23 Burst results for "Michelle Wiley"

"michelle wiley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:53 min | 2 months ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Good morning, it's been a year since Haitian migrants were a corral under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas by border patrol agents on horses. Some are still looking for safety and accountability for how they were treated. The images sparked outcry. There is no justification for the actions of some of our personnel, including unprofessional, deeply offensive conduct. I'm Michael hill, it's morning edition from NPR and WNYC. The leaders of China and Russia meet today to talk regional security in the invasion of Ukraine as drug deaths in the U.S. crime public health experts look at how Canada handles harm reduction. And when it comes to masking on the subway, governor hochul says do what you feel, but some say you do you is not the right messaging. It's Thursday, September 15th, the news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington on corva Coleman, President Biden says there is a tentative agreement between national freight railroads and unionized workers, it averts a potential strike that could have happened at midnight tonight. The tentative agreement provides a 24% wage increase over 5 years, but it's not clear how differences on work schedules have been resolved. And beers David schaeffer tells us the schedules sometimes penalize rail workers for taking sick leave over time for family needs. Some of them also felt punished when they would have to take time off for doctor's appointments or if a family emergency came up a couple of the railroads were using this kind of complicated point system in which you would be docked points whenever you had to take a day off and it could be pretty devastating to some real way workers because they ended up losing all of their points and that could be grounds for firing at some point. NPR's David schaeffer reporting, negotiators for both sides reached the tentative agreement overnight after working at the bargaining table for about 20 hours. The temporary strike of some 15,000 nurses in Minnesota has just ended. Nurses with the Minnesota nurses association walked off the job Monday over contract talks from Minnesota public radio, Michelle Wiley reports. The strike which impacted 15 hospitals in the twin cities in northern Minnesota area was set to last just three days, according to an earlier union vote. M and a president Mary Turner says that while she can't be sure of the strike's impact on negotiations, their actions are inspiring others. We are the ones that are showing all the workers all across America. How it is to fight. And what it means to stand up for your contracts, but not only that, stand up for the working people of America. In statements Wednesday night, officials representing several impacted hospitals said they're looking forward to returning to the bargaining table. For NPR news, I'm Michelle Wiley in Minneapolis. Russian forces continue to attack critical infrastructure in Ukraine, as NPR's Ashley westerman reports missile attacks this week struck a dam in the central part of the country, resulting in flood damage to over 100 homes. Russian missiles lobbed at the central Ukrainian city of krivi on Wednesday struck the caraccio nav reservoir dam, destroying a water pumping station officials say. As a result, the in Hulu's river broke through the dam, flooding over 100 homes and threatening the city's water supply. The institute for the study of war, a Washington based think tank says the river rose over 8 feet and that Russia was likely trying to destroy bridges further downstream to disrupt the southern counteroffensive inheritance region. Local officials say the waters have started to recede and repairs to the dam are ongoing. President Vladimir zelensky's hometown in a video address early Thursday, he said the water system there had no military value. Ashley westerman NPR news Kyiv. To NPR news, from Washington. On WNYC in New York at 8 O four, a good Thursday morning at Michael hill. 66 in sunny right now, 72 for a high today and sunny as well. In the news, his city's police watchdog agency could now investigate allegations of bias based policing, racial profiling, and improper use of body cameras. The civilian complaint review board voted to expand the scope of incident investigations at its monthly board meeting yesterday. Here is board share, arbor rice. The motion is passed, the rules are now approved. The CCRB reviews officers actions when they are accused of breaking the rules, but only for some types of behavior like excessive force, the updated rules add to the list of policy violations they can look for. They also allow the group to open investigations even when no one has filed a complaint. Jersey City is taking back control of its public schools from the state, the state board of education voted to allow the move yesterday more than 30 years after taking control, advocates say will give more power to those most interested and invested in the district's successors that is, Jersey City residents. It's the third district granted local control under governor Phil Murphy. It follows Newark and Patterson. And speaking of New Jersey's governor, he will nominate Douglas officially to New Jersey Supreme Court, officially is a union county Republican. It has been a judge in the state's court system for 18 years. I wish my parents were. Alive. To witness this moment. The nomination paves the way for Murphy's prior in nominee for a separate open Supreme Court seat, Rachel wehner after to get a Senate hearing. The democratic governor initially nominated her 18 months ago, but her confirmation has been held up by a Senate Republican due to a dispute over the court's partisan makeup. New Jersey has a tradition of keeping the court balanced between the two major parties if confirmed for Charlie will fill the vacancy left by faustino Fernández vina, who retired 7 months ago. The mother of three children found dead on the shore at Coney Island earlier this week has been arrested. Police are charging her with three murder counts after the city's medical examiner's office ruled the deaths of her children as homicides by drowning. 66 in sunny today, sunny and the revised forecast now says the high in the city will be 72 and then tomorrow sunny and 75 back to the 80s on the weekend with sunshine. It's 8 O 7. Support for NPR comes from Progressive Insurance with snapshot, a personalized program that bases rates on safe driving habits, a progressive dot com, not available in California and North

NPR news David schaeffer Michelle Wiley NPR Ashley westerman governor hochul corva Coleman WNYC Minnesota Minnesota nurses association Mary Turner Michael hill Ukraine U.S. Washington krivi Del Rio reservoir dam Russia
"michelle wiley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 2 months ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Resolution after these three days after it's supposed to be over? You know, this came up at a press conference on Monday with the union president Mary Turner and this is what she had to say. The strike ends at 7 a.m. and we continue in our contract fight. If you're going to ask for strategy beyond these three days, that we have to go back as a group to figure out. I think what this has shown is that the nurses are willing to take this step, you know, what sort of unique about this strike is union officials told me that they don't have a traditional strike fund. So folks out this week are unpaid. And that just shows that they're really serious about the issues that they've raised and are willing to walk out without pay over them. That's Michelle Wiley from Minnesota public radio telling us about the nurses strike in Minnesota Michelle thanks. Thank you. When I was filling up the car last weekend, I noticed the price for gas was well under $4, meaning considerably below the summer peak at some gas stations in this country it's gone below $3 and falling gas prices will likely be part of an improving inflation rate when the government gives an update on consumer prices today. But many months of high energy prices have left millions of Americans behind on another expense, their utility bills, NPR Scott horsley reports. There's not much shade where Bernice Brown lives in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, she tries to stay indoors during the hottest time of the day, and she's grateful for her central air conditioning. The heat here is horrible. And pretty much the houses are just sitting baking. Brown's electricity bill is no laughing matter. In both July and August, she paid about $400 for power. It's been damaging to be honest. Utility bills across the country have jumped sharply in recent months, largely because the soaring cost of natural gas, which is used to generate nearly 40% of the nation's electricity. The rising price of power has been compounded by hotter than usual summer weather, which is kept air conditioners working overtime. It was one heat wave after another, which of course families need to use. Air conditioning, the stay safe. Mark wolf runs a trade group for officials who help low income families pay their power bills. The group estimates the average family paid about $600

Mary Turner Michelle Wiley Minnesota Scott horsley Bernice Brown Michelle Tuscaloosa Alabama Brown Mark wolf
"michelle wiley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:56 min | 3 months ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Kids are facing another school year in the shadow of the pandemic. We tag along with students in Jackson, Mississippi, on the next morning edition from NPR news. Tomorrow morning at 5 on 90.1 WAB. Live from NPR news and Culver City California, I'm Dwayne Brown. After President Biden recovered from a rebound case of COVID-19, The White House says First Lady Jill Biden has now tested positive for the coronavirus. Like her husband, the 71 year old First Lady is double vaccinated and boosted and says she's only experiencing mild symptoms. In PR's Windsor Johnston has more. The First Lady will self isolate at a private residence in South Carolina for at least the next 5 days. White House doctors say Biden began to develop cold like symptoms last night and will start taking paxil did an antiviral drug that has proven effective against preventing severe cases of COVID-19. President Biden, who's considered a close contact according to CDC guidelines will wear a mask for ten days when indoors and while in close proximity to others. The bidens have been vacationing in South Carolina and Jill Biden will no longer travel to Florida later this week for a series of scheduled events in support of military families. Some 15,000 nurses in Minnesota, including Minneapolis have authorized a strike, the vote tally comes after months of contract negotiations between the union and hospital officials from Minnesota public radio, Michelle Wiley reports. The Minnesota nurses association has been negotiating over numerous issues since March, including working conditions and paid family leave. Nurses have been without a contract since June. But one of the biggest concerns the union says is staff retention, nurse Jamie whitland. The hospital has been hiring nurses, but we're seeing them not complete orientation. If they do complete orientation, they actually

NPR news President Biden Culver City California Dwayne Brown COVID Jill Biden Windsor Johnston White House bidens South Carolina Mississippi Jackson Biden Michelle Wiley CDC Minnesota nurses association Minnesota Minneapolis Florida Jamie whitland
"michelle wiley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:50 min | 6 months ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is rising for This two is WNYC companies with dollar FM in their name HD and a.m. What's the rise of New York dollar stores say about our economy Also what remains of a Ukrainian town after Russia bombed city hall in a church and we remember Ray Liotta It's Friday May 27th this day in 1861 chief justice roger taney ruled president Abraham Lincoln overstepped his authority by arresting rebels at the start of the Civil War Lincoln ignored him The news is next Life from NPR news in Washington I'm Louise schiavone The National Rifle Association today kicks off its three day annual gun industry convention in Houston just days after the deadliest school shooting in Texas history Some previously scheduled speakers and performers have backed out of the event but as Houston public media's Andrew Schneider reports the convention will still feature high profile speakers The roster of speakers at the NRA's 150th annual meeting includes former president Donald Trump and Texas senator Ted Cruz Texas governor Greg Abbott is also scheduled to attend but it's unclear whether he will in the wake of Tuesday's mass shooting at an elementary school in uvalde which left 19 students and two teachers dead Abbott's democratic rival for the governorship former congressman beto o'rourke has publicly called on Abbott not to attend and to request the NRA move its event out of state O'rourke will participate in a protest rally against gun violence outside the convention center this afternoon I'm Andrew Schneider in Houston In Washington a first legislative gun control effort by Senate Democrats failed yesterday Republicans blocked debate on a domestic terrorism bill that would have opened debate on hate crimes and gun policy As Congress heads into a two week break a bipartisan group of senators has begun negotiations on a new measure the focus of their considerations include background checks for guns purchased online or at gun shows red flag laws designed to keep guns away from those who could harm themselves or others and school security measures The latest trials stemming from the violent January 6th attack on the U.S. capitol is headed to jury deliberations As NPR's Tom drives back reports the cases against a former army reservist No one disputes that on January 6th Timothy Hale cusanelli joined the first wave of rioters as they breached the capitol building Prosecutors alleged that he intentionally went to the capitol to obstruct the Electoral College count that day They presented evidence that he talked about the need for a quote second Civil War On the witness stand hail kusana said what he did was wrong but he was not trying to disrupt Congress He said he knew it sounded quote idiotic but he claimed he did not know Congress was in the capitol building Prosecutors said that defied all common sense and the evidence The jury will now decide whose argument is more credible Tom dries buck and PR news Washington World markets globally shares are heading for their first weekly gain in 8 weeks European shares hit a ten day high Britain's fitzy remained in positive territory indexes in Japan and China were also up positive retail earnings reports and a signal that the fed may put the break on rapid rate hikes late this year gave traders a boost This is NPR news in Washington Hundreds of Planned Parenthood workers across 5 states are taking steps to unionize Michelle Wiley of Minnesota public radio reports who more than 400 frontline staff work at clinics in Minnesota Iowa north and South Dakota and Nebraska They cite wage disparities and staffing levels as some of the reasons for unionization But also say the possible overturning of roe V wade by the Supreme Court makes it even more pressing April Clark is a registered nurse and senior training specialist working at clinics in Iowa Honestly just made us doing this more important So that we can give the absolute best care of the patients in a statement Planned Parenthood nor central state says that it is always prioritized autonomy and choice And supports its employees for NPR news I'm Michelle Wiley in St. Paul Under a new law just side by governor Ron DeSantis Florida will require periodic statewide recertification of condominiums over three stories tall The new statute is a response to the collapse of the surfside condominium building collapse that killed 98 people Andy fletch Fletcher keyboardist and founding member of British pop group Depeche Mode has died.

NPR news Andrew Schneider roger taney Civil War Lincoln Louise schiavone Houston senator Ted Cruz NRA Texas beto o'rourke Abbott Washington Ray Liotta WNYC president Abraham Lincoln National Rifle Association Greg Abbott Timothy Hale cusanelli uvalde Congress
"michelle wiley" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Orders in place for vulnerable low lying communities especially fire island a popular summer tourism. Hotspot if you have to move if you have to stock up if you have to get to higher ground. It has to be today. Cuomo leaves office monday night. He resigned following a sexual misconduct. Investigation recovery from the damage on re brings could be the first challenge. Lieutenant governor kathy. Hokkaido faces when she becomes governor on tuesday for npr news. I'm jay dee allen. On long island. President biden is to speak to the nation tomorrow. From the white house. On both hurricane rianne the kabul evacuation. The address is scheduled to begin at four. Pm eastern time a california superior court judge has struck down a state valid measure that exempted some companies like uber and lift from classifying their workers as employees for member station k. q. e. de michelle wiley reports the proposition which state voters passed. Last here meant that app. based right. hailing and delivery companies could classify their workers as independent contractors rather than employees who'd be eligible for benefits skirting california labor law and alameda county superior. Court judge ruled. The proposition unconstitutional citing with three drivers. And the sei. You they argued that. The measure removed the legislature's ability to grant workers access to the states worker's compensation program the measure will remain in force until a decision is made on the appeal. The case is expected to end up in the state supreme court for npr news. I'm michelle wiley this is. Npr news demonstrations were held in cities across australia today. Against corona virus restrictions. The city of sydney has been in a strict lockdown for two months with people mostly confined to their homes. This has not contained a recent surge in corona virus cases driven by the highly contagious delta. Variant tributes have been pouring in for the british children's author jill murphy. She began writing and illustrating her books when she herself was still in school. Vicki barker reports just destroyed the sport in the first five minutes tug on netflix adaptation of the worst witch series two decades before harry potter protagonist mildred hubble brought mischief and chaos to miss cackles academy for witches base. Jill murphy said on her own years at a convent school. She also wrote an illustrated stories about the large family and anthropomorphized clan of elephants. Friend and illustrator. Chris rebel telling the bbc rainy felt you knew. For instance mris large sitting in hobart with a t top on on her tummy escaping from kids that was a parent. We can all identify with jail. Murphy died of cancer at seventy to her son at niece were by her side for npr news. I'm vicki barker in london. At least eight people died today when flash floods swept through central tennessee. The sheriff's office has at least thirty people are missing in humphreys county. About sixty miles west of nashville officials say thousands of homes and businesses lost power. I'm nora raum npr news..

npr news Lieutenant governor kathy jay dee allen President biden hurricane rianne california superior court de michelle wiley jill murphy michelle wiley Cuomo Npr news Hokkaido kabul long island alameda county Vicki barker white house legislature supreme court california
"michelle wiley" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Has declared a state of emergency for parts of the state rhode island officials. Say they too are prepared. The co founder of the taliban moolah abdul ghani arar dr is in the afghan capital of kabul today for talks on forming a new government. He's the most senior taliban leader now in afghanistan. And he's also the man who signed the agreement with the us that led to the american withdrawal. The bbc's dan johnson has more is another sign of the talibans confidence that they have control of the country that they can move freely and move even the most senior figures now into position in kabul to start talks. About what the next form of government will actually be. The taliban has said that it wants to reach out to some other groups. Some of them will be considered extremist. Islamist groups like the county network. We saw some of that figures in couple yesterday perhaps ready for talks but also reaching out to more moderate figures like the former president hamid karzai taliban says it wants to form an inclusive government that will represent everybody in afghanistan. The bbc's dan johnson california superior court judge struck down a state ballot measure that exempted some companies like uber and lift from classifying their workers as employees for member station k. q. Ed michelle wiley reports. A coalition of businesses says it plans to appeal the ruling the proposition which state voters passed. Last here meant that at least right. Hailing and delivery companies could classify their workers independent contractors rather than employees who'd be eligible for benefits skirting california labor law and alameda county superior. Court judge ruled. The proposition unconstitutional citing with three drivers. And the sei. You they argued that. The measure removed the legislature's ability to grant workers access to the states worker's compensation program the measure will remain in force until a decision is made on the appeal. The case is expected to end up in the state supreme court for npr news. I'm michelle wiley. This is npr conductor. Michael morgan the longtime music director of the oakland california symphony has died at the age of sixty three. He'd suffered a severe infection after undergoing a kidney transplant in may as jeff london. Morgan was a passionate advocate for music education and a beloved figure in his community the washington. Dc native showed his prodigious gifts in an early age playing piano and conducting the dc youth orchestra. He attended oberlin conservatory and studied under leonard bernstein and seiji ozawa at tanglewood one of very few african american conductors morgan appeared with the new york philharmonic. Saint louis symphony chicago symphony in vienna opera among others taking a job in.

taliban dan johnson abdul ghani arar kabul california superior court afghanistan bbc Ed michelle wiley rhode island hamid karzai npr news michelle wiley oakland california symphony alameda county jeff london Michael morgan us legislature california npr
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Works. We're going to the dogs. Quarantine life led many of us to adopt the canine companion. How about you? We're going to talk about it next time on the take away. Join us for the take away One of the topics later this afternoon on KQED Public radio at one p.m.. Good morning to you. I'm Dave Freeman. And the time now on KQED is 5 30 live from KQED News. I'm Brian White, a state prison in Vacaville has recently been experiencing a covid 19 outbreak after months of low case rates. Corrections officials say More than three dozen people incarcerated at the California state prison in Solano have active coronavirus cases. That's after having a high of more than 80 early this month. Dr. Stefano Bertuzzi is a U. C. Berkeley professor who works with a group that helps the state correctional system fight infections, he says. As the prisons open up to more visitation and programming, there are more possibilities for the virus to spread. The higher the vaccination community, the better, the higher the vaccination rate among staff, the better the higher vaccination rate residents the banner, corrections officials say 60% of people incarcerated at the prison are fully vaccinated in 52% of prison staff are The entity in charge of prison healthcare is trying to incentivize correctional officers to get a vaccine. It launched a small scale lottery late last month. San Francisco Appeals court has ruled in favor of an immigrant from Mexico. Overturning a decision by federal immigration authorities. KQED S Michelle Wiley explains. Delfina Sotto sotto sought refuge in the U. S. Nine years ago, she says, while in Mexico, she experienced assault and waterboarding by authorities while being held in custody on homicide and kidnapping charges that were dismissed because of due process errors. Mexico. Prosecutors later re file the charges against her issuing a notice for her return. Then in 2019, U. S immigration judge moved to allow her to stay under the convention against Torture. Immigration and Customs Enforcement appealed the decision to the Board of Immigration Appeals, which then denied her case. But last week, the ninth Circuit reversed that decision, saying the board overstepped Hector Vega is with the San Francisco Public defender's office. That idea is not allowed to make it some conclusions of the evidence or imposed its own beliefs of what it thinks the decision should have been. Its only role is to review the findings of the immigration judge as they were found. The case will be remanded back to the board with specific instructions to grant relief. Michelle Wiley. KQED NEWS. Some urban and rural leaders in California are calling on the state Legislature to pass Governor Newsom's universal broadband planned outline in his budget. State budget. The governor's three year proposal would spend $7 billion mostly federal money to build a fiber optic broad man network statewide. Former state treasurer and controller. John Chung is a co chair of the California Forward Leadership Council and Economic Development Advocacy group. He says the pandemic exposed the digital divide among Californians. We had too many people from middle and low income families sitting, you know, at the local, Taco Bell or Burger King or some other energy to get WiFi access. We need to invest today in California and America's infrastructure. The group says the plan would help connect the 51% of rural households that have no high speed options. I'm Brian want KQED news after the most challenging year for Northern California that any of us can remember..

Brian White Dave Freeman John Chung $7 billion 60% Mexico 2019 Hector Vega Stefano Bertuzzi 52% 51% Vacaville Board of Immigration Appeals Brian Taco Bell KQED Michelle Wiley one p.m last week Delfina Sotto
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good morning. I'm Lily Tamale. The recall election against Governor Gavin Newsom will cost California counties $215 million. That's according to an analysis from the State Department of Finance out yesterday. KQ eighties guy Marzorati has more. A recall election will require counties to spend millions sending every voter a ballot and setting up in person voting. The Democratic leaders of the state, Senate and Assembly say they'll cover those costs in the upcoming state budget. And with the price tag in hand, the Legislature won't need the 30 days that state law gives them to study the cost of the election that could result in a recall vote later this summer, rather than in the fall as previously expected. For the California report. I'm guy Mars karate. Former Orange County police chief is among the handful of Californians who have been indicted for their roles in the January 6th insurrection at the Capitol Building in Washington. The grand jury indictment for Alan Hostetter, former chief of the La Habra Police Department, was unveiled yesterday. It alleges that he and five other Californians conspired on social media prior to the insurrection and also breached off limit areas of the capital. House sitters attorney denies those charges has center has organized stop the steal rallies in Southern California in support of former President Trump and is accused of conspiring with members of the three Percenters militia, an anti government militia known for attracting military and law enforcement members. Four men from the Sacramento area were also indicted this week for their alleged roles in the riot. Three immigrant families in the Bay Area are suing the federal government after border officials forcibly separated them in 2018 K securities, Michelle Wiley reports. According to the lawsuit, the Central American families were seeking asylum at the US Mexico border when the Children were taken from their parents as part of the Trump Administration zero tolerance policy. Now reunified in the Bay Area. They say they're still suffering trauma from the weeks or months of separation and other abuses and immigration custody. Braeburn winger is the senior immigration attorney with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area. It's not only to make sure that families aren't separated, but also to make sure that we have an immigration system that doesn't hurt people. She says the lawsuit seeks punitive damages to hold federal officials accountable and ensure this never happens again. For the California report. I'm Michelle Wiley. California has over a billion dollars in aid to give out to struggling renters and landlords, but so far a little less than 3% of that money has actually gone out. And far fewer people have applied to the state program than expected As KQED is, Aaron Baldessari explains, the state has made some changes to get more money out more quickly. Jackie Loughery lives with her extended family in Antioch. Her husband, son and daughter in law all lost their jobs on the same day last March, right after the pandemic, it Now they Oh, about $11,000 in unpaid rent. It's just really scary right now. Lori's family filed for rent relief as soon as they could. We have heard absolutely nothing back yet nothing back and that was in March. Officials at the Housing and Community Development Department say just over 4000 people have received assistance out of around 190,000, who've applied. Jessica Hayes with the department says the state has moved slowly to make sure no one got paid twice and to serve the people with the lowest incomes. First, we've been able to increase the number of households that were processing through the application each week, and we expect that to continue as we continue to ramp up and add more staff. But he is also said the state has only received applications for about $543 million in rent relief. That's about a third of the money that's currently available. The more applications we can get in the more folks we can assist applicants have had a hard time slogging through a clunky and complicated process. That process will now be streamlined and require fewer documents. The application is also now available in six languages. Advocates are pushing the Legislature to extend the state's eviction moratorium beyond June, 30th. So more people can get eight for the California report. I'm Erin Baldessari. Support for the.

Jessica Hayes Jackie Loughery Aaron Baldessari Alan Hostetter Erin Baldessari Lori Michelle Wiley Sacramento March Lily Tamale Southern California La Habra Police Department June, 30th Trump Administration Antioch Capitol Building $215 million 30 days Bay Area Lawyers Committee for Civil Ri
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KCRW

"On Korver Coleman. President Biden is meeting today with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. This comes ahead of a summit of leaders of Group of Seven nations that Johnson is hosting. He and Biden are expected to discuss trade in their meeting. One matter that's expected to come up is Brexit. That's the process the UK used to break away from the European Union. NPR's Asma Khalid says Brexit has affected the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, which is a part of the UK The backstory is that Northern Ireland is part of the UK and it has officially left the European Union. But the Republic of Ireland remains part of the EU, so they'll talk about this customs border that is supposed to be part of the arrangement, and Johnson wants a trade deal with the United States. Biden has warned that any trade deal between these two countries between the United States and the United Kingdom would be contingent on keeping the peace in Ireland. NPR's Asma Khalid reporting Later today, Mr Biden is expected to announce the U. S. Has bought 500 million doses of fighters. Covid 19 vaccines. The White House plans to donate these to poor nations. It's the largest covid vaccine donation yet by a single country. The 1st 200 million doses are to be distributed this year. Drug maker Moderna announced today it is seeking emergency authorization to distribute its covid 19 vaccine to adolescents. NPR's Joe Palka has more. In announcing the move, Moderna said it's vaccine had 100% efficacy in the nearly 2500 volunteers aged 12 to 17. Who received the vaccine as part of a study. The company also said the vaccine was well tolerated in this group with the most common side effects being headache, fatigue, muscle aches and chills. The Covid 19 vaccine made by Pfizer and Biontech has already received authorization for use in adolescence. Both the Pfizer and Moderna. Vaccines are currently being tested in Children as young as six months. Results from those studies are expected later this year. Joe Palka NPR NEWS An internal United Nations report, obtained by NPR finds more than 350,000. Ethiopians are living in conditions of famine. NPR's Eider Peralta reports There's worry thousands of people could begin starving. The report paints a dire picture of the ticket I region of Ethiopia. Millions of people are food insecure. But according to the report, 350,000 of them have reached the most acute level of food insecurity and they are facing starvation. The report finds that an eight month war has decimated the region. The banking system is in shambles. Many people have lost their farming implements, and the majority of the population is now fully dependent on food aid. The Ethiopian government disagrees with this assessment, but this study is comprehensive, the report says. If the warring parties continue to block aid, hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians are in danger of starving to death. Eider Peralta NPR NEWS Nairobi It's NPR. It's 804. I'm Cherry Glazer With KCRW news. The federal government plans in the coming weeks to reunite more than two dozen families who were separated by the Trump Administration zero tolerance policies. That's according to a new report from the Family Reunification Task Force. KQED is Michelle Wiley has the details in a press called a cell You attorney legal learned who's been representing the separated parents as part of a class action lawsuit. Said he was glad to see the 29 families being reunified, and he hopes things will move faster now that there's a process in place when the president United States says that something is an historic moral stain on the country that I think all red tape needs to go, there can't be any bureaucratic slowness. We just need to get this done. More than 2100 Children remain separated from their parents, according to the report. Oh, good. Lawrence says he believes more families have been reunited than the tally indicates. In a joint statement with New York Congressman Jerry Nadler, Silicon Valley congresswoman So Lofgren praised the progress of the task force, but said reunification is not enough and expects future reports to include more detailed plans on how to support these families. KQED Is Michelle Wiley reporting. Fire crews working through the night have stopped the forward progress of a wildfire in hysteria. The farm fires it's being called, broke out yesterday afternoon near the 15 Freeway and has ripped through 250 acres. It's now 30% contained. No structures have been damaged and no injuries are reported. The coronavirus has touched many facets of our lives from home to work to school. Now it looks like Koba can also be blamed for stalling population growth in the Golden State, his KCRW's tar a tree on reports new projections released by the Southern California Association of Governments and the University of Southern California. So the Southland is for seeing its first ever population decline. Southern California has been classified among the most vibrant population centers in the nation. For decades, the number of residents has risen to more than 90 million people. But the growth rate slowed in the 20 tens with declining birth rates, the housing crisis and other factors. With this decade, kicking off with the global pandemic, 2020 saw the first year over year drop in overall population. The Covid crisis led to an increase in mortality rates, a further slump in birth rates and all but stopped foreign immigration to California. Looking ahead. Projections show the fastest growing segment of the population will be mature Adults ages 75 through 84, followed by their younger counterparts, age 65 to 74. When it comes to college aged adults and very young Children. Their numbers are declining. The aging population revealed by the projections has officials rethinking the region's future for KCRW. I'm Tara a tree on as the pandemic slowed the world to a crawl last year, it did help put a lid on the growth of a toxic gas ozone. A new report from the Jet Propulsion Lab finds emissions of net nitrogen oxides, which create ozone. Increase 15% globally, with reductions in some areas, even getting cut in half. Support for NPR comes from U K G a charm Workforce management solutions designed to make employees happy. When employees feel supported..

Joe Palka Pfizer Michelle Wiley Asma Khalid 30% Biden Southern California Associatio 350,000 Jerry Nadler 100% Johnson Jet Propulsion Lab University of Southern Califor 29 families NPR yesterday afternoon Biontech So Lofgren California Trump Administration
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Most of its covid 19 restrictions. Next week, five counties will be able to spend a few days in the least restrictive yellow tear for reopening Alameda, Napa, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and San Diego County's will all be allowed to loosen capacity limits before the state's scheduled reopening on June 15th. Stanislaus County has also moved from the red tier to the less restrictive orange here. Governor Gavin Newsom has said that despite the planned reopening the pandemic related state of emergency will continue past June 15th in large part due to federal funding for things like covid testing and vaccinations. Republican legislators sent the governor a letter this week asking for a better explanation as to why that declaration hasn't already been lifted. The federal government plans to reunite more than two dozen families who were separated by the Trump administration's zero tolerance policies in the coming weeks. That's according to a new report from the Family reunification task force that came out yesterday. KQED is Michelle Wiley reports in a press call Tuesday. A cell you attorney legal learned who's been representing the separated parents as part of a class action lawsuit. Said he was glad to see the 29 families being reunified, and he hopes things will move faster now that there is a process in place when the president United States says that something is an historic moral stain on the country that I think all red tape needs to go, there can't be any bureaucratic slowness. We just need to get this done. More than 2100 Children remain separated from their parents, according to the report. Google. Lawrence says he believes more families have been reunited than the tally indicates, in a joint statement with New York Congressman Jerry Nadler, Silicon Valley congresswoman So Lofgren praised the progress of the task force, but said.

Michelle Wiley Tuesday June 15th San Diego County San Luis Obispo Jerry Nadler Santa Barbara Google 29 families So Lofgren Napa Alameda Lawrence yesterday Next week Republican this week Gavin Newsom Governor More than 2100 Children
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Democrats are asking if the president can be elected without the popular vote is the system out of whack, Plus Idaho has one of the lowest vaccination rates in the country. Why has demand for the shots ground to a near halt its Wednesday June 9th actress Michaela Conlin is 42 Today news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington on Korver Coleman. President Biden has departed for his first foreign trip since taking office. He's en route to the United Kingdom, where he's scheduled to attend the G seven meeting, but it will later go to Brussels for a NATO summit. The president has ended negotiations with a top Republican over infrastructure packages. NPR's Mara Liasson reports, Biden is now apparently reaching out to a bipartisan group of senators that are working on a different infrastructure deal. President Biden's talks with West Virginia Senator Shelley Moore Capito about a bipartisan infrastructure bill appear to be over, Senator Capito said she spoke with the president. And he told her he was ending the negotiations. But the White House says the president is still pursuing a bipartisan deal. He's talking to Republicans who are part of a bipartisan group. We're trying to put together an infrastructure package. That group includes Republicans Mitt Romney and Rob Portman and Democrats Joe Mansion in Kirsten cinema. Biden is also keeping in touch with Democratic leaders in Congress who are working on a parallel track, preparing infrastructure legislation that might be able to get through the Senate with just 50 Democratic votes. The White House continues to insist that there are many paths to an infrastructure deal, but at least so far, they don't have the votes to succeed on any of them. Mara Liasson NPR news authorities in several countries say the FBI coordinated a global sting operation that led to the arrest of some 800 people. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The investigation revolved around an encrypted messaging platform that was being used by transnational criminal groups. The encrypted communication system was called Unum. Authorities say that criminals used it to plan multi ton drug shipments, illicit payments and other crimes. What the criminals didn't know, however, was that the encrypted system was secretly run by the FBI. And all of the messages were being copied and monitored by law enforcement. Acting U S attorney for the Southern District of California, Randi Grossman. The criminals using these devices believed they were secretly planning crimes far beneath the radar of law enforcement. But in reality, the criminals were not underneath the radar. They were on it. Officials say the sprawling international investigation was one of the largest ever to go after encrypted criminal activities. Brian Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington Thousands of Canadians turned out in Ontario last night, they mourned the killings of a Muslim family on Tuesday. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also attended. Dan Carpenter Chuck reports that police in Ontario say four people were killed in a targeted attack. Only the nine year old son survived the attack after the driver of the pickup truck mounted the curb and struck a family of five out for a stroll. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called it a terrorist attack. At the vigil, he said. Islamophobia is real racism is real, and Canadians should not have to face it in their communities are in their country. He and other political leaders promised change. A 20 year old London, Ontario Man faces four charges of first degree murder. Dan Carpenter Chuck reporting. This is NPR Live from KQED News. I'm Brian. What? Good morning. South Bay. Congresswoman Zoloft is calling on the Biden administration to do more to support families who were separated at the border and are now being reunited by the federal government. In a new report, A federal task force says it plans to bring together more than two dozen families in the coming weeks. KQED s Michelle Wiley has more. These 29 families are part of an initial group recommended by the American Civil Liberties Union. They sell you Attorney League alert when the president knighted states says that something is in a historic moral stain on the country, Then I think all red tape needs to go. There can't be any bureaucratic slowness. We just need to get this done. The Family reunification task Force says more than 2100 Children remain separated from their parents, though the value says that number is likely smaller. Representative Lofgren, who chairs a House panel and immigration, said in a statement that reunification alone is not enough. She wants to see the government's.

Rob Portman Michaela Conlin Brian Lucas American Civil Liberties Union Mara Liasson Michelle Wiley Mitt Romney Ryan Lucas United Kingdom Wednesday June 9th Joe Mansion Ontario Brussels Tuesday Biden KQED FBI Randi Grossman Congress Brian
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The time is 6 51. Good morning. This is the California report. I'm Saul Gonzalez in Los Angeles, California Supreme Court Chief Justice is praising a new policy issued this week by the Department of Homeland Security, one that will limit how federal officials operate in or near courthouses. KQED is Michelle Wiley reports. The new guidance, says officials like Immigration and Customs Enforcement can on Lee enforce civil immigration laws at or near courthouses under certain conditions. Like a national security threat or a danger to public safety. This supersedes a previous policy, which allowed ice to arrest people who are at court for reasons unrelated to their immigration status. One of the loudest critics of that policy was California Supreme Court chief Justice Tani Cantil Sakauye, who said in a statement that the new policy quote, respects the dignity of our residents who rely on our state court justice systems. For the California report. I am Michelle Wiley. Since the 19 eighties, California cities have used gang injunctions as a way to fight street violence. The injunctions band suspected gang members from specific activities like socializing together and even wearing clothing and colors associated with gangs. Now in San Diego County District Attorney's summer, Stefan says she's filed court petitions to live 20 different gang injunctions in cities across the county that could affect hundreds of people listed on the injunctions. Dismantling them would be a win for advocates of criminal justice reform. They argue injunctions too often marked people permanently as gang members and make it harder for them to move on with their lives and put their gang days behind them. The D A says Her decision is supported by police chiefs in San Diego County, turning to Los Angeles, where the LAPD says it needs nearly $70 million to address problems that contributed to its mishandling of last year's protests. KPCC is Robert Horava has more. The request is a response to a trio of reports outlining the LAPD's botched response to last summer's demonstrations. Chief Michael Moore calls the Ask preliminary The bulk of the money more than 50 million would go towards training after all. Three reports stressed that as a department efficiency that includes some 15 million for training on less lethal munitions, such as hard phone projectiles. Last week, the LAPD suspended its use of one type of projectile after a federal judge imposed a series of restrictions on their use. The judge ruled in response to a request from groups that have filed a class action lawsuit against the department. Reform groups have criticized the LAPD's funding request, arguing the police should not receive more money for the California report. I'm Robert Korova in Los Angeles, Let's turn to education and some guests Kindergarten students at one Los Angeles Unified School got yesterday. Okay, so we'll celebrate their boys and girls I want to introduce to you our very special visitors. Let's begin with our superintendent, Austin Beautiful articulation..

Saul Gonzalez Robert Korova Los Angeles LAPD Stefan Robert Horava KPCC Michelle Wiley Last week Department of Homeland Securit Three reports yesterday Tani Cantil Sakauye Los Angeles Unified School last year last summer Austin Michael Moore more than 50 million Immigration and Customs Enforc
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Supersedes a previous policy, which allowed ice to arrest people who are at court for reasons unrelated to their immigration status. One of the loudest critics of that policy was California Supreme Court chief Justice Tani Cantil Sakauye, who said in a statement that the new policy quote, respects the dignity of our residents who rely on our state court justice systems. For the California report. I'm Michelle Wiley. Since the 19 eighties, California cities have used gang injunctions as a way to fight street violence. Thean junctions band suspected gang members from specific activities like socializing together and even wearing clothing and colors associated with gangs. Now in San Diego County District Attorney's summer, Stefan says she's filed court petitions to live 20 different gang injunctions in cities across the county that could affect hundreds of people listed on the injunctions. Dismantling them would be a win for advocates of criminal justice reform. They argue injunctions too often marked people permanently, is gang members and make it harder for them to move on with their lives and put their gang days behind them. The D A says Her decision is supported by police chiefs in San Diego County, turning to Los Angeles, where the LAPD says it means nearly $70 million to address problems that contributed to its mishandling of last year's protests. KPCC is Robert Horava has more. The request is a response to a trio of reports outlining the LAPD's botched response to last summer's demonstrations. Chief Michael Moore calls the Ask preliminary The bulk of the money more than 50 million would go towards training after all. Three reports stressed that as a department efficiency that includes some 15 million for training on less lethal munitions, such as hard phone projectiles. Last week, the LAPD suspended its use of one type of projectile after a federal judge imposed a serious of restrictions on their use. The judge ruled in response to a request from groups that have filed a class action lawsuit against the department. Reform groups have criticized the LAPD's funding request, arguing the police should not receive more money for the California report. I'm Robert Korova in Los Angeles, Let's turn to education and some guests Kindergarten students at one Los Angeles Unified School got yesterday. Okay, so we'll stop right there. Boys and girls I want to introduce to you our very special visitors. Let's begin with our.

Michelle Wiley Los Angeles Robert Korova Robert Horava LAPD Stefan KPCC Last week Three reports yesterday California Supreme Court Los Angeles Unified School last summer last year 20 different gang injunctions Tani Cantil Sakauye more than 50 million Michael Moore nearly $70 million One
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"KQED News. Santa Clara County is again barring indoor church services after being ordered to allow them a federal appears. Appeals court has ruled that the county can maintain its ban on all indoor gatherings kick you, Edie's Julie Chang explains. Earlier this month, the Supreme Court ruled California's ban on indoor religious gatherings was unconstitutional, allowing churches to reopen indoors at limited capacity. But Santa Clara County argued the ruling didn't apply to it because the county is prohibiting all indoor gatherings, religious or not as a safety precaution. JP Samuel is the lead pastor of the Spectrum Church in San Jose. He says. If other churches could follow CDC guidelines and safely operate indoors they can to except for one or two fringe cases who have not properly followed the mitigation protocols. Most of these places are doing incredibly well. There have been no major outbreaks. Samuel says the church's lawyers are working on filing another motion. I'm Julie Chang KQED news. The new tally of hate incidents against Asian and Asian American people in the U. S. Finds that the majority of the California incidents happened in the Bay Area. KQED is Michelle Wiley reports. Of the 1200 plus hate incidents reported in California more than 700 took place in the Bay Area, and nearly 300 of those happened in San Francisco. The new tally, which goes from March to December of 2020 comes from stop a P. I hate Ah project based out of San Francisco state that asked people to self report acts of anti Asian hate and discrimination. Cynthia Che is one of the co founders of the group, She says these numbers are likely an undercount. We don't by any means believes that it's exhausted because just like our community under report to law enforcement, we think that there's under reporting just in general of these types of incidents. Chase says the majority of incidents being reported our verbal attacks and harassment. Michelle Wiley. KQED NEWS. There's more local and state coverage at KQED dot or G'kar. I'm Richelle Maria Dylan Coming up on morning edition on KQED in a few moments in California care givers of people with disabilities are supposed to get priority for the covert vaccines. But they're often turned away and vaccination sites one of the stories ahead on this Monday and later today at one Covert 19 is messing with our bodies, even if we don't have the virus working from home, moving less and feeling constant stress, Worry or even depression is taking its physical toll. I'm tansy no Vega and next time on the takeaway from W N Y C. NPR Rex How just living through a pandemic could account for your increased aches and pains. That's one of the topics also on the take away at one o'clock, Maura about the spike in attacks on Asian Americans, particularly in the Bay Area. Join us had one this afternoon on the take away..

Samuel San Francisco JP Samuel Michelle Wiley Cynthia Che March Bay Area San Jose Julie Chang U. S. one December of 2020 Spectrum Church Maura more than 700 one o'clock Chase Earlier this month Richelle Maria Dylan Supreme Court
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In January, the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the federal government will be releasing new guidance next week about reopening schools. NPR's Asia, Roscoe reports President Biden has made reopening schools a priority, but concerns have been raised about safety. The administration's goal is to get Children back in the classrooms even before the pandemic is over, CDC director Rochelle Wolinsky says further guidelines for making that happen are in the works were actively working on the guidance Theophile Shal guidance, which will be released in only dad earlier this week. Well, let's get said getting teachers vaccinated is not a prerequisite for opening schools safely. But the White House downplayed that statement saying Wolinsky was speaking in a personal capacity. President Biden has set a goal of getting most elementary and middle school students back to you in person learning by the end of April. Aisha Roscoe NPR news The English woman, Marjorie Taylor. Greene is speaking out a day after she was expelled from two powerful committee assignment when the Democrats and 11 of my Republican colleagues decided to strip me of my committee assignments, Education and labor and the budget Committee. You know what they did they actually strip my district. Of their voice. Critics from both sides of the aisle rebuke Green for her public support of far right conspiracy theories like those calling mass shootings in schools staged and her history of violent rhetoric against Democratic leaders. The European Union is condemning Russia's decision to expel three European diplomats, accusing them of attending rallies in support of jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny. Wrestles Teri Schultz reports. The Kremlin announced the move while the EU's foreign policy chief was visiting Moscow. The use taught diplomat Joseph Burrell says he found out Russia was declaring on voice from Germany, Poland and Sweden persona non grata while he was meeting Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. Well, says he rejects allegations the three had conducted activities incompatible with their status is foreign diplomats. The Russian government says they attended to January 23rd protest. The decision should be reconsidered, Burrell says. German Chancellor Angela Merkel called the explosions unjustified. Both Poland and Sweden said their diplomats had on Lee carried out their official duties. Poland says If the decision is not reversed, it may retaliate against Moscow for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels. The U. S trade deficits, the largest it Spence is the height of the 2008 financial crisis. Commerce Department reporting pandemic related disruptions resulted in a trade gap ballooning more than 17.5%. Nearly $679 billion last year. You're listening to NPR news. Life from KQED News. I'm terrorists. Tyler. Oakland Mayor Libby Shaft has tapped Deputy chief Laurent Armstrong's to be the city's new chief of police. Armstrong is a native of West Oakland who has served in the OPD for 20 years. In an announcement video this morning, Armstrong says he'll focus on the safety of Oakland's youngest residents. I'm one of those young people that didn't feel safe. And so is my job now to do everything I can to make sure that we is a police department Do our John Armstrong will take over a department that has faced years of turmoil and criticism over police misconduct. The city has had 10 police chief since 2003 and remains under federal oversight to reform its practices. The area. Congress members used a Thursday hearing on Capitol Hill to condemn the enduring trauma caused by the Trump administration's family separation policy that drew shock and anger when it came to light in 2018. Hears Kay cuties Michelle Wiley while questioning the inspector general of the Department of Justice. San Matteo, Congresswoman Jackie Spear called separating families quote, harmful, traumatic and chaotic. She said federal officials knew forcible separations were traumatized Children and had no plans to address the harm. So was Charlie Chalice Act. Within the Department of Justice and not stepping in and providing some kind of medication. Under Trump. Border officials separated more than 5000 Children from their parents. Earlier this week, President Joe Biden established a task force to reunite hundreds of families who remain.

Joe Biden Laurent Armstrong President Poland Aisha Roscoe Teri Schultz NPR Rochelle Wolinsky Joseph Burrell Centers for Disease Control an European Union Russia Moscow Oakland Sweden Sergei Lavrov Department of Justice federal government
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's about centering the voices of those who have been most harmed and most marginalized by the existing system. So it's a paradigm shift. Plus some answers to the question. How well do the cove it vaccines work against the new variants? What we have seen is these vaccines still seem completely effective against the variants at preventing severe disease, hospitalization and death. Details coming up, Stay with us. Life from NPR NEWS. I'm Laxmi, saying the year's first monthly jobs report signals just how difficult to recovery the pandemic battered economy faces, the Labor Department says. Is 49,000 jobs were created in January, The unemployment rate fell to 6.3%. A lot of people have left the Labor force. Senior White House economic adviser Jared Bernstein says the administration's especially concerned The labor force has retained fewer women. This larger decrease for women is unusual in recessions and likely reflects both the industries that this pandemic has hit tourism services face to face industries, leisure and hospitality restaurants. On increased care responsibilities that have been pulling woman out of the labor force. Abide administration says today's jobs numbers further support the need for a new and big coronavirus relief package that includes extended employment and other protections. On the day the Senate took a major step toward passing the nearly $2 trillion stimulus plan. President Biden is making it clear he's comfortable moving forward on the measure with on Lee Democratic support. NPR's Scott Tetro has the latest Earlier this week, Biden met with Senate Republicans for two hours to discuss a compromise spending bill. But Biden says the plan they want to pass is just too small. What Republicans have proposed is either to do nothing. We're not enough. All of a sudden. Many Marie discovered fiscal restraint. And the concern for the deficit by didn't want to spend nearly $2 trillion funding vaccine distribution, protective equipment for schools, money for state and local governments and many other areas. Senate took the first step toward approving Biden's plan this morning with Vice President Harris Breaking a party line. 50 50 tie. Scott Tetro NPR NEWS The White House The Food and Drug Administration is raining in the use of convalescent plasma to treat patients hospitalized with covert 19. NPR's Richard Harris reports that new data are helping doctors better understand who might benefit from the treatment. In August, the FDA granted emergency authorization to this treatment, which involves collecting blood plasma from people who have recovered from covert 19 and infusing it into people with active illness. Evidence was thin, but the potential benefits outweighed the known risks. More than 400,000 Americans have received this treatment. New data from international studies suggest that it doesn't help severely ill patients, and it only appears to be useful if the plasma has high concentrations of antibodies. So the FDA is revising its emergency use protocol limiting treatment to people early in the course of the disease and two high potency plasma. Ongoing studies are continuing to evaluate the value of this treatment. Richard Harris NPR news At last check on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average was up 85 points a 31,140 You're listening to NPR news. My from KQED News. I'm Brian what Santa Clara County is turning Levi Stadium home of the 40 Niners into California's largest vaccination site. Starting next week, the county hopes to inoculate 5000 people a day. With the goal of tripling that number in the months ahead. Anyone who lives in Santa Clara County in a 65 and over is now eligible to receive the vaccine, regardless of where they normally get healthcare eligible. Santa Clara County residents can go to the county's cove in 19 website to sign up for appointments. Bay Area Congress members used a Thursday hearing on Capitol Hill to condemn the enduring trauma caused by the Trump administration's family separation policy that drew shock and anger When it came to light in 2018 cake, you ladies, Michelle Wiley reports. While questioning the inspector general of the Department of Justice. San Matteo, Congresswoman Jackie Spear called separating families quote, harmful, traumatic and chaotic. She said federal officials knew forcible separations would traumatize Children and had no plans to address the harm. So was Charlie Tallis at within the Department of Justice. And not stepping in and providing some kind of mitigation. Under Trump. Border officials separated more than 5000 Children from their parents. Earlier this week, President Joe Biden established a task force to reunite hundreds of families who remain separated. I'm Michelle Wiley. KQED news for more by a area coverage head to KQED, God or G'kar. I'm Brian. What in Oakland? Support for NPR comes from Morgan Stanley, with their podcast thoughts on the market, offering concise takes on current events and their implications for financial markets. Three minutes and episode five times a week. Thoughts on the market.

Joe Biden Santa Clara County NPR Senate FDA Richard Harris Michelle Wiley Scott Tetro President Department of Justice KQED Congresswoman Jackie Spear Labor Department Jared Bernstein Oakland
"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"michelle wiley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the California report. Good morning. I'm Luigi Molly, California's Cove in 19 Surge has crested both positive case numbers and hospitalizations are declining. And Dr Mark Galley is making a promising prediction about the state's hospitalization numbers. He's the secretary of the California Health and Human Services Department. We predict that fewer than half the people you have in hospitals today will be in hospitals 30 days from now across the state, though he warned that that could change quickly if people let down their guard. Alley urged residents to avoid Super Bowl gatherings this weekend. The virus is still light spread. Nearly all 54 58 counties are in the most restricted status for reopening and the death toll continues to be at an all time high about 540 people are dying in California daily. President Joe Biden signed several executive orders on immigration Tuesday, including one that creates a task force to reunify migrant families separated by the Trump administration. Thank you Ladies. Michelle Wiley reports, Biden said he quote condemns the human tragedy of taking Children from their parents of the border and put the force of his government behind reuniting them, and I'm doing some of the harm they suffered. More than 5000 Children were separated from their parents as a result of the Trump administration's immigration policies and more than 600 parents are still unaccounted for. Kathleen Karen is director of Justice in motion a nonprofit that's been tracking down parents in Central America. She emphasized how important it is that the families are consulted in the reunification process. They need to be at the center of this The families are unintentionally traumatized, hurt again. Advocates say another way to address the harm is by providing families away to live in the U. S Building is a professor of law and migration of the University of San Francisco. There are visas in our law already, for example, victims of crime victims of domestic violence that Get these asses well, Wang out of these air for Sonny, who's been victimized by the United States government. The task force will be led by the newly confirmed head of homeland security, All 100 my or kiss. Biden also signed orders ended addressing the underlying causes of migration and promoting immigrant integration and citizenship for the California report. I'm Michelle Wiley. As we approach the 50th anniversary of the federal Clean Water Act, Hollister Assemblyman Robert Rivas says 95% of the state's waterways are polluted or impaired. He's authored legislation that would reallocate money to start cleaning them up so that our most polluted regions are most polluted. Communities don't have to keep waiting at the back of the line for funding..

California Joe Biden Dr Mark Galley Michelle Wiley Trump administration Kathleen Karen Assemblyman Robert Rivas California Health and Human Se Luigi Molly Alley San Francisco Sonny President United States U. S Building Central America professor of law
Doctor compares conditions for unaccompanied children at immigrant holding centers to 'torture facilities'

Morning Edition

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Doctor compares conditions for unaccompanied children at immigrant holding centers to 'torture facilities'

"Francisco doctors is calling the Trump administration's treatment of migrant Children of the U. S. Mexican border torture under international law. Cooties. Michelle Wiley has more anxiety, depression post traumatic stress. Pediatricians say these are the effects on kids who've been through border experiences like detention and separation from their parents. Now, a new paper argues thes actions fall under the United Nations definition of torture by purposefully inflicting pain and suffering at the direction of government officials. Dr Colleen Kevlar Hand co authored the paper. And she says Thie impacts could be long lasting. This becomes a multigenerational story of loss and trauma. That impacts entire populations and is completely avoidable. In preventable thie. Authors urge pediatricians to speak out against these policies and document their effects on Children. For the California report. I'm Michelle Wiley. Support for the

Michelle Wiley Dr Colleen Kevlar Trump Administration United Nations Francisco U. S. Mexican California Thie
Firefighters make big progress on Kincade Fire

Morning Edition

01:31 min | 3 years ago

Firefighters make big progress on Kincade Fire

"There is progress to report in cinema county where officials say the Kincaid fire has now burned seventy five thousand acres KQED is Michelle Wiley is there for us good morning good morning when we begin with where this fire stands right now it sounds like firefighters gain some ground so there were some concerns last night that due to the windows and another when the bank that the fire was going to spread as we've seen in the last several days but he didn't gain much from last night just as you know a few hundred acres and firefighters were able to up their containment fifteen percent thirty and big gains today and are they pretty optimistic about the outlook going forward you know it's it's soon so they said that the day you know is this another big trucks there the red flag warning in effect bill four PM and they do expect more when you know they're not out of the woods yet but they are feeling good about the progress that they made last night and they like you are going so we try to keep containment mind stable trying to keep the fire away from populated areas and trying to anticipate you know what the wind is going to do today is expected to blow towards banner ads that are part of the day and then shift and blow towards Lake County so they're trying to be nimble and be able to compare Michelle Wiley thank you so much thank you the Kincaid fire has burned more than two hundred structures officials say ninety thousand are still under threat to hundreds of thousands of people have also been forced to evacuate due to

Michelle Wiley Kincaid Kqed Lake County Seventy Five Thousand Acres Fifteen Percent Hundred Acres
Big forest-thinning project begins in California to reduce wildfire risk

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

Big forest-thinning project begins in California to reduce wildfire risk

"This week crews are beginning a four month nine million dollar project to thin forests to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires in the Santa Cruz mountains here's Paul Rodgers managing editor of KQED science and environment writer at the mercury news workers plan to thin out the forests along seven miles of highway seventeen from the town of Los Gatos up to the Santa Cruz County line at summit road the idea is to thin out dead trees brush invasive species and grasses that could cause flames in a fire to go from the ground up into the tree tops threatening homes all around the area it's one of thirty five similar projects the governor Gavin Newsom fast tracked earlier this year as a way to reduce wildfire risk across California but there are still millions of other acres that need to be treated crystal work from nine to five on week days until the end of twenty nineteen I'm Michelle Wiley KQED news

Santa Cruz Managing Editor Kqed Writer Los Gatos Gavin Newsom California Paul Rodgers Santa Cruz County Michelle Wiley Nine Million Dollar Four Month
 Sephora closes US stores for diversity training

Morning Edition

00:49 sec | 3 years ago

Sephora closes US stores for diversity training

"Cosmetics company. Sephora says it's offices and stores nationwide or closing for one hour today, Michelle Wiley with member station. K Q, E, D says Sephora sixteen thousand employees will be given diversity training after an alleged incident of racial profiling at one of its stores in southern California are in B singer says a tweeted back in April that security was called on her at a Sephora in Calabasas California to make sure. She wasn't stealing. She tweeted she was just trying to buy a product in peace. The cosmetics company announced that all its physical locations distribution centers and corporate offices would shut down for diversity and inclusion training. The company says the training was already planned, this move mirrors a similar one from Starbucks last year. After two black men were arrested for trespassing at a store in Philadelphia while waiting for their friend to

Sephora Michelle Wiley Starbucks California Calabasas Philadelphia One Hour
Lawyers welcome U.S. court order to slow deportations of separated families

Fresh Air

04:34 min | 4 years ago

Lawyers welcome U.S. court order to slow deportations of separated families

"Vivid Albertine guitarist and lyricist for one of the first all women, punk bands the British band, the slits. Now she's a writer and has just published her second memoir the slits worked hard, not to copy popular male bands and dressed in ways that defied ideas of what is feminine and sexy on the street band members were literally attacked. I'll singer who was fourteen fifteen when we first got together with stop twice in front of me by men, starved for looking like she looked Albertine is in her sixties now has been married, divorced, survived cancer, raised her daughter and stayed best friends with her mother who died for years ago. We'll talk about her life today and what her punk aesthetic and anger mean to her now and David in Cooley reviews a new HBO documentary about Robin Williams. That's on fresh air. First news Live from NPR news. In Washington I'm. Lakshmi. Singh President Donald Trump is drawing bipartisan criticism after he appeared to cast doubt on Russia's interference in the two thousand sixteen. Presidential election NPR's Scott Horsely has more on what Trump said and didn't say during today's joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin after their one on one in Helsinki lawmakers from both parties are lining up to say what the. President did not that they believe the assessment of US intelligence that Russia interfered in the two thousand, sixteen election, Tennessee Republican Bob corker who heads the Senate Foreign Relations committee said Trump's equivocation on that point makes the US look like a pushover and. Democratic leader Chuck Schumer suggested darkly Putin may hold damaging information on Trump the president insists that, isn't so and I have to say if they had it would've been out. Long ago Russia's president was asked directly if he has compromising material on. Trump Putin sidestepped. The question Scott Horsely NPR news Washington in his first remarks since departing Helsinki Trump tweets that he has. Quote great confidence, in. His intelligence people however he goes on to tweet we cannot exclusively focused on the past as the world's two large nuclear, powers we must get along a tweet from President Trump a short time ago as Air Force One makes its way back to joint base Andrews NPR's Ron Elving reports Trump's to meet around Putin appeared friendlier than when he met with. NATO members last week those are our allies twenty eight other countries with whom we are allied largely, against the, threat posed I by the Soviet Union now by the Russian federation under Vladamir Putin and we did not seem to have anything like the. Same kind of chummy relationship with many of those leaders and the staging of much of it brought that out that's NPR's Ron Elving a federal judge in California has temporarily. Halted the deportation of immigrant families that have been reunited after being separated. By the Trump administration NPR's Joel rose reports that decision came from, the same judge who ordered the government to reunite the, families the government is working to reunite roughly two thousand. Five, hundred and fifty immigrant children. With their parents by court order deadline of July twenty sixth what will happen. To those families after reunification is unclear lawyers for the American Civil Liberties union which brought. The lawsuits say they're concerned about rumors of mass deportations, of families that have just been reunited in response judge Dana Subroto said he would order a temporary halt. To deportations for a, week until lawyers for the government can respond to the ACLU's motion the Trump administration says it has reunified all eligible children under the age of five. And it submitted a plan to reunify older children ahead of next week steady line Joel rose NPR news before the close the Dow was up forty five points at. Twenty five thousand. Sixty four the NASDAQ was down twenty points at seventy eight oh five SNP was off two points this is NPR from geeky weedy news Amina Kim San Francisco transportation officials are expected to. Vote tomorrow on a ban on tour buses in. Front of. One of the city's famous. Homes key cuties Michelle Wiley has more The house featured on the ninety s sitcom full house and recent Netflix reboot fuller, house is a major tourist attraction Neighbors say the crowds are relentless visiting day and. Night now the San Francisco MTA, is set to vote on. Whether or not they'll band tour buses on the street. But resident Carla has Hagen says buses aren't the real problem we have people standing. On the street to take pictures we have people double parking..

Singh President Donald Trump Vladimir Putin Andrews Npr President Trump Russia NPR American Civil Liberties Union Joel Rose Helsinki Washington Scott Horsely Writer Ron Elving HBO San Francisco Albertine Chuck Schumer Bob Corker United States
Facebook Reveals Apps, Others That Got Special Access to User Data

Glenn Beck

01:27 min | 4 years ago

Facebook Reveals Apps, Others That Got Special Access to User Data

"Parts for the two girls held inside the demonstration was put together by moms take action for immigrant families san francisco a group formed through their mutual outrage at children being separated from their immigrant parents seema patel brought her two daughters to the demonstration we hold our kids closer every day imagining what so many parents are going through right now the group plans to hold more demonstrations in the future the trump administration has said it will end practice a family separations at the border but will keep its zero tolerance immigration policy i'm michelle wiley news a new state law means big changes for some silicon valley companies cake ud sam harnett explains the legislation allows california residents to have more control over their online personal data it's almost certain your personal online data has either been hacked or sold a third parties you've never heard of now california residents will be able to ask any company from those like google and facebook to healthcare providers what data they collect what's done with that information and they can also ask for it all to be deleted data compliance lawyer michael morgan says there are a lot of questions for companies how will they separate california from the rest of the us how will they prove they've actually deleted your information data is complicated and it resides in a lot of different locations that is no easy thing to delete all of it polls have shown strong support for more control and rights over private information california's new law will go into effect in twenty twenty privacy advocates hope it will compel companies to change the handle user data everywhere i'm sam harnett kqed news us environmental protection agency heads scott pruitt was in san francisco this morning for meetings with local agency staff and state air regulators cake ud's peter jon shuler reports pruitt's unannounced visit comes amid tension with.

San Francisco Sam Harnett Google Michael Morgan California United States Peter Jon Shuler Seema Patel Michelle Wiley Facebook Scott Pruitt