29 Burst results for "Michelle Martin"

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:17 min | 4 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news, I'm Michelle Martin. Earlier this week, one of the most celebrated athletes in the world made the kind of announcement that a certain to come, but rarely welcomed when it does. Tennis legend Serena Williams revealed that her upcoming tournament is likely to be her last in the sport that made her a household name. But even after decades on the court, 23 Grand Slam victories and a career in which she and her sister Venus changed the face of their sport, it's actually her future plans that caught our attention. In a feature in Vogue magazine, Serena Williams wrote that she plans to focus on investing in companies led by women and people of color through her venture capital firm Serena ventures. We wanted to hear more about the kind of influence Serena Williams is already having in that realm and what she may yet be able to accomplish so we called Sally krawcheck, the CEO and cofounder of ellevest. That's an investment and financial literacy platform aimed at helping women reach their financial goals and she's with us. Now, Sally project, welcome back. Thanks so much for joining us. Michelle, thank you for having me. So I want to mention two of the reasons we called you. First, you were considered one of the most successful and highest profile women on Wall Street before you left to do this venture. You were very successful in private banking. And the second reason we called you is that Venus Williams, Serena's older sister, is one of the investors in Ella vest. So you have experience in this particular realm. So the first question I had for you is why is Serena's decision to ramp up her investing significant? It's significant because women supporting women, women investing in women is a path forward to get more women's businesses funded. So today, venture capital goes primarily to men. Women CEOs raise a single digit percent of venture capital dollars and I can tell you in FinTech, which is what alabaster is. It's about 1%. Even though the returns on these investments in women's CEOs tend to be higher and having women like Serena and Venus invest in companies run by women is a way for us to break open the boys club and we just haven't made as much progress with traditional venture capital firms as we would have hoped by now. Let me dig into some of those data that you just shared. There's some research from Harvard University that says that women make up just about 11% of general partners at venture capital firms, and yet venture capital firms that hire more women tend to be more successful. Harvard's research shows that these firms make more successful investments have higher returns and more profitable exits. That seems to be a disconnect there. And in a business that sort of prides itself on being based on the numbers. So first of all, why does it remain so male dominated? And why does this data? But Michelle, we see it again and again, if you look at my old industry Wall Street, they're about the numbers there about the returns, and yet they remain more mailed and female in the investing business, 98% of mutual fund dollars are managed by men even though there's research that women are certainly as good, some research shows better investors than men. And so why wouldn't it then bleed into venture capital where women are coming in, but haven't made it to fully to the senior ranks yet that men continue well. I know what the research says that I'll get better returns if I invest in diversity, but gee, this guy who reminds me so much of myself when I was younger, just really has it. And venture capital has been a pattern recognition business, invest in people like this, doing things like this, have worked in the past, so I will continue to do it and work in the future. And those theoretical returns that I'm not getting because I'm not doing something different or only theoretical. There's no scorecard of those that shows you you made X you could have made act double X if you had invested in a more diverse group. It's been reported that Serena ventures has participated in early stage funding for 16 companies that are now valued at more than a $1 billion. I don't know how much of her investment made up their early stage funding, but the fact that she's associated with it. Can you just give us some context for how significant that is? Yeah, so what's interesting is, you know, it's the money and it's also the support. Said before, networking is the number one unwritten rule of success in business. And so as individuals come in and invest not just their money, but also their network and their connections. This is sort of this positive feedback loop. Again, men have been doing this forever. I always love to say men play business as a team sport. They promote each other. They fund each other's businesses. They talk to each other up. Et cetera, et cetera, women probably because there have been so few at the senior level for so long. There have been so few startup CEOs who are women have really had to play the game as an individual sport. And by bringing this knowledge base and these connections to bear, you increase the chances of success by some good measure for a startup CEO. I'm also thinking about precedence of high profile celebrities in another field trying to use to leverage their kind of profile to make a difference in another realm. I'm thinking, for example, Magic Johnson's partnerships with Starbucks. To bring those cafes to urban neighborhoods, right? The reason I mention that is that there just seems to be these structural poles that push against women's participation, particularly younger women. I mean, Serena talked about this herself in her own sport, like she talked about wanting to grow her family. And the physical facts of that, bumping up against the realities of her sport. And I just wonder kind of can an investor like her change that dynamic for other women who aren't necessarily athletes, but who are pushing up against these biological realities. Can an investor like Serena or Venus for that matter actually intervene in those, I don't know, 2000 years of social history, biology, all of that. No one individual will make the difference, but this beginning to be a trend can make a huge difference in several different ways. First of all, you know, we talk about retiring. She's not retiring. She's moving on to a different phase of her career. So I think she's demonstrating a really interesting way of pulling together different careers over the course of one lifetime. And then the final thing I'll say is money makes a difference. You know, when you're trying to, you know, can she make a difference? Can she say that helps tremendously in terms of women's success? That was Sally crochet. She's the CEO and cofounder of LFS telegraph. Thanks so much for sharing these insights with us. Thank you for having me.

Serena Williams Serena ventures Serena NPR news Michelle Martin Vogue magazine Sally krawcheck ellevest Ella vest venture capital firms Michelle Harvard University Venus Williams Venus Sally Tennis
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:52 min | 6 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sheryl W Thompson in from Michelle Martin Around the country today thousands rallied for stronger gun safety laws Hundreds of events were scheduled in the wake of the most recent string of deadly mass shootings and as Congress is considering ways to limit them NPR's Jennifer London was on the national mall here in Washington D.C. today and joins us now Hi Jennifer Hi there So Jennifer these rallies were organized by March for our lives the same group that staged huge demonstrations in 2018 What was their message today Yes These were created by survivors of a high school shooting in Parkland Florida in 2018 And this would just want to say this was not nearly as large as the huge 2018 rallies we saw But they have kept at this many might remember David hogg one of the most high profile of these Parkland students and he was on the stage today Here's what he said I'm here because I don't want anybody to live this nightmare anymore No matter your politics no one should I'm here Because like you I love this country And for it to function we need to understand that rights are power and with power comes responsibility All Americans have a right to not be shot a right to safety And so here we had people gathered talking about safety and the fear that they feel and Cheryl I'll tell you there was just this really odd confusing point toward the end when lots of people just suddenly started running away from the stage of the speaker told them to stop They said there was no thread and then someone else suggested someone had taken advantage of quote the fear we live with every day in life It was confusing and sad Aside from that what did you hear from people who turned out today to join the rally So much frustration so much anger You know many had been advocating for years I spoke with Christine Martin she came from Orlando Florida She was galvanized after the pulse nightclub shooting there She said she wanted to come to demonstrate in D.C. though to send a message to lawmakers I'm not against guns per se as far as if you're going hunting or something But nobody needs to be able to go in and kill 30 people in ten minutes It's ridiculous I also spoke with iris de La Paz she's a substitute teacher one of many teachers I might add They were out in force and like many of them she does not think that hardening schools and giving teachers guns as many Republicans suggest is the answer I know a lot of teachers And so I know that they won't necessarily take guns And it's why are we going to arm teachers with guns and not books and social services And.

Sheryl W Thompson Michelle Martin Jennifer London Washington D.C. Jennifer Hi Parkland David hogg NPR Jennifer Florida Congress Christine Martin Cheryl iris de La Paz Orlando D.C.
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 6 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is all things considered from NPR news I'm Michelle Martin What compelled a young Palestinian man to open fire at a bar in Tel Aviv last month It was one of several deadly attacks in Israel that has sparked a military crackdown in the occupied West Bank where a prominent journalist was recently killed covering an Israeli raid NPR's Daniel estrin visited the jeanine refugee camp to trace one early spark that ignited the latest flames Amin hasm invites us to his rooftop porch in the jeanine refugee camp From your rooftop you can see the whole camp Yes What are you growing here All these rooftop plants what are these Small oranges Yeah I mean is also raising two parrots And looking after his 5 year old grandson whose T-shirt shorts and shoes feature the silhouette of an M 16 Your T-shirt A gun the boy says Hold on Look over do you hear this shot Here are the culture in the refugee camp as a culture of Jihad and martyrdom Amin says They carry the memories of their families old villages destroyed when Israel was created Well one two three four 5 6 7 8 9 You can't even count how many bullet holes are on that wall too Scars from a major battle with Palestinian militia 20 years ago It was the Palestinian uprising Young men from this camp were going to Israel to carry out deadly attacks Israel stormed the camp and destroyed hundreds of homes A means 29 year old nephew raad watched all of this when he was this little boy's age One night last month raad wasn't home in the camp A Palestinian assailant opened fire inside a crowded Tel Aviv bar killing three Israelis Hundreds of Israeli officers.

NPR news Michelle Martin Daniel estrin jeanine refugee camp Amin hasm Israel Tel Aviv West Bank NPR Palestinian militia Amin Jihad raad
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:51 min | 7 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is all things considered from NPR news I'm Michelle Martin Over the years Canadian journalist Anna Maria tremonti has covered some of the biggest stories around the world from intense armed conflicts to long running social problems Eventually becoming the host of the current Canada's top current affairs show But her latest venture a podcast called welcome to Paradise isn't about her globetrotting career It's about the secret she carried with her around the world until now As a young woman in her early 20s she fell in love with a man who seemed charming spontaneous and fun They eloped But not long after they married he became physically violent and abusive in other ways as well Although the marriage ended after a year tremonti says the after effects followed her for years and that's what she explores in welcome to Paradise allowing us to listen in as she works through her motivations feelings and reactions with her therapist family and Friends As you might imagine this conversation will likely include discussions of intimate partner violence so if this isn't the right choice for you right now please feel free to step away for a few minutes And with that being said Anna Maria tremonti is with us now to tell us more Welcome thank you so much for being with us today Oh thank you for having me Thank you very much And first I just want to say I'm so sorry this happened to you And I also want to say thank you for sharing your story with us and being willing to do that Well I appreciate that Can you just tell us a bit more about how and why you decided to tell your story now You are very very upfront with the fact that you never talked about this And as a journalist I certainly understand that I mean you and I were both trained in the manner of you don't make yourself the story You cover the story you don't make yourself the story So was there a Eureka moment when you said you know what I really need to talk about this There was sort of a Eureka moment I had wanted to talk about this publicly on and off over time And I just never did want to insinuate myself into a story And I didn't know how people would react to me because this happened in the 80s and a lot of there are a lot of misconceptions and I didn't want to be labeled a certain kind of journalist because I would be seen as someone who was a quote unquote battered wife And I thought it might hurt my career at one point But the other thing was that I felt that I could take what had happened to me I remember telling myself that at least if this had to happen to you maybe you have more empathy in dealing with other people And in helping them tell stories if they want to tell what happened to them And so I kind of did that But there was one interview I did on CBC radio with a woman who had been in a terrible relationship and was talking about what it was like to get out and how it's still followed her And we were disguising her voice and her location And it was a pre tape It wasn't live on the air And I stopped I asked to stop the recording because I felt she was being too specific and she would be identifiable And in the course of the conversation we had off tape we both got a little bit weepy and I told her a bit of my story And I'd never done that And then we continued with her story but after I thought about what I had done and I thought you know like for the longest time I thought this gave me an opportunity to be empathetic and now it feels like being silent is an error of omission if not a full blown lie So I thought I needed to find a way to talk Do you know who that thing about this series is that you have these little moments that first of all I mean the telling of the physical violence I'm not going to play here because I feel like many people will have experienced this themselves and I don't know that they need to hear this again but let me just say for people who need to know this for whatever reason that this man could have killed you I just want to make that clear that the level of physical abuse was such that he could have killed you and you and I might not be here now talking about this So I'm very thankful that that did not happen But one of the things that I find really really moving about the series is when you talk about these small moments of recognition like you describe this moment in the grocery store when you see a woman who looks happy but you realize from the outside it is you really don't know What's going on with her You really don't know what's going on with people And I was interested in that too The fact that people you were very close to didn't know and I'm wondering how you feel about that that there was one instance where your neighbors called the police because they heard something was going wrong but then you said you said you were mad at them for calling the police But can I just ask you what are your thoughts about that That feeling of being alone in it or not people not knowing even people you're very close to I went out of my way to hide my bruises I went out of my way to appear and he did too by the way like a loving couple in public My family lived in Ontario and I was on the east coast of Canada at the time so it was easy to hide it from my parents And I think the other thing that happens is we really don't know I mean I've always been struck as a journalist that you know you walk along the streets of any city you pass people you don't know who you know who was tortured 5 weeks ago and ends up in your country now Who ends up somewhere else We don't know each other's stories And I realized that that was my moment of recognition in the grocery line because I was thinking about that woman who seemed to have a great life Well you don't know how bad mine is and I stopped myself and I thought well you don't know what her life is like And again something that has kind of influenced me journalistically You know you can't tell outwardly what's going on with someone's life you have to kind of make space to let them tell you How do you mind sharing I'm trying to sort of dance around here because I'm not sure how much you want to reveal and how much you want to let the series reveal but do you mind talking about how did you finally end it How did you finally get out I got out of the marriage because he threatened to kill me He literally sat down across from me one morning with his coffee and said if I didn't leave he would kill me it would just be a matter of time And I did not believe him but I did leave and I went crying to my Friends Several hours down the highway And then I went back and the assault when I went back made it pretty clear that I better leave And so I did and you know several months later he wanted to get back together with me and I actually considered it for a week but by then I had some distance and I couldn't put myself through that And it was a moment of understanding that I had agency that I could have some control And it was a watershed for me And I was about to say to him I'm not coming back and he said to me I don't want you to come back So you know I thought fine good I don't have to go through it That's how I got out What I didn't understand is that that shame and all that stuff would follow me for years you know not always so prominently but it would kind of always be there.

Anna Maria tremonti NPR news Michelle Martin tremonti Canada CBC east coast Ontario
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:58 min | 9 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news and Michelle Martin Russia's attack on Ukraine is going into its fourth week now It's met far stiffer resistance from Ukrainian fighters than the Russians seem to expect Now we've talked quite a bit in recent days about what Ukraine's allies can do to help the country defend itself But now we need to focus on the other side of the equation What is Russia likely to do to break the impasse for clues many experts are looking to Syria where Russian forces help Syrian dictate a basher Al Assad stay in power despite a decade long uprising against him those clues are frightening A United Nations commission investigating atrocities committed in Syria has repeatedly concluded that Russia's military launched attacks in Syria that targeted civilians and amounted to war crimes To learn more about this we call it Mona yakubi and she is a senior adviser at the U.S. institute of peace and she's with us now Mona yakubi and welcome Thank you for joining us Thanks so much for having me Now we've been seeing Russia launch air strikes in Ukraine against civilian targets like that theater and Mario pole were displaced people were hiding Targeting civilians is something Russia also did in Syria That is mentioned specifically in a number of UN reports The question always hangs in the air is this intentional or somehow a mistake or collateral damage So based on your understanding of the facts were those kinds of attacks deliberate a part of Russia's strategy in Syria Well I think given how widespread the tactic was used in Syria which as you note for now more than ten years has seen indiscriminate shelling and bombing of hospitals medical facilities schools residential neighborhoods areas with no military targets to speak of That kind of shelling really can't be can't be understood in any other way And I would note there was also in 2016 the deliberate targeting of a UN humanitarian convoy by Russia the convoy was attempting to bring food and assistance into a besieged part of Aleppo So I think there's very little question that this was a very deliberate tactic to intimidate and kill civilians and win by brutal force So based on what we saw in Syria is this a the question now is is Russia likely to rely on large scale aerial bombardment And if so is that because the ground offensive continues to stall or is this just a not just I mean I don't even know how to say this is this part and parcel of their military tactics Well I think as Russia becomes more desperate more frustrated in Ukraine you can see it pull out all the stops And use a number of tactics not only the deliberate and indiscriminate shelling of civilian targets but also tactics that were already seeing in Ukraine such as besiegement This is something that the Russians and the Assad regime used with great purpose in Syria We saw it specifically in Aleppo And in the Damascus suburbs where these areas were besieged for as long as four years During that time these areas were cut off and no assistance was allowed into these areas People were essentially starved into submission That is another tech that we're already beginning to see Unfortunately in Ukraine And as we've mentioned Russia has been called out by the United Nations for conducting attacks in Syria that amounted to war crimes has Russia suffered any consequences at all for that from an international law perspective or has Syria for that matter Well there have been massive sanctions placed on Syria not on Russia for its conduct in Syria but certainly on the Assad regime Unfortunately we have not seen the accountability for the brutality of the way the war was prosecuted in Syria on the contrary The Assad regime and by extension Russia operated with virtual impunity And what does that tell us though I mean was there some ambiguity about Russia's role in Syria or does this say something about the international legal system I mean how do you understand that Well I think part of it is the consequence of a UN Security Council that was rendered ineffective by virtue of Russia's member as one of the permanent 5 and therefore wielding veto powers So international institutions that are designed to address these key issues of peace and security were rendered virtually ineffective in Syria and unfortunately sadly and tragically The world largely stood by as this horrific war in Syria unfolded So before we let you go is there anything else you would want to say about so taking a step back What do you think the legacy of the Syrian conflict is When it comes to all of these things that we've talked about or there's a way wars are fought going forward the way the international community responds What lessons do you hope people will draw from what happened in that conflict Well I mean I think there are a few things that come to mind One is of course just the international community must come together and think more creatively about how we address these kinds of conflicts And I think what we're learning about the nature of conflict in the 21st century is just how complex it is and how quickly it takes on a dynamic of its own That becomes very very difficult to roll back One other kind of similarity that I'm thinking about with respect to Russia and how it prosecuted the war in Syria and what it might hold for Ukraine is if we look at Russia's endgame in Syria Russia came in at the behest of the Assad regime to retake all of the country Instead it has settled for a fractured unstable and impoverished Syria Syria is now divided into different areas not under the government's control They were not able the Russians to achieve their maximalist aim so they settled for this One hopes that that's not aware things are going in Ukraine Where Russia its ambitions stymied nonetheless prosecutes a war that leads to the fracturing of Ukraine That was senior adviser to the vice president for North Africa and the Middle East at the U.S. institute of peace And thanks so much for speaking with us today and sharing these insights Thank you.

Syria Russia Mona yakubi NPR news Michelle Martin Al Assad United Nations commission U.S. institute of peace Mario pole Aleppo Assad UN Damascus United Nations UN Security Council North Africa Middle East
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:41 min | 9 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news and Michelle Martin Russia's war in Ukraine will soon have lasted a month in that time major Ukrainian cities have been bombed relentlessly The United Nations says at least 900 civilians have been killed and likely many more and though Ukrainian president Vladimir zelensky still says negotiations are the way to end the war the two sides are too far apart to reach a deal any time soon and Pierre Becky Sullivan is in lviv in western Ukraine and she's with us now to give us the latest Becky Welcome Thank you for joining us Yeah thank you Michelle First let's start with the humanitarian aid situation which you've been looking into What can you tell us about this The need for aid is huge here I mean the scale really can't be overstated The latest numbers from the UN say that there are 6 and a half million internally displaced people which means Ukrainians who've left their homes but are still inside the country About 3.4 million have fled altogether And then on top of all of that there are 13 more million people still living in the places worth fighting is taking place And so just put another way that's more than half of the country directly impacted by this which is just staggering In the last few days I've spoken to representatives both from the UN's refugee agency and from the international committee of the Red Cross Both of which report that they're working hard to get aid to people They've set up warehouses in cities across Ukraine working to get aid flowing from west to east The biggest needs right now they say are shelter for all those people who are leaving their homes They of course need a place to stay At least for a few nights and some of these cities that are closer to the conflict to get on their feet collect their documents And then longer term the UN says they're looking into converting buildings into longer term shelters that can collectively house thousands while people find housing or wait to return home And we've heard about the need for humanitarian corridors out of these places How is that working Yeah this has been a huge deal too The UN's office for human affairs negotiates these things directly with Ukraine and Russia I talked today to a representative from the UN who says the negotiations have been quote incredibly challenging And some of them have worked just today Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky said about 6600 people were able to evacuate yesterday along 8 of these humanitarian corridors Most of them in the Kyiv area are in Luhansk which is one of these contested regions in eastern Ukraine And more than 4000 people were able to leave Mario pull He said which is of course the city on the southern coast that you might have heard about were Russian air strikes have hit a theater in an art school in recent days according to city officials where they say civilians were taking shelter But Karolina leonhard billing she is the UN's refugee agency's representative in Ukraine She told me that those aren't official UN negotiated corridors that would also allow for aid groups to safely deliver relief to these places It's not enough to say yes yes we will hold the ceasefire during this period There really has to be also guarantees on the details like where the positions of the troops at the time of the ceasefire start And even if there is a ceasefire there's still just some logistical concerns Like for example the main road from dnipro to Mario pole is now either just damaged by fighting or there are big burned out vehicles blocking the road she says or in their minds in some places which of course make it very dangerous for aid groups to trouble So what can you tell us about negotiations between Ukraine and Russia to end this Yeah those are ongoing They've been on for weeks just taking place off and on between diplomats and representatives Zelensky and Russian president Vladimir Putin have not taken part in negotiations to themselves directly zelensky has been calling for these direct talks between the two leaders and he repeated that call today talking to CNN through an interpreter I am ready for negotiations for the house I think that was our negotiations We can not end this war But Putin so far has turned that down And so although the sides have reported more of a productive tone in recent days they still seem quite far apart on the biggest issues like whether Ukraine can be part of NATO whether Russia can make any security guarantees after this is over and then what the future is of these Ukrainian areas that are held by Russians now That is NPR's Becky Sullivan in lviv which is in western Ukraine Becky thank you so much Thank you Ukraine's allies have been showing their support opening borders to the country's refugees sending weapons humanitarian aid and applying debilitating sanctions on Russia and last week as Russian strikes fell on parts of Kyiv the prime ministers of Poland the Czech Republic and Slovenia traveled by train to the Ukrainian capital to meet with president zelensky The trip which was not announced in advance took place despite the obvious security risks to show support for Ukraine Today we are joined by one of those leaders prime minister Yang xia of Slovenia prime minister thank you so much for taking the time to speak with us Thank you for showing that interest Please tell me why was it important to you to make this trip despite the obvious security risks to meet with president zelensky Well this idea came from our actually personally experienced also because 30 years ago is the winner was invaded by Yugoslavia's army We were partially in the same position So we know exactly how Ukrainian friends feel and we know what the difference between if something is calling you by form or via video conferences or if somebody is coming to support you and when we came to kill presence and said I hope he said this is the beginning of the return of the representatives and I have to announce that Slovenia is sending power and vascular or charged affair Back to Kia within van reek and we are trying to persuade our European friends in browsers to send you ambassadors back After the meeting you gave a press conference where you said that Ukraine is part of the EU family and you were part of a group of leaders who called for the EU to admit Ukraine immediately which they declined to do things are moving so quickly on the ground How would that change things in your view You know that new grain that put into its constitution The aspiration to join European Union and NATO They are prepared to abandon this aspiration for NATO But at the same time they once as they say institutional guarantees and they see those guarantees inside the European Union and I think that they're right And we need to take fast track for.

Ukraine UN NPR news Michelle Martin Russia Vladimir zelensky Pierre Becky Sullivan international committee of the lviv office for human affairs volodymyr zelensky Luhansk Karolina leonhard Becky Mario pole Kyiv zelensky United Nations Michelle southern coast
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

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06:09 min | 9 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is all things considered from NPR news on Michelle Martin Russia's invasion of Ukraine has sparked one of the largest refugee crises of the modern era with more than 2.5 million people leaving their homes in just the last two weeks to try to find safety And that means many are traveling long distances without adequate food or water World central kitchen the nonprofit which provides meals in response to crises around the world is trying to get food to those people They've set up meal distribution sites at 8 border crossings with Poland and they're working with local restaurants supermarkets and caterers in the region to provide food The founder of world central kitchen chef Jose Andres is in western Ukraine in lviv right now Chef welcome thank you so much for talking with us Thank you for having me Would you just tell us a little bit more about where you are and describe the scene where you are Well right now I am in lavish right outside a hotel in the heart of this city that is becoming kind of where all the refugees trying to leave the war behind trying to find a safe home in the countries that are welcoming them This is becoming the hub or almost everybody that tries to little train is coming through So you started operating your group started operating shortly after the invasion began How did you get set up so fast And how are you even getting the food you need Well I want to make sure that everybody understands that obviously Ukraine has different scenarios Is the places for 150 kilometers away from where I am right now where people are in a war where bombs are falling down and where children and women are dying every day by these non logical attack by the Russians Why we are so quick because we don't plan We don't meet We come and we began cooking And in the process we began covering the needs Phase one for us was making sure that in Poland all the border crossings we could have food set up So when people were coming in they could have a hot plate of soup and water and that we began taking care of them right there But very quickly we regard spending in other countries So obviously on the Romania we are in the Slovakia making sure that we cover every entry point to safety for due to any refugees At the same time we began doing the same in the Ukrainian border inside the Ukrainian because sometimes the way it was at the beginning of this war was up to 5 days for people to be able to turn the moment they left gifts to the moment they went into safety could be many hours many days People walking people in buses people in trains And we're making sure that people will get food down the road We will become partnering with restaurants with people that already were doing and making sure that we create a network Right now we are in 12 cities and set to claim with hundreds of places that we deliver food daily from train stations to refugees shelters et cetera et cetera bringing the full force of the restaurant industry to make sure that we can feed everybody living the horrors of this war And I know that you talk to people while you're working with them and serving food I mean that's something that you've always done wherever you are Would you just tell us a little bit about some of the people you've met or some of the stories that they've told you Well every time you engage with people giving them smile and sometimes people use they want to be listen or they don't want to talk To feel that somebody is getting for that But sometimes a child you are giving them a fruit or sandwich And very quickly one of the first things that Joe boy or young girl tells you is my dad is not here with us my dad is stay behind You'll know that that child is almost like growing up way too quickly because he's almost knowing why Without telling you he is almost telling you that he's that He's the same behind To defend his city to defend the country And this kind of breaks your heart at the same time that you may have young men who trains coming from all over the world even non Ukrainians citizens of other countries that they are coming to join the defense of this country When you see those young men going into crime knowing that they are going to be joining the fight Kind of break too hard because you wonder why we need to be put in young people men and women in this situation of having to go to defend their country and put in their lives at risk Nothing makes sense I lead feeling people is what makes sense Longer tables people working together to make sure that one people feel that the time we can bring hope of a better tomorrow And before we let you go how are you doing I'm doing great I'm coming to the comfort of my hotel room We had water but that makes you think like not too far away from where I am What we enjoy the safety of our homes right now is John Boyd's young girls woman elderly somewhere somewhere in a tunnel somewhere in a basement and were bombs are falling down over their heads We all need to speak up We need to do more We need to be asking our leaders especially the leaders of the democracies of the world that we can not leave the Ukrainian people along We need to be next to presidential landscape They are defending their country We need to make sure that the horrors that president put in is bringing to train and to the world will not be successful We can not allow never again one person to control the destiny of an entire country of an entire planet That is chef Jose Andres is the founder of world central kitchen which is a nonprofit that provides meals to people in crisis situations around the world Chef thank you so much for talking with us and we respect and appreciate you Thank you.

Ukraine NPR news Michelle Martin Jose Andres Poland lviv Joe boy Russia Slovakia Romania John Boyd world central kitchen
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:05 min | 9 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news and Michelle Martin Russia continued to expand its attack on Ukraine today air raid sirens rang out in the past few hours across almost all of the country There has been fierce fighting in the suburbs of the capital Kyiv and heavy Russian bombardment continues to rain down on cities in southern and eastern Ukraine The port city of mariupol has been under Russian siege for several days now and was the scene of more terror today some time ago Ukrainian authorities said more than 80 people including children were trapped in a mosque there as Russian shelling continued nearby NPR's Lauren freyer is in western Ukraine and she is with us now to tell us more Lauren thanks so much for being here Thanks for having me Michelle First could you just tell us what is the latest in Mario poll which is in the south The situation is incredibly dire there The city doesn't have gas electricity it's running low on food Every day civilians try to get out of Mario polo through these humanitarian corridors and nearly every day Ukrainian officials accuse Russia of violating the rules and firing on evacuees You mentioned that mosque in Mario where civilians are sheltering Well the international Red Cross also said today that 65 people are sheltering in their Mario bowl office too The people that are trying to get water at the agency says people are coming into their office and saying they no longer have any food for their children What about key We were hearing for days about a Russian convoy that was stalled on its way to the Ukrainian capital Can you tell us the latest on that Yes that convoy is fanned out now and it looks like those Russian forces are aiming artillery directly at the capitol now There was fierce fighting today northwest of the city We're getting to the point where many Ukrainian cities are being flattened There's a huge humanitarian crisis There's also concern for Ukraine's history It's churches its monuments all being destroyed by war I met up with officials in lviv in western Ukraine where I am who've launched this special operation to try to protect their heritage monuments Take a listen Standing in a cobblestone square in central lviv lilia onishchenko is bracing herself against the cold scrolling through bad news on her phone and cursing Vladimir Putin A 19th century wooden church flattened she says a folk museum shelled a library with rare books destroyed On top of the human losses across Ukraine this really makes on this chunk of angry In some ways it just brought official an amarna I've devoted my life to protecting these monuments she says On this chanco is the head of historical preservation in lviv It's the biggest city in western Ukraine It's old quarter is a Unesco World Heritage Site Parts of it date back to the 5th century There's a stunning church on almost every street architecture from the medieval and renaissance periods Onishchenko takes me on a tour of what she's doing to save all of this We pass through an Armenian church Oh wow Smells like incense Massive golden ceiling here And into a courtyard Where workers in coveralls are putting up scaffolding around a giant baroque altarpiece Jesus is moved further more than Jesus for there This is left of me Yeah Jesus has left because it's made with wood Wooden Jesus has moved for the moment says Alexander rucho who was a tour guide in lviv Now he's helping disassemble and stash away all the artifacts he used to tell tourists about Jesus statues across the city have been taken down from their crosses paintings removed from museum walls Hidden in secret locations underground for safe keeping Vitalik kulluk is another tourist official who's been walking the streets taking stock of metal statues in city squares Neptune with his trident the Ukrainian poet taras Shevchenko with his arm raised Kulug is trying to figure out what Russian bombs could do to them But usually the bombs are making the high temperature or that burns everything around So you're worried that these could melt Yeah Kulaks team went to the local equivalent of Home Depot bought fire proof material and wrapped up the statues right there on their pedestals hundreds of them At the city's Roman Catholic cathedral a crane lifts workers up to soaring stained glass windows To cover them with plywood and aluminum These are areas that survive occupation by the Nazis and the Soviets The front lines in World War II moved back and forth across Kuluk the tourism official hopes that that won't be the case in this war Our army is doing very.

Ukraine NPR news Michelle Martin mariupol Lauren freyer Michelle First Mario polo international Red Cross lviv lilia onishchenko Kyiv NPR Onishchenko Lauren Mario Alexander rucho Vladimir Putin Kulug taras Shevchenko
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:52 min | 9 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news and Michelle Martin This weekend lawmakers activists and supporters vice president Kamala Harris among them gathered in Selma Alabama to commemorate the anniversary of bloody Sunday and the larger campaign by black citizens of the south to exercise their right to vote Bloody Sunday is so called because on Sunday March 7th 1965 the day the first attempt to march from Selma to the Alabama capital of Montgomery began state troopers and their accomplices violently attacked the unarmed men and women causing serious injury to many but provoking national outrage which is back when reporting trip to Alabama ourselves where we spoke with officials and activists about the current conflict over voter access and voting rights That's one reason we spoke with congresswoman Terri sewell She is a native of Selma and now represents Alabama's 7th congressional district which includes Selma and other historic cities like Birmingham and Montgomery It's also the only one of the state's 7 districts that's majority African American Not surprisingly she's the state's sole African American and democratic representative in Congress And that's a data point at the center of the latest controversy in the state's long history of battles over fair access to the polls Representative sewell says the fact that she is the only African American representing the state in Congress points up the problem Alabama is comprised of 27% African American And there are 7 seats in Alabama's congressional delegation and there's only one that is represented by an African American And we deserve to have 27% of the seats which would be another seat I was proud to see that several lawsuits were filed about that And packing my district means that my other colleagues don't have to even listen to the issues and concerns of African Americans in their district And that's not fair It's about voter dilution is what it is Not to get into the legalese of it but just on the representation African Americans need to be represented more in the state of Alabama An Alabama is not the only one Mississippi Louisiana South Carolina all of which have populations of African Americans that hover around 30% And so times they need to be a change in But if you told me as a little girl sitting at Brown chapel AME church my home church in Selma that I would grow up and become Alabama's first black congresswoman or yet still that the issue that I would have to carry is the issue of voting rights Surely that issue had been decided by the John Lewis of the world who made major sacrifices for the Voting Rights Act And the eventual election of African Americans across the host of offices political offices But my cause is now their cause because the reality is that old battles have become new again We see state legislatures all across this country imposing tougher and more barriers for people to vote What are you most concerned about You're concerned you've said you concerned that the Voting Rights Act will actually have no oversight at all But what else What are their state level initiatives that concern you right now Because the state legislature meter is meeting right now And I know that's not your primary responsibility But is it no longer so much the legal framework is that the administrative interpretation is that is that what you're mainly concerned about Well I'm concerned about every state especially my state because I represent my state but the fact is that after what was ostensibly the most secure election ever the most voter participation ever in this presidential election You saw state legislatures across this country introduced 400 over 400 bills that would restrict voting And 39 of them passed And now this new legislative cycle of states like Alabama are considering more restrictive laws And so I visited with the state of Alabama the black caucus the Alabama legislators legislative black caucus And I think everybody is concerned that without federal oversight And let's just face it We wouldn't have the Voting Rights Act of 1965 if it wasn't for federal intervention whether that was the court systems And judges like Frank Johnson who allowed who granted the injunction to make Alabama stay away so that the marchers could march from Selma to Montgomery It was federal intervention that really gave us and help implement a lot of the very important desegregation and access issues that deal with race What do you say to those who argue that this isn't racist gerrymandering it's partisan gerrymandering that their argument is that the argument is that yes there are advantage Republicans But it's not because they're white it's because they're Republicans How do you respond to that The argument is that it's a constitute a violation of the constitution to the one person one vote concept And so this is not about partisan Yes it may look like it's partisan just because African Americans tend to vote democratic Not all of us are monolithic by the way But the reality is that the reason why we should care and the federal government does care is because race discrimination is a protected class And the fact that these districts are being packed with African Americans and Hispanics I mean frankly the Latino community is affected just like we are affected in states like Texas And Florida And so I think that it is about voter dilution I think that all of my alabamians wish to have their voices heard And I can tell you that many think that their voices are not being heard because their legislators don't agree with them Don't look like them Don't come and visit their communities are not engaged with them And the reality is that we represent everyone in our districts not just some of the people Before you let you go though you have a very distinguished biography you obviously very committed to this work You are gifted in this work But do you ever worry that really the intention is to discourage people who are not as motivated as you are Because people often point to the historic voter turnout in both in 2016 and then in 2020 and say there is no need for these protections because look at the voter turnout But do you ever wear that people maybe turned out because they were mad and motivated then but that after constantly fighting for this they will get tired and discouraged and they won't understand what is the point One of the points that you were making earlier in our conversation as you said that you know that people don't feel that they're represented If that continues you ever worry that people will just give up Absolutely I think one of the biggest threats to our democracy is voter apathy Voters have to fill vested vested in the election vested in the people who are representing them And I am encouraged by how many young people are now getting more interested in politics and being more engaged on progressive issues that matter to them That's the bright spot But yes a threat to our democracy is voter apathy But I think that what we have to do we who are in this fight is to time and time again be able to show our constituents how their vote benefits them People in Selma were mad that we didn't pass the Voting Rights Act I mean let's just say that My constituents a lot of my home folk were evil But I had to remind them that their vote in voting for this administration got them the American rescue plan within the first hundred days which was money directly in their pockets in a third round of stimulus which was shots in arms which was money for small businesses which helped people back to work I also reminded them as I did today that we also.

Alabama Selma NPR news Michelle Martin Montgomery Terri sewell Brown chapel AME church Kamala Harris Congress sewell John Lewis Birmingham Frank Johnson South Carolina Mississippi Louisiana legislature federal government
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 10 months ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All things considered from NPR news on Michelle Martin a trial going on in Central America could have broad implications for indigenous communities around the world that seek to regain control of ancestral lands It started this month at the inter American court of human rights in Costa Rica The case centers on a land dispute near a nickel mine in Guatemala Demand for nickel has increased around the world as it is used in batteries for electric cars The ruling could take months and one question is whether the Guatemalan government would comply with it report at Maria Martin has more Like so much indigenous history going back to the Spanish conquest in Guatemala The case has to do with Latina The land and who controls it An indigenous group from a small community in the northeastern part of the country is asking the inter American court of human rights to give them clear title to the land They've been living on for generations But longer Attorney Carlos Pope represents the people of the community called awa caliente He says residents have worked for nearly 40 years to establish legal title After paying for it they discovered the titles had been ripped from the property records They faced force evictions as the government handed out mining licenses in the slush area in the mountains above the shores of Guatemala's largest Lake Lago Isabel Get to Maya community leader Rodrigo totte tells me by phone that people are anxious for the court to rule as they've suffered for many years As he was growing up starting in the 1960s He watched a mining company started to strip mining for nickel all around our caliente with no consultation with the communities whose land they were polluting The Lake the rivers and other sources of water he says This strip mining first of all it creates a toxic waste dump You can see nasty stuff You can smell nasty stuff The community brought Victoria Sanford into the case as an expert witness About the violence that catchy Maya have endured trying to hold onto their lands And about the complicated history of land grabbing by the state going back centuries An anthropologist at Lehman college in New York she says this case is significant not only in Guatemala but in New Caledonia Africa and other places A small batteries are needed for electric cars demand for nickel rises as does the danger For local communities You know the most dangerous occupation to have right now in Latin America is to be an indigenous environmental activist And so these folks need protection the Guatemalan ministry of energy and mining failed to respond to numerous requests for comment Meanwhile our caliente leader Rodrigo Todd says he's concerned about what the court will decide And whether the government of Guatemala will comply The inter American court is backed by the organization of American states and its rulings carry legal weight But the Guatemalan government has ignored past court decisions in favor of our calientes land rights I'm worried because our own authorities don't understand our situation And in fact are against us They favor those who seek to take the riches from our community That's activism has led to threats and in 2012 his son was killed In addition to the land titles the community is asking the court for compensation for damages and for security for dot and his family For NPR news I'm Maria Martin and Antigua Guatemala.

inter American court of human Guatemala Guatemalan government NPR news Michelle Martin Maria Martin Attorney Carlos Pope Lake Lago Isabel Rodrigo totte Central America Victoria Sanford Rica Costa Guatemalan ministry of energy Lehman college Rodrigo Todd New Caledonia The Lake Maya inter American court
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is WNYC 93.9 FM and a.m. 8 20 NPR news and the New York conversation This is all things considered from NPR news I'm Michelle Martin Michael tubbs made national headlines in 2016 when he was elected mayor of Stockton California It was not only the first African American elected to that office He was only 26 making him the youngest ever mayor of a major American city The attention didn't end with his election as he became known for an ambitious and controversial agenda launching an experiment in universal basic income or trying to curb homicides by paying people at risk of committing them to put down their guns But despite the Cinderella beginnings the son of a single mom and incarcerated dad who goes to Stanford and comes home to make a difference it did not have a fairytale ending Tom's lost his bid for reelection after a vicious smear campaign by a former rival He talks about all this in a new memoir the people and places that made him the challenges that awaited him and what he still hopes to accomplish It's called the deeper the roots and memoir of hope and home and Michael tubbs is with us now to tell us more about it Michael tabs mister mayor welcome back Thank you for joining us Thank you so much for having me So you open your book with the phrase your mother said to you each day before you went to school don't tell nobody our business That's what way to start a memoir So what made you decide to disobey her at least in this case and tell everything I realized particularly in the work as mayor and the work on basic income and the work on alternatives to policing that narrative is what really changed people's ideas and perceptions and what was possible I know my mom was very adamant about the young to tell people your business but I think story and storytelling is what's going to help this democracy It survived in my opinion I thought it would be useful to use my story as it lends through which to talk about policy to talk about innovation to talk about race and class and all those things Before we move on to that bigger story I did want to talk about your folks because your parents loomed so large in your story and how you got to where you are I mean we meet the three women who raised who your mom your aunt and your grandmother and something you're very honest about is not having your dad around I just wanted to ask if you would talk about what effect do you think that had on you Because I'm sure there are people right now who are who are experiencing the same thing Yeah growing up with a father who was incarcerated and not knowing what he was incarcerated for but knowing he was going to be away for a long time you and merely things like the worst case scenario So I was embarrassed I was like what if my father raped somebody with my father murdered somebody What does that say about me There's enough judgments already 'cause my mom is young There's never judgments already 'cause I'm black I don't want to add another layer and sound like a stereotypical story So I was just like I can tell anyone this But it's also real sense of shame And also I think it really gave me a chip on my shoulder to prove everybody wrong to prove to people like no I'm not going to go I'm not going to be in prison No I can be smart I know I can quote unquote be successful But I think it also creates a lot of pressure I put on myself to be almost perfect or to just do everything right to never mess up to always be the best And I think that led to some of the attitude that a lot of my teachers didn't appreciate You know even if you over the years as you were taking on some of these programs like I remember you are now internationally recognized for your efforts to spearhead a universal basic income pilot program which you launched in 2019 We spoke with you about the program just after the pilot And the outcome seemed positive And one of the reasons I'm bringing that up is that I just think it was a shock to many people when you didn't win reelection because you had put so many things into motion And one of the challenges you face as a mayor is disinformation I mean there was a local blog that fabricated stories racist tropes we've seen just in the last election the same thing happened in New Jersey And people didn't It's almost like they didn't even notice And I just you know you were dealing with then a lot of the things that people have observed now how do you think about that Yeah this information I think it's a commentary on just the crisis of democracy that we're in Around sort of how hyper capitalism and unfettered technological innovation without guardrails has created an environment where people are being fed poison every day where we have people lighting up thinking that John F. Kennedy Jr. is going to rise from the dead It's a scary moment I think without a proper antidote because it's really about people are scared things are changing so quickly People are looking for an explanation a quick explanation to make sense of the world At the same time we have these local news stations evaporating like towns like south is a ton of 300,000 people We had one newspaper and that one newspaper was gutted by 40% my first year as mayor And I think it's a real crisis and people really have to wake up because people.

NPR news Michelle Martin Michael tubbs Michael tubbs Stockton Stanford Tom California New York Michael John F. Kennedy Jr. New Jersey
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR news I'm David falkin flick in for Michelle Martin As the number of Americans who are vaccinated against COVID-19 continues to rise one of the big questions many people still have is what about kids When can they get vaccinated For many who are parents few questions are more urgent None of the COVID vaccines are authorized for use in small children Yet And that could be about to change Last week The White House announced its plan to roll out Pfizer's COVID-19 shots for kids aged 5 to 11 and fast Just as soon as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control each give a green light The Biden administration says it's bought enough doses for all 28 million children in that age group Yet that doesn't guarantee they'll all get the vaccine How are doctors preparing for this major new moment We wanted to learn more so we reached out to pediatrician Noreen womack at saint Luke's children's in eagle Idaho Doctor womack welcome Thank you We've just caught up with you after you had a pretty full day of appointments with children and their parents What are you seeing out there Well this winter versus last winter we're seeing a little bit of everything again Croup RSV which is respiratory syncytial virus not an influenza yet and of course COVID So let's talk about that Idaho lags in vaccination rates just slightly more than half of adults are fully vaccinated according to figures from the state government Why are those rates so low It's a very good question I think that there's still a lot of uncertainty in a lot of people was this too fast Is this going to cause infertility Despite data to the contrary there's still lots of hesitancy And unfortunately not just hesitancy on some people's part It's just Frank What I would call willful ignorance Why do you think that is You know I'm not really sure When you ask them they cite freedom They just want to be able to do the things that they want to do I see a lot of it's my body You can't tell me what to do And I even saw that on a sign somebody put that sign on their young kindergarten student not too far from where I work There was a recent poll by CBS News that found about 37% of parents with children between the ages of 5 and 11 would clearly get their kids vaccinated 35% said no And 26% said maybe And those numbers seem to roughly align with whether or not the parents themselves are vaccinated What are you personally hearing from parents I think parents want to do the right thing I think there is so much misinformation out there that I think for them they think the safest thing to do is nothing So we'll just wait and see is there going to be more data Maybe in a year they'll know more So I think that's part of the hesitancy on parents part And of course it's your children so they want to be extra careful and make sure that it's the right thing to do I mean it sounds as though from a little bit of what you're talking about that it can get contentious in there in the examination rooms Yes It's been thankfully people overall are cordial especially on a one to one basis Where I've seen a lot of contention and just raising of voices is actually at the school districts and the rural school boards There's been a lot of fighting and anger There have been three school board members that have resigned up in northern Idaho They had to cancel a board school board meeting because it wasn't safe There is at least one member that I know of that has a police escort to go to and from her school board meetings She has to park far away and then get walked by police because she's worried about violence But in my day to day life it does not look like that thank goodness So give us a feel for what it looks like from your perspective You're in the room with parents of a kid They're thinking about this stuff Vaccines our political flashpoint There's ranker about even wearing masks How do you cut through the anger or the anxiety It's very difficult unless you already have her relationship with the family And I have to say I actually work mainly in the schools I work in a couple of title one schools so I do school based clinics And in the school district where I work there is no mask mandate And so when you're talking about me being in a room with the family a lot of times you know I'm wearing a mask and they aren't And that kind of tells me a lot of what I need to know there I do find again on a one to one basis especially if you have relationship with them you've known them for some years You can have those conversations And that's why I think it's going to be a good idea and the national American academy of pediatrics did say that they want the pediatric COVID vaccine to go to pediatric clinics which is smart because who knows better than a pediatrician how to counsel on vaccines You know that's our bread and butter I'm not saying it's easy but we certainly have a lot of practice at it And so we can have those open conversations And I think that's going to be really helpful in hopefully in increasing vaccination among children We do now have the potential to likelihood of a vaccine for these young children ages 5 to 11 and yet there's this delta variant there and there's a resistance that you've just talked about So eloquently are you worried Are you hopeful How are you approaching the next phase of this pandemic Well I think all of us pediatricians are thinking about the messaging around vaccines to our families Some of the things that I'll definitely mention to families who are contemplating getting the COVID vaccine for their children is that I think COVID vaccines have had the most intensive safety monitoring ever in the history of monitoring vaccines that there have been tens and thousands of patients being studied from 6 months of age and up and that everything shows that the vaccines are safe and effective And let's not forget that we know that COVID-19 is not good for kids even if they don't get as sick more and more kids in Idaho are losing their parent or their uncle or their grandparent I think all of us will be bringing that up as well.

NPR news David falkin Michelle Martin U.S. Food and Drug Administrat Biden administration Noreen womack eagle Idaho saint Luke Idaho womack Centers for Disease Control Pfizer White House influenza CBS News Frank national American academy of p
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:30 min | 1 year ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin. We're going to begin once again with the latest on the violence in the Middle East, where fighting between Israelis and Palestinians continued for 1/7 Day today, Israeli airstrikes pummeled Gaza once again, officials said they were targeting the home of a top leader of Hamas, which controls the territory. Officials in Gaza said at least 33 people were killed by the bombings. Must responded by launching another barrage of rockets into Israel. Overall, at least 180 Palestinians have been killed in the violence so far, including more than 50 Children. Well, at least eight people have been killed in Israel, including a five year old boy. This crisis has escalated over the past week. NPR has brought you a wide range of perspectives on this story from diplomats and officials and longtime observers of the region as well as Palestinians and Israelis. Just trying to get through this So we're bringing you another perspective. Now. That's of Mont Rashid Erica. He is a Palestinian diplomat, a former chief representative of the Palestine Liberation Organization to the United States. And he's a veteran of previous negotiations. Ambassador Erica Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you, Michelle. It's been seven years since the last significant conflict with Hamas. It's been 16 years since the last major Palestinian uprising or intifada, as briefly as you can. Why now? Well, I I think it's the fact that the root causes for this conflict are still there, which is simply tow your listeners. The continuation of the Israeli military occupation off the Palestinian people that started in 1967. And Israel's refusal to allow the Palestinians toe have their own self determination and their own independence and freedom. And as long as this military occupation continues, it reminds me with the slogan that the Clinton a team used in 1992. It's the economy stupid. It's the occupation. Stupid, You know. I mean, if you try to explain it, no matter how you try to explain it It's the Israeli military occupation that continues to create conditions for the Palestinians that are unbearable and that is the main source off the violence in the region. So we know that Hamas and your organization the P L. O Have actually opposed each other. I think we might say their political rivals on the P L O has made agreements with Israel that Hamas rejects Hamas took over Gaza, kicking out the Palestinian Authority officials. If I could ask you to help us understand what Hamas is. Strategy is I mean, Hamas firing rockets at Israel is provoking a response where the death toll is vastly disparate. I mean, many more Palestinians have Died. Then Israelis have and Israeli defenses seem to make these rockets less. Lethal than the otherwise you know, would be or could be. So what? What is the strategic objective here by Hamas? If if you could help us understand that? Well, listen, I witnessed I witnessed many rounds of talks in my life and You know, the plover opted for peace agreements with Israel signed the Oslo Accord in 1993 made peace with Israel and what what the Palestinians did get in return. You tell me Israelis. The majority of Israelis do not even contemplative solution with the Palestinian people and the Palestinians found themselves in a situation where Israel is exploiting our goodwill and good faith to reconcile to co exist with them to build more settlements and deny us the right to self determination of statehood. So it's natural that people who are factions who are opposed to toe Israeli policies like Hamas and others will gain popular support among Palestinians. Hamas did warn Israel before They launched the rocket Unless you stop your provocations in Jerusalem At Al Aqsa most we will retaliate. This is not a Hamas Israel situation. Michelle. This is a Palestine Israel situation. Hamas is trying toe show Israel that the Palestinian people are not going to give up. We are not going to succumb, but we are not going to surrender and accept the dick tat off Israel to deny us our freedom and our independence. And therefore this is the reason behind Hamas is a response to what Israel has bean doing. We are doing the diplomatic track. They think that by exerting pressure on Israel, they can make Israel understand that they cannot break the well off the Palestinian people. Even at the cost of this tremendous loss of life because Palestinians aren't paying the heaviest price in terms of, you know of loss of life breaks our heart. It breaks our heart. But what is the alternative? Michelle what is alternative throughout our history? Palestinians are the only people in the world who are refugees in their own land. We are refugees in our own land on what is happening today has proven clearly that Israel's peace and security can only but guaranteed through an agreement with the Palestinians. We are the people who are on the same land. We are the people who will be on this land for hundreds of years to come. And Israel's best option is to make peace with the Palestinians by allowing the Palestinians to be free and independent. So as we mentioned you are a diplomat, you were involved in peace talks in 2014. Which, as we said, was during the last major fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza. If the two sides were to sit down now, can you give us a sense of what the Palestinian side would be asking for when the Palestinian side I'll be honest with you is sick and tired off the complacence off the international community sick and and tired off. The terms that the administration here is using. Israel has right to defend itself defend itself against who the occupied people. Has there ever. Bean in history and example where an aggressive on occupying power has the right to defend itself against occupied people. I think what we want to see is a real effort and you approach That Israel simply Continuing the status quo, continuing the occupation off four million Palestinians against their will building settlements, ignoring the national aspiration off the Palestinian people, dehumanizing the Palestinian people. Must end the United States must stand for its own principles everywhere around the world. The U. S applies its Zbynek principles of Freedom. Liberty Justice. What have you Why? When it comes to Israel This does not that is not implemented. What is about Israel that makes the United States and the Western world so complacent with Israeli policies and with Israeli aggression that they can tell Israel enough is enough. The Palestinians are humans who deserve to live in dignity and in freedom, like any other nation on the first off Earth, unless we do that. I am afraid we will see more episodes off violence that we are witnessing today. That was Palestinian diplomat month. Rashid Erica. He's a former chief representative of the Palestine Liberation Organization to the United States. Ambassador. Thank you so much for talking with us today. Thank you, Michelle. Have a good Sunday. We also have perspective from Israeli officials, who are speaking out today on CBS's face The Nation this morning, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu defended his country's actions in response to what he claims have been 2900 rockets fired on Israel. Hamas thought that they could just fire your rockets and then sit back and enjoy immunity. That's false. We're targeting a terrorist organization that is targeting our civilians and hiding behind their civilians using them as human shields. We're doing everything we can to hit the terrorists themselves, their rockets, They're rocket caches and their arms. But we're not going to just let them get away with it. Netanyahu went on to say that Israel has a right to defend itself and would continue this course as long as it deems it necessary. I think any country Has to defend itself. It has a natural right of self defense will do whatever it takes to restore order and quiet on the security of our people in deterrence we're trying to degrade Hamas is terrorist abilities and to degrade their will. To do this again, so it'll take some time. I hope it won't take long, but it's not immediate. We also heard from Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Cohen Rica's He is the international spokesperson for the Israel Defense Forces. Speaking on CNN's reliable sources, he was pressed this morning to explain the Israeli military's decision to destroy that building in Gaza yesterday that housed the Associated Press and Al Jazira. His response not only was Hamas in the building they were actively using it to fight against Israel. They were using the infrastructure as their command center and intelligence center..

Michelle Michelle Martin 2014 1992 Palestine Liberation Organizat Rashid Erica Associated Press 2900 rockets 1967 Hamas Palestinian Authority yesterday Clinton CNN CBS 1993 Jerusalem NPR P L. O Israel Defense Forces
"michelle martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"All things considered from NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin. Whatever happens in the wake of the attack on the Capitol last week, a new administration will be entering the White House and just a matter of days. And so we wanted to turn our attention to key challenges facing the Biden administration, and we're gonna focus here on foreign policy. President Trump leaves behind him a complicated legacy. His supporters say he highlighted long, dysfunctional or outdated policies and instigated new and productive relationships in the Middle East. On the other hand, he's pulled out of long standing trade deals escalated tensions with countries like China and Iran aligned himself with strong men and pursued in America First agenda that critics see is dangerously unilateral. So what needs to happen now that a new administration is coming to Washington? We've called to people with deep knowledge but different perspectives to talk about this. Kirsten Fontane Rose is the director of the Scowcroft Middle East Security Initiative at the Atlantic Council. That's a global affairs think tank here in Washington, D. C. She also served as senior director for Gulf affairs at the National Security Council under President Trump. Person. Fountain Rose. Thank you so much for joining us once again. Thank you for having me. Michelle and Nicholas Burns has a long career in diplomacy. He served in numerous key post as ambassador, including two NATO. He served on the National Security Council under President Bill Clinton ahead. He currently teaches at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Ambassador Burns. Thank you so much for speaking with us as well. Thank you very much, Michelle. And ambassador. I'm going to start with you. I mean, before we turn to what's next? I do want to get perspective from each of you on what's just happened here. I mean, on the day of the right at the Capitol, you tweeted quote our credibility as a leader of the Democratic world has hit rock bottom under Donald Trump. Noon on January. 20th can't confess enough. Your career diplomacy spans decades. You've seen all kinds of upheavals all over the world. And I just have to ask what went through your mind when you saw what happened this past Wednesday. Well, Michelle, I think it was one of the worst weeks in American history. We've suffered a severe blow to our credibility and our moral standing in the world. You think of Donald Trump's incitement. The assault on the Capitol, the seat of power of the United States. Without question. I think these events this past week and a lot of other events over the last four years have stained our our reputation and What really pains me is it's a gift to Russia and China. You've seen what they've been saying the last couple of days. They're essentially charging that our commitment to democracy here in the United States is hollow. And our strongest allies are very worried. I think they're shocked. By what happened? There are custom maybe to seeing this happen and authoritarian countries on assault on a presidential palace or a parliament but to see it happen in the United States to see a mob Of anti Democratic people attacked the police and attacked the rule of law. They're worried. I think our allies in Europe in particular are worried that this political contagion could spread to them. We need to demonstrate over the next few months and few years that we're going to rid ourselves of authoritarianism and rule of law, and this is so important for our foreign policy stand up for freedom of the press. For our Constitution and for the Democratic order. We've lost that this week, and we need to rediscover it. Christian Fountain rose your thoughts, particularly as a former member of this administration, and as a national security expert. I agree with Ambassador Burns about the signals to Russia and China and the concerns about the debate. Regarding whether or not there is greater strength and systems of democracy or systems of authoritarianism. I'll be looking to the seasons members of Congress to use this shock to the system as a force to pull them a little bit closer together. I am concerned that we will see younger members of Congress who seem to be A bit more polarized, reacting with continued almost sectarian legislation, But I do think that the older, more seasoned legislators will look to this as ah, desperate call for help from our own governing system and say, we really need to Come to the middle on some things we really need to work together is much as we possibly can, or we're really risking. You know, a fracture in our society that will have repercussions for generations. So let's turn our attention out of what comes next. The Bite administration is going to enter the White House and Under two weeks. What should be the top foreign policy item for them and Christian farmers? I will start with you because, as I said, you know, President Trump does have his supporters in some people do feel that he has made important strides in certain areas. And because you participated in this administration when I asked you first. What do you think the incoming administration's top priority should be The number one thought that keeps me awake at night when I think about both the outgoing administration and the incoming administration, in terms of the formulation of foreign policy is the piece of American exceptionalism, which much of our foreign policy is empirically been based. It doesn't work anymore. But our policies have not adapted to that both in the Trump administration and based on what we're hearing from the Biden team thus far so we can no longer apply pressure to other nations in terms of their foreign or domestic policy. Their votes in the U. N their defense acquisition plans with the assumption that they need us more than we need them. Even small and comparatively less powerful countries now have other options specifically in the forms of China and Russia. And while we think these options Aaron viable in the long term, the governments and populations of other nations do not. You have China presenting itself as an alternative to the U. S. For economic growth. Complete with cheap financing, kickbacks, the no strings attached policy. And you have Russia presenting itself as an alternative to the U. S. For national security. More specifically your regime security. They won't simply sell you arms and train your troops..

President Trump Michelle China Russia United States National Security Council Ambassador Burns Biden administration President White House Michelle Martin assault Middle East NPR Trump Fountain Rose Scowcroft Middle East Security Congress
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin. We're gonna return to a subject that we've addressed before, but which has returned with full force in recent days. And that is the reality that Americans are in fact living in different realities. And it's become very clear that conspiracy theories shared online and from the highest elected offices are informing many American sense of the world. We wanted to talk more about why that is and what effect this is having on the country and on relationships. So we called Trent Kate Maverick. We spoke with Trent last year after she wrote an article in The Washington Post about navigating her relationship with her boyfriend, who she discovered. Believed in some of these conspiracies such as those espoused by Q and on and trick A maverick is with us once again trend. Thanks so much for coming back on. Welcome. Thanks so much for having me on the show again. Michelle. I really appreciate it. So just to remind folks who may not have heard our first conversation. You and your boyfriend, your significant other even really realized he had some of these views before you actually started quarantining together. Would that be right? Oh, yeah, it was. It was a bit of a drop bomb right before quarantine started. We've been together about four months. I suspected we had somewhat divergent politics. But the The full force of the conspiracy undertones was not made apparent to me until yeah, the week before we went into quarantine together, So that was a shock. And what was some of the theories or the beliefs that he holds, which frankly, are queuing on? Yeah, some of them so I don't know if he identifies his acumen on follower. I don't know if he sees himself was a follower of any particular group or Part of any particular group. But But what was some of the Theories that he spouse that you came to understand that he holds. I mean, he definitely identifies with Q and on, you know, follows the Q and on message boards and is part of cumin on communities online and to the best of my understanding. I mean the underpinnings of Q and on or that the deep state is kind of out to undermine President Trump and President Trump, meanwhile, is trying to Dismantle the super secret, high powered Kobol of child raping satanic pedophiles that you know is mostly made up of high ranking liberals and Hollywood elites. So that is my understanding of the underpinnings of Q and on. What was the election season? Like for you off, We survived it. Um, I think we kind of came to an understanding to not talk about politics as much particularly in the ramp up to the election. I could tell you. I was all jazzed about going over there on election night and watching election returns with him. And he was, like, you know, I think I'm gonna do that on my own. I'm gonna have a private moment. He was joking that he wanted to put a Trump Ensign and his window but thought that his roommates would probably kill him. So it was. It was quite a season, so I take it. You two are still together. We are still together. You know we're making it happen, and you know, there's there's really no illusions about what's going on. He knows where I stand. I know where he stands. I think I've also come to accept that. I'm not gonna convince him to leave these theories behind. I'm not going to disabuse him of these beliefs and the reverse is also true. I mean, he's not going to convert me. So I think coming to that acceptance has been really helpful and has helped us just know that this is a difference that we have and one that we can work around and work through. Let's talk about what happened at the capital on Wednesday with these supporters of the president Invading the capital trashing the capital. Sadly, some people lost their lives. Um you know, the Confederate flags, the anti Semitic, uh, signs the racist, overtly racist signs and T shirts and so forth. What does he have to say about that? You know, I have not talked to him yet about what happened at the capital. We haven't checked in about that again. Maybe more of the not trying to talk about it. I will tell you that we've talked about protests just you know, in separate Conversations and he would not be caught dead in a protest of any sort because he believes that the will of the people are ultimately I mean, will ultimately be subverted, and it's just not worth his time. I mean, if anything, he's kind of a cute on slack. Davis. He's gonna sit at home on the Internet. He's going to scroll through. You know the Q research message boards and that's about the extent of it and then go vote. And again. I don't want to go back to something we talked about earlier. I am not for one minute, saying that everybody who adheres to these beliefs is a racist or an anti Semite. I am not saying that What I am saying is that you wrote about this racist and anti Semitic roots. Too many of these conspiracy theorists and the way they act out in public and the way they manifest these Beliefs. Does move in the direction of racism and anti Semitism and other forms of deep marginalization of people who have historically been marginalized. And I just I'm just very curious about how you discuss this and how he thinks about that. Yeah. I mean, this is a really tough area, and I mean, I think we've all seen the social media posts of people saying, you know, if you voted for trump, that means you're racist, please on friend me, and I think you know for a certain group of people that works for them. Um, it doesn't work for me that has never worked for me. You know, I grew up in a politically mixed family. My mother's a Democrat, My father's Republican. I have many Republican leaning family members and friends and I can't just Dismissed these people and say, because you support conspiracy theories or because you support President Trump or because you support the Republican Party that automatically means you're a bad person, or you're a stupid person, or you're a violent person or a bigoted person. I'm just not willing to take That extra step people support the president for all sorts of reasons. People support the Republican Party for all sorts of reasons, and I think crucially, people believe in conspiracy theories I have come to believe or over the past year. Not because out of hatred for other people, but because of just this underlying worldview that is rooted in a mistrust and is rooted in doubting information that is coming to them period. I mean, I think the underpinning belief that my boyfriend has that just underscores all of his other beliefs. Is there are powerful people who are working very hard to engineer the course of human history. And for that reason, I can't believe a single thing that I'm being told. Period. That's what he believes. What? So what's the way forward here? In your view? I mean, you know, it has been one of those sayings that's been repeated. I think it was Daniel Patrick Moynihan, who said, you know everyone's entitled to their own opinion. But you're not entitled to your own facts. We live in a moment where people do think they're entitled to their own facts. And so the question becomes like what's the way forward here? It's fine. I'm less concerned about the relationship at this point than I am about just the state of our country and our democracy and our society. You know? How do you begin to solve the problems that we have? In our communities if we can't sit down and agree on what those problems are, even with the underlying reality of those problems even is that's what I'm concerned about. You know, it's a significant chunk of the population that is just kind of living in this other dimension. And how do we reach those people? And how do we work together with those people? I don't really have the answers to that. But I think that you know, unfriending. All your trump supporting friends on Facebook is probably not the way forward. That was the journalist Trent Kate Maverick..

President Trump Trent Kate Maverick president Michelle Martin Republican Party NPR Michelle The Washington Post Facebook Daniel Patrick Moynihan Davis engineer
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are Michelle Martin. We're going to go back now to the questions of accountability and the way forward after the violence at the capital Wednesday. In recent years far right extremism has become increasingly visible and perhaps even accepted in some quarters, in part because of President Trump's own rhetoric or refusal to criticize it. So where do we go from here? We called Mary McCord to help us. Think about that. She served as the acting assistant attorney general for national security at the Department of Justice, and she is currently the legal director at the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection at Georgetown University Law Center, where she's been researching and writing about these issues. Mary McCord. Thank you for joining us once again, although, of course we're very sorry about the circumstances. Yes, thank you for having me and I couldn't agree more. It zah terrible situation that we find ourselves in having to talk about this. So to begin with, Let's talk about how to talk about this. I mean, there have been a lot of terms used to describe what happened Wednesday. Some Are calling it a protest. Others are calling it an insurrection. Some are calling it domestic terrorism. Given your expertise. How do you characterize what happened Wednesday, and why? I mean, I guess In some ways, it's all of the above. But I think it it's certainly most jumps out at me from a legal perspective as an insurrection because it was an attempt that so much to overthrow the entire government, but to prevent Um, the fulfillment of governmental functions, which on that day, January 6 was the joint session of Congress who gathered pursuant to federal law to count the electoral college votes of the state. States and to certify the president and the vice president as the winners of the election, And that would be Joe Biden and Kamila Harris. And so this insurrection was an attempt to stop that, And in fact, for a least several hours was successful in preventing that vote. Can you talk a bit about how the law Treats acts of violence committed under these kinds of circumstances, Because because as you you certainly know, um there has been a very robust conversation going on about the fact that these Thies Writers seemed to have been treated. With a lot more leniency than we have seen. In other circumstances. Social justice protests black lives matter, so they're two questions there. One is a tactical question how law enforcement specifically chose to To deal with it. But then there's the legal question. I mean, does the law see the this kind of conduct conducted in for these particular reasons in a particular way? I mean, the criminal law has all kinds of really a menu of options that are applicable to the conduct of the insurrectionists at the capital on Wednesday, I mean everything from the assault on the federal law enforcement officials the violent and unlawful entry into a restricted U. S government building. The destruction of US government property, the stealing of US government property, insurrection itself, seditious conspiracy, and I also would say, even though there is not a crime called terrorism that applies to this. This would certainly fit within the definition of crimes. Intended to intimidate or coerce and influence of policy through intimidation or coercion in terms of the handling of this differently than what we saw over the summer. I think there's no question it was. It was very much soft policing so soft that it was immediately overrun by the insurrectionists and the rioters. Um, And we way saw hard policing this summer in Washington, D C as well as other places around the country, and I think there's a couple reasons for that. I mean, one is I think, you know we'd be fools to ignore the fact of the difference between this being a bunch of Of white people, primarily white people who were supporters of the president, as opposed to the summer's events being racial justice demonstrators who were very mixed race certainly obviously a lot of black Americans, but also a lot of white Americans and other Americans of color and and non Americans as well participated in those, and I think that's something that has to be looked at that disparity. That seems to be based on on at least in many ways, the color of the skin and the support the political support of the protesters. But beyond that, I think there's some also just Actual tactical missteps here. I think the Capitol police, you know, I think, in part as a result of criticism of heavy handed techniques this summer, there was an effort by law enforcement to to try to engage in self policing, which I would say in general, we should agree with right. I think we'd like to see more soft policing instead of hard policing when it comes to First Amendment protected activity. The problem was this devolved from First Amendment protected activity into a violent mob really fast and at that point that soft policing is not good enough, and that's where the Capitol Police were completely overwhelmed, unprepared and it's frankly unfathomable to me why they were so unprepared. Because the intelligence was available. The information was available. It was online. We knew these demonstrators were going to go to the capital. We knew they were going to encircle the capital, and we knew that at least some among them wanted to do so violently. And once you have a crowd that becomes a mob, even those who had no intent to engage in violence are often times swept up into that violence. President Trump will be gone in a couple of weeks. It leaves he will be he will no longer be serving in that position, whether it's days from now or whether it's a week from now it's a short period of time where he will no longer hold that office. But he has a person remains, and he still has access to some means of communication. So the question has become is does this kind of should we be planning for an era in which street violence? Promulgated by whoever is a reality. And if that is the case what should happen? E think we have to recognize that, you know, maybe this is a wake up like we saw something that I don't think most people thought they would ever see in their lifetimes in America. A lot of the world didn't think they'd see that in America and we saw it on Wednesday, and it's scary and it's frightening and I have to wonder if if they'd have gotten their hands on on.

President Trump Mary McCord president Capitol police US America Michelle Martin Institute for Constitutional A Department of Justice Thies Writers Georgetown University Law Cent Um acting assistant attorney gene Washington vice president
"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"michelle martin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Michelle Martin. Happy New Year we are going to start again. With the battle against the coronavirus. We are sorry to say, starting the new year with some of the same daunting challenges that marked the end of last year. With the virus continuing to spread the hospitals in many places becoming overwhelmed and there is a new challenge getting millions of Americans vaccinated. The Trump Administration had set a goal of distributing 20 million vaccine doses to be administered around the country by the end of 2020, but so far fewer than three million people have been vaccinated nationwide. That, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, So we're gonna begin by trying to figure out what's going on with that distribution effort for that. We are joined now. But Joshua Michelle, he is associate director of global health policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation. He's been following distribution efforts closely, and I do want to mention he has advanced degrees and health policy, economics and infectious disease epidemiology. So He knows whereof he speaks Joshua show. Welcome. Thank you for joining us. Thank you. It's great to be with you. Well, first of all, the federal government says it's distributed more than 12 million vaccine doses to the states, but it's leaving it up to each state. Actually get those shots into people's arms. So it seems that the effort is pretty slow and chaotic. I mean, how are the states doing and why? Why are we seeing these problems? Yeah, I think what we're seeing now is what we expected to see, which is ah, lot of variation in how states have been able to roll out their vaccine programs. Some states are doing quite well on you could look at examples like West Virginia, where they've actually completed vaccinating their nursing home residents and are close to completing their First priority populations, Um and the other states that have doing, you know, less vaccination and have had a harder time. Sailing up the vaccines. So, um, part of the issue here is that we know that the two groups have been targeted for initial vaccination are The health care workers, especially those working directly at the front lines and persons in nursing homes, staff and residents and the health care workers piece has been Moving along a little bit faster. But really, I think much of the discrepancy between the number of doses that have been distributed and the number that have been administered, Um Comes from the fact that the federal pharmacy Partnership, which is responsible for doing a lot of the vaccination of nursing home residents, has gotten off to a real slow start in a lot of states. We're talking about that federal partnership with CVS and Walgreens that's supposed to be tackling immunizations for long term care facilities. Is that what you're talking about? That's right. Yeah, The name of the program is the Federal Pharmacy partnership. And it's the program where the federal government through its interagency program, operation works speed. Delivers doses of vaccines directly to CVS and Walgreens, who are responsible for going to nursing homes and vaccinating people there on Has received on the order of 2.2 million doses distributed but have only been able to vaccinate about 280,000 people through that program, at least according to the numbers that are on the CDC website. Well, I'm sorry, Don't we don't have more time to discuss this, but I just want to sort of see if we can get some clarity about what would improve this. I mean, the U. K government announced a few days ago it's prioritizing. Giving as many people as possible their first dose of a covert vaccine rather than providing the required second dose as quickly as possible. Some say the U. S. Should do the same. I take it. You're not a fan of that suggestion. So what? What would make a difference here? What would improve things? Well, the U. K is in the different circumstance because they're talking about doing that approach with the new vaccine that they've just approved for use on the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine. Of course, they have access to some of the fives of vaccine, which is one of the vaccines we have here, but they are really worried about this new strain of the virus. The new of Aryan Which is potentially has increased transmissibility and would cause a surge upon the surgeons already facing on so they're really pulling out all the stops and one of the ways that they're doing that is by using all available doses that they have. At least according to their plan in vaccinating many people as possible. I think that here in the United States There's no real movements, at least that I can see towards doing something similar. We are experiencing problems with our rollout. It's gotten slower than We had hoped, But there's really no talk about getting one dose out. Everybody right now. Sorry, Dr Michelle. We have to leave it there For now. That's Dr Joshua Michaud is associate director of global health policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation. Thanks so much for talking to us today. All right. Thank you. As officials try to improve vaccine distribution, A new strain of Corona virus has shown up in at least two states this week. Scientists say that while the variant does not appear to be more dangerous, it does seem to be more contagious. And of course, all this is happening as hospitals across the country operate at or near capacity and brace for what might be another post holiday, Serge. He wanted to know more about how this virus is mutating and how we should think about it. So we've called Matt McCarthy. He is a physician and authority on infectious disease and professor of medicine at Cornell University. And he's the author of Superbugs..

Joshua Michelle federal government federal pharmacy Partnership Kaiser Family Foundation Walgreens CVS associate director Centers for Disease Control an Michelle Martin United States Trump Administration Matt McCarthy West Virginia Dr Joshua Michaud Superbugs Cornell University professor of medicine AstraZeneca Oxford
With 'Deaf U,' Nyle DiMarco Strives To Show 'There Is No One Right Way To Be Deaf'

All Things Considered

06:06 min | 2 years ago

With 'Deaf U,' Nyle DiMarco Strives To Show 'There Is No One Right Way To Be Deaf'

"On Michelle Martin. Let's go back to pre covert times for a minute. You're a college student, and you want to take a break from the grind by going out for a few drinks or maybe getting a mani pedi with your B F F. But the seats only allow you to sit next to each other rather than face each other. No big deal, right? Well, it kind of is, if you are deaf or hard of hearing, And if you use American Silang, which SL to communicate Where you use your hands and facial expressions are important. And those are just a few of the subtleties revealed to those outside of the deaf community in the new Netflix reality, Siri's deaf, you know. It follows a group of students that guided at University in Washington, D C, which is known as the on Ly University in the world, where students can live and learn in American sign, language and English. But students still have to navigate a world that isn't necessarily built for them. The creator of the series is Nyle DeMarco, the model actor and activist who won both America's next top model and dancing with the stars, the first death contestant to do so, and he is here with us now to tell us more. And through the miracle of technology. He and I are talking to each other. And you're going to hear the voice of his interpreter. Gray Van Pelt. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. Of course. It's my pleasure. Thanks so much for having me today. As I just noted, you've been on reality television kind of a star. You're a model dancer. Clearly an activist. How did the idea of making a show about your alma mater come to you? It's pretty interesting. It goes back to my own experience being on reality television. I always felt that the image that was kind of made of me on screen was very one dimensional was always asked specifically about my deafness about my identity's sorts of struggles, but never about the things that I liked or disliked or really anything that I would have offered more to who I wass. It was nothing really about The culture right? And the idea for this show really came with the realization that we could use this to reframe the deaf community and offering entrance into our world which is so rich in culture and so layered in diverse but one of the things that I noticed If you've seen any show about college life, then you're going to, you know, recognize the types the The athletes, the influencers, you know, I activists, But you also introduced us to another divide a guy a debt between the so called elite Capital D, deaf from well known deaf families. And then as you've described elsewhere, lower case D death, those who don't come from these well known death families. Why did you feel it was important to kind of highlight this other divide myself as somebody who views elites as a group. I see. It could be a positive thing in the preserving of sign language, our culture, You know, it's about passing down those legacies in those traditions that make our culture. So Reg. There certainly are lower case D people who might see elites as someone who's had an unfair advantage, right? Whether it's their educational background, their confidence, their identity, their language fluency coming into college debt for them often, you know, they face a challenge that They have to not only focus on getting a degree, but also focus on learning a new language and a new culture. But there are so many layers to that divide between elites and perhaps Laura Kees de definite, something that's really key for a community. It's very complicated, but it's a discussion that were starting to have one of the characters of football player named Rodney. Likes to think of himself a somewhere in the middle of this divide. He has cochlear implants so he can hear and he also signs and I want to play a clip. This's Rodney's father. Do you feel like you're in between? We're like caught in the middle. I a deft So I'm in a body community. And this is what he is saying to some degree. Is is that he gives himself a license to be a Yeah. Ronnie Rotten family is so incredible. He's one of my absolute favorite. On the show. And one thing that I really love about him is that he really, you know, showcases and embodies that there is no one right way to be deaf, right? He's already fluent in American sign language, and so he has access to both. He's able to function in a hearing world in a deaf world with SL in English versus Ah lot of other students who come in to Garland at with outside language. You know they're facing a struggle of looking to find a place to fit in. Ronnie's already got it figured out so you can see through the show. He's like, I'm good. It's one of the things I love about him. Well, one of the things that I really liked about this exchange, though it mirrors some conversations that I think we have about race in this country to Rodney's also African American, and he also Exists in the space of trying to figure out like, what does it mean to be that right now? What do I want to be the truth of me and who gets to decide that? I think at the core of it, you know, it comes from growing up specifically in a culture and having access to the language. You know, I do think that Romney is incredibly confident. And you know, he knows exactly where his intersectionality lies. I do want to mention that you've been forward facing death advocate part of Your work in this area met hiring death crew members and creatives. I want to highlight that because that's not something that you want would necessarily know watching the Siri's. But why was that important as someone who is deaf? You know, I know that if you really want unauthentic story, it has to happen behind the camera, you know, defies really captured the culture best and we actually made it a requirement that we had to hire deaf people. We wanted to ensure that at minimum, we had 30% of the deaf crew behind the scenes working and we ended up with 50%, which was incredible, and it's the first time it's ever been done in history. You know we're working. So that later we have a little Hollywood empire were able to develop our own TV shows in our movies and our content that really reflect of culture and an authentic experience. And this essentially was the start. I'm so thrilled about it. That was now DeMarco, creator of the New Netflix. Siri's deaf You It is available now. And just wanna mention that we've been hearing him through the voice of his interpreter, Nyle DiMarco. Thanks so much for talking to us. Course. This was such a pleasure. Thank you so much for having me.

Nyle Demarco Rodney Siri Netflix Ronnie Rotten Michelle Martin Washington Van Pelt Ly University Nyle Dimarco Laura Kees America Football Garland Romney Hollywood
Michelle Martinko - Forever 18

Court Junkie

06:43 min | 2 years ago

Michelle Martinko - Forever 18

"Over the course of the next two weeks or so. You're going to go on a journey back in time. The evidence in this case will take to the year nineteen seventy-nine specifically six days before Christmas summer. Nineteen nineteen seventy nine show. Marchenko was a girl out on the town in nineteen seventy nine eighteen year old. Michelle Martin was in her senior year at Kennedy High School in Cedar Rapids Iowa and on December nineteenth. She was headed to a Christmas banquet for her school concert choir at a local hotel she had the adorable little rabbit fur coat and she do her era blue. What I refer to as the fair Faucet flip and she to her hair makeup and You know we're pretty dress. And that's very typical of how she dressed up if she was going home. Michelle left the banquet and headed to the West Stale Mall to pick up a coat. Her mother put on layaway for her when she got there she ran into a group of fellow students who had also just left. Think about the time that we did come out of the store a friend of hers and a friend of his they we read. We did run into them out of the mall. Michelle had been spotted by her ex boyfriend. Andy sidell Andy says he thought Michelle was at her choir banquet so he thought it was the perfect time to buy her Christmas present for Awhile. Marina went down on remember. We went downstairs. I think there was an escalator. There I don't remember which route we took. It just went went down towards it. Hey wasn't expecting to see a here. I'm going to go back up and go get your gift. Please don't follow me. She agreed and told Andy She'd give him a call later that night. Michelle then ran into another friend. Curtis Thomas who was working at a clothing store. He took is break with Michelle and they went to get a bite to eat upstairs at the food court but the two ended up talking for too long and he had to get back to his job but Michelle said she was going to leave and so we walked past the store and we kept walking and we turned to the first exit. Pass my store and we walked up to the door and she said she was going to go and I said I had to go but we were lucky we were talking. My don't be a stranger. You Know Michelle bundled up and headed out. Another schoolmate saw Michelle coming out of the exit from the mall and going towards the parking lot. She said she saw Michelle carrying packages in a bag appearing to be in a hurry other people came out at that same time but. Michelle was by herself an employee who is closing down. One of the stores noticed Michelle's car still in the parking lot sometime between ten thirty and eleven PM. There were few cars left so it seemed out of place around this time. Michelle's mother frantically called her friend. Jane she asked me if I knew where Michelle was. Well I asked me of. Michelle is with me and divide now. Michelle was would I have any idea or Michelle would be. Jane didn't know it was a school night and she had gone home early to work on our homework. Michelle's mother called police at two. Am to report. Her daughter. Missing around four am Cedar Rapids Police Officer James. Kincaid phoned her gold seventy two buick four door in the mall. Parking lot with the rear driver's side door unlocked dispatchers instructed. Him to open the door was she was sludge down the door. Several stab wounds on her chest and Remember seeing laceration on her Chin and she was no signs of life twos. Obviously Dad the officer then radioed for backup. Michelle's body was laying inside of her car. Curled into the passenger side seat floorboard stabbed multiple times and bloodied from her wounds. Crime scene investigators collected evidence. They preserved it not knowing. If anything of value could be found the case would remain open for the next thirty. Nine years you will hear that the advancements into science breathed new life into the investigation and provide a glimmer of hope for the investigators that the answers they sought may lie in the eyes of physical evidence still remaining from the nineteen seventy-nine crime scene those advances included the capability to test for DNA in bloodstains found Michelle's black dress and on the gearshift selector in her car. New leads and developments in technology led investigators in two thousand eighteen to a pizza joint. Forty five minutes down the road from the West Stale Mall there. They found themselves sitting in a booth staring directly at the possible assailant. That suspect got up and left afterwards. Investigators took a straw from the glass. The target had left behind. The evidence will show the comparison of the DNA that was able to be obtained from the Straw. Used by the defendant in the suspect male DNA profile from Michelle's dress revealed an outstanding development for the first time in the investigation of any suspects. A defendant could not be eliminated as a major contributor to this profile. Who was sitting across from the officers at that pizza parlor. Was it someone? Michelle knew someone. She cared about someone she trusted or was it a random individual were after thirty nine years. Her family friends and the police finally had the answers to the questions that had evaded them for so

Michelle Michelle Martin Andy Sidell Andy Cedar Rapids Iowa Officer Kennedy High School Marchenko Curtis Thomas Cedar Rapids Police Marina Jane Kincaid Chin
Islamic State leader leaves a legacy of terror

All Things Considered

11:02 min | 3 years ago

Islamic State leader leaves a legacy of terror

"This is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Michelle Martin we're gonna begin this hour with that major announcement today from president trump in the morning press conference at the White House the president announced that the leader of ISIS Abu Bakr al Baghdadi had been eliminated that was trumps work only Daddy was one of the world's most wanted figures he was killed and his Syrian safe house by US commander rate we can have several conversations about this about who al Baghdadi was and what this means for the region we're going to start with NPR's Daniel Estrin in Beirut and national security correspondent Greg my re here in our studios in Washington DC and Greg I'm going to start with you let's first start with the details the timeline of the operation president trump gave a vivid cinematic description of what happened here he said eight American helicopters went into this small village they land they don't go into the front of this compound they blast through the walls the interest they track down al Baghdadi and the president says that how Baghdadi has a suicide vest and three kids with them he detonates this killing himself killing the kids no American casualties except for a military dog I think the number of people have been struck by the level of detail that the the president you know offer here including descriptions of what he claims were up and down his last moments did that strike you as a person is cover these issues for sometime was it unusual for that kind of announcement beyond unusual actually quite remarkable I mean this would all fall into the category of classified top secret information for him to just come out and riff and take questions on this providing this this granular level of detail was quite striking and then his defense secretary came on it was mark espera was much more tight lipped about the whole operation today I let me turn to you what's been the reaction in the region I mean you're in Lebanon at the moment and but if you've been following this throughout the region including in Syria what's been the reaction there we've been hearing a whole mix every action from inside Syria we spoke with the researcher in the city of Rucka he's been researching ISIS crimes in the city when isis was there and he says this is a moment of celebration you know trump gave a list of the victims of ISIS you mentioned American journalists humanitarian aid workers killed Christians killed disease killed but actually most of isis is victims were Muslims and just in Syria alone approximately six thousand civilians were killed by ISIS so Syrians civilians I feel very strongly about this man but there is a lot of skepticism this researcher the Syrian man we spoke with thought the US had its own interests in killing Baghdadi he said the US wants to grab Syrian oil which we heard trump's speak about we're also hearing from many Syrians who are skeptical that apple buckle but Daddy actually died they've heard several times before in the past that he had died turned out to be fake news they say we haven't seen the pictures how do we know for sure and we also reached a few Syrians in in live but the city where I'll Doug Daddy was reportedly given safe haven and was targeted living there seems very careful with their words or didn't want to speak at all and they could be scared of retribution from ISIS so Daniel the president thanked many countries in his announcement starting with Russia and Turkey then including Syria and Iraq the Syrian Kurds as well but in that order and that was striking to a number of people what about that I mean does that show that the Kurds are still important players in fighting the extremist threat despite president trump's decision to back away from well it's a very interesting to hear how the the STF the Kurdish led forces in Syria have been speaking about what happened today first of all their top commander said that they had been tracking Abu Bakr al Baghdadi is movements and location for the last five months that they were part of the intelligence cooperation in planning for the US to nab about Daddy but that that operation was delayed by a month because of the recent Turkish offensive after we heard that about Daddy was killed they praise the operation they said it was a joint Curtis U. S. operation just days ago though we heard from the top commander they were very upset with Donald Trump for withdrawing US troops and leaving them exposed to a Turkish offensive what Greg this comes at a time when a standard just point out the president's pulling US troops out of Syria putting a stop to what he has called endless wars it is there a contradiction in US policy then between wanting to destroy ISIS and other terror groups overseas but still wanting to bring US forces home I mean is there a contradiction US policy a fundamental contradiction that's existed throughout the the president's time in office we're going to hit all of these groups whether it's ISIS of the Taliban or al Qaeda but it's time to bring Americans home and the president seem not bothered by this contradiction today he said we we carried out a very successful operation in Syria and yes we're still bringing the troops home he seem to see it as as so you see we can do both while critics are already saying no you can't this was an operation that required a special operators in the US working with Kurds and you want to leave an area of the intelligence goes cold very quickly so you you can't really have it both ways you can stay and fight or you can leave but hard to do both before we let each of you go I do want to hear from each of you on this what is the strategic significance of the death of opportunity right the death of al Baghdadi does not end ISIS we've learned that time and again when the leaders of terrorists groups are killed however you should also look at the number of things that have happened in the past couple of years ISIS has lost its territory it's lost its revenue streams it no longer has recruits flowing in and now they've lost a very important leader this group is not dead they still have lots of fighters out there but they are in no way organized the way that they were so they've been greatly weakened but they still exist Daniel what about you it's true that ISIS isn't dead it exists in many different permutations and groups across the region and finally the city it live is a place where we're hearing many ISIS operatives fled to that area after the fall of the ISIS territorial caliphate and the question is will they be able to regroup there that was and personally scar Spahn Daniel Estrin in Beirut and national security correspondent quick Myrick here in our studios in Washington DC thank you both so much for talking to us my pleasure thanks we're going to turn now to someone whose life was directly affected by Abu Bakr al Baghdadi and the rise of ISIS James Foley was an American journalist covering the civil war in Syria in two thousand twelve he was captured in northern Syria by ISIS and held captive for nearly two years then in two thousand fourteen he was killed in a gruesome manner beheaded in what would become something of a signature of the Islamic state he was the first American to be killed by ISIS in his honor and name his mother I am fully created the James W. fully legacy foundation which advocates for the safe return of American hostages abroad and protection of journalists and she's with us now from her home via Skype thankfully thank you so much for speaking with us today my pleasure we shop how are you reacting to today's events well we're very grateful my shall we have to be I am very grateful to president trump our intelligence community and the military for fall waiting and finding al Baghdadi and stopping him our he obviously wanted to continue to regroup and continue his reign of terror so it is a blow to isis and I'm very grateful we had there US troops in country to make that happen ask you though today what does this does this bring up anything for you I mean I know what you know the word closure is so controversial people think it's some people think it's ridiculous some people think it it actually kind of capture something or says something does the death of this person who who because your son's death does this bring anything for you does it and anything for you does that term what what is it bring up for you well it protects others from whatever he was planning to do start money the thing that would bring me the most solace is does ISIS fighters who have been captured I would like them to be brought to trial and the federal criminal court here in the U. apps I'm grateful that two alleged Jack hottest Cody and I'll shake our impact in US custody and I'm hoping they'll be brought to trial but there are thousands of others and I feel it's very important that the international community hold them responsible by bringing them to trial and if convicted put away for the rest of their lives how do you hope the elder Jerry might be captured alive so that he could face trial yes he would have been able to answer so many questions but it appears he detonated himself he didn't want that to happen so he wanted to be a martyr for his because I'm sure so obviously that would have been the past the more we can take into custody and bring to trial the better however as you can see from there and present is that it's hard to find the will to bring them to trial and there's a lot of blocks in that regard but I feel that is necessary to actually stop terrorism is to bring these folks who inflicted such terror to try and hold them accountable for their horrific Dietz we let you go how does this how does the work of the fully foundation proceed does the does al Baghdadi is death affect the work of the foundation in anyway well anytime we can capture people who are from loading hostage taking which he surely wise that is a win he wives using human victims to inflict yes terror on the country and the citizens in that area so yes of course that's a help I would just or that our administration might give a higher priority to innocent Americans when they first taken hostage to maybe hopefully prevent some of that horrific crime so but I I certainly applaud today's victory and it is a victory for the free world was stand for Lee she's the president and founder of the James to be fully legacy foundation she's the mother of the slain US journalist James Foley who was killed by ISIS in two thousand fourteen she was with us today via Skype painfully thank you so much for talking with us thank you so much for

Michelle Martin White House President Trump Isis Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi Daddy NPR Five Months Two Years
Puerto Rico bankruptcy judge upholds oversight board powers over government

Morning Edition

03:45 min | 4 years ago

Puerto Rico bankruptcy judge upholds oversight board powers over government

"I'm Rachel Martin, good morning a federal judge has ruled that Puerto Rico does not have the final say when it. Comes to its own fiscal policy the final word belongs to a fiscal oversight board, that congress, created two years ago it's a ruling that will have far reaching consequences for, the island's financial future to. Talk about that. Let's bring it NPR's Adrian flurry toe from San, Juan Puerto Rico Adrian hey Rachel so this fiscal oversight board was created way before the hurricane when Puerto Rico was. Still suffering from all kinds of financial problems right yeah I mean remember it was a couple of years ago the government basically, said that it would not be able, to pay the more than seventy billion. Dollars that it owes to bondholders, into, that led congress to do two things that passed Allowing. The islands to effectively declared bankruptcy to restructure. That debt it also created this seven. Member board with. Huge power to make decisions. About the island's finances in order to to get this debt under control and turn the economy around listen to what the. Board's chairman Jose Korean told me in our colleague Michelle Martin back in June the. Government's function aside from taking care of the needy is to create the economic conditions whereby private enterprise. Succeeds and employees folks creates wealth that's that's the nature, of our, system, are, legal. Needs destruction reforms that will allow it to do so with the board sees one of its roles is being as forcing Puerto. Rican? Government. To implement, these sorts of reforms along with huge spending. Cuts in this you can imagine his has been big source of tension right so then their control was essentially a called into question because the governor of Puerto Rico and the legislature In Puerto Rico sued the oversight. Board, last month the governor and legislature don't believe that this federally, appointed board should be able to, force the, local government to implement these measures, they think they can recommend but not not require the government to. Do so until one example input Rico workers are entitled by law to a Christmas bonus the board wants this bonus eliminated and so in the budget that it drew up. For Puerto Rico did not include enough money for something the governor said, it did not have the. Right to do, it's just one example I mean the fundamental question here right is when it comes to fiscal policy to fiscal reform canvas. Board do that who has the final say the elected government to fourth three or the sport created. By congress and yesterday with, this federal judge ruled is that it's this appointing board that they have the power to overrule Puerto Rico's government when it comes to. To financial policy well so I can't imagine that government, in? Puerto Rico Governor there especially is very happy about this then no he was not a huge overseas but But he issued a statement saying that. It was proof that the Rico which is a u. s. territory is in fact more like a US colony he called it. An undignified relationship because you, know congress basically dictating policy he said without the islands consent on the other, hand the members of this oversight board some of. Whom are from Puerto Rico others. From the mainland US they welcomed the ruling and they said it, was time for the governor to begin. Implementing these cuts and austerity reforms to get Puerto Rico back. On on the right. Track so, what does it mean then I mean if you consider the fact that now the democratically elected government their. Their their power and control over Puerto Rico has been curtailed what does that mean for regular. Folks that's absolutely right what you just said it also means that for regular folks they can expect more cuts to services benefits even pensions some of these cuts have. Already, begun to public education the health benefits and we're talking about, an island where through where half of the, population lives in poverty in these, cuts Unconvicted, to slice pretty deep

Puerto Rico Government Congress NPR San Juan Puerto Rico Juan Puerto Rico DMV Rico Joe Mcconnell Adrian Florida Rachel Martin Bay Area Lakeville California United States Michelle Martin Chairman
Israeli military evacuates Syrian White Helmets

All Things Considered

02:25 min | 4 years ago

Israeli military evacuates Syrian White Helmets

"I'm Michelle Martin we'll ask congressman Brian Fitzpatrick to tell us what he still needs to know about what happened in Helsinki plus the latest on the documents linking a former Trump campaign advisor to Russia I'm. Not aware of any other example in which a. FIS a warrant has ever been released in, this, way and hip hop star t. I. On his journey from delivering drugs and a bicycle, to building. And, running a business empire I couldn't envision it The stars in the move whatever land. They have first news Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Louise Schiavone the Trump administration has released some documents from an FBI request for permission to surveilled former Trump aid Carter page. On CNN state of the union page derided the Pfizer application but he did. Say he had contact with Russian officials during the Obama years I may boss back in the g twenty. When they were getting ready to do that in Saint Petersburg I might have participated in a few meetings that a lot of people, including, people. From the Obama administration we're sitting on in Geneva Paris. Etc but I've never been anywhere near what's being. Described here the documents suggest that Russia tried to. Recruit page Jordan says hundreds of Syrians with the. White. Helmets rescue group have been evacuated. From south west Serey NPR's Daniel estrin has more from Jerusalem the Israeli, military says it followed a recall West from the US and from European countries and rescued. Several hundred Syrian humanitarian volunteers and their relatives from southern Syria ministerial government offensive to regain. Control of the. Area the evacuees are with the white helmets group which the US has supported it's a volunteer group known for saving the lives of Syrian civilians caught in the war the. Volunteers were evacuated across the border to the Israeli occupied Golan Heights and then. To Jordan it's the first such as rarely evacuation during the Syrian war Israel said their lives were an. Immediate danger a person close to the white helmets group tells NPR they were evacuated because the Syrian government has targeted group members and, would, not. Let them escape to northern Syria as rebel groups have. Daniel estrin NPR news Jerusalem a deadly California wildfire. Is moving closer to Yosemite national park Jeremy Siegel. From member station k. q. e. d. reports that. With. Forty seven square miles scorched the..

Daniel Estrin NPR Donald Trump Syria Russia Jordan United States Brian Fitzpatrick Israel Syrian Government Barack Obama Obama Administration Michelle Martin FIS Helsinki Jeremy Siegel CNN Congressman Louise Schiavone
Judge orders Trump administration to share list of separated children

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 4 years ago

Judge orders Trump administration to share list of separated children

"I'm michelle martin we'll talk with people with a direct stake in the conflict and the latest on world cup england is through to the semifinal plus the churches asking wedding guests to stay focused on those other big events i heard a couple of leading not to come which does make you wonder plus meet maria and marcel who sweet catalan folk music tackles hard issues from the past and the present what every young person in spain shares is the silence but first this news live from npr news in washington i'm janine herbst a federal judge is denying the trump administration's request for extensions on court ordered deadlines to reunite immigrant children forcibly separated from their families at the southern border instead as npr's windsor johnston reports the judge has imposed an additional deadline the trump administration has until eight pm eastern time to provide the court a list of the estimated one hundred children younger than five who remained separated from their parents a federal judge will then decide which cases meet the tuesday deadline just morales is with the families belong together coalition she says it's clear the administration is struggling to reunite families i very little confidence in their ability to act competently of the government and ensure that families are reunited and that's why we're doing everything we can make sure about being no we are watching the federal government says it needs more time to locate family members and confirmed parental relationships windsor johnston npr news north korea slammed the us today saying it made robber liked demands and calling the attitude of secretary of state mike pompeo regrettable that criticism comes just hours after pompeo left north korea following two days of meetings with officials in pyongyang over several issues including the denuclearization of the korean peninsula pompeo had a different take on the outcome of the talks saying it was largely a positive set of meetings we made progress on almost all of the central issues some places a great deal of progress other plays there's still more work to be done he's they also made headway on setting a time line for denuclearizing the peninsula but that more work has to be done a you a service member was killed two others were wounded in an apparent insider attack in southern afghantistan native says the wounded are in stable condition the incident is under investigation in somalia at least nine people are dead after militants attacked the country's interior ministry in mogadishu and ada peralta reports the islamist group el shabaab is claiming responsibility local television footage shows plumes of smoke billowing from the interior ministry after the blast security officials say the attackers first detonated a car bomb and several others entered the building with weapons and suicide vests al shabaab which attacks often in somalia says it aims to establish islamist state over the past decade the international community has helped somalia push alshabaab out of the capital but the african union mission is coming to an end sparking worries that somali troops will not be able to keep the militants at bay npr news nairobi croatia as advanced to the world cup semifinals beating russia four three in penalty shootout this afternoon they will play england who beat sweden two zero today you're listening to npr news this is wnyc in new york i'm lance lucky pro union and anti union forces in new york have launched rival campaigns related to last week's us supreme court ruling that decision allows an estimated two hundred thousand state and local government workers and teachers who aren't union members to stop paying the agency fees that had been allowed since the nineteen seventy seven supreme court decision earlier this week a group called new choice new york with ties to the politically influential coke brothers published a website with step by step instructions showing how members could leave their unions spokesman bob belfi ori says the.

Michelle Martin Two Days
European Union, Syria and Iran discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

02:50 min | 5 years ago

European Union, Syria and Iran discussed on All Things Considered

"This is all things considered from npr news i'm michelle martin we're going to start the program today looking back over what has been an important week in diplomacy for the trump administration president trump applauded and historic summit between north korea and south korea on friday he tweeted the united states and all of its great people should be very proud of what is now taking place in korea and even though president trump was not a participant the south korean foreign minister credited him with bringing north korea's kim jong un to the table and then here in washington dc two important meetings president trump hosted french president emmanuel macron for an elaborate state visit at the beginning of the week and then met briefly with german chancellor angela merkel on friday at the white house now you might have seen that the body language had both encounters was a bit awkward at times but we wondered about the substance of those visits specifically whether mccown merckel bridge any of their substantive differences with president trump for a european view joined now by the european union's ambassador to washington david sullivan ambassador thank you so much for speaking with us a path of acquiring nuclear weapons so we still hope that the advantages of preserving this deal also in the context that you just mentioned of north korea where if we're going to proceed as we all hope to some negotiation denuclearization the iran deal is the only working model currently available of how you could do that yesterday chancellor merkel was asked about this also at a joint news conference with president trump and play what she said and you're actually going to hear the voice of the interpreter over her is here it is this agreement is anything but it will not solve all the problems with avon it is one piece of the mosaic one building block if you like on which we can build up this structure so what are the other building blocks that the chancellor merkel and other europeans have in mind for example or the europeans working with the president of supplementing the iran deal with some other measures to address arounds behavior in syria support for hezbollah something like that.

European Union Syria Iran David Sullivan Chancellor Washington NPR Hezbollah President Trump Michelle Martin Mccown Merckel Bridge White House Angela Merkel Emmanuel Macron Kim Jong Un Donald Trump United States
Chemical weapons inspectors collect samples from Syria site

All Things Considered

01:34 min | 5 years ago

Chemical weapons inspectors collect samples from Syria site

"I'm michelle martin we'll dig into the political news of the week and we'll also hear from journalists who still trying to make sense of what she saw on a two thousand sixteen campaign trail people have said oh i don't wanna relive that but i think that we have to plus remembering former first lady barbara bush as she's laid to rest mom got a su are difficult times with consistent take it to the bank unconditional but tough love that and my essay about barbara bush are all coming up but first this news live from npr news in washington i'm janine herbs in syria chemical weapons inspectors have visited a site in douma where an alleged chemical weapons tack on civilians prompted a retaliatory airstrikes from the us uk and france the team from the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons collected samples for analysis and says it will evaluate the situation before considering next steps which include another possible visit to the city meanwhile un secretary general antonio tara says those responsible for that alleged weapons attack need to be held accountable walk leavings meeting unity clearly a war crime that should have robbed the face of at an informal meeting of the security council in sweden today gutierrez says the syrian conflict can only be resolved politically not militarily at the international monetary fund's spring meeting in washington dc today treasury secretary steve mnuchin and federal reserve chair jerome powell join counterparts warning the improved.

NPR Jerome Powell International Monetary UN France UK Syria Michelle Martin Steve Mnuchin Gutierrez Sweden Antonio Tara Douma Washington Barbara Bush
Trump's decision to launch air strikes against Syria without congresses approval is illegal

01:03 min | 5 years ago

Trump's decision to launch air strikes against Syria without congresses approval is illegal

"This is all things considered from npr news i'm michelle martin top trump administration officials say the us is quote unquote locked and loaded and ready to strike syria again if needed but there are other officials who questioned the legality of these military strikes one lawmaker raising the issue is the united states senator tim kaine he has a democrat from virginia he is a member of both the senate armed services and foreign relations committees he has been a vocal critic of president trump's decision to act without consulting congress and he is with us on the line now senator kaine thanks so much for joining us got michelle glad to be with you you are on twitter last night and i quote trump's decision to launch air strikes against syria without congress's approval is illegal we need to stop giving presents a blank check to wage war today is syria but what's going to stop him from bombing iran or north korea next so a couple of questions here first of all if president trump had come to congress i as incidentally he said president obama should have done in two thousand thirteen would you have supported these strikes likely.

United States Syria Senator Tim Kaine Virginia Donald Trump Congress North Korea Barack Obama NPR Michelle Martin Senate President Trump Michelle Twitter Iran
Journalist killed and six others injured in Gaza while covering mass protests

02:15 min | 5 years ago

Journalist killed and six others injured in Gaza while covering mass protests

"I'm michelle martin christian activists gathered in lynchburg virginia to push back against evangelical support for the president plus a palestinian journalist is killed as is really troops respond to protests along the gaza border and comedian tracy morgan celebrates his recovery from a devastating accident with new show the last boji thank god i'm day for spare my life just to come back in touch you guys in a funny way that's all coming up but first this news live from npr news in washington i'm janine herbst canadian investigators are trying to determine what caused a bus crash in saskatchewan last night the killed at least fifteen people and injured more than a dozen others dan carpenter reports many of the victims were members of junior hockey team the bus was transporting the humboldt broncos hockey team to a game when it was tboned by transport truck on a regional highway about one hundred twenty miles northeast of saskatoon police say there were twenty eight people on the bus including the driver three of the injured are in critical condition in a hospital players in the schedule in junior hockey league range in age from sixteen to twenty one and at this level many would be considered as prospects by teams in the national hockey league hockey is a major sport across the country prime minister justin trudeau scheduling premier scott mo have expressed their condolences for npr news i'm dan carpenter in toronto hundreds gathered at a funeral today for a palestinian journalist who died after he was wounded by israeli fire yesterday while covering protests along the israel gaza border from gaza city npr's daniel estrin reports several other palestinian journalists were reportedly injured the palestinian journalists syndicate in gaza says six palestinian journalists were injured covering the protests on friday and one journalist was killed at gaza's main hospital to people told me they were taking pictures at the border and wearing vests marked as press when they were shot in the legs the israeli military says it does not target journalists and that it is investigating the palestinians claims more than six months after hurricane maria hit the head of the federal emergency management agency was in puerto rico serving the agency's ongoing response in zeta in florida were reports.

Puerto Rico Gaza Israel Gaza Toronto Justin Trudeau Prime Minister Saskatoon Janine Herbst NPR Lynchburg Michelle Martin Florida Virginia Maria Daniel Estrin Dan Carpenter Hockey Humboldt Broncos
Major events in Xi Jinping's rise as China's leader-for-life

02:23 min | 5 years ago

Major events in Xi Jinping's rise as China's leader-for-life

"President trump says he will meet with north korea's kim jongun will ask a former diplomat what china thinks about that what so stunning about president trump's decision is that he is in many ways following china's li for saturday marks 10th this is all things considered from npr news michelle martin we'll also talk with a state representative in florida about why she thinks arming teachers who put some students at risk study show that many of our black and brown student are often seen as a threat and will ask the governor of connecticut why he's calling the nra of terrorist organization this really is an organization that is devoid of courage when it comes to making our nation's safer that's all coming up but first this news live from npr news in washington i'm janine herbst president trump is in western pennsylvania campaigning for rick scott so cohn who is in a tight race for republican congressional seat ahead of a special election on tuesday drove use the appearance to tout his willingness to hold talks with north korea over its nuclear plan saying pyongyang should have been handled already and the former presidents didn't do the job but he says china's president xi jinping really helped the lord john and has done more for us than they have ever done for any other president or ever done for this country and i respect that jamaica trump's says ninety three percent of the goods to north korea come through china making them powerful meanwhile president trump is planning his first trip as president to latin america next month the white house says he will travel to peru and colombia for multicountry summit bilateral meetings and cultural events for secretary sarah huckabee sanders as trump wants to deepen historically ties with the between the us and partners in that area but one country he won't visit is mexico as eylandt march was held in parkland florida were seventeen people were killed in high school shooting there last month and fears wracked and booker has more about two hundred people gathered in a neighborhood park through unity and solidarity in the community still reeling from a deadly shooting three weeks ago after speeches organizes asked participants toll heads.

Jamaica Trump Mexico Secretary Colombia Peru America Pennsylvania Connecticut NPR Booker Sarah Huckabee Sanders Multicountry Summit White House North Korea President Trump John Pyongyang Cohn Rick Scott Washington
West Virginia teachers say schools will "remain closed" until Senate honors deal

All Things Considered

01:36 min | 5 years ago

West Virginia teachers say schools will "remain closed" until Senate honors deal

"This is all things considered from npr news i'm michelle martin we're going to start the program in west virginia where schools are expected to be closed again monday as a state teacher walkout enters its eighth school day this after a confusing weekend at the state capital in charleston molly born from west virginia public broadcasting has been covering the story and she is with us now molly thanks so much for joining us thanks michelle so what happened at the capital over the weekend senators and the west virginia state senate passed a teacher pay raise bill of four percent and that was less than what teachers had been asking for they wanted a five percent raise and it was a bit hectic of it it was an awkward process because senators actually ended up passing the original house version of the bill that allowed for a five percent raise and they had to go back retract recall that process and then pass yes it again again with a four percent raise and it was very confusing sort of a long drawnout process over many hours teachers were in the galleries watching this happen no sort of mass confusion but ultimately they passed a four percent raise again less than what the teachers had asked for why did they do that to explain why they did that it was my understanding that the governor jim justice had negotiated this five percent pay raise that's why the house passed it the teachers had an interesting that that was going to be the agreement wh how did the senate explain their decision to change that that's right just a day after governor justice introduced that plan the house of delegates passed it rather quickly it was almost unanimous the.

Michelle Martin West Virginia Charleston Senate Jim Justice NPR Michelle Five Percent Four Percent