Vernon blank no that EH businesses better than regular many who do not have a tech background and frankly on Hilda squeak me so many struggled to really grasp what is going on what about I know this sounds crazy but what about consumer behavior ultimately is it possible people that this really could come down to competition and consumer behavior driving more change than regulators can well. This is the one thing that no one wants to talk about is the fact that we all love facebook. We all use Google Amazon prime account. The issue is Frankie. Not on both sides of the Atlantic most people still prefer tech companies even facebook to lawmakers and therefore when it comes to trust there is an issue that because we have limited contact with politicians ahead of the twenty twenty elections in states. It's just really become toxic. Mark Scott is chief technology correspondent with politico and now for some related links now. I know we just finished talking about how we don't think the government is going to take substantive steps toward regulation but maybe hold that thought the Washington Post reported Thursday that the Federal Trade Commission is considering revamping the Children's online privacy protection act better known as. COPPA it says that APPS and websites can't collect personal information about kids under the age of thirteen and it's why you're supposed to be thirteen to sign up for on line services but the F._T._C. says kids are visiting all kinds of data collecting safes like <hes> Youtube and downloading all kinds of APPs like instagram snapchat and fortnight and that it might need tougher enforcement or even new rules to deal with all that activity a bipartisan bill in the Senate would actually expand Coppa uh-huh cover kids as young as five so maybe we'll regulate after all if it's for the children seventy WHO's produces marketplace tech Eve tro is our senior producer. We got production help this week from Matt Hardy cerebral gear is our engineer. I'm Ali would would have a great weekend everyone. This is a P._M.. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Intel track tracking hundreds or even thousands of items at a time can be a little overwhelming with the right inventory tracking software by your side your.

Europe Facebook Amazon Google Mark Scott Politico ALI Technology Correspondent Michigan Washington Evan Lyle L. A. N. Washington Post Dublin Airport Intel Rush Enterprises Federal Trade Commission Matt Hardy Youtube
YouTubers, influencers and big business converge at VidCon 2019

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:14 min | 2 years ago

YouTubers, influencers and big business converge at VidCon 2019

"Hey marketplace tech listeners. Marketplace has a new podcast out now called this is uncomfortable. It's a weekly show out Thursday's about life and how many messes with it. The show looks at things like what happens when one person in a relationship has way more money than the other what happens when work is the thing that makes us cry at work and how to manage all the ways many gets in the way of our relationships shapes our identities and a lot of times defines what it means to be an adult subscribe to this is uncomfortable wherever you get your podcasts. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation Evan Lyle of rush enterprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it. The future of mobility is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet dot com to find out why. That's P. L. A. N. E. T. M. dot com. It's BITCON twenty nineteen. The Mecca for Youtubers influencers and there are many many fans from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Jed Kim in for Molly. Would masses have converged on Anaheim California for the tenth annual Vid con where Industry execs and fans they interact with their favorite influencers and of course take selfies with a giant rainbow slide barbecues glittering dream house. People vote lined up early like Valerie Ortega at seven A._M.. She says her daughter WHO's on Youtube as galaxy lunar begged to come from El Paso my daughter Dazzling Ortega is a big fan of a lot of youtubers. So she's helping to meet some important. People try to get her name out there. To <hes> Jesus Kevin Wagner live streamed from the line to Gamer platform twitch. He had thousands of dollars worth of gear strapped to his shoulder. His waist erased my main goal of doing this is a share experiences with people that maybe can't financially afford to go or if they have you know fears of planes or just have social anxiety altogether so that's why I'm trying to do most of community helped me fund this rig covering all of this for the Atlantic is Taylor Laurenz. She says instagram and Tick Tock are gaining ground on youtube among creators at the same time. Being a Youtuber is still sort of seen as a very higher status mark. If you're successful youtuber you're making a lot of money because youtube is still the only platform that offers creators direct monetization so they can run pre roll ads on their videos and get paid. You can't run pre roll ads on your instagram account or your fifteen second tick tock so it's. Harder to get money more directly. Those people have to rely on brand deals which are a little bit more volatile. What are the kinds of announcements or big things that you're going to be looking for this year? I think another interesting thing that's happening this year. BITCON is the influence of China and Chinese these companies. You have executives from Baiju ten cent. There was a big East West Forum actually held at the Mary where a bunch of ten cents executives and other Chinese executives met to figure out how they can stay claim to some of the American market and was such a big deal for the it's interesting they have this whole Morad of APPs and platforms that have reached scale in China and have hundreds of millions of users but they haven't really been able to penetrate the Western market so I think we're seeing more Chinese companies see if there are big American creators they should be working with and also what can they learn from what we have going on over here a lot of controversies these days surrounding you too. How are those things showing up here? It's funny because they're completely. Wheatley not most stories about youtube this year defined as like extremism problems with Algorithm <hes> you know leading to the proliferation of all these outright white supremacist videos getting shown teens feeds and it's funny because here there's is just none of that is very entertainment focused. It's very focused for industry professionals and brands so you have brands like chipotle lay you know Walmart coming bitcon to scout new talent and they aren't interested in the kind of Neo Nazis that are actually the trending on the platform pretty calling Taylor Lorenzo reports for the Atlantic. She says YouTube uses vid con as a space to keep pace with competitors like announcing new ways for creators to make money and now for some related links the vid con experience has already gone overseas with Vid Cons London and Australia next year it will expand to Mexico City. The Hollywood reporter quotes a bid conning. Executive says some of the top global creators have emerged from Mexico in recent years content creators will have a new way to make money announced at BITCON. The S._e._C. has qualified a new crypto currency called props. They'll allow content creators to earn Crypto for the work they do and probably usable across several APPS. You can read more about it at tech crunch and Yahoo and finally youtuber ten emotional had a rather infamous role last year with BITCON BITCON over its denying her featured Creator status that led to her skipping bitcon and announcing her own concurrent convention tennakon was not a success some have made comparisons to the disastrous fire fest well the hedge it has been unburied. Tanna is back at Bitcon this year and happily. She's got that future Creator Badge Stephanie Hughes Produces Marketplace Tech Tro is our senior producer. We had production help from Matt purdy Serb. Regather is our engineer.

Youtube Bitcon Bitcon Bitcon Dazzling Ortega China Executive Michigan Instagram Anaheim Evan Lyle Taylor Laurenz Vid Cons London Rush Enterprises Kevin Wagner Matt Purdy California Jed Kim P. L. A. N. E. T.
Bot? Or not?                          New California law requires disclosure

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:30 min | 2 years ago

Bot? Or not? New California law requires disclosure

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the michigan economic development corporation jon rahm minnelli's founder and ceo at airspace experience technology says in michigan revolution is any air find out what planet m is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com that's p l i n e t n dot com or robot overlords have arrived in california wants them to identify themselves from american public media this is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy i'm ali would today a new law goes into effect in california that would require any online chat bot that's trying to sell you something or get you to vote a certain way to disclose that it's about no pretending to be a person trying to sell you and extended warranty and customer service chat and no pretending to be a real person posting on twitter about voting in an upcoming election the la is meant to target dishonest bots but it could affect the conversations we have with companies online to jessica lee is a partner with the law firm lobe and low end advises companies companies on this law i asked her what harm the la is trying to address i think there's a concern about you know having people have all the information when they're entering into a transaction you know the the ftc the federal trade commission enforces you know truth in advertising laws this seems to me to be a law kind of in that vein so that if you're interacting was an artificially powered by whether that's you know a chat bot or on a social platform otherwise you should at least know that that entity is being powered artificially in that you're not speaking to a real person so you're not deceived so can you describe sort of like what the future vision for how we interact with spots looks like i'm you know i'm i'm imagining that it's something like this ad campaign was paid for by this particular superpac like that do you know do you imagine that we will get this disclosure upfront and are kind of future blade runner looking world i think we will and i think you'll have some creativity around how that happened a you know there'll be creative language that's used i think that'll be kind of maybe the first round of potential enforcement of this law you know what is it mean to provide clear disclosure that you're interacting with the body is it just fine to have fought somewhere in the name you say artificially empowered like what kind of creative language kenny is that you know doesn't ruin the consumer experience particular we were talking about the kind of commercial marketing side of things in terms of long term i think we're gonna get to the place where this is just normal which frankly seems kind of logical right what i guess i don't understand i i can't understand it in the sort of the twitter bots space where you're using bots to try to amplify a message and it's really part of a propaganda effort i think a lot of people were caught a little flat footed when google demonstrated for example you know and interactive speech assistant that pretended to be human when it seemed like that's just not even necessary like the people macaire right yeah and that's an interesting question i mean i think phone for now you know trying to create this transition where you still want to have the feeling of interacting with the human even though you're not think will get over that hump and everyone will get comfortable at some point you know it seems very futuristic it seems very blade runner but i don't think it's in that far distant future where were engaging with spots at whether they're you know online or over the phone or they could end up in person just to play devil's advocate is bought necessarily any better at selling me something like doesn't really matter if i bought something over the phone no pun intended a from a real person or an artificial voice well that's a great question particularly if you think about these influencers space where you're seeing a lot of a quote fake setups even from real people but there's a there's extra about have you heard a little more kayla little my tail isn't artificially empowered social media influence her i think she without for maybe two years before it was revealed she's a robot and that's part of her kind of her steak but she appears with celebrities reporting out from coach challah you know you could see her really wearing really cool outfits you know kind of the typical influencer but all kind of artificially powered and you know they're able to have our look 'em you know racially diverse in a in a soft kind of way so she's kind of racially ambiguous she could appear appeal to a lot of people and she could be put in almost any situation and so you could see kind of influence too long those lines maybe having maybe a more powerful impact on selling a lifestyle or closed or whatever she's kind of pushing at the moment jessica lee is a partner with the law firm lobe and lobe now this california law is pretty narrow so far are given that it only applies to online bots an automated accounts but at least said there's definitely a future where it could apply to robotic assistance on the phone or even humanoid robots that you interact with in public spaces humanoid robots that are that good are pretty far away i hope now before we go a correction last week on the show i spoke with marketplace reporter kimberly adams about programmatic ad targeting in the twenty twenty election she said greenpeace

Jon Rahm Minnelli Founder And Ceo Michigan Two Years
What happens if the trade war hits the tech industry?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:02 min | 2 years ago

What happens if the trade war hits the tech industry?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, Evan Lyall of rush enterprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it the future of mobility, is going to be decided right here in the state, visit planted dot com to find out why. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. What happens if the trade war hits the tech industry from American public media? This is marketplace tech. I'm Tracey Samuelson in for Molly would. The Trump administration is hearing testimony this week from businesses and industry groups affected by a pending fourth round of tariffs on Chinese imports. If an acted these tariffs would cover an additional three hundred billion dollars worth of products. Meaning nearly everything we buy from China would face a tariff that's left, some tech companies scrambling to try and shift their supply chains away from China. Others are lobbying to try and prevent the tariffs. But all face a similar question. Whether to pass the extra cost of tariffs along to consumers. Let's talk more about this in quality assurance, a segment where we take a deeper look at big tech story. See, we covers tech for the Wall Street Journal from Beijing. We talked about how tariffs will affect various consumer technology with sick. The iphone, for instance, a lot of phone parts come from China. There were some reports from J P, Morgan that said that if these terrorists take place than it would could raise the cost of an iphone of an iphone by v. Fifteen twenty percent and unclear whether apple had pass those costs and consumers but we're talking about one hundred fifty dollars increase in the price of the iphone ten if that happens so you mentioned, I phones already are there other products that we should be looking for in terms of the impact of these tears. There's a lot of component so anything that requires a computer chip might be affected. A lot of computer chips, and other components are, are manufactured out here and there's also some indirect costs that could rise because of these tariffs to for instance, stuff that an internet provider like Comcast wireless provider like AT and T buys, they need cell phone tower quit -ment. They need internet routers, and that stuff is facing tariffs to so while AT and T would be, for instance, paying those tariffs. They might raise the cost of your wireless plant because they have to pay more for that equipment. Right. And that's the choice companies face right now as their costs rise, you detectives, they have to decide whether to absorb those costs or how much they might pass on to consumers. Are we hearing anything from companies? To what they're planning to do. Cisco for instance already face a ten percent tariffs since last year. And they said, okay, ten percent we can absorb that. But once they went up to twenty five percent last year. They said we had to raise prices for some of our equipment. We just can't absorb a twenty five percent increase. A lot of people can take ten, they can't do twenty five and companies can also try and avoid the tariffs by shuffling their supply chains to bypass China altogether. What are we hearing from tech companies about their ability to do that? Yeah. Love companies have said they've already taken steps to move production to their other factories outside China. Cisco's done at Ericsson which also makes cell phone tower equipment. They've done that too, but not every company can do that. And there's some logistics involved for instance, if you wanted to move production from China to Vietnam, maybe you already have a factory there. But do you have enough workers to work at that factory? It's not easy to snap your fingers and say, we'll just move it to another country. It's going to be difficult rate, and even if they could there's going to be cost associated with that there's going to be cost. And you might not be able to manufacture a product as quickly or as well, as you did the foreign China, St. we with the Wall Street Journal next week, President Trump and Chinese president Xi Jinping will meet on the sidelines of the g twenty in Japan. Both countries are hoping to make progress after negotiations stalled last month. And now for some related links, US Trade Representative Robert lighthizer testified before Senate, and house committees this week and defended Trump's use of tariffs on Chinese goods, quote, if there's a better idea than tariffs. I'd like to hear it. He told the Senate finance committee, also fortune took a look at why analysts expect iphone production to largely remain in China, despite an offer from Foxconn which assembles the phones to move production to its facilities outside China. I'm Tracey Samuelson. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. This is Molly would host of marketplace tech the podcast, where you can hear conversations like legendary Sifi, author, William Gibson, talk about the problems created by the uneven distribution of wealth and technology, helping you think differently about the world you live in every weekday. That's marketplace tech on apple podcasts or wherever you like to download.

China Tracey Samuelson Wall Street Journal Apple AT Molly Cisco Beijing President Trump Comcast P. L. A. N. E T Michigan Economic Development Senate Finance Committee Evan Lyall Foxconn Michigan J P Rush Enterprises
Forced tech transfers happen. But how do they actually work?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:17 min | 2 years ago

Forced tech transfers happen. But how do they actually work?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by vast a global cybersecurity company trusted by over four hundred million people avast is dedicated to protect you online. So you can connect to the internet confidently avast keeping the world safe from cyber attacks. Visit them at a vast dot com. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John really founder and CEO at airspace experienced technologies landed his company in Michigan. He said it's because he believes in Michigan revolution is in the air land at 'em agrees. They're working hard to support and grow the state's mobility ecosystem with powerful matchmaking and entrepreneurial resources, the next big thing in mobility, is happening in Michigan. Find out what planet am can offer your business at planet, m dot com. That's P L A, an ET m dot com. Force technology transfers are getting a lot of attention in the US China trade talks. But how do they actually work from American public media? This is marketplace tech. I'm Tracey Samuelson in for Molly would. Here's how force tech transfer doesn't typically work usually, there's no explicit requests from a Chinese official handover this trade secret or else you cannot right here. Instead, it's murkier perhaps a verbal request for sensitive information behind closed doors as part of the government's licensing or approvals process. It's tough to say how prevalent the practice is says Naomi Wilson, she's director of policy focusing on Asia at the information technology industry council, a tech trade group. She talked about the most common ways foreign firms are pressured to part with their IP. We see a couple of most prominent ones in the cybersecurity reviewers James that the Chinese government has established which are very ambiguous, so companies are often, not entirely sure of what compliance means and they may be getting different direction, depending on. On the enforcement arm of the Chinese government that contacts them the other area where we see this is in forced partnerships with Chinese companies. So in the cloud services market, in particular, foreign companies cannot obtain licenses to operate on their own. It's the Chinese partner that obtains the license and that runs the operation under their own brand name for the US or foreign company. And so the idea is when you're required to work with a Chinese partner you're required to share how your business works with that local firm. Right. So think of it this way, essentially the force partnerships give a Chinese company, the inside track onto how the best cloud services providers in the world operate their businesses. So it's sort of like a master class in the business of cloud services. But it's. Not necessarily like here's some valuable piece of code that makes our business run. Right. They're basically learning from the experts at a much faster pace than they would be able to develop this type of business model on their own the close coordination between the foreign cloud service provider and the Chinese partner also does lend itself to circumstances where individuals may be privy to information such as intellectual property that they might not otherwise be. But I also think it's fair to say that companies take very specific and concrete measures to safeguard their intellectual property, which, of course, is the lifeblood of their business, and it seems like when companies do the math calculating maybe the cost of force tech transfer verses the opportunity that they have to operate in China. They. Often move forward with their Chinese operation. Right. And it's interesting that you bring up the cost and the potential cost of operating in China. And the potential negative cost say think companies more and more have to factor in the cost of dealing with US policies, as well as Chinese policies in the current climate. The China is an exceptionally influential and large market. And so pulling out of China completely for many companies is just not an option because it would put them at such a competitive disadvantage. Not only in China but globally. If you're not in China, you're not a recognized name brand in China than, really, what are the prospects for success in the rest of Asia Naomi Wilson with the information technology industry. Council. The Chinese government has long denied for technology transfers are problem, but this spring, it passed a foreign investment law that says foreign firms shouldn't be forced to transfer their tech to Chinese companies. It was seen as an effort to appease the US, but there are also concerns about how it will be enforced. And now for some related links. The US trade Representative did a big investigation into four second transfers in China last year. You can read their two hundred page report for a lot more information on how this happens. Also, Bloomberg put together a helpful Q and A on tech transfers a few days ago. It includes a roundup of some high profile court cases where companies have alleged. They were made to share their secrets. I'm Tracey Samuelson. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. This is Molly would host of marketplace tech the podcast, where you can hear conversations like legendary Sifi, author, William Gibson, talk about the problems created by the uneven distribution of wealth and technology, helping you think differently about the world you live in every weekday. That's marketplace tech on apple podcasts or wherever you like to download.

China United States Chinese Government Michigan Partner Tracey Samuelson Naomi Wilson Founder And Ceo Molly Michigan Economic Development Asia John Apple Official Bloomberg Director Sifi
Could a challenger to iOS and Android come from China?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:24 min | 2 years ago

Could a challenger to iOS and Android come from China?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, Evan Lyle of rush enterprises, is a big fan of Michigan as he put it the future of mobility, is going to be decided right here in the state, visit planet dot com to find out why. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. Could the mobile operating system to challenge? I o s an Android come from China from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Ali would. The Chinese electronics guy in while way is the world's second biggest smartphone manufacturer. And it suddenly finds itself without an official mobile operating system. Google is scheduled to cut off while ways access to its official version of Android as of August that follows a US ban on doing business with w-way while we says it's been working on its own mobile operating system. And meanwhile, the Chinese company bite dance, which owns the hit social network, tick tock, said it would explore launching its own custom phone with preloaded by dance apps, but many have tried to build alternatives to either Android or Apple's. I o s and so far all have failed Julius gets a principal analyst at Forrester research. She said the reason is any new mobile operating system, just doesn't have enough apps. It just takes a lot of momentum to build out an ecosystem with a developer community that's going to build enough services and apps. For your platform, or for your operating system to make the device compelling to consumers. Do you think that the way to success for a third party mobile OS developer is to sort of re imagine the ecosystem, like, for example, where we're talking about to Chinese companies. We know that integrated messaging is already huge in China, like, is it possible that, that a company could come along, and say, we're going to build a new mobile operating system. That is that's one hundred percent dependent on messaging and mobile web. So I think a company could come along and do that. And that would fit a slice of the market, and that would be a good plan. That might carry a company for the next three to five to eight years. We haven't seen that success replicated though outside of China. So it may be the right strategy for China, but I think you have to also be willing to look beyond and say, what about voice and immersive experiences. And what's next either things that are more ambient? So you think we're. For the duopoly is likely to continue until we actually transcend. Let's say smartphones completely. I think Molly. I mean we've both been in mobile long enough to remember when the center of power was in Europe and Nokia dominated the world with their Symbian operating system. So I don't think there's ever like a forever in this picture. I think absolutely. We could see the center of gravity shifts west and into Asia. And then who knows what's next this gets to my theory about the parallel tech economy in China that it could the only place that could incubate competition at that level. Really is China. And then it could depending on, you know, global relations sort of come screaming out of there like real competition to apple and Google hasn't happened yet. But could. Right. But I tell you Marley ever pretty limited perspective. Right. We've watched ten cent tried to come to the US. We've watched by do and we've watched them put beachheads out in Silicon Valley. But I haven't seen much of it yet Julie, ask as a principal. Analyst at Forrester research, while way has said it's mobile operating system should be ready to launch by twenty twenty. And now for some related links now Julius was diplomatic about whether Asia could end up producing the next great mobile operating system business insider, not so much. It's got a story with two charts showing how back in two thousand ten there were six or seven mobile operating systems, and, yes, Nokia's Symbian was by far, the most popular and nine years later, there are two and that is it. I mean, the poor windows phone didn't even make it onto either chart. That's how fast it came and went. Samsung tried to build its own s twice. Blackberry would not give up Mozilla tried with fire, FOX us, I mean, even Amazon had a go at it and jerks like me would review those phones ago. Yeah. But there's no official Instagram hap and now the thirty percent cut that apple takes from abseiled the amount of money that developers can make selling absence services on these phones pretty much. Means the app economy is here to stay as long as that's the experience. We expect on our smartphones. It's beyond an uphill climb for Weiwei way or by dance or anyone else. Now that said the economist has a story from April about yet another challenger rising in India, based on Mozilla Firefox. So s it's on fifty million or so lower. End phones in India, and Indonesia and raised all over there will appreciate this. It's called high. Oh, S. I'm Molly would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM.

China Apple United States Forrester Research Nokia Molly Asia Google Official Julius Michigan Economic Development Principal ALI P. L. A. N. E T India
Hollywood Dream Machines exhibit explores sci-fi vehicles used on screen

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:33 min | 2 years ago

Hollywood Dream Machines exhibit explores sci-fi vehicles used on screen

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini, founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. To solve the scourge of the car. Maybe we have to go back back to the future from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Jack Stewart info. Molly would. The future of causes always exciting and always just around the corner. Things like self driving cars have been five years away, for I'd say about forty years now, but there are times when pure imagination is exactly what's needed when vehicles have to be as out there as possible nearly incredible. 'cause or a big part of science fiction TV shows and movies. They're often characters themselves, and someone has to make them I went to see some of the creations of writers directors and designers at a new exhibition at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles. It's called Hollywood dream machines. And there cause from Mad Max Bladerunner and the classic Star Wars amongst others. Brian Stevens is exhibition director at the museum, and he started by explaining how a car designer works with a filmmaker in the use of vehicles in Hollywood productions. There are a number of scenarios, one of, which is the need to design a car from scratch to fulfill the vision of the producers of the directors of the film, in many. Cases though. There are pre existing cars that do just that and there's no need to design a car from scratch, and when it came time to create back to the future just so happened, that this very exotic wild stainless steel bodied car existed. In fact, was very much in the public eye. Do some lawsuits at the time which which made it a perfect option for this particular use in this particular film. Doc. Are you telling me that you built a time machine? The way I see it if you're going to build a time machine into a car, why not do it from style now that we are up close, I can see. There are a lot of wires zip ties parts that look almost unfinished. Yes. Which is deliberate in this case, the producers and directors of the film didn't want something polished, they wanted something that looked like it was handmade in a garage. So you worked with designers of some of these actually put this exhibit together. How important, did they say it is to be accurate as opposed to just be entertaining when the coming up with these visions of the future. I think it's a combination of both if you're projecting fifty years in the future. I think accuracy is, is going to be difficult to achieve, regardless of what you what you propose, but they certainly do want some level of realism when you start getting into science fiction films as opposed to Pierce to pure fantasy films. You do want there to be an element of science basis, you want there to be something that seems even somewhat. Ause -able about what you're predicting. So you have kit here, for example, from Knight rider from what the voice of industry thousands microprocessor K IT for easy reference. A can't. If you prefer, do you think that, that was fully autonomous long before most of us had heard of even the concept of self driving, 'cause it's a 'cause like that an inspiration to real engineers and real designers, I think there's no question that when today's designers were children, watching these television shows in these movies that they are even potentially subconsciously gaining inspiration from what they see. And that's probably part of why we see some of the technologies that are shown in these vehicles. Eventually become real Brian Stevens, taking us on a semi nostalgic semi futuristic, look at the cause of Hollywood at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles, fun facts. I learned from him in the early drafts of the back to the future. Script the time machine wasn't built into a cholera toll. It was built into refrigerator. I'm not sure I would have enjoyed the movie. Quite as much. And now for some related links. Check out the exhibition website if you want some inspiration for movies have been Joan this holiday. I'd forgotten how much I enjoyed some of them the Audi r s q concept from I robot made me want to watch that all over again. And I will be streaming the original Bladerunner as well as twenty four thousand nine to see that vision of Los Angeles with spinners in the dark and rainy skies in terms of making these sci-fi visions come true. The Atlantic has a great story with the headline flying cause a real and then not bad for the climate that describes the efforts to build a new type of electric flying machine that isn't a plane and isn't a helicopter but could fly building to building top skipping city traffic. And it's not just frustrated commuters who could benefit as sea levels rise coastal cities, like Miami, a going to have to go to ever greater lengths to mitigate the impacts of climate change. So we'll also link you to a court. Story about developers in that Florida city who are already designing buildings where rooftop observation decks can be converted into flying, taxi poets, if you didn't catch recent marketplace tech series on climate change at up, by the way, it's called how we survive in the podcasts are online to where we're going. Maybe we really need roads. I'm Jack Stewart. And that's today's marketplace tech. This is a PM. I'm Shepard from Lincoln Nebraska, and I listened to marketplace several times, actually every day because it's got the economic news and developments that are important to me. Donate the marketplace, so that it can be available to everyone and asked her hope. You'll join me in this effort. Thanks to join shepherd is a marketplace investor donate online. Marketplace dot org. This Mike in place podcast is brought to you by evident helping businesses create a solid foundation of trust and safety on their platforms. By seamlessly verifying workers unless time. And with more confidence evident also helps companies stay up to date on any changes to relevant information and readily adapt, if and when compliance requirements, evolve evident is bringing confidence and peace of mind, personal data interactions across the globe. Visit evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications immediately. That's evident ID dot com slash tech.

Los Angeles Petersen Automotive Museum Brian Stevens Jack Stewart Founder And Ceo Hollywood Michigan Economic Development Max Bladerunner Michigan P. L. A. N. E T John Rimini Molly Cholera Audi Bladerunner Shepherd Pierce Mike
Ethical hacker is a big and growing job

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:13 min | 2 years ago

Ethical hacker is a big and growing job

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by vast a global cybersecurity company trusted by over four hundred million people avast is dedicated to protect you online. So you can connect to the internet confidently avast keeping the world safe from cyber attacks. Visit them at a vast dot com. And rather Michigan economic Development Corporation, Evan lie. All of rush enterprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it the future of mobility, is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet dot com to find out why that's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. A job where you get to act like a criminal, but for noble causes to have a career change to ethical hacking from the American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for Molly would. So you've got your computer science degree, your coded masterful. Now an elder of the internet comes to you holding a black hat, and a white one. We'll you hack to steal and disrupt or will you work to stop the bad guys. Which will you choose in reality? The distinction isn't really that clear entered the role of the grey headed or ethical hacker. Gary Rivlin is a journalist and author of the new book becoming an ethical hacker. It's part of the masters at work guides to interesting careers riven sat down with several of the fields, top information security professionals, a quirky and fascinating bunch. He says they're out to do good. But there are practical rewards to the draw would start with the salary and the demands cyber security folks are paid even more than the typical programmer. The demand is off the charts the world last year was talking about this study that saying that there's going to be a need for more than three million cybersecurity jobs across the. Planet. Those of us who are on computers, living, our digital lives. That's frightening to anyone who wants to get into cybersecurity as profession. That's certainly good news. There always be demand in your book. You spoke with half a dozen or so cybersecurity experts. What did they tell you is the hardest part of their job to me? It's what they call the defenders dilemma as a defender you have to win every single day. The attacker only has to win once so it's a really, really stressful job because one breach, and it negates every positive day you had up until then there's a puzzle aspect. You know you need to be created. There's no off the rack solution as the cybersecurity people ethical hackers. I spoke to you have to think like a black headed hacker. You have to kind of put yourself in their shoes. How would they get into the system? To you point in your book that amongst the hackers and the cyber security experts. It's more stude- mail. Why is it important to get more women into these positions? Well, so there's this notion that you have to think like a hacker. Well, if all of the computer security, people are white men who live in the United States, that's leaving out a whole lot of people who would like to break into our systems, we just need diversity, not just as a nice goal though. It is an important goal. But just for more practical reasons I mean as bad as the numbers are for programmers, generally, like roughly twenty percent programmers, give or take a women nowadays. The underrepresentation is worse in cybersecurity, and we can do better in and we need to do better. Gary Rivlin is a journalist and author of the new book becoming an ethical hacker. All of. This might remind you of the nineteen Ninety-two film, sneakers in which Robert Redford leads a rag tag team of noble thieves. I brought up the comparison with Gary and he says, it's one of his favourite tech movies, along with war games. And now for some related links interested in reading, Gary Rivlin's book. It's fun quick read, especially if you're into heists another big takeaway, the path ethical hacker is buried and winding. There's the former journalist the child prodigy the NSA guy, the Wall Street Journal recently got a look into the security team at IBM code named x force read apparently demand in the field has grown so much so fast that, quote, his team of corporate hackers contains more music majors than graduates with security degrees, given the dearth of collegiate programs that focus on the quickly evolving field and quote turns out, you can get certified as an ethical hacker. The council offers several courses including forensic investigation and penetration testing just a heads up the final test to become a licensed penetration. Tester is eighteen hours long. E Andy news has a post mortem on the first cyber attack on the US 'electricity grid pack in March, no blackouts. Like there were in Ukraine in two thousand fifteen but the threat is real people. And finally, trust me, sneakers is not only a great film. It's practically prescient when it comes to this topic don't believe me, birth movies, death dot com. Hasn't analysis, there's the phrase, most undervalued movie of all time. I agree. I agree. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM Patrick in Santa Cruz, California wrote to us to say marketplace is an essential element in his life, and that we're helping make him smarter through high quality thought provoking and informative journalism to join Patrick, and supporting what we do. Please donate online today at marketplace dot org. Thanks to Patrick, and all the marketplace investors who make our work possible.

Gary Rivlin Jed Kim United States Patrick Michigan Economic Development Rush Enterprises Evan Robert Redford Michigan Wall Street Journal Programmer P. L. A. N. E T Santa Cruz IBM California Ukraine Molly Eighteen Hours
Startups looking for funding now have more options

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:02 min | 2 years ago

Startups looking for funding now have more options

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at platinum dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. Startups looking for funding. Have a lot more options lately from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Molly would. Venture capital firms that were invested in lift Uber. And Pinterest just got paid when those companies went public and the banks foundations and pensions that fund, the venture capital funds, we'll get a lot of money too. So, yeah, these big firms will now have more to invest and they'll get more powerful, but the venture industry is changing. There are lots more smaller players like angel investors. Usually really rich people who want to help fund companies and increasingly even everyday investors. Have more ways to get in on the next pre IPO tech unicorn, Jason Calcutta's is a tech entrepreneur and angel investor who got in on Uber when it was still a pipe dream. I asked him how VC is evolving. There are the funds that have been around for decades like sequoia, Kleiner Perkins or benchmark, and those firms have partners who may stay with them for multi decades, and they are the first stops when a founder comes to Santo road or San fr. Francisco. And then there's a new crop of angels. And I went from being essentially a nobody or somebody who was kind of annoying in the industry. This journalist entrepreneur with a big mouth and a big social media following in a podcast to now I'm the first stop were in the first two or three stops for angel investing. I'm the most successful active angel investor in Silicon Valley. So then let's talk about the industry. I mean, we know that these exit is big unicorns. Going public is important for the firms that have funded them and the angel investors that funded them, and how might that money then get funneled back into new startups. Like how important is it to that future person with a PowerPoint injury? It's critically important. I'm in Bolden. Now, having had a couple of grade exits to put more money into my own funds, and put more money to work. So that is a specific phenomenon that occurs, which then benefits the next generation of founders, and we saw that with people who made a lot of money off of Google than invested in Facebook and Twitter, the Facebook and Twitter. Folks, obviously invested in Airbnb and Uber. Yep. One complaint. I have heard actually about venture capital right now is that there's a lot of the same money going into the same big companies and there's maybe not as much diversity. Is it possible that the inflow of money could change that dynamic, and introduce some more innovative investing the venture firms have raised bigger and bigger funds? So the VC's are looking for companies that have a lot more traction, a lot more revenue fuller management teams. So the world's changed the markets are much more efficient, but they're private and this is where the SEC and the investment rules for private companies have to evolve, and we're starting to see that with equity crowdfunding where civilians non accredited investors people with under a million in net worth under two hundred thousand a year in income are being able to write small checks through platforms like Sede invest and Republic. So that's going to be I think the future. And that process is just starting. Ng Jason Kao. Kansas is a tech entrepreneur and angel investor as the number of angel and nontraditional investors in the US has increased. So has the percentage of female investors from five percent in two thousand and four two more like twenty six percent as of two thousand sixteen. And now for some related links. There's a link to a story in entrepreneur magazine on our website marketplace tech dot org. It has the data I mentioned about female angel investors, and actually Alex Conrad over at Forbes, who's also very funny on Twitter has a good piece about how Facebook and its soaring stock over the years has produced a new generation of investors like Jason Calcutta's was talking about, and in fact, lots of them are women who are funding women run businesses who then hire women who might get big payouts if their companies go public or get sold and then might also turn around and become more diverse investors. However, I am definitely aware that a lot of times when we talk about diversity in venture capital. We're talking about adding more white women, so to that effect. There's a good story in fast company about an organization called pipeline angels. It's a boot camp for would be angel investors, and it focuses primarily on. Inclusively meaning, people of color, women non binary end geography. It has training cohorts in Montana. Idaho, Ohio Texas, North Dakota and Minnesota among others. I'm Molly would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by evident helping businesses create a solid foundation of trust and safety on their platforms. By seamlessly verifying workers unless time. And with more confidence evident also helps companies stay up to date on any changes to relevant information and readily adapt, if and when compliance requirements of all evident is bringing confidence in peace of mind, personal data interactions across the globe. Visit evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications immediately. That's evident ID dot com slash tech.

Twitter Facebook Jason Calcutta Molly Founder And Ceo Founder Entrepreneur Magazine Michigan Economic Development John Rimini Airbnb Jason Kao Michigan Silicon Valley P. L. A. N. E T SEC Pinterest Sequoia
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on WLAC

"Michigan economic Development Corporation. You don't often find the words business and friendly in the same sentence. Let alone the same state. Learn about the best state to start or grow your business at Michigan business dot org. Walk into a hotel lobby, and you may notice something unexpected people not people checking in or waiting for someone to arrive or hustling to the elevator. No, people sitting working and socializing in the past handful of years hotels have started to create lobbies and common spaces that are a destination in themselves for both guests and locals. It's a story by Tullia Minzberg at the New York Times tell you what's up here. One thing. A lot of hotels have said that the reason they want to open their spaces to local than people who are traveling and working as an energetic hotel is a more exciting hotel, if you walk into hotel lobby and you see a lot of people working there. It's a cool place to be. So they say it's great for word of mouth, if you're working in a hotel that you've become a fan of you're more likely to tell a family or friend who's coming to visit that it's a great hotel, the STAN, and it also does help at some point to the bottom line. You know, a lot of people are spending an hour two here. They're they're probably buying a copy, maybe buying a sandwich. But it's all about getting a really energetic feeling in hotel lobbies and an hotel common spaces that previously. It was it was just not there are hotels. Like, I dunno marketing themselves are dressing things up to make it a friend the say community workspace or one of the first things that the ace hotel and New York City that is put outlets everywhere, which sounds like a really little thing. But if you walk into a coffee shop. You can tell really quickly whether they're places they want you in our out or places that want you to stick around and work. You can't find an outlet. There's a good chance. They don't want you there for more than an hour. But at the hotel, you could find outlets everywhere. There are long tables with lots of different shares. There's some good light there about the comfy places to sit. It's it's everybody spoke with said, it was a combination of of the right furniture at the right lighting. And everyone's at outlets. No kidding. Is. It's happening at mostly high end hotels, not necessarily. I mean, I think to some extent hotels are kind of acting like hostels in the way in which they wanna create common spaces that people want to spend time in. But I would say the brand they spoke with are looking to attract both business travelers and locals who are maybe artists are are freelancers. So the hotels that I would point to are the hotels by Marriott. There's a very interesting hotel called. Zocor in Amsterdam that is focusing on creating a space for freelancers and artists not only those who are traveling and those were staying at the hotel. But those who actually they created a space for people who co worker actually lived there for a month or months at a time. So it's it's all across the board in terms of different hotels takes bake brand, small bands, fancier, less less fancy about that. We're speaking with tall. You Mincberg senior editor of special projects at the New York Times. She's written a piece about how hotels have started to turn their lobbies and common areas into lick we work gathering places attracting, both guests and locals speaking of we work, do they feel competition here. That's a good question. I would say I wouldn't expect they feel too much competition. We work as a as a massive company. They have spaces all around the world. I feel like the hotels that are doing this. They wanted just create another space for fans of co working to sit down and get some work. Done. I wouldn't necessarily think we work is is a feeling really threatened. The thing about we work that hotels. Can't guarantee is we were you can reserve desk space conference rooms at some hotels. They actually are moving more towards we work in that some hotels are creating spaces that you can reserve a phone booth. Are you can reserve a meeting room? Of course, that's not free. They do charge for those services, generally, speaking sitting in the lobby free. Okay. What about keeping out say the riffraff? That's not actually an issue that anyone has ever spoken about. They say they want people to come in. If they if they buy a coffee or sandwich. Great if not, hey, it's a freeze base to get some work done their bathrooms that that's another thing. People mentioned that it makes it a little more of a welcoming space if you know, there's the restroom nearby Mincberg at the New York Times thirty minutes after the hour on this weekend. MS RPM invoice list price dealer price, Toby Knapp here, if your car shopping, you've probably heard these terms, but what do they mean? It's so confusing. It was confusing. Not anymore me.

New York Times Michigan Toby Knapp Tullia Minzberg New York City economic Development Corporati Mincberg Amsterdam senior editor thirty minutes
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"To you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation. You don't often find the words business and friendly in the same sentence. Let alone the same state. Learn about the best state to start or grow your business at Michigan business dot org. Walk into a hotel lobby, and you may notice something unexpected people not people checking in or waiting for someone to arrive or hustling to the elevator. No, people sitting working socializing in the past handful of years hotels have started to create lobbies and common spaces that are a destination in themselves for both guests and locals. It's a story by Tullia Minzberg at the New York Times tell you what's up here per one thing. A lot of hotels have said that the reason they want to open their spaces to local than people who are traveling and working as an energetic hotel is a more exciting hotel, if you walk into hotel lobby, and and you see a lot of people working there. It's a cool place to be. So they say it's great for word of mouth, if you're working in a hotel the. Become a fan of you're more likely to tell a family or friend who's coming to visit that it's a great hotel the stand, and it also does help at some point to the bottom line. You know, a lot of people are spending an hour to here. They're they're probably buying a copy navy buying a sandwich. But it's all about getting a really an energetic feeling in hotel lobbies and hotel common spaces that previously. Was it was just not there are hotels like, I don't know. No marketing themselves are dressing things up to make it a friend the say community workspace or one of the first things that the ace hotel in New York City that is put outlets everywhere, which sounds like a really little thing. But if you walk into a coffee shop, you can tell really quickly whether they're places they want you in our out or places, they want you to stick around and work. You can't find an outlet. There's a good chance. They don't want you there for more than an hour. But at the hotel, you can find outlets everywhere. There are long tables with lots of different shares. There's some good light there. Lots of comfy places to sit. It's it's everyone. I spoke with said it was a combination of of the right furniture at the right lighting. And everyone's at outlets kidding is. It's happening. It's mostly high end hotels, not necessarily. I mean, I think to some extent hotel are kind of acting like hostile than the way in which they wanna create common spaces that people want to spend time in, but I would say the the. Brands. I spoke with are looking to attract both business travelers and locals who are maybe artists are freelancers. So the hotel that I would point to are the AC hotels by Marriott. There's a very interesting hotel called Zocor in Amsterdam that is focusing on creating space for freelancers and artists not only those who are traveling and those were staying at the hotel. But those who actually they created a space for people who coach actually live there for a month or months at a time. So it's it's all across the board in terms of different hotels teak baked brand small brands fancier less less fancy about that. We're speaking with Paul Yemen's Burke, senior editor of special projects at the New York Times piece about how hotels have started to turn their lobbies and common areas into lake we work gathering places attracting, both guests and locals speaking of we work, do they feel competition here. That's a good question. I would say I wouldn't expect they feel too much competition. We work as a as a massive company. They have spaces all around the world. I feel like the hotels that are doing this. They wanted to create another space for fans of co working to sit down and get some work done. I wouldn't necessarily think we work is is a feeling really threatened. The thing about we worked at hotels. Can't guarantee is we were you can reserve desk space conference rooms at some hotel. They actually are moving more towards we work in that some hotels are creating spaces that you can reserve a phone booth there. You can reserve a meeting room. Of course, that's not free. They do charge for those services, generally, speaking, sitting in the lobby free, no cost. What about keeping out say the riffraff? That's not actually an issue that anyone has ever spoken about. They say they want people to come in. If they if they buy a coffee or sandwich. Great if not, hey at the freeze base to get some work done their bathrooms. That's another thing. People mentioned it makes it a little more welcoming space if you know was the restroom nearby. Mincberg at the New York Times thirty minutes after the hour on this weekend. Hey,.

New York Times Michigan economic Development New York City Michigan Tullia Minzberg Amsterdam senior editor Paul Yemen Burke thirty minutes
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"You by the Michigan economic Development Corporation. You don't often find the words business and friendly in the same sentence. Let alone the same state learned about the best state to start or grow your business at Michigan business dot org. Google home and Amazon echo speakers do not run paid advertising. So brands like HBO Proctor and gamble tied. And oral B have approached the devices in two ways, the New York Times says some are trying to crack the code on search results and make sure that their products are mentioned. I when users say they want to buy a specific item. Others creating games that entertain people or tools that provide some sort of service like directions for how to get a Weinstein of clothes in order to build loyalty or name recognition analysis from rob Enderle principal and founder of the Enderle group. Rob what's happening here. Well, so what's happening is a lot of folks bigger a lot of companies. Gigabits twenty two million things a bucket at they're supposed to be fifty percent of the households by twenty twenty two that maybe we things stuff now Amazon's really interested in following me thing, but what happens on cells and mostly they're focused of allowing you to order stuff up by. When you need it. So far they haven't pivoted advertising Google, they're not gonna advertising any either. But I kind of believe that at some point they probably and Schuylkill baked buddy. Bottle. But what they're trying to do is figure out ways to interject the product in things you outs for this initially. So if you wanna ask for tattoo removal. Purpose gained for people clothing. You might get it by tells you how do you hide to remove that stain? Also, they are using it to help you better integrate with the product you have which makes more sense to be long-term all be has an app that you can load or a skill. You can load on an echo device, the pines your toothbrush and to make sure you brush long enough. I every quadrant. The way too high the offload from the things more expensive electric toothbrush did invite help you brush properly, which I think you're probably a way to use a devising act. You back with the brand that your product. And of course, as we get these this marketability, the article talks about the fact part speakers, but hopefully figures pasta Monday, it has Alexa built and so I'll be able to talk to get recommendations. And maybe quake, meet a certain restaurants chain. Over others based on the relationship at the app has with friends. Rather than pointing towards the pop up alibi towards a bowel or something along those lines. But my hope forces that will learn about actually like tacos more coffee to either one. Place like Mexico Paco. We're speaking with tech analyst, rob Enderle principal and founder of the tech advisory firm, the Enderle group, and we're talking about marketing through smart speakers these things basically used for simple task right? Order me paper towels out of paper towels how complicated though, will they get based on some of the examples you've given so far. Well. Recently smarter. So I mean, I was actually watching I show Amazon. Hi. Show. I think it was a big electric dreams us series, which they created just four crime in one of the episodes feature. Smart speakers for you were were really have apps, which was scary. But the ads rendered three d abattoir. I am. That's what sold to part of. It was the fact that you guys figured out that the avatar for cheese was a gorgeous woman who had talked you weren't with you. Great guys wife was fought Aubanel part. That was connected with popcorn. So those coffee with the copy, and it was a, you know, a Eurasian male, very handsome, and she was hanging out with him. And did what hang our husbands anymore? But he was basically that selling copy open, the cupboard all this. Fair was with the brand not with the person. The future about nature that the future. I want. The. The articles to make is the fact that. As the ball back may become advertising platforms at the wake recipe. They just wanted to be a storefront if it's gonna be added to the app for something that they're selling for what you what Luke Wilson by the off off of off of advertising, more, blah. They're much more likely than the pivot that way because the model thanks rob tech analyst rob Enderle at the end early group. It is twenty two minutes now after the hour on this weekend. When a.

rob Enderle Amazon Enderle group Google analyst principal Michigan economic Development founder New York Times HBO Proctor Michigan Luke Wilson Alexa Mexico Paco Weinstein twenty twenty Aubanel twenty two minutes fifty percent
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Com. Sponsored by the Michigan economic Development Corporation. David Beckham post on his Instagram account, a lovely picture of he and his daughter. She's like six years old kissing each other on the little pack a little at a ice skating rinks, and boy, it's just been inundated and people are getting like psychoanalytical about this Piers Morgan. Says that he said it's a bit weird. And he thinks that come just did it because everyone be talking about it. Well, I guess we are talking about it. Others said this is just a father showing affection for his child. And he's a good dad. What do you think? Triple eight six thirty W A L how about Jack in Alexandria, Jack. You're on wwl. Hey, hey, Larry, how you doing? I'm good. What do you say on this? Well, first of all I want to save his we have three kids my wife, and I never kissed her kids on the mouth always on the cheek or the forehead our when I heard you starting to talk about this and brought back my childhood my grandparents came for eastern Europe. And my don't cousins the men and women would kiss each other on the lips all the time and the Russian from Russia is common all men kiss each other on the lips all the time. Obviously sexual at all. But that's just the culture. And I still go home. And does cousins I grew up with you know, the men women just kit. He lifts when they say Hello, and hug, and and again, my wife, and I never did that. But I just thought kind of maybe it's a cultural thing. And maybe this is more of a European thing that we're seeing. Yeah. Yeah. And of course, if you have a talion family members, the kiss you on the lips Jackie pretty much. You're not long for this world. You got you're gonna be swimming with the fishes it's going to be ugly. Jack, a good perspective. I appreciate it. How about Tony Frederick? Tony. You're next up on wwl. Yeah. Hey, how's it going good? What do you think about this a big controversy here? What about if it's not the adult kissing the child, but it's the child kissing the adult because when my kids were little when they go to give me a good night kiss. They would grab my wish my cheek and kiss me on the lips all three of them. Did that until they were about ten years old and decided it wasn't fair to kiss mom? You know, I wonder do you think that I would guess Tony that people would look at that and say well a child doesn't do that on their own. They learned it because you as the mom started doing it. I. Yeah. No. When the kids were like two three years old. I would you know face and make them laugh, right? Yeah. I think it's a great point is how do we know? It's not the child yearning for affection from their parent doing this. And what's wrong with that Peter in Woodbridge are Peter Peter is on tape side on this on her take. What do you think? Peter Peter creates very creepy. It's it's certainly I agree that your kids will tell you when it's it's no longer could. But I'll tell you what it it's it's it's one step away from Michael Jackson sleeping with little boys. Really? You really think it's that bad. I think it's creepy. I listen, I can't convince you otherwise terrier Peter excuse me. I just wanted to get your voice out. There's a Peter thinks it's creepy. It's right up there with I mean, I guess the difference. Here is Michael Jackson was sleeping with little boys. Who weren't his children? You know, and they weren't necessarily always little boys. They were like, you know, adolescent. All right. How about Terry and Leesburg, Terry? You are on WMA. Hey, thanks so much. You bet I think it's more of a personal thing. I mean, it takes two to do the kid thing thing. And when you know, the other person has to accept it and the other I person's giving there has to be an Accenture. And you know, my daughter was never a big cancer. Periods is more of a hugger, but my son is a kiss her, and he kissed his kisses me on the list, sometimes, and you know, I never really gave it much thought grandmother was a was more of a one grandmother was a no kissing on the list, and the other grandmother was,.

Peter Peter Piers Morgan Jack Tony Frederick Michael Jackson Larry David Beckham Russia Michigan economic Development Instagram Accenture Terry Europe Jackie Alexandria Leesburg Woodbridge eight six thirty W two three years six years
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KTOK

"And it's brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation. You don't often find the words business and friendly in the same sentence. Let alone the same state. Learn about the best state to start or grow your business at Michigan business dot org. Experts say that workplace bullying is disturbingly common. A big part of the problem is that there are very few places bullied and harassed employees can turn to for help. How to employees fight back, especially if the human resources department may not have your best interests in mind. Here's market watch. Reporter Jacob Passi. Jacob set this up over the past year. There've been lots of stories in the wake of the metoo movement about different high profile people who have bullied or sexually harassed their workers or permitted there. You know, their staff to harass harasser are bullied each other. And you know, one of the questions that rises in these. Who do you go to and you know, kind of the default thought is to go to HR human resources. They're there to help you with any of the questions you have regarding workplace issues. So, you know, it might seem like the best place to go to in a situation like this. But worker advocates I spoke with painted kind of a mixed picture HR is there to really support management and to support the company itself in many cases, and they're not necessarily there. You know, support the workers and protect the workers in the same way in that obviously varies from company the company, but, but you know, the kind of rule of thumb that that I got was that, you know, you shouldn't necessarily go to HR expecting them to solve the issue for you. Boy, that's a scary scenario. So what's an employee to do? Yeah. So one thing that that, you know, it's always helpful in a case like this with.

Jacob Passi Michigan economic Development workplace bullying Michigan Reporter
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Michigan economic Development Corporation. You don't often find the words business and friendly in the same sentence. Let alone the same state. Learn about the best date to start or grow your business at Michigan business dot org. There seems to be a Grinch like approach to companies and their annual holiday parties this year. Here's this weekend's Jennifer Kushinka, if you're expecting a big holiday bash at your company this year because the economy's doing well think again, we're speaking with marketwatch's Andrew Andrew what percentage of companies are planning parties. What does it look like now right now it's about sixty five percent of companies in. That's according to a survey of about one hundred and fifty HR reps from you know, from one hundred fifty companies and how different is that from years past. That is definitely down. It looks to be that it was about. Hovering around seventy five percent or seventy five percent back in two thousand and sixteen. The lowest was sixty two percent. And that was two thousand and nine, you know, right? When everyone was struggling with the great recession. So Andrew, what's the story? Why are some companies shying away from holiday parties? It's not exactly one hundred percent clear, but the people doing the survey have a good guests that a lot of it has to do with the metoo movement and concerns from companies about, you know, throwing parties where there's alcohol and in in creating situations where you know, workers exposing themselves to sexual misconduct that sort of thing alcohol certainly had spin around at these parties for quite a while says it really were there. Some underlying other problems with alcohol, it's not clear at least from this. Because the the number of people the number of companies that say, they're still. They're still having parties. You know, they're not cutting back on alcohol intact did many of the companies who are still hanging onto the parties. This year are actually increasing their budget for the parties in none are reducing their budget. So it's not quite clear. We're speaking with market watches. Andrew Kastner, Andrew there's some other stories or other reasons cited in your story for why some companies are not having holiday parties, including the fact that a lot of work forces are spread around. How's that affecting things? It's not really fun to have a soiree via Skype. You know, everyone's all, you know, telecommuting from various places it's tough to wrangle everyone together into one place at one time in another reason that they that that the survey is thinking about is maybe parties at another time of year. And this is my speculation. Maybe they're hoping to just get a better deal on a on a venue not in holiday. Season. Who knows? What does the economy has an effect on these parties are our companies not wanting to spend money right now. Well, you would think maybe they'd be a little bit more easier with the cash because it's, you know, by a lot of measures a really good economy right now, you know, it's been a bull market for nine years. Unemployment is low. We're about a almost a year or so into the implementation of a tax cut at the federal level that, you know, would you would think would be reaping a lot of tax savings for companies. So you'd think they'd be willing to pony up. Andrew we've heard a lot of stories about behavior gone awry because of alcohol or other reasons or flirting or inappropriate relationships or whatever, but what are some of the benefits of having a holiday party. The benefit one of the biggest things that that that the survey definitely points to is just getting getting your co workers together, and you know, sort of that team building exercise of just kind of being together and building those relationships has as a team, you don't when it goes all well, and there's no, you know, alcohol fueled shenanigans or something like that. But in in at its best, it's meant to build that cohesion. Marketwatch reporter, Andrew Kashmir with this. Weekend's Jennifer Kushinka, it is thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend..

Andrew Andrew Jennifer Kushinka Michigan Andrew Kashmir Andrew Kastner marketwatch economic Development Corporati reporter seventy five percent one hundred percent sixty five percent sixty two percent thirty minutes nine years fifty HR
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on KTRH

"The Michigan economic Development Corporation. You don't often find the words business and friendly in the same sentence. Let alone the same state. Learn about the best date to start or grow your business at Michigan business dot org. There seems to be a Grinch like approach to companies and their annual holiday parties this year. Here's this weekend's Jennifer Kushinka, if you're expecting a big holiday bash at your company this year because the economy's doing well think again, we're speaking with marketwatch's Andrew cash, Andrew what percentage of companies are planning parties. What does it look like now right now it's about sixty five percent of companies and not Cording to a survey of about one hundred and fifty HR reps from you know, from one hundred fifty companies. And how different is that from years past that is definitely down. It looks to be that it was about hovering around seventy five percent or seventy five percent back in two thousand and sixteen. The lowest was sixty two percent. And that was in two thousand and nine, you know, right? When everyone was struggling with the great recession. So Andrew, what's the story? Why are some companies shying away from holiday parties? Not exactly one hundred percent clear, but the people doing the survey have a good guess that a lot of it has to do with the metoo movement and concerns from companies about, you know, throwing parties where there's alcohol and in creating situations where you know workers exposing themselves to sexual misconduct. That sort of thing to alcohol certainly head spin around at these parties for quite a while says it really or were there some underlying other problems with alcohol, it's not clear at least from this. Because the the number of people the number of companies that say they're still they're still having parties, you know, they're not cutting back on alcohol intact did many of the companies who are still hanging onto the parties. This year are actually increasing their budget for the parties, and none are reducing their budget. So it's not quite clear. We're speaking with marketwatch's enter cash, Andrew there's some other stories or other reasons cited in your story for why some companies are not having holiday parties, including the fact that a lot of work forces are spread around. How's that affecting things? It's not really fun a soiree via Skype. Be you know, everyone's all, you know, telecommuting from various places it's stuff to wrangle everyone together. Into one place at one time in another reason that they that that survey is thinking about is maybe parties at another time of year. And this is my speculation. Maybe they're hoping to just get a better deal on a on a venue. You know, not in holiday season who knows and what does the economy happen effect on these parties are our companies not wanting to spend money right now. Well, you would think maybe they'd be a little bit more easier with the cash because it's you know, by a lot of measures a really good economy right now. You know, it's been a bull market for nine years. Unemployment is low. We're about almost a year or so into the implementation of tax cuts at the federal level that, you know, would you would think would be reaping a lot of tax savings for companies. So you'd think they'd be willing to pony up. Andrew you've heard a lot of stories about behavior gone awry because of alcohol or other reasons or flirting or inappropriate relationships or whatever, but what are some of the benefits of having a holiday party? I guess the benefit one of the biggest things that that that the survey definitely points to is just getting getting your co workers together, and you know, sort of that team building exercise of just kind of being together in building those relationships as as a team, you don't want it goes all well, and there's no, you know, alcohol fueled shenanigans or something like that. But in at its best it's meant to build that cohesion. That is market watch reporter, Andrew Kashmir with this. Weekend's Jennifer Kushinka, it is thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend..

Andrew marketwatch Jennifer Kushinka Andrew cash Michigan economic Development Andrew Kashmir Michigan Cording reporter seventy five percent one hundred percent sixty five percent sixty two percent thirty minutes nine years fifty HR
"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"michigan economic development corporation" Discussed on WJR 760

"Teams in Detroit Too. Well, you tell me it helps the entire state huge deal not only for Detroit's tourism. But for the entire state, and you know, people love to towns with great sports teams. But they like to experience the entire state the entire region as well. So when alliance are doing well the tourism industry is doing well same thing with tiger season pistons Red Wings, I love them all but I'm a big fan. But I'm really hoping that they all win well too. Well. Give me a wrap up on on. What's going to happen here with the with the leaders from around the state talk about well, you know, people looked at pure Michigan as leading the tourism effort in Michigan, and we certainly play our role, but it's the convention visitors bureaus all around the state the local tourism offices that really makes so much happen. So it's a team effort between the state local effort as well. And I'm very appreciative for all that they do because they help your community look better, and they help your community be more successful. So there are jobs for your kids and grandkids. And that's really what it's all about. Okay. I'm gonna leave with a personal question you for asking. Well, we got together as race coming up and who knows who's going to win. Are you going to have to reapply for your job? Well, see, I'm not a political appointee. I'm just a regular at will employees. So I worked for the Michigan economic Development Corporation eventually worked for the people of Michigan. And whoever the administrator is I try to work for them as well. So you've always. Yes. Yes. Whoever the governor is they'll be my boss, but you know, at the end of the day I worked for the people in Michigan. So when you work hard for us. Thank you. Good. See you Dave Lawrence from travel. Michigan eight and by the way, your trip begins at Michigan dot org. It does indeed all the time..

Michigan Michigan economic Development Detroit Dave Lawrence administrator