20 Episode results for "Michelle Luhan Grisham"

expunge

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:50 min | 6 months ago

expunge

"The word of the day four February ninth. Today's word is expunge inch spelled E. X. P. U. N. G. E. expunges verb that means to strike out obliterate or mark for deletion. It can also mean to if face completely to destroy or to eliminate from one's consciousness. Here's the word used in a sentence from the Albuquerque Journal by Colleen. Lean hired and Katie. Barnett's now court officials and prosecutors are bracing for a possible flood of people seeking to expunge their criminal records beginning January first under a new law passed by the legislature and signed by Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham in Medieval and Renaissance Manuscript. A series of DOTS was used to mark mistakes or to label material. That should be deleted from a text and those deletion dots can help you remember. Member of the history of the word expunge they were known as Posta Dementia. The Punta part of the name derives from the Latin verb whom gourmet which can be translated as to prick or sting and you can imagine that. A scribe may have felt stung. When they're mistakes were so punctuated in a manuscript pungo Hungary is also an ancestor of the word expunge as well as a parent of other dotted pointed or stinging times. Such as punctuate compunction poignant can't puncture and pungent with your word of the day I'm Peter Sokolski visit Webster Dot com today for definitions. wordplay play and trending word look ups.

Medieval and Renaissance Manus Michelle Luhan Grisham Albuquerque Journal Peter Sokolski Katie Colleen Barnett P. U. N. G.
A Governors Job And Butterflies

The Children's Hour

53:55 min | 1 year ago

A Governors Job And Butterflies

"Who is the Queen of the insects? I know the monarch. Thai shelters. So much. So much. In the gap fans around. We. Man. So much. Out so much. And you may have. And you may have to win some all get. Get their way. Got so much. So much. Mm. It comes along for you to go out in the world just off hand in friendship and random word keep on your face and a half bean. You step. Big big ways. You got to guess. I know. Dot. Up. Out by plow. Hey, that was me we featuring flutter be and DJ Mike from a CD called hip. Hop for kids me, we is M E E W E E all one word and so much love to give. Indeed, we do. This is Katie stone. You're tuned to the children's hour. Welcome to everyone in the room. Hello, everyone in the room. Hi, everybody. There we go. There's actually a lot of people in the room, but they're putting finger puppets on. So it's kind of distracting we were distracted by all the finger puppet. What can we say finger puppets will do that to you? How I I we're getting pictures. They're posted right now to Instagram. You can follow us on Instagram that posts onto Twitter and to Facebook into all kinds of places, and we're so happy that you're all with us today. So I'm Katie stone. Let's come around the room right over here and see who's in the room with us. Hi. Hi kilo. It's haley. Hi chaban. Good morning. I'm sienna. Hello. This is Julia good morning. I'm kaya. Zen. Hello. This is taffy via heights days. Hey, it's Maya will everyone. It's so great to have you. Hello. We're back in studio here at K UNM in Albuquerque, New Mexico on the campus of the university of New Mexico and any news in the studio other than there's little critters on people's fingers everywhere. Yeah. Please come to the mic today. I find out if I made it into a musical. Oh, the stressful. Pure U2. are you at the same school by chance to curious now? But we are both to cardboard playhouse calls. Oh, today's the day when the show parts are announced. Yes. So what you have to do to try out for a musical. We have to addiction and we have to sing like a minute or two of song. And then you do like little improv games, and it's really fun. And then you find out later, and what's the musical Allison wonderland. The musical junior. Well, good luck to you both. Yes. Please lush. What to the we set in stone the date? I'm getting braces off which is sometime in April. I think oh thank goodness. That feels like a long process doesn't it braces for the science limpid tournament. My school got third place congratulates. Wow. That was next week or last week. Yes. And you're going and we go to state. That's really exciting. Wow. Super cool. Well knows is good news for me except. Yes. Oh, oh, hey, we we forgot over here. Working at the board. Our engineer and training, miss Eliot high. My school had moral UN, and I won best position paper. That's awesome. We are super excited about the show. We have interviewed the governor Michelle Luhan Grisham Sienna. You were part of that interview. What what can you tell us about that interview? What was what was it like? It was pretty fun. She governor Michelle Luhan Grisham was really funny. She was funny kind of made fun of me a little, but that's okay. I've thick skin. I just thought she she did a great job with you guys. And you asked such good questions. And I know they're questions that all kinds of kids who are listening right now have themselves including about park testing. And what's going to happen this year with park testing? We're going to get right into it. You are tuned to the children's hour, but first we're going to go to a little of this the governor's right hand woman is a woman named Nora Sackett. And she told us this cool thing she told us that you used to play the song called nora's room. And she always thought it was so cool that you would play it because her name was Nora. And this one is going out to you. Era. This is the children's hour. Rationed FANG crash bang. Special crash bang, boom. Thanks. Crash bang. Pressure. Girls. Downside, boys. Lots outdoors special fresh. Much noise. There's a little girl me sounds like the whole city got freed sounds like the pair is dancing with the moose dance when they're on. This says hippo hippo pickup and drop were sixteen conspiracy off a truck go a couple of guerrillas play duck duck duck goose thing. On. Bridges, really falling down. A couple of giants are sitting on account. Forty seven are talking on the phone to forty seven dogs are fighting for phone thing wrench bane. Bang. Rodeo ride upstairs refund of rhinos planned musical. Chairs. Sounds like a dump truck. It's Joe elephant hoedown swing. Your trump? Room. Girls. Sounds boys. Lots of noise on the sign on her door to enter if you dare so I just say what's going on? Pressganged pressure. Bang bang. Today on the children's hour. We have governor Michelle Luhan Grisham here with us. I'm Leela Allen. And I'm Sienna Allen, describe the job of state governor and the balance of powers between you and the judicial and the legislative branch. Well, so we'll do the ladder question. I rate that we operate much like our founding fathers for the US constitution that if you're going to have an effective government with write checks and balances, right? You've got policymakers that your legislative branch, those are our representatives and state senators, then you have to have an executive so they set the policy, and then I have to implement that policy. So it's my job to take every idea that they pass. And if I think it's a good idea I sign that Bill into a law, and I have to then meet the requirements of that loss. I operate the government. And then the judicial branch is really that check and balance there the oversight function make sure that if there are challenges or questions about who's doing what that there's someone who can make a final decision, and you have that kind of accountability and oversight. So or all co-equals were all independent. I can't boss them around directly, and they can't bus me around, and it is really the hallmark of an effective democracy. Otherwise, you have all the power focused on one person or one entity. And it is not a fair representation to the people that you are serving. So I think it's very effective model, and I get to do the fun work to implement all these good ideas. What isn't average day? Look like, well, I never really no there's no such thing as an average day. So the beauty of my job usually. You're achilles. Heel is also your greatest strength like advocacy, you get passionate about everything. But sometimes it's hard to be. Focused so a governor's day. But yearly right now with the legislative session is I don't have much control. So it's communicating like this radio show today and dealing with the media and getting stories out. It's meeting with my leadership team making sure that we're on track to get our work done for the day. Then I've got a take meetings for people who have emergencies or could be a wildfire somewhere or an issue with an airplane or an airport or hikers who were lost. I have to send out the national guard. I've got legal issues that pop up, and I've got to get my lawyers all ready to go make sure that they're taking care of that. I have constituents that come into our office or call us, and they have problems all kinds of problems that can't get their benefits they lost their, Medicaid, which is a healthcare benefit of they're worried about childcare, and we've got to get all of that figured out. And then I get to meet with constituents who just want to know what our priorities are. And they wanna be able to weigh in. So. It's a lot of hands on work. It's a lot of traveling. And it's a lot of meetings, and it's hard to control it because it depends on what's going on every single day sort of dictates. What might they is? Like do you live in the governor's mansion? What's it like, so I do live in the governor's mansion? So most states have a governor's residence or a mansion and in some states, the governor is not required to live in it. But in our state, you are if the governor chooses not to live in this beautiful Santa Fe mansion, then it goes to a foundation, and then we may not be able to use it for the public in the way that we want to because it belongs to all of us. So like all the governors before me once we had a mansion I live in the mansion, and it's beautiful and incredible. And I've learning things even though I grew up in Santa Fe, it's on thirty two acres joss a an area. Still refer to as north hill sort above where they do Zober above fort MARCY, and it's got stables empty. It's got incredible yards and incredible view on a hill. It's got this big public part where we showcase art, and we invite dignitaries and legislators and kids who are interested just like you are making a difference in their community to come over. And a look at it and have a tour and have a meal come to a reception, and then there's like this area where they call it the private residence, and it's got three bedrooms, a kind of a guest area for for dignitaries and an office. And that's where I live. Do you work twenty four seven around the clock? So I get sleep. I do but I'm on call twenty four seven, and I've always had jobs that are difficult for something. I like to refer to as a good work life balance. But my. Days start pretty early. I often will work from six thirty or seven in the morning until eleven or twelve o'clock at night, and I work weekends to are you still governor when you travel, I am and governors are required to travel with folks. So in New Mexico, and so do most of the states, I actually have state police officers assigned to me to make sure that the public who's interacting with me is always safe and to make sure that I'm always safe. So even when I go on vacation. So if I were to go hiking in the summer, a state police officer has to go with me and has to hike with me. So I can't fit that I will hike ten miles when I only did too because they tell on you. So when I travel even for personal reasons, I'm always the governor. Did you want to be a governor? When you were a kid. I don't think so it's hard for me to remember. When I first started to think about things I wanted to do in the real. I said, I don't think so as some of my friends and colleagues have said to me, oh, when you were first in the cabinet secretary running a department, you said that you really wanted to be the governor the attorney general, and I I'm sure I said that because I would get frustrated that I wasn't the ultimate decision maker. And when I was trying to right a wrong. I couldn't convince people that kids weren't safe or getting education support that they needed families who are taking care of their parents and loved ones and disabled children, they weren't getting the services and support that they needed, and I would get really upset, and I thought well, if I could be the governor or if I was the attorney general at all that legal power to protect consumers. So I'm sure I probably did say that. But it didn't come clear to me about the role. I might play until I got elected to my first office at the Berlin county commission, and I realized how much good you can do if you have the support of your constituents in. In a job like this. And so then I got really excited about coming home. And being governor of the state that I love and believe in. So who inspired you? I got lots of heroines in my life. But this probably won't surprise you. So our our listeners can't see that. You've got a mom and older sister here cheering you on. But you know, my mom was this incredible advocate. A woman who got married when she was just eighteen had me by the time. She was nineteen. She met my father in Hamburg, Germany. He was a captain in the air force. She was what they call. It's not very nice an air force brat, which basically meant she was traveling the world with her air force family and her dad, and she came to this little state, New Mexico and mean little by population, right and had no connection to it. And at three children and her her my my youngest sister who I've lost was only two years old and was really sick. And so here's here's basically a really young woman responsible for three children who has a real tragedy. In her family, and she chose to take that on and to fight against healthcare that wasn't meeting. My sister families needs against a state that thought that children with disabilities should live in institutions and should not be. They didn't believe in the sixties that you should even get to go to school for things like blindness and deafness let alone things that we called developmental disabilities or challenges. Now, we're clear these are special kids with special needs. And they have gifts that we ought to embrace and shares and promote and create educational supports the give them the same opportunities that we give to everyone. But it wasn't like that in the sixties, and my mom had no tolerance for it. And she ruffled a ton of feathers, and she made a difference for so many families. And so my mom is a clear champion in my life. And my dad did the same kind of work, and I was really lucky to grow up in a family of champions. How is being governor different from being a congresswoman can make decisions and just do them. Right. So if you say to me, how do you how do you ladies feel about park? I don't think that the effect of it are going to where they should be me too. And as a congresswoman I have to convince five hundred and thirty five other individuals, many of whom don't live in Mexico. Don't agree with me that my idea about high stakes testing is right. And then I have to convince even if I can get them to pass it. Then I have to convince the president that may or may not care about New Mexico Mexico's edge -cations system. We've got a president in my opinion, right now that doesn't believe in public education. Now, I just have to make the decision and then do it. And there are some things I need that independent branch like policymakers the legislature. So they don't give me funding that I can't find an assessment tool or an accountability. The vehicle so parents and students know where they are each year and can help direct the kind of educational support that they want, but I got to make -sition, and I get to direct the public education department, and that is awesome. What are you going to replace it with an how's it going to be different from the was going to be high sticks? Right. High stakes basically means that we just teach to a test. We want you to perform a certain way on a test. And high stakes means that everything is tied to that test score. Which means we don't teach anything else if you're not taking that test for the rest of your life, and at work, it has no relevance on your ability to problem solve or to to work in effect to all the new national studies looking at high stakes testing, including park say exactly what you said that it's making no measurable difference that it's not helping students at all. So we we're looking at maybe creating what we call a New Mexico tool. So it some kind of testing. But there's learning I, and there is looking at where you start and having routine checks about whether you feel and your educators, and parents feel like you're demonstrating in a number of ways just test that you're meeting your own personal education goals. So that feel like you can do more math problems, and you understand the concepts that you're feeling really good about where you are in writing and reading because you're reading both at home and in class, and you eating things that are valuable and important to you that meet your own goals and needs. So we're gonna have to think about a New Mexico tool, and we're going to engage parents and students to help us create it, and our timelines quick we're hoping to get all that work done. We've a whole new system place by this coming August. So will there be a park test this year? So there's going to be what we call a simplified version. So we're going to spend at least an hour and a half less on each component of park. So more. Time teaching less time testing. We're looking at whether the feds are going to give us permission to streamline how we're doing that more right now. And then we're going to be developing tools, and I don't wanna call him tests. I want you to help me figure out what that is for the rest of the year. But it would be an unfair and untrue statement to say that no educators going to pop into your classroom and say that you don't have to do some part of test. And I'll tell you why we have federal funds that come here that are tied to a plan. And the plan requires us to do some testing that looks a lot like the current park. And so if I don't meet most of the standards, I would lose federal funds. So you'll see less of it. See more teaching you'll get to have more pinions about what works, and what doesn't work. We think we can refine the subjects that we're focusing the the limited time in park testing. And then after this semester, we're not. And then we go to something that's meaningful next. Year. How are you gonna deal with the shortage of teachers? Well, I hope that you're going to help me I want you right now on the radio say, it's so fun for teachers to teach and that you are great students and you're so excited because we're going to need renewed energy and commitment, but there's things that government can do. Here's the easy things state governments going to respect teachers and everybody in public education and give them dignity. We're gonna listen to them and their opinions. Now, we have to do some other things that allow them to do what they want which is teach. We have to pay them enough that they can raise their own families in New Mexico. So the lowest paid teachers in Mexico, we're going to get a walking ten percent raise. No one will make less than twelve dollars in the classroom. So the men and women who keep your schools clean and drive. Your your school buses and serve you lunch. No one no one makes less than twelve and our goal is to be much higher than that. So overall six. Percent more in in in for teacher raises. We're gonna pay for all their extra education and professional developments of the actually get more raises. We're gonna lower their individual healthcare costs. There's more money in their paycheck. We're gonna do loan forgiveness and pay for school on the front end. So we've got a pipeline of educators coming in. We're gonna allow them again to teach in the classroom, and we're gonna pump about five hundred and one million dollars in the public education. And so it's an exciting time to be an educator in New Mexico. And we think that that will address our teacher shortage just one last thing. I know I'm too long winded. But there are things that we have to do all of that takes hold. So we're asking our retired teachers, you know, who who can and want to come back who's who students miss them and believe that they can make a difference. There's a thing called alternative licensure. So I'm a lawyer. So maybe I. Go to antique to civics class and mid school. So you find folks who have expertise who can help don't replace educators, but but help with those burdens of those oversized classrooms. So we're going to do all those things while we build a brand new pipeline of teachers and other public education workers that sounds like a good idea, and one of my classes, we don't have a teacher right now, what classes that my algebra class algebra class. OC we need a math professor from a college or a mathematician, or an engineer who's willing. Who's retired can come into a classroom and help and we actually train them to teach because knowing something doesn't mean that you're very good at teaching it. So we train you up. Right quick. And then we give them a special license that's never intended to replace a fulltime educator, but gets you the algebra instruction that you need just like to have some consistency of teacher until they can find a permanent is so important because this substitute teaching. Environment is really hard on the students. And honestly, it's really hard in the substitute teachers to what are your plans to deal with climate change, everything right? We have twelve years to reverse the the damaging and devastating effects of of climate change. And I think New Mexico should be identified as the clean energy state for the country. The most important thing that I can do is move away from fossil fuels the best thing I can do. So we're going to set things called Arp ES renewable portfolio standards. It's actually a hard Bill to get past in this legislative session. So this is a good chance for me to tell every kid out there listening to get involved, and there's lots of climate champions who are school age kids all around the state who are who get your parents involved because I need that Bill, and it would say that we have to do more geothermal more wind and solar which don't create greenhouse gases or. Sheen's they lower our carbon footprint and its renewable. Right. So we never run out of it. I need that. And I need to show that I'm joining the US climate alliance. So that I meet the Paris accord requirements, which is by twenty thirty forty five percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This is how we start to reverse, basically. Right. The overheating of our planet, and I'm gonna do this in oil and gas because New Mexico has a lot of oil and gas. So we're leaking one of the most dangerous devastating greenhouse gases methane, and I'm gonna do something called methane mitigation recapture. So I'm going to require all these oil and gas companies to capture all their leaking methods of it's not out into the atmosphere. We use it like you do it's natural gas. And so we in it's cleaner than our fossil fuel. So we can use it. It's jobs for detection its job. Cbs for climate protection. It's also money that we could put in to say early childhood education. So there's all kinds of great ways that we can improve where we are. And then we can create one more thing called sort of clean energy standard. So it's telling everybody that all the utility companies that they have to have a better clean energy portfolio. What are you going to do that will affect kids? So we're going to engage young people in the health and wellbeing of our state. We're going to improve public education. So instead of fifty if we can aim to be number one, I'm calling it a moonshot I'm going to protect the earth the planet. I'm gonna create space for us to be the number one state for outdoor activities and outdoor economy, which means we're preserving the planet doing our part to reverse the damaging and dramatic effects of climate change. We're going to invest in child wellbeing. I'm gonna have a youth advisory council. So that young people give me good ideas about. What I should do as governor. So any they're listening anyone out there interviewing me may Katie cannot be on multi youth advisory council. She's just not young enough. But I do these fresh ideas key people invited in young people have great ideas. Those are just some of the things we're going to create a children's cabinet. I could go on for a long time children are going to be the focus of this administration. Thank you so much for being here with us on the children's hour. You are welcome. Thank you for having me on the children's hour. Listening to the children's hour will be right back. Supporting our community means a lot to Albuquerque based K and Molly textiles, which is why they're proud to support. The children's hour podcasts. Their print studio is committed to creating great jobs that include health and education benefits, leadership development and flexible hours for new immigrants and refugees and Albuquerque find their hand-printed towels at their retail store or in a store near you nationwide. Find out more at K and Molly dot com, that's K E, I and Molly dot com. The children's our podcast is made possible in part by meow wolf meow. Wolf your portal to the multi-diverse meal will proudly supports the children's hour Inc. Stick with us. We're talking butterflies next. Butterfly dance. Classes guide me come and spend some time with me. From is not depend you down even frown if you have to fly away. Into someone else's dream. Come and spend some time with me. Named or just Dolittle one. But if last I'll read away. I used to think the bud flies were meant for catch and tell the time account one and my net to home. Happy about the next. The next day was. But of fly buried in the meadow wear I founded fly and so free after high learned a lesson. If you love about a flaw. If you love let the. Butterfly, glad to see you back. Come and rest, your wings, my friend from was not to pin you down even frown if you have to fly away into someone else's. Come and spend some time with me. Just a little while. But you. Away. Away. That is the butterfly song by pink MARTINI, and they are a CD code. And this is where my French does not pan out Judy. We something like that the butterfly song pink MARTINI. You are tuned to the children's hour. We sure hope you enjoyed our interview with our governor, Michelle Luhan Grisham. She really has a lot of great plans. And I really hope the kids in particular heard her call to join her youth advisory board because she's really gonna need to hear from you kids to know what to do for you kids. And you know, what people who are your representatives. They don't know your point of view unless you tell them. So you can always write to our governor anytime and tell her your thoughts. Well, I'm Katie stone. You're tuned to the children's our whole crew will the people here. Hello. Hello cry. But we also want to introduce Mr. cliff Ross he is a friend of bees and butterflies also the director of celebrate planet earth, which is a community of kids who love and protect the earth. And if you go to celebrate planet earth dot org. You can join that community you can post exactly what it is. You do to care and protect for the earth. And join a group of kids all over the country who are planning seeds and taking care of birds, butterflies and bees as a way of taking care of the earth love that what cool thing. Well, you know, we have a lot of questions in studio for you. And so I start okay CNN's can start. Okay. Go for it. Go for echoed by either one of you. You're so polite. They're like, no, you know, you, okay. How long is the butterflies life-span? Well, different butterflies have different life spans. But the ones that were most familiar with tend to be in the range of I would say about a little over a month. And basically the way that goes is after they hatch is nag the be a Caterpillar usually for a week to ten days, they'll go into their chrysalis and be in between if you want to know what they're doing they'll melt and kinda hang out in that Christmas for another week. And then when they emerge they usually are adults where they flutter among the flowers among themselves for another two to three weeks. So here it is. It's we're broadcasting today in February. And I always think the butterflies I've always imagined all the butterflies. We see in the summer here in New Mexico or anywhere. They go on what I would do if I was about fly, they go to Mexico, and they relax and they live there for a while. And I guess the curiosity is first of all is that really true to all the butterflies migrate. And second of all those butterflies. Do migrate the only live four weeks. So how do they get all the way to Mexico in four weeks? Well, what ends up happening actually there? Two groups of butterflies paint migrating butterflies in this hemisphere. The painted lady butterflies in the monarchs and both of those do basically start their season with the rainy seasons in Mexico and the eggs all hatch. And then they begin to migrate north. And what happens is they'll go through their lifestyle multiple times during the migration. So as they go up to Canada, you might get two or three. Generations of painted lady or monarchs and upon and with the monarchs do the monarchs actually will migrate all the way back to Mexico where the painted ladies will turn around, but they won't quite get all the way back. So it's usually the butterflies that stayed in Mexico every year that are the source of the next year's butterflies. And that you get these other butterflies migrating with the seasons up and down as the flowers bloom. But there are a lot of other butterflies that don't migrate. And with those guys do is what the difference is when it becomes winter when it gets cold that has a direct effect on their life cycle. It really kind of like they don't hibernate, but it really they really slow down. So then that im- between state when they're pupa that normally is a week under in the summer in the winter. Can last six weeks to two months to three months? And so that's how they over winter and not freeze there. In insulated little pupa buried somewhere in the woods. And when things heat up or warm up they'll emerge butterflies, what types of butterflies live in New Mexico. Oh, we get a whole slew of butterflies. But the ones that most people really know are the swallow tells in the painted, ladies, I think are the two most kind of dominant once in a while we do get a monarch coming through. But most of all the painted lady. Butterflies migrate through and you'll see them all summer. They're the ones that have that Brown and orange color and they migrate through generally back towards Mexico in September October. So we on Camis bushes and those late blooming flowers in the fall, you'll see the mutter flies. They migrate back through the state. Are they living off of nectar is that what they eat? So they they caterpillars live off of a different food source. They live off the different host plants leaves and the green part of plants, but the butterflies once they emerge. Get all their calories from the nectar that they and unlike bees, they don't turn it into Honey, they're able to actually just use the pure nectar as their primary source of water and. Retrea what what's the main thing? And then you mentioned this off Mike, but butterflies have been with us, a very longtime eve Lucien airily, how many years did you say over seventy million years. And so we were talking off the mic, wouldn't it be hilarious to imagine a butterfly landing on a dinosaur? Is that even a possibility? Indeed, however, nine times out of ten if it was a predatory dinosaur. Probably eat it free calories. Oh, yikes. What are the other enemies of butterflies? Dinosaurs about those fascinating things about butterflies. When you look at them is their whole way of flying. There flutter is actually designed as a way of their survival from predators because that odd little flight pattern makes it really difficult for more difficult for birds who who love who. Who feed off butterflies to actually zone in and catch them too little evasive maneuver they've developed, but primarily birds are the only ones who can reach them while they're flying. How can we help the bees and butterflies so they can help us better. Well, the key. I think the one thing that we really stress if you really wanna take cares of bees and butterflies plant plant seeds plant flowers because what ends up happening is. It's only when these migrating butterflies come through. They're going to be dependent on flowers opening up with nectar to feed them. So if you wanna feed them plant flowers, and what's beautiful about that is once you've done that the initial time afterwards every time the butterflies pay for that by pollinating, those flowers and creating more seeds. So your flowers will. Eventually grow into these beautiful giant corridors which the bees and butterflies can fly there fly zones there flying mounts, and what kind of plant stupi and butterflies like to eat. If there's a flower in all probability, there's a B or butterfly who's feeding off that flower because what happens is the flowers put out a little bit of nectar, and the flowers are very smart that they will put every day, they won't put all the nectar out. They'll put a little out every day. So that the bees and butterflies will return to it increasing the chance that they will be pollinated. So it's a win for the flowers. The powers that what we call the butterflies in the Bs there and the flowers, they're all what we call we beans, which means you don't get one without the there's no such thing as I happy butterfly without a flower. There's no such thing as a happy be without a flower. They. Just really they need each other completely to to be. And so that's what we call them we Bs. That's why there was no butterflies before followers around be. Because of the fact that they're completely relying on each other interesting, and yeah, that's fascinating. And so if folks do wanna get involved you brought some I'm him you brought some seed packets here for us to plant you brought us sunflowers. And so if you go on at celebrate planet, or what we do is we distribute we give out lots and lots of sunflower packets. We give out probably a couple hundred thousand packs of sunflower seeds out every year for kids all over the country to plant we give out in the spring. We sent out live butterflies for anybody who wants to take care of and nurture live butterflies. We have those available and what I brought in to the. Studio are these pet little bees and butterflies that were made by the women down in the rainforest for us. And what we do is when we pay them to make these little pets for us. And we bring them up here. Because what we discovered is. Why one of the really tragedies not tragedies? But if you ask people what is their favorite pet? Most people will not say bees or butterflies. And the reason is obvious ABI that stinger just seems to get in the way and with butterflies they seem a little too fragile. So we finally solve the problem by having these women hand-knit, these pet bees and butterflies, and what's beautiful is you get all the advantages of any pet with these bees and butterflies you can Pat him, and you can also really what's wonderful about the bees in the butterflies. Is they have a whole language of themselves that they are there. There. You can get all the benefits and the wisdom of beef and a butterfly from the Hannett bees and butterflies I love it. Celebrate the earth celebrate planet earth Saleh -brate planet, or or or and we'd love anybody who hears this go on post, and we will make you a lifetime member. And we will strew to you everything you need to continue to enjoy taking care of the bees in the butterflies and the flowers and seriously there is nothing else. You can do that one other question somebody was asking what could a lot of people are very concerned about what's happening to be and Honey bee populations over the last several years have been kinda decimated by a virus a bug that seems to be taking them out. And there's. Really wonderful news now that there's a little fun goods that if you add fungus to the water of the bees, it seems to fortify their immune systems and could be the key to the rebounding of the bee populations. So people should keep their ears open. And find out what we'd love eventually is to have a whole community of kids who are out there, helping the bees by putting fun guy out in their water as well as planting seeds and butterfly planting seeds for their food. I really if we take care of the bees in the butterflies, we take care of all of us because it's the bees and butterflies that I brought here. Some giant some wonderful Buckeye tree seats, these earn example of a seed that would not be here if it weren't for a be taking that extra bit of energy to get up to one more flour. And pollinate that flour. And what got created is this beautiful tree. Seed and inside this is a baby tree that's going to give us the oxygen. We need to breathe it's all in there. And this wouldn't be here. If it weren't for the bees. So if we take care of the bees, we're taking care of ourselves. We take care of the butterflies we're taking care of ourselves. And so my job here is to really just see if I can get more of you two more kids out there to step up and join us in helping taking care of the bees in the butterflies. Thank you so much cliff. It's been great to talk to you. Celebrate planet earth dot org is the web site. It has all kinds of information. And we just love our puppets. Everybody's playing with them. And here's thank you so much being with us on the children's hour. Thanks bye. Bye-bye flood. But pain. Flying. Stall and shine and why that time. Bye. The pain in. Bye. Bye. Then. Without stuff. Munching tasty. You think your? But. The pain. This. They call Chris. The children's hour is produced by Haiti stone and all of us on the children's our kids crew follow us on Instagram Twitter and Facebook to search children's hour radio we post from the show links to our podcast and so much more. We wanna thank everyone for being with us on the show. Thank you governor Michelle Luhan Grisham for being with us today. And also, thank you very much to cliff Ross, Mr. cliff the butterfly man, thanks so very much and coming up next on the children's hour. This is uncool Neptune. Listening to the children's hour. While. The. Lovely. Thanks. Thank you. Love makes. Flowed in. All. Love me. Love. Love makes you love me. Love makes you feel. It's the best time. Love make you reach them. Lovely. Saying week. Love makes you wanna get the world to sing. Love make Bill. Love me love make you feel is the best time. Lawmaking wanna reach them. Love makes you. Sweet. Love makes you. Oh well. Let me. The children's hour is a production of the children's hour incorporated. A New Mexico nonprofit dedicated to producing high-quality noncommercial educational children's public radio. Find out more about us and support our work at children's our dot word. Our theme music was written by CK Barlow. Let us know what you think of the show sign up for our public events and follow us on social media. It's all at children's our dot org. Thanks for listening. I'm Katie stone.

New Mexico Michelle Luhan Grisham Mexico Katie stone New Mexico Albuquerque US Bill Mr. cliff Ross Facebook Mike Nora Sackett engineer advisory council Dot Twitter university of New Mexico Michelle Luhan Grisham Sienna
Employers' Role In Solving Surprise Medical Bills

Biden's Briefing

03:42 min | 2 years ago

Employers' Role In Solving Surprise Medical Bills

"This is Biden's briefing. I'm Joe Biden every week. I'll be bringing you stories and articles of piqued my interest, and I think might be yours as well. Thank you for joining. Employers role in solving surprise, medical bills by Bob, Herman, for axios every American who gets private health insurance, most of whom get it through their jobs is at risk of getting a surprise Bill from hospitals, doctors, air and ground ambulances, and other providers. The big picture employers would need to be part of any solution and they say they want this problem fixed, but they don't support some prominent proposals to rein in surprise billing, including tinkering with her own regulations or giving governments more power over doctors and hospitals where things stand analysts at the Brookings Institution have suggested fixes that would force healthcare providers and the purchasers of care employers and insurers to agree on a couple things. Patients should not be on the hook for surprise, bills that are tied to emergencies, nor should they have to pay for care. They receive at in. Network hospitals where a specific doctor like an anesthesiologist or a surgeon turns out to be out of network and regulators should cap how much hospitals, doctors and others can charge in certain situations, and legislation should force fair, arbitration when providers and insurers and employers can't agree, yes, but providers, loathed the idea of having their payments regulated and employers aren't keen about being forced into a dispute resolution process. Employers believe, arbitration benefits providers who stay out of network and charge at will and that it will unnecessarily Pierce holes in the employee retirement income security act of nineteen seventy four or Irizawa, which governs employer plans that directly pay for their workers, medical claims and preempts state insurance laws. This is not an issue of the management of self insured plans. It's an issue about the practice of medicine, said James Gill. Fan who handles health policy for the Orissa industry committee. The bottom line. This is messy. Toying with Orissa quote is a political, third rail health policy legal expert. NNcholas Bagley wrote in two thousand sixteen that means provider regulation, like outlawing balanced billing for emergency care or requiring all doctors at in-network facilities to accept in network rates is probably the most direct way to solve this issue. All payer rate setting is viewed as a compromise that could neuter surprise billing by reigning in providers. But corporate America is in championing it. The Orissa industry committee has not polled its member companies on all payer rate setting, but does support state efforts in California and Ohio. For instance, that would cap dialysis payments. Near Medicare rates. Go fan said Steve, whoa, GIC of vice president of policy at the national business group on health would not say whether his organization. Supported all payer rate setting. And instead said it supported reasonable pricing and billing. We feel insurers and employers through the contracting process can get there. He said, go deeper, federal legislation proposed by New Mexico Representative. Michelle Luhan Grisham would ban surprise billing but has gone nowhere in congress. That's it for today. If you like today stories, share the region with the friend, let us know what you think on social media. Again, thanks for listening.

Joe Biden Orissa industry committee Orissa Steve Brookings Institution Michelle Luhan Grisham NNcholas Bagley James Gill America Bill Medicare Bob congress vice president Herman California Ohio
AG William Barr Testifies, Hidden FBI Funds in COVID Bill, & Bidens potential VP Picks  Wednesday, July 29th

Rob Talk Podcast

09:14 min | 2 weeks ago

AG William Barr Testifies, Hidden FBI Funds in COVID Bill, & Bidens potential VP Picks Wednesday, July 29th

"It's Wednesday July twenty. Ninth. Attorney. General. William Barr testified to Congress plus information on the hidden FBI funds in the coronavirus relief bill, and who is Biden considering for VP. Welcome to rob talk podcast where I bring you the latest Progressive News and politics in ten minutes or less I'm Robert Cunningham. Thank you for tuning in. Let's get informed. Attorney General William Barr appeared before the Democratic led House Judiciary Committee yesterday. Bars considered by some to be corrupt ag who will blindly defend the president or worse. The House Judiciary Committee press to the G on a number of incidents which call into question is agency's independence and USA for CNN says, Jerry Nadler the chair of the committee has said the House is looking into impeaching bar for politicizing investigations bar defend himself from the accusation that he was not independent from trump saying that he feels he has complete freedom to do what is right Bar also pushed back on his politicizing of the DOJ saying it was not true and then Michael Flynn and Roger Stone didn't deserve to be worse because they were the president's friends. The attorney general then went on to claim that federal forces have a duty to defend the Portland Oregon courthouse, which has been under national scrutiny recently since the arrests of peaceful protesters there by unmarked federal agents. Chair Jerry. Nadler. Reprimanded AG bar for causing the use of pepper spray and batons on these protesters and the pursuit of a political objective further as representative Sheila jackson-lee was pressing bar on systemic racism and policing outright denied it existed responding to her saying quote. I don't agree there systemic racism in the police department generally in this country. So it turns out the Coronavirus Relief Bill I've been talking with you all about for the past few episodes does have some sneaky unrelated stuff in it? mainly. In as funds for a new FBI headquarters, NPR reports, Multiple Democrats and Republicans have raised objections to this provision snuck in by trump Republican Senate majority leader. Mitch McConnell told reporters, he does not support the funding on the grounds that isn't related to the immediate coronavirus needs. Quote. When we get to the end of the process, I would hope all the non-co vid related measures are out no matter what bills they were in at the start. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate. Minority Leader Chuck Schumer included the new FBI headquarters in a list of unacceptable things included in the bill. Bernie. Sanders actually pointing out some crazy things in the coronavirus relief bill. Get this. He says over two separate tweets, the Senate Republican plan. And then he lists twenty nine point four, billion dollars for the Pentagon, zero dollars for hazard pay zero dollars for nutrition assistance zero dollars for the uninsured slash underinsured zero dollars for the postal service zero dollars for state and local governments. One hundred percent deduction for three Martini CEO lunches what a disaster. The GOP Kovic Nineteen Bill includes two billion dollars for thirty five's one point seven five billion dollars for an FBI building one billion dollar for surveillance planes three hundred seventy five million dollars for armed vehicles three hundred sixty million dollars for missile defense two, hundred eighty three million dollars for a patchy helicopters zero dollars for millions facing eviction it's dead on arrival. Back in a debate between Bernie, sanders and Joe Biden Joe Biden promise to choose a woman as his VP. So here, the final contenders with a decision likely coming in the next few weeks at some point. Senator Connell a Harris of California former national security adviser. Susan Rice Representative Val demings a Florida representative. Karen Bass of California Senator, Tammy Duckworth of Illinois. Atlanta Georgia Mayor Kisha Lance Bottoms Senator Elizabeth Warren New Mexico Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham and Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer. That's a lot. That's a nine people on Biden's VP list but I'm going to list some quick facts here. On the top of the list is commonly Harris Commonly Harris is aged fifty five and she ran for president. This cycle is well, she endorsed Biden after dropping out but a concern is her attacks on Biden during the debates where she attacked by on his early opposition to bussing. Concern as her history with law enforcement specifically when she was ag of California and vigorously prosecuted Marijuana Crime Susan Rice aged fifty five served as Obama's national security adviser, and before that served as US ambassador to the United Nations under Obama. The concerns around rice come from her involvement in the controversy surrounding the two thousand twelve Benghazi attack val demings aged sixty three. Is a congresswoman from the battleground state of Florida. She's a former police chief of Orlando, which could be problematic for progressives considering the tension nationally right now amongst the American people and law enforcement. Karen Bass aged sixty six is a congresswoman from California who chairs the Congressional Black Caucus seen by many as a progressive. She has an extensive background in police reform and was one of the first to start the houses response to the police killing of George Floyd earlier this year. Her weaknesses include her age, which is something. Biden wants to contrast himself with. Tammy Duckworth aged fifty two is a senator from Illinois who lost her legs in combat while fighting in Iraq in two thousand four she was the first woman with a disability anti American to be elected to Congress. Her main weakness is lack of name recognition. Kisha Lance bottoms aged fifty is the first term mayor of Atlanta Georgia, which has seen massive protests since the killings of George Floyd and Ray Shahr Brooks by police earlier this year a concern around bottoms is that she has no experience at the federal level. Elizabeth Warren aged seventy one also ran for president this cycle. She's the Progressive Senator from Massachusetts which can help bridge the divide between moderates and Progressives a weakness of Warren is her age, and also the fact that she did not endorse anyone for a while after dropping out of the primary. Michelle Luhan Grisham, aged sixty became the first Latina Democratic governor of a state in two thousand eighteen when she assumed the governorship of New Mexico, she's held federal office before serving in Congress for six years. Her main weakness is probably name recognition. Finally Gretchen Whitmer aged forty eight the governor of a battleground state that trump won in two thousand, Sixteen Michigan. Reuters reports that she came under fire earlier this year from some Michigan residents for a stay at home order that they viewed too onerous. So that's a breakdown of all of Biden's potential. V. P picks it's probably not going to matter. It would have to be someone truly vile for Biden to screw this one up. Biden. As a head commandingly and the polls right now and of his lead does change it's not likely related to his VP pick I'm personally rooting for Warren as she is the most progressive on this list, but I'm not too hopeful on that. We'll know soon and I'll do a bigger deep dive on whoever Biden ends up choosing. Okay. So as I was wrapping up today's show, I saw a strange tweet from twitter user, mark? Bedminster. He writes political labeled senator calmly. Harris's Biden's running mate that he chose on August first four days from now. The. Twitter user then included picture of Kamla. Harris has image which reads. Joe Biden chose Commonly Harris to become his running mate for the two thousand twenty election on August I two weeks before the Democratic National Convention after keeping his choice close to his chest for months in his announcement Biden called Harris a worthy opponent and a worthy running-mate alluding to the pair's rivalry during the earlier stages of the Democratic primary. She will bring her experience as a prosecutor household name recognition and skills as a debater to the ticket. A user responded to this tweet saying they amended the article where the picture reading editor's note due to a technical error and Of this story mistakenly identified one of the women as Biden's BP pick, we regret the air. Wow. So this is wild if politico accidentally leaks this. I'm going to leave my previous segment in the show just in case it's not true I guess we'll find out on August I. I'll be keeping. You posted here. Make sure your subscribe to the podcast wherever you're listening to this you don't miss it. That's offered today. Thank you for tuning in. If this show brings you value, be sure to share it with a friend and let them know they should be listening as well. Have a great rest of your day. I'll see you next time.

Joe Biden VP Senator Elizabeth Warren FBI Senator Connell a Harris president Senate Governor Michelle Luhan Grisha Attorney Michigan William Barr Gretchen Whitmer Tammy Duckworth Congress Senator Susan Rice Karen Bass senator California George Floyd
Who Actually Reopens the Country?

The Point with Chris Cillizza

02:26 min | 4 months ago

Who Actually Reopens the Country?

"Welcome to the point for April thirteenth. I'm Lauren designed ski. Co Author of the point. I'm here to cut through the political spin to bring you the news. You need to know for all of the talk about President. Donald Trump's decision about whether or not to re opened the country the truth. Is that much of the mechanics of actually lifting? Stay at home. Orders and reopening local businesses lies with the governors of the governor's a whopping forty to have issued. Stay at home directives. That they and only they would have the power to remove. Trump can say whatever he likes about the national social distancing guidelines but he cannot foresee governor to lift their own orders and already some governors are speaking out about the possibility of trump declaring the country open for business on May first indicating that these governors are on their own timelines New Mexico governor Michelle Luhan Grisham told. Cnn's Jake Tapper. On Sunday. She is going to make decisions that safeguard new Mexicans quote all do what is best for New Mexico and quote also keep an eye on republican governors. Like Ohio's Mike DeWine Massachusetts Charlie Baker and Maryland. Larry Hogan all of whom have been willing to buck trump on corona virus and more we will see what they have to say about the possibility of reopening their states on their own timelines. Let's get to the point. Trump can say whatever he wants but it is ultimately the governor's where the rubber will meet the road on when life gets back to normal and that is the point for April thirteenth twenty twenty for more updates throughout the week including our Sunday night campaign edition subscribe to the point newsletter at CNN dot com slash point. If you like this audio briefing you can get it. Every single day on Google home or Amazon Echo. Four subscribe on Stitcher or Apple podcasts. Or your favorite podcast APP so you never miss an episode.

Donald Trump Michelle Luhan Grisham Cnn Jake Tapper President Apple Larry Hogan New Mexico Charlie Baker Google Mike DeWine Mexico Ohio Maryland Massachusetts Amazon
In Midst Of An Oil Boom, New Mexico Sets Bold New Climate Goals

Environment: NPR

06:04 min | 1 year ago

In Midst Of An Oil Boom, New Mexico Sets Bold New Climate Goals

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Amelia Island, Florida a barrier island on the northeast coast that captivates visitors with thirteen miles of uncrowded beach championship golf, natural beauty and a historic district Amelia Island dot com slash NPR. President Trump's administration may be doubling down on fossil fuels, but many states are not yesterday lawmakers in an especially sunny state, New Mexico approved a plan for rapid transition to renewable sources like solar and wind the plan is considered even more ambitious than the ambitious plan in California New Mexico may soon use a lot less fossil fuel. Although New Mexico is still producing it NPR's Nathan rot reports. New Mexico has the only round shape state capitol building in the country, which means it's always a bit hard to find a quiet corner. But that's especially true. These days the Blue Wave of last year's midterms swept over the enchantment state with Democrats taking control of the house Senate and governor's office, they've setting ambitious legislative agenda that's bringing supporters and protesters of every type to Santa Fe this day. It's environmental advocates and co workers the latter still in their work uniforms shuffling into a stuffy overcrowded room for a hearing on the energy transition act. A massive piece of legislation that would require the state us one hundred percent carbon free energy by twenty forty five. That means no more coal and number natural gas in just twenty five years. Get started here. Lucky for you. We can skip this hour's long hearing and just go straight to the source. My name is Nathan small in. I represent house district thirty six in New Mexico legislature small is from Las Cruces home to hatch. Green chili and he's one of the sponsors of the energy transition act. We're going to end up with a renewable portfolio standard that is among the leaders or perhaps is the leader for the entire country, which is striking because the state currently gets more than half of its electricity from coal, but that's changing we have the number two potential when it comes to solar resources nationwide. And we're told that it's number twelve when it comes to win. If there was ever a state that can transition to renewables, and then get it on the market. It's off New Mexico governor Michelle Luhan Grisham, and because California's following the same standard they're going to need to look to states like New Mexico to sell them this energy. That's one of the economic reasons at Christian is expected to sign the Bill later this week, but it's far from the only one she gives this is a state that is not in climate denial. We are clear that we have basically a decade to begin to turn things around into Mexico needs and will do its part the energy transition act will cut in-state greenhouse gas emissions dramatically, but New Mexico's role in the global climate picture is a complicated. One. Just look at the southeast corner of the state. We're quiet. Two lane roads have become major thoroughfares with truck after truck after Trump. The cool desert nights are now punctuated with venting flares and the steady Thrum of bobbing. Pump jets. Southeast New Mexico is oil country. It's part of the Permian basin home to the largest continuous oil and gas pool ever assessed in the United States. And folks here will tell you at oilfield supply stores like Robert Higgins, and Wally Leicester's that sure they've seen booms before and busts a disco can go go in there. Nope. Would you say it's crazy would say it is crazy. All of this production has been a windfall for New Mexico. The state is looking at a billion dollar budget surplus, thanks to oil and gas revenues money. It's putting towards the state struggling public schools and other needs. And there's a fear here that the legislation in Santa Fe, which some disparagingly. Call New Mexico's green new deal will hurt that production killing the goose that lays the gold mood. But the truth is it won't the energy transition act will require New Mexico to power itself with renewables, Denise four retired environmental law, professor from the university of New Mexico points out though that nearly all of the oil and gas being pumped in the Permian is exported. We really can't meet the greenhouse climate goals that we have to meet in develop all that oil and gas consuming all that oil and gas. She says would essentially be a climate change game over what a dilemma because it isn't consumption from New Mexico. That's gonna make a difference. It's it's the export market at this time. But the option of stopping oil and gas development, keeping it in the ground for says isn't much of an option at all. At least not now much of the drilling is happening on federal land. And the state is dependent on oil and gas revenues. It's a dilemma Ford says that the entire US could soon face more and more states are committing to renewable energy. Sources but the US is set to soon become the top oil exporter in the world. Thanks in large part to the Permian. The irony of the situation is not lost on New Mexico's governor back at the state capital in this complex moment. We have to demonstrate that renewable energy is available is redundant is reliable. And then that changes the debate about fossil fuel exports. But today, we're not in that position. For now. Grisham says she's going to work with oil and guests to limit greenhouse gas emissions. And hopefully, she says set an example for other states to follow Nathan rot NPR news.

New Mexico Mexico NPR university of New Mexico Santa Fe Amelia Island Michelle Luhan Grisham United States Nathan rot Permian California President Trump Senate Nathan small Permian basin
AP Headline News Nov 07 2018 11:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

03:30 min | 1 year ago

AP Headline News Nov 07 2018 11:00 (EST)

"Entertainment design, just for you, then checkout, customizable, streaming TV from finishing. It makes your life simple easy. Awesome. Expended? He gives you, customizable, streaming TV options. Enjoy the most free shows anywhere on any device and even access your streaming apps right on your TV with x one. Go to expend dot com. A one eight hundred spineta or visit a store today. To learn more restrictions apply. AP radio news. Good morning. I'm Ed Donahue. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is smiling this morning, it is in and a good morning for Senate Republicans after last night's election Republicans maintain a majority in the Senate McConnell knows who is responsible. I wanna thank the president. He was extremely helpful to us and states where he is in excellent shape. He worked very hard, drew, large crowds. And I think it clearly had a positive impact on the on the outcome and Democrats now have control over the house after last night, the AP saga megani has reaction from President Trump. President trouble hold a rare solo news conference here at the White House late this morning detached. Would he calls incredible elections where the Senate expanded its GOP majority? Senate Republican chief Mitch McConnell will speak to reporters and our earlier House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi will have her own news conference to celebrate her party regaining the chamber the questions remain about whether she will return to her old role as speaker in the race for governor in Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Bryant camper. Waiting for the final accounting of absentee and provisional ballots. Lauren grow Wargo with the Abrahams campaign says there were problems voting. County despite a warehouse at seven hundred machines stood at the ready deployed that never was never were. We feel the white voters two million dollars to all voters to make your every vote counted Brian Kemp expressed confidence that the final result whenever it comes will go his way democrat Gretchen Whitmer is the governor elect in Michigan feel really good that the voters of the state voted to reject bigotry and hate they voted to reject the divisive politics that seem to be permeating everything. Three Senate races remained too close to call in Montana, Florida and in Arizona, this is AP radio news in New Mexico Democrat. Deborah, Holland becomes the first female native, one of the first female native Americans elected to congress. Along with an overwhelming majority of Americans had embraced a path to success for all of Holland fills. Michelle Luhan Grisham seat in congress. A world against tyranny that provides opportunities for a nation of immigrants that nurture. That nurtures an open society and a free press that protects that protect the underrepresented and the disenfranchised there were two native American women elected to congress last night. The other is Cherie David's of Kansas. The I do Muslim American women were elected to congress last night as well. Russia Labe of Michigan and Minnesota's on Oman. I'm Donahue, AP radio news. From the boys and new music from a route five we have not one not two not three four, but all five of them Maroons here L Helen today at three on NBC four. It's four o'clock so much has happened during the day. It's hard to keep up. That's why news force working for you. I pedals amusing on Harris break it all down along with the storm team four forecast from Doug cameras for new four. I it four we'll be on and working for you.

Senate Mitch McConnell AP congress president Ed Donahue President Trump AP Nancy Pelosi Gretchen Whitmer Michigan White House Brian Kemp Michelle Luhan Grisham congress Doug Deborah
Michelle Lujan Grisham on U.S. covid-19 response: 'Most outrageous environment Ive ever worked in'

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

34:02 min | 3 weeks ago

Michelle Lujan Grisham on U.S. covid-19 response: 'Most outrageous environment Ive ever worked in'

"We'd love to hear your thoughts on this show and other Washington posts podcasts, so we can keep making things you want to hear to share your feedback. Go to Washington Post, DOT COM slash podcast survey all one word. Tell us what you like what you don't and what else you want to hear from us again. That's Washington Post Dot. COM SLASH PODCAST survey. Jonathan, Kaye part, and this is Cape Up. My guest has been her states. Secretary of Health sees represented her State in Congress today. She is said to be on Joe. Biden's vice presidential shortlist in chose it. She would be the first lat next American on a presidential ticket. She is New Mexico Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham. Hear what she has to say about that and her states response to Corona virus in this special case up live episode right now. Governor Welcome! You know I'm delighted to be on your show. Nice to meet you spend a little time with you Jonathan. Likewise. Thank you very much for being here now. I mentioned that you were the health secretary. You are a member of Congress because they gave you incredible insight, I think and how to deal with the corona virus early on you declared a statewide health emergency on March eleventh when there were only four cases in your state. What did you see that pushed? The pushed you to move so quickly. Well two things that you know that this virus is moving, and so it comes with travelers we've got commuters were movie Hijab I was still dealing with folks who were trapped on a cruise and California and I've dealt with the pandemic before and the. You Start and the more aggressively you start, the better control and management efforts you have in. This is the problem because you can't see the pandemic everyone I think falsely assumes it won't come here. The it'll be easy, and we'll wait until we see what's happening because I think for too many leaders. It's easier to explain you have to move immediately. Otherwise it rages out of control and we're seeing that all across the country now. What we follow up, you said you've been through a pandemic before. which are you talking Ebola or something else? Blue so we had two issues. We had a flu epidemic I said pandemic epidemic in two, thousand, seven, two, thousand eight, and then in two, thousand and five. We had a flu vaccine shortage so when you are in a state where you've got higher. Per Capita. Issues related to chronic issues for children and adults, and that you have a higher death rate then from influenza we'd have a third of the capacity of healthcare providers and hospitalizations I literally had to join with illiinois to. Import flu vaccine from Canada Rich. You really couldn't do then and we found A. Soft, can I say loophole and brought it in and I protected Mexica residents then we took. Out of flu vaccine, so I took all the mercury out of it to further protect new Mexicans. I wouldn't buy anything that had. Mirasol in it, and then when the epidemic was coming in the same thing, he didn't have sufficient investments in public health, so getting to people getting them vaccinated partnering with limited. A. Private Provider Group was really challenging so probably answering this too long Jonathan but in December I knew this was coming. I asked my teams to start planning in early January, so we began to have round tables and start looking about where we was secure. And testing supplies. That's really interesting. You started focusing this on in December. And then moving with your staff in January, so you anticipated what could happen, but didn't you anticipate the inaction from the federal government in terms of having a national strategy? No in my wildest dreams I would not be spending my known specific time finding supplies testing supplies, and the right manufacturers, trying to figure out which instruments right the FDA was going to authorize in an emergency use environment, then test for the for the virus, so not every instrument was available. Not every then re agent is available every testing because they're not all. They weren't at the time universal, getting swabs and then chasing. And, then, in my wildest dreams I wouldn't be dealing with the federal government who would literally then take the things that you secured and redistributes them for the country while you want it to be a country focus. Because it wasn't it meant that you were fighting? Frankly with other governors and FEMA to get the adequate supplies into your state, and now we're seeing it occur again because there was without any federal strategies, still now that you have these outbreaks, governors are in the same situation chasing down supplies and P P and trying to adequately cover their first responders is the most outrageous environment I've ever worked on worked in in my entire career. So now so now let's talk about the outrageous environment that you are working in in your state you will the press conference a believe last Thursday, where you said the trans quote are going in the wrong direction. What what's the latest data from your state and what's driving them? So two things we believe. That we were, we flattened the curve early we did have some significant issues in the northwestern part of the State Jonathan I think it's pretty well known in the country of folks like the Navajo nation that are dealing with really critical issues one. You've got people living in very remote areas without running water or electricity to they're not near any healthcare services largely supplied also by the federal government to they're dealing with the tri state region with very different rules very different testing strategies, very different sort of resource developed states. And then the third thing is They have a sicker population. They have incredible poverty and chronic disease issues again largely failure of federal government, and I can tell you that I see incredible leadership by the Navajo nation, but early on I signal on a warm to the white. House, that we need to do something specific in Indian country and more specific to the Navajo nation because they are so at risk and I couldn't get kind of tristate. Strategy up and running. I couldn't get Arizona. Really think about aggressive testing strategies setting up. A screening systems or triage systems at the Border Areas Arizona Utah New, Mexico, really challenging also had trouble although great cooperative efforts, but just not the kind of leadership I needed early on from Indian Health Service so except for that New Mexico frankly was lowering seeing a reduction in cases in other counties in the state, so we did a very slow opening. We introduced risk. We knew that we introduced risk that get a mitigated by people's personal behavior, and I need my surrounding states to be in a like situation. What happened surrounding states not in a like situation I have to say that new Mexicans and our border states. Personal behaviors weren't as good as they needed to be. And so we saw then a huge rise a jump in cases and we believe in the next couple of weeks we'll see a jump and also mortality rates which I'm devastated by so I immediately rolled back many of those issues and now we are literally citing next. Out of staters if they're not quarantined out of staters, Mexicans aren't wearing masks all the time. If you're outside of your house, you have to have a mask on. You've given me so much to follow up on in that answer. I'm going to go back to the to what you were saying about. The Navajo nation because I had a question about but I wanted to zero in on something. I think I miss. You said that you reached out to the to the White House or at least reach out to the White House or alerted the White House that I did not hear you say you heard back from the White House. So in in March, I signal the alarm that I was incredibly worried that we didn't have a cohesive effort that would protect. Our sovereign nations in New Mexico, and particularly the Navajo nation just given where it sits right three states, the reservation covers Utah Arizona and New Mexico, and they lack basic infrastructure still and I had just signed into law in incredible HAP-. It'll investment to connect them to running water. Not In all the chapters I gotTA figure out the rest of the laterals, but I'm clear about what these risks are and clear about what we need to do with the Navajo nation in. It's not so much that I didn't hear back from the White House it's. It's more Jonathan about. Staying, the course without leadership, being cohesive comprehensive, what does it look like? What does it mean and instead I ended up walking down a city Gallup doing a lot of work in one of the county's McKinley county delivering all the food and water, all of those surrounding that's the local body of government for the Navajo Nation Chapter Houses, and the president and Vice President, and the Council of the Navajo Nation likewise have in very extreme curfews. Downs and the only way that works is if we're bringing worked with them supplies. Federal Government took them more than four to six weeks to even get fema on the ground operating there and I don't think they were nearly as effective until way too late in getting adequate testing supplies and even today. If Indian Health Service runs a covid nineteen tests, it will. Will take twice as long or even longer to get back from a laboratory that if those tests came to our state laboratory I, can turn those around in twenty four to forty eight hours routinely. The sooner we know you're infected, the better we are at managing the isolation, and it's the state of New Mexico. That did all isolation sites, not the federal. Government! And, that's interesting that you can turn it around in Mexico and twenty four to forty eight hours. We're hearing from I've been hearing at least from other states such as Florida, where can take up to a week to get results back me up on. A second thing you mentioned in that in that first answer, and that was about people coming in from other states. Is We've been talking about. Your state has relatively. Lower Number Cova cases compared to your neighboring states like Colorado Arizona. Co patients from say Him County Arizona are now being moved to Albuquerque and treated their due to staffing and equipment shortages in Arizona. Are you concerned about the potential risk? This poses to New Mexican You Bet we are, and we've been watching Jonathan. The hospitalization rates in all of the surrounding states, and early on and I got it new Mexicans have every right to be both concerned about their personal well-being and safety, and that of their families, and what's happening economically, and I had a lot of Mexicans on Texas border areas that do get their healthcare in midland and Lubbock and early on in the pandemic. They said look. We got plenty of access. Access to healthcare providers because I wouldn't let Mexicans travel. If you went over the border, you had to come back in quarantine and I get a lot of pushback about that, but just what we predicted if we aren't careful, those hospitals still up, you participate in moving the virus. Of course, none of our hospitals. It's a illegal and be even if it wasn't no American, would deny in other American health care I mean. That's not who we are. But. It does create real challenges in Mexico, where I have a third, the hospital capacity and a third, the ventilator capacity per capita than any other state in the nation, so as we're picking up support to Texas and Arizona that means that we have less available for folks here, which means I have to do an even better job at managing Kovin and the Mexicans. Mexicans are going to have to have even more personal responsibility and many other Americans and at some point that fairness argument is really I. Hope GonNa play in this political arena because if we don a national. If we'd had an effective national strategy, these equity challenges could have been incredibly mitigated in tens of thousands of lives across this nation would have been saved. Well. This is a good segue to the third. Follow up that I wanted to ask you about and that's masks. You've mandated that Mexicans wear masks. Do you think that there should be a national mandate that we should wear masks? Absolutely, I don't have any idea, Jonathan? How masks became political. Look. Nobody wants to wear them. I agree with that basic statement there. We don't wear masks Americans. We haven't done that. Other societies and countries in their public health efforts really promote mass wearing. We have done that as so. It's very uncomfortable and it's not something that. We have very very effective experience at, but they mitigate right the transmission of this virus, so it's here. We have no vaccine. We don't yet have really effective treatments, so the only thing we have is to control the rate of sporadic rate of infection and it's we can mitigate that by mass wearing. Why wouldn't we because then it means you can introduce more risk like schools. Schools and more businesses at close to full capacity without them. You can't because you can't control your rate of infection and I knew Mexicans. I'M GONNA. Give them a great shout out. They don't like it. I would say overall they have been I think disappointed that I mandated. Now that we're going to enforce that mandate, but I will tell you that we can see by. We we use that. One of the national laboratories has a very interesting way of reviewing social media and then getting just other anecdotal data, and they can tell you based on that with a fairly. Productive degree of certainty, how much of that mass waring's taking hold right? How much of my increasing every day and we're seeing dramatic increases in the number of people wearing masks all the time I can't tell you that it's eighty percent which we would like to have eighty or eighty five percent that means I can introduce more risk but maybe where went. Went from thirty to fifty five and closing in on sixty and seventy percent, and this will make a huge difference in our state, and for the Mexicans who've sacrifice rates has done it even though they disagree and are working at protecting others and making sure that we just stay together as we battled cove. It I, think them all because it hasn't been easy. Government, let me ask you this about about enforcement of the mask mandate. Have you gotten law enforcement on board with this and I'm asking because we have seen situations where law enforcement have made it clear that that they're not about this. There was an interview on CNN where a Sheriff I. BELIEVE IN I don't WanNa. Say the stay in case I get it wrong, but a local sheriff, not in your state basically said Hey, this is America. People should have a choice of whether they want to wear a mask or not. Are you facing that kind of pushback in New Mexico from law enforcement. We are at some of it is absolute back. We will not assist you at the local level. I can't say primarily sheriffs who were elected right and try I think people are treating this pandemic again. As a political situation is not a political situation, it does not care whether you're Republican or Democrat, young or old, whether you're independent or declined to state. It does not care at all about it's hosts. It will attack you right indiscriminately and so i. think that's largely been the response. I've got some local police departments I. think that are also reluctant, but here's what I do. Have nearly universally nearly everyone will educate folks and try to get their first responders to be better. At wearing masks, and they should be wearing masks all of the time as first responders and appalled when they don't. And then I've got several jurisdictions who are now going to actually issue citations with the state police who have already been issuing citations so I have two both admit that we're having to grow that support and invest in that advocacy. I'm happy to also report that we've got many more than I think a lot of states in this situation. Can expect early on in terms of making sure that we do enforcement because I've made it clear. The more people who are masks, the better we are than the better it is for us, is the state to then carefully methodically and slowly reintroduce some risk and our goal. Is Schools and I am not pollyanna. The countries that have successfully opened schools didn't just bend the curve. They crushed the curve. Countries like Germany that flattened the Kerr, but still had an infection rate over one. They had trouble they had that open than reduced participation and closed and reopened and I think that the United States ought to work diligently not to be in that situation and I'm working diligently not to be in that situation. Governor I'm glad you brought that up because I'm wondering. What do you make of the president of the United States? Threatening schools if they don't reopen or a threat threatening Yeah, threatening schools if they aren't reopened. Does you've already announced that you have? Stopped contact sports. Do you think it's responsible to open up schools on the normal schedule? It. I think that each state needs to be really careful about what their rate of infection is, and where they're whether they've bent that Kurban. All before they reopen schools, they will put that workforce at risk, and you can't maintain it, and while we don't believe kids are super vectors and we're seeing that kids don't seem to have the same. At least consistently, really negative impacts from having coverted, there's a lot we still don't know and New Mexico has a higher rate of infection among children than any other state or most states actually be careful about that with the last set of data over the last week, but it's way too high so I'm really cautious about those risks and here's my response. To the federal government, what first of all they, this seems to me to be more of a political consistent attack on public education. This is an administration that doesn't want to fund public education that has been harsh and cruel about investments and strategies and outcomes for public education, and I think frankly Congress has worked really diligently to try and counteract many of the. Proposals that are discriminatory on their face, and I state that's majority majority in terms of its population. The sort of Betsy Devos plan for public education is unacceptable so. Part of the same pattern. If you will, the threat is win. This president can't get all of the governors on the same page. That's what he goes to me just less than a month ago. We call does all jerks on the telephone for not reopening our economies. It's an outrageous threat. It's incredibly immature and the worst is. It's dangerous because there isn't a national strategy. I don't mind that the White House is clear that education. Going back to school is really important. These kids need to go back to school, but you better way those risks and you ought to be a partner. Right, you're not a hammer, and this is no time to pretend that you cared about public education so I find this threat another really shallow attempt at trying to get their way without having any real plan and the other thing I really have to say. Is that one on one members of the task force and members of the White House are in fact, really effective at solving many of the states problems. If I needed more testing supplies, I could get. Amanda burks to put us on the testing strategy pilot. If I'm having trouble with one of the manufacturers I could call the chief of staff and they work on figuring that out if we for. Several weeks New Mexico is a tier two state, which meant for some reason. I don't know how that arbitrarily got done. We couldn't get as many P. and related supplies. End I not that removed. We've had folks come here and help navigate even the National Laboratory. Support now working on the detention centers I. Want them to follow every federal detention center ought to follow the same. Prison reform present activities that we have making sure that our inmates in our officers safe as they can be. We had an outbreak. Where did it come in federal detention center, and so I'm getting some support now. But this could have been done as a federal strategy and again we wouldn't be in this situation. We're in with an out of control national infection rate. Where it's. Industrialized nations, the worst and so many more people have died and will die. It's unconscionable for this nation in the situation. Governor we've got seven minutes and I've got more than seven questions to ask you I'm GonNa go to a question from from a viewer who in that you've mentioned several times that people coming in from out of state have to quarantine and this question from George Henry George Henry. Schneider from Oregon asks. Your requiring a fourteen day quarantine for most visitors New Mexico, how you enforcing that. So enforcing the quarantine is top. We're asking that are watching industry. Don't accept first of all. That's not an enforcement, but it's a proactive approach. You should not have any reservations from folks out of state in less. They affirmed that they're clear that they have to stay in that cabin the entire fourteen days before they can go out. We're asking the same things of our businesses. We restricting access to things like. Restaurants so that it I hope it's not as enticing. They have to wear masks. We have signs outside at the airport. We've got staff who tell you it's a fourteen day quarantine. If you're pulled over out without a mask and we find out that you're from out of state, you will get cited for violating a fourteen day quarantine the hard part about enforcing it is that we're not at every airport. People are driving in I. Do not know. And, if one of our hospitality industry partners doesn't hold them accountable, I may or may not know about that situation so better. Enforcement were trying to be proactive, which means I'm literally advertising through our Department of Treasury system saying as much as we want your business. This is not when it's good for business. I need you to stay home and I've eliminated. You can't go to any of our parks so now camping no hiking. Hiking no boating. If you're from out of state, you can't be at those parks, so it's a combination of you can be cited and being proactive and firm about travelers as we can, and we're looking at some proposals like Lasca, which allows some travelers to bring you a very recent negative tests and I'm looking about whether or not that might be a vehicle to ease up as we introduce more risk in the future. Okay, Governor Fair, warning I have two questions and we're going to go, and we're GONNA go over time because I want you to answer them. Both the first one has to do with the environment that we're in right now. The racial environment that we're in right now. You had a situation in new. Mexico, where armed right wing militias! Shot someone while people were taking taking down a statue. Could you just reflect on the conversation that we're having right now about racial injustice, but also about the statues conversation your view about where we are right now. I really appreciate that Jonathan. Show I'm, GONNA try to. They're still investigating exactly. The individual who shot a shot fired the shots that critically injured a young man during a protest really making clear that this is also a state that has institutional racism, and we need to do everything in our power to address it, so it's not really clear, if someone that malicious civil guard actually. Was the perpetrator of the shots fired. But we do know is this. The militia should not have been engaging or intimidate or creating an environment that absolutely created the conditions or that hostile event, and that risks, and that's untenable, and we think as I think actually this week. There will be a charges filed against this new. Mexico militia for bringing intimidation many of our protests to. The whole issue, so it's unacceptable into Mexico. We're doing everything we can about it and we are attending to as we should. As leaders that racial unrest in this climate in this country requires every single leadership tool in our toolbox, and if we don't do it now, it's not going to get done and we will continue. Forwarding our racial or racist past and I want to be in a state that rejects that and does everything that we can New Mexico has a tough history, and we have a our largest city is still under a consent decree from the Department of Justice for Excessive Force with their police department We have a incredibly negative. Outcome instead of statistics about excessive force, resulting in the deaths, involving an officer shooting of an individual, so we are really clear about how this can get out of hand in ways. Nobody wants so right now. We've got a commission on Civil Rights. It's GonNa look at police brutality in particular that means new police training requirements for de-escalation looking at community police strategies that are more about less. Less of I'm sorry about a name and more about real community efforts that build trust in protect us in different ways. We're engaging our public education department. WE'RE NOT GONNA end institutional racism until we do something different in education, where now requiring body cams of every police jurisdiction and I've created a racial council for Justice. We talked about statues. Mexico's got its own right effort at the KHIMKI. Who came here four hundred years ago, it came as conquerors, and they conquered, and these are individuals, of course that I'm related to and they enslaved native Americans and the amount of cruelty. is quite frankly really untold and unknown in our state because we don't teach it. Somewhere in this state is an incredible opportunity given that we're so multicultural Anna Minority Majority State that we need statutes that are clear. And clearly marked about at a pass we are not proud of and why they're important. Teaching moments by the can't be celebrated. and. We've got to be in a place where we celebrate the victories of coming together and attacking racism and not abiding by past that was about. Conquering killing? Raping murdering or enslaving, and we know that's how the world moved. But we should be much more enlightened than that today, and we should be teaching every American that we can only heal by recognizing our past and being accountable to it, but also preventing it from moving any. Anywhere in the future, and that's what New Mexico is GonNa do, and I'm really proud of them, and it won't be easy if I made that sound easy I want everyone to know who is watching your show. It will not be easy. Governor last question as I mentioned in the in the introduction you or sent to be on the shortlist. To Be Joe Biden's vice presidential running mate. If you're selected, you'd be the first Latin American to be on a presidential ticket. Talk personally about what it means to you and your family that your name is being talked about as a potential vice president of the United States. Oh that's a tough question Jonathan Up. I lost my father almost ten years ago, and I announced one day in the backyard that I wanted to run for Congress because I cared so much about healthcare, and at the time and the primary both Hillary Clinton and Barack Senator Barack Obama were debating in primary healthcare changes so that we could have adequate coverage and protect Americans and I was all in I, wanted it. It and I have to say that my children and my close friends were just shaking their head. You can't just never run for office and go right into a contested primary for Congress and my father. was my number one champion. He was incredibly proud. We've got a very proud family. My my grandfather was the first Hispanic Supreme Court justice and Chief Justice in the state. A cousin of mine was the very first. Of Congress, he was Republicans. We lost him a couple of years ago. Manuel Luhan. He was the secretary of the Interior for the first Bush administration, and so there are very deep-rooted legacies here and I can tell you unequivocally my father. Just in the conversation would be incredibly proud for me. Personally I, want a White House I want a Biden White House. It is clear about governing clear. Clear about respecting all Americans and clear about national strategies that can really make a difference in governor's being able to make the kinds of differences. They need and bringing Congress back together, so that there a more cohesive political body and went biden depict person gets his ticket elected, and allows him to do the kind of leadership renewals and efforts in this country that are so badly needed, so it's flattering. But I try to just keep focused here and I am grateful that my my family legacy. It's an opportunity to get promoted unabashed on your incredible program here today. Well Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham. Thank you very much for for being here for coming on the podcast and good luck. Thank you very much, thank you Jonathan. Thanks for listening to Cape Up Tune in every Tuesday you can find us on apple, podcasts and Stitcher, and how about doing me a huge favor subscribe rate and review us I'm trying to think part of the Washington Post you can find me on twitter at K. Part Jay.

New Mexico Jonathan Up Mexico federal government Congress White House Joe Biden Arizona Governor Michelle Luhan Grisha Washington Post secretary United States Washington flu vaccine FEMA influenza California
She The People's Aimee Allison on Rebuilding American Democracy around WOC Organizers (plus Ocasio-Cortez in #3019, Stacey Abrams update, women-led legislatures in Colorado and Nevada, and more!)

Deep Democracy

1:11:54 hr | 1 year ago

She The People's Aimee Allison on Rebuilding American Democracy around WOC Organizers (plus Ocasio-Cortez in #3019, Stacey Abrams update, women-led legislatures in Colorado and Nevada, and more!)

"Welcome to the deep democracy podcast. My name is will Nellie Rivera in joined by my co host and fellow movements assert Gina Christo. Hello will yet. And I met working on the Anna Presley campaign, and we spent many hours and talking about the dumpster fires called democracy across this country and the inspiration. We find in the emerging progressive movement. That's what we hide out on the show, these organizers and activists the heavy lifting of what we call deep democracy, the belief that those at the margins should be at the center, and that the inclusion of all voices allows for more complete view of the system. It's just it's interesting this history of of politicians being racist. And now the accountability that they're look. Oh, it didn't even I didn't even consider that shouldn't run because I was in black facing the eighties. You know? And in the silliest thing is like when when people try to put it in like, the usual kind of party buckets is the problem of the left or the problem of the right is a problem for Democrats are my coupled is a cultural problem, this is it is a national cultural problem that we have not resolved yet. And you can scribe it to a party, but you can also ascribe it to institutions to how so many things function in this country. Right. So it's a psych is there are racist people on many sides, many shapes shapes. So let's not try to put in these cute little ordained boxes. That's actually been the most telling thing for me seeing people trying to put this into a box and guys stop come on be better. I mean now we know that there's like a legion. I swear someone. What I'm here for? I'm here for that. Like twenty something year old right now, that's like doing a special like feces on like your books. I know all their product just got much more interesting so much more more interesting. I can just see like the, you know can be a psychology thesis like how people reinvent themselves or something over time in how the brain that fits interesting because I was like on my hands, which I don't I would like be. I'm like, so can I can I. Yeah. Just go through your books between like the seventies and eighties and even the nineties. Just like to you know, what that's funny because I do remember on campus. There's a couple incidents when I was there. So this is two thousand two thousand four where there were instances where people like, you know, some of the frats had like, oh, yeah. Black-faced parties and face Partyis. I remember one in particular. God, let's say that ministration came down on them pretty hard. Pretty hard number one offs because they were administration along with like Sudan sexually organizing brought it down pretty quickly. But it says other thing about like, you know, how important is the hold that Suffolk. Honorable when it happens, but conversation is like at a fraternity or even as a wordy where they're like, I have a great idea party. Not very let's dress up like black like why? I did you hear that story though about this was a this was a little bit of a twist. Right. So he's a young budgets later in Florida who dressed up in black face. But it was him in his best friends. Just as each other as a joke one year when they're in high school, so and his friend is actively coming out like like, look, we did this in like, yeah. Where we both stupid about it. Yeah. Totally like he was I was he shouldn't have to resign. What do you think about that? I Don, I know. I'm like crap. I don't have tenure sometimes it's not so. No. I I, you know, I think I guess I would I would my question would be how do people of color in his in his district feel what that is the right way of looking at you know, like in into listeners that right? There's what's called going to the context to the content meeting people where you are not parachuting in from where you are where you stand. Yeah. And I mean, don't get me wrong. There's tons of times to parachute in and be like, you're racist. But if his friend is coming out, I didn't really article. But if his friend is coming out. Issues like this is not an easy slam dunk like in Virginia where it's all right wrap it up a bit up. Can I ask you about Justin? Fairfax. It is a complex thing. When men of color are accused of assault by white women. And as like as a survivor in a sexual activist for me. My autopilot is two women. She's. She's. Yeah. And so it's complicated. Because I you know, I I I am a trust woman kind of gal. But the, you know, I mean, look, I think that you know, she has a clear account we dove. What of what happened? She was willing to go to the post way before this. This was actually happening Virginia. And I'm on I'm on her side. And I think that you whenever we leave things up to like, social media, popular, culture leg resolve things. It's never good thing. So I do think that a thorough investigation. What that means? I don't know. I'm no lawyer. So don't ever look for me in that way. But I'm with her in that way. Because at the end of the day, I think, you know, as a as a woman in someone that's working politics. I think we've all been in situations. Sometimes sometimes you feel comfortable, and you know, some of us are able to say, no one's of you know, you don't know where people are at. So it's complicated and people make bad decisions. And sometimes it come back for you. Yeah. That's what I think on that one because I don't see. How someone like years later will, you know, bring something up like that back up again for for no reason. Yeah. So it's it is complicated though. Because he's a man because of you know, you know, men of color and politics are unicorns. Just like women are right, but even more so so it's always a point of feel like you lose one. But at the end of the day, it's about improving the law. It's not a popular opinion. I will say, but you don't think that's a popular opinion. Not among some people know. Yeah. No. Because I do that. There is a real story line for those that have felt that there's been a lot of false accusations against men of color in black men, particularly the course of time. And we know what that means in history. So there's a particular sensitivity there in I understand that right? And to bring this up because I think it's not the same. But I I wanna bring up the culture point when you when you look at people like R Kelly, right like the the community has known for a long time what he's been up to right people that still support him, right? And you know, that cognitive dissonance or that cultural reasons sometimes where you feel like you just rather not talk about something. I think we need to get over all that stuff. And it's going to be uncomfortable. Because it means that some of the people that you admire aren't aren't admirable admirable as you thought. If you like this show, you'll probably also like the Brown girls guide to politics podcast of Brandon shows wonder media network hosted by emerge, America's political director Ashanti goal are as no this year was a record year for women of color running for and being elected to office on the Brown girls. Guy to politics podcast, Ashanti talks with amusing women of color who are changing the face of politics, and who are still vastly undercover d- in mainstream media episodes include stories of being the only Brown girl in the room profiles of politicians and candidates roundtables to inlays the news and more episode one drops next week on Monday, April first with the one and only Stacey Abrams. Listen our every day. You're. Nevada and Colorado have female legislatures lady will not all females use me majority. I still believe it some sort of gender balance that that's good. That's good. Yeah. But yeah, my I know use their lady dominating the legislatures in Colorado, Nevada can't be really interesting to see from policy making perspective like whether it was like a real shift. There has to be you know, in also in Texas. There is a a caucus of women women of color. They're actually majority now in Texas legislature. What? Yeah, what's. Yeah. Or no within the within the Democrats. Yeah. It's not like the majority of the legislative caucus wrong and of caucus now they could really like actually put forth some bills be a block. That's which at the end of the deal is real like, you know. Oh my God. Policymaking? You gotta have a crew which you if. You know, it's really interesting to think about that both in all three of those states because Nevada and Colorado in particular had really strong female candidates for governor and weren't able to get them across the line. And it's it's so interesting, you know, to see finally Democrats understanding that this is about bench building. And I think the women's organizations are finally have understood the bench building. But learning the the large success that they had in different legislatures and what they can learn from those individual districts to empower another woman to woman to run for governor. But you know, this country has a problem with executive women and women powers who knows how long it'll take. But it's good that there's in three really important states that there's like powerful. Good examples. I mean, look at Michelle Luhan Grisham. Yeah. She's the governor of New Mexico. She's not she has she's had her her own. You know issues that say, but I always say the it's that kind of leadership that is different because seeing that she's called she's calling back her own national guard from the border right because people don't realize this. There's forty five hundred American troops in the US in the US Mexican border, and it continues to grow in there on assignment until through until September of this year. Oh my God. I didn't know that. Yes. You know? I like to go down the rabbit high. No. I n right. So isn't that crazy? That's that some it's literally a human wall like the president's literally. So Michelle is really interesting. I mean, she she is the first native governor of New Mexico and her family has really deep roots there. It's seven twenty yet. Crazy. I mean there were there. Treat your you. All the way back. Yeah. Yeah. So it's it's cool to see somebody who has those roots in leadership in a time where it's like everyone's racist upfront, there racism is unencumbered Larry. Mexico's interesting police, though, any other interesting good stuff that's happening. They want. Oh, we could we could talk about Stacy before we talk about any talked to Amy about Stacey. All that's true, man. So isn't this interesting? Right. So like, I feel that I've been listening allot in reading lots are saying about Stacy. And I always I always I always get suspicious. When you start hearing the same line by everyone in what's clear is that everybody wants to make sure that she runs for Senate. This is all about her Senate run. This is all of our sooner. I were trying to keep her in Georgia. That's what I think too. 'cause I honestly was expecting to open up my Twitter and have it be like Stacey twenty twenty. I'm here for it. And everybody has the right like if we're gonna talk about beta running for president you have to talk about stakes. Exactly. That's basically, my my whole thing. Right. And I also it really irritates me. There are lots of people have talked to who are like, well, he just ran a better campaign. Like it was on. What turns terms I know to understand the what they think that he reached a larger national profile than she did. But into liver, Texas, does it matter, and I think no I hate when people people are ridiculous. But I also think it's because when you run for Senate, it's a federal office and Stacey was running in Georgia, which is like the most hometown state ever. She was running to be the governor of Georgia. She she didn't have the leisure to make her campaign national because it would have heard her, you know, I mean, it would have some. Her campaign on exactly and then they wouldn't have had the, you know, the they wouldn't have stolen from her. I know which I know we talking about that. I just really it just continues to me how it American election. Another one was stolen, and we don't call it that I know. And this one was like, you know, like literally hidden ballots ballots hidden in closets craziness machine still in their original manufacturing rap sitting in downtown Atlanta. Yes, it just it's it's oppression. I mean, it's just full full ass oppression on that one. Like, oh, man. What did you think about Howard Schultz announcement? Do that until the money. Agree. It's like complete talk about dumpster fire. Oh my God. Like just the level of like just. Self-aggrandizement? That's the word. I just you know, it just it's I truly wish that someday. I have the confidence of that white, man. I wish you I wish none of which we just like take that away from like our society period and take confidence away that level because that's confidence that something different delusions. No. I mean, you know, even delusional to some degree like. Delusional search for it. There's this word. I can't think of it right now. But it gets used to basically like describe dictators, right? But if they, you know, dictators right like, they really do believe that they've done a public good. And even though they've had to like, murder and rape. And all these other horrible things because they build bridges and build schools and did all these other things, you know, for a country. You know, they're kind of looked at it in a different way in history. It's that word, but I can't remember it. But it's it's the same kind of thinking for me. It's like this. I just I don't know. I just think it's too much like, you know, you're ready gave us burn coffee bean stopped. That's what I'm saying an even coffee tastes, burnt and uncall- until there's a seismic shift in like our political system like operates in terms of like how you elect, you know, a a a president. It's stabilizing to have a third party candidate. You know, honestly, whether it was someone that I actually like liked or not I would still feel the same to be honest. It's just we can't, you know, designed for a third party candidate like a win merciful and be it just it's going to it's going to give the presidency back to back to back to Donald Trump. And that just is not I think scenario I wanna face. I can't handle it. There's not enough Lexa pro in the world. But if so here's my question for you on that. Because I don't disagree with you. But Bernie Sanders man is is an independent, and he says that he has this whole following and this movement and all those things I mean to me, I think he should run outside of the Democratic Party. You know, I don't I don't Howard she'll do it. But honestly, I'd rather birdie still run within the Democratic Party democrat though. So so I don't understand destabilizing to the overall system to have them run as an independent than it is to have a democrat. And I think Democrats are just be okay with it. And that we probably disagree with that point. But I just think it's it's a primary. It's democracy. Listen, I'm fine. I'm fine being okay with it. I'm working through it. And I will work myself up to it for this cycle. But like it's frustrating to me when he comes out, and he says, the only reason I run in the Democratic Party is because I can't get on CNN any other way. But then in the same breath is like I have this incredible movement behind me. And I, you know, have this legislation that I can just run on and do and like, I don't know. I just it feels disingenuous to me. I think he's gonna he's consistent. He's always been disingenuous systems agree. That's all right. Casey on that one. Well, and I and I. Invalidate your feelings. But you know, how feel about this whole thing. I I've been talking about moving to her parliamentary system for very long time. But that's just me. I know is not realistic. Whatever idea. See the Commons. You see how they go for the comfort of their prime minister. Oh, yeah. They have a we don't they have in Britain. Don't they have something like every other week where they come in? And the PM just gets shit on. I don't know if it's every other week, but feels like it's weekly. But yeah, I mean for her la- firm for recent Brexit vote that was that was voted down. They literally read a soon as the vote was was was was counted up and she lost. They're like, yeah. We're going to now like file for vote of confidence to see whether we want, you know. Cold out there cold. But unfortunately, a lot of it's also driven by phobia. So let's not keep it real to you know. No, it's not it's not as bit rate again is that as Evelyn as we wish we wish it was. So, but you know, what's interesting though to listening to NPR and talking about how the EU after this most recent buckle resigned. Let them feel their pain. We're not gonna give them another chance, basically. We're not. Yeah. Because you know, they've just been counting on the fact that the EU will just continue to play along with them and not like actually hold true to the to the agreement. But there. Yeah. No. This is not. Many agree to anything else. So God in clear people wanna leave. So so let them leave. I know. It's gonna be stabilizing when it happened or it is who's the adult who is the adult that's left in Europe, you know, angle Markle's like I'm outta here. And also she's again pretty imperfect fellowship at Harvard right now. I think she's going to be God. What did she is going to be doing the commencement at Harvard? Actually, it's going to be one of the base best free tickets in town if you can get one how do you get one? I don't know. Yeah. I mean, I'm sure if it really wanted to try. Rather spend a Sunday too. Many people. Yes. No. I thought I could handle the big crowds. And then I walked outside to get lunch during the patriots grade. And I was like, Ooh, I wanna die. That's not unusual like big crowd too that in like, she's not going to be rowdy drunk Harvard. Graduation not this year. Oh, God harbor game. Yeah. But even that have you ever been to heal Harvard game? Undergrad? I went to the parties around the time it's going to take note of freebies area standards, a pretty low at that age. Yeah. Yeah. Else? Can we talk about honesty? The folks that's how so I just brought my ass back to campus. I only went to once you were. I was in Atlanta of the smack my weirdos. But this is a whole 'nother level keep around the ones. I know you're like, my waiters are the only ones I can deal with. Let's these oversight hearings. Oh, my. Did you see Alex, quite honestly, there's nothing? I don't see this. She puts up with you. You know, I'm not one to like stay over most people because I tend not to stand stand for her. I really do Sanford. I really do just like the the storytelling that she leads with a so powerful, you know, because it just is this powerful. I just I to see someone who is in their twenties. Get up in a congressional hearing. And be like, boom, boom, boom, boom. And just and just so clearly and simply illustrate how fucked up our campaign finance. I could. Yeah. So I'm the bad guy. And I'm like, yes, I don't know where this is going, but please please keep going. Thank you chair. So. Let's play a game. Let's play a lightning round game. I'm going to be the bad guy, which I'm sure half the room would agree with anyway. And I want to get away with as much bad things as possible. Ideally to enrich myself, an advance my interest, even if that means putting putting my interests ahead of the American people. So MRs Hobart Flynn. Oh, and by the way, I have enlisted all of you as my co conspirators. So you're going to help me legally get away with all of this. So MRs Hobart Flynn, I want to rent if I want to run a campaign that is entirely funded by corporate political action committees. Is that is there anything that legally prevents me from doing that? No, okay. So there's nothing stopping me from being entirely funded by corporate pacts safe from the fossil fuel industry, the healthcare industry, big pharma entirely hundred percent lobbyists pack funded. Okay. So let's say, I'm really really bad guy. And let's see I've have some skeletons in my closet that I need to cover up. So that I can get elected Mr Smith. Is it true that you wrote this article this opinion piece for the Washington Post entitled these payments to women were unseemly that doesn't mean they were a legal can't see the piece, but I wrote a piece under- that headline in the post. So I assume that's right. Okay. Great. So green light for hush money. I can do all sorts of terrible things. It's totally legal right now for to pay people off, and that is considered speech that money is considered speech house thirty nineteen thirty nine. That's what that's what Twitter socially says about eight. You'll see. Y'all season thirty nineteen the rest of us are just trying to catch up to catch up. Actually, some people aren't even trying to catch just storms. It's really actually, you know, I'm not amazing me strike that from the record these men coming for her, man. They just the insecurity. I'm like just here. Sipping zero for it. Enjoying every moment of it. Because I'm like, you know, it just as fragile as knew you were like we knew we knew a new. But now, we get to see this in a national sage, I know. And I also I just think that you know, the way that she just sat there in the state of the union and just was her cell solemn. And like no like a I'm I'm not taking your shit face. She liked didn't stand up and clap when everybody did sometime during nineteen blazer on. I know I know arm slip. What is thing? I needed one. Max. What's second? And TJ. Max is that in because I need a short requested to do it Instagram bushy disres- shopping. You know, she would. Oh my God. I should do that. If she doesn't do it on her own already. I know do how do what do you think about the way that she uses social media, and like the way that now people running for president are trying to use it like do you find it disingenuous? Oh, I mean, look people will copy and paste, you should take it as a form of flattery. But just because you do the same thing they see someone doing leveraging at the same. Yeah. I totally agree. Seeing some of that is he kind of looks like your parents. And then you video like they feel awkward your awkward receiving it. Just doesn't really work. I'm I thought I was being overly critical. Not critical doesn't mean only gopher it. Because you know, from my perspective, you know, as someone that like is trying to say that we should be doing campaigns differently. Running them differently. Yeah. Go ahead and use the tools, it doesn't mean. We're going to use them the same way. Right. But go ahead and using. Yeah. Right. You know? Hey, I think it's the fact that every. Had like Instagram announcement as part of their presidential campaign tells you everything and he didn't know about the impact that campaigns like you'll see and others like hers like had across the country. And it's also why like, you know, the the consultant industrial complex traditional one doesn't want to see this happen and the more. I think I realized that the more I realize it's not worth to get into certain Bates on people because he realized that like, oh, this is your bread and butter, and you don't want to change. I think we talked about that a little bit earlier offline about like this cycle, and deciding how we're going to engage with people about you know, who should be voting and who should be counted who should be counted in polls. And and all that. And it's like you, and I and people around us have to make a decision not to like really get into it with the dinosaurs man, like it's it's a lost. It's a lost cause to try to chart at convince people who don't want to share power to share power just have to take it back. Screaming over spoil milk. Not going to make it less spoilt. And at some point is going to be stinky for the wolf of us. Kill him kindness. Right. One of my favorite phrases that to say sometimes it's easier than than other days honestly to stick to the mantra still building. But you know, how that goes? Our guest speaker today is the wonderful and amazing Amy Allison she is a founder of she the people in national network, elevating the political voice and power of women of color. We met Amy she the people conference in San Francisco last year. She the people was just incredible room of women, especially women focus on women of color talking about running for office talking about being a community organizer a leader. And it was just one of the most powering political days I've ever been a part of three hundred women's wish into college ballroom in in San Francisco with some of the most bad ass, strategists and movement leaders were delivering some of these primary victories and went on to deliver some of these general election victories as well. So it was a very inspirational experience end as you get imagine. She is off to an amazing year. She has a big load for in terms of what this means for next for the Sears or this. I love it. It's twenty twenty. Actually isn't. But let's be honest guys fake twenty twenty twenty nineteen. With the presidential primaries. But she she is hosting. She the people is hosting the first presidential form, specifically focused on black women issues surrounding black women. It's an April in Texas, and it's going to be excess Dallas I think okay, Huston's matter. I dunno. She's gonna start naming just random no, not an Austin. It's in a Houston or Dallas. But yes, she she's incredible. I think you know, she has really broken in in terms of like normal mainstream politics really bringing women of color to the center from a media perspective. Like, we always talk about how there's so many women of color running and pushing these issues, but the fact of the matter is like the political system media is a part of it. And I think that Amy has really done a lot of cracking the glass ceiling for women in terms of the representation. What I would say is this, you know, you know, in terms of the people experience, what was so powerful for me is that I've never really seen an organization really try to bring people across movements and across funding lines for four sorta speaking and by by funding lines when I mean tends to be a lot of silos between whether you do your work in a nonpartisan way. Whether you do it in a semi political way, or whether you do it enough, you know, a hundred percent political way, and what I like about what she what she brings in what she the people brings it. It's about bringing all these people together. Right. Because ultimately, we are in the same ecosystem in often we feel like unicorns and all the different parts of the country that we were doing this work and by bringing us together. It's also about like deepening the work and relationships that we have with one another. So that we can be doing this work in caliber in collaboration with one another as opposed to like competition, which let's be honest. It happens too many times in so many little of us. So for me that was like actually the most sensational part of it. All listen. Till the amazing folks that honestly just doing some pretty cutting edge work across the country. It was great to go to San Francisco after it was like a week after I on one and just to like if like a homecoming to come home to people who want to build those types of campaigns. Just like we did and just to see to learn like how you can make it even bigger, you know, you can you can dream even bigger in terms of movement building campaigns in elector in electoral politics. I was just really I think even the bigger picture here too. It's like, you know, nothing short of a national movement will shift shift this, right, right? You know? And that's the the reality anything, but she she understands the power of like mass communication, right? And I think that that's something in particular is Amy Amy's contribution is all this. Because I think a lot of times we're trying to get our voice into like, though, the big lock of the mainstream media and having someone that understands that like she can, you know, galvanize her own relationships in network to then also not just open the door. But literally like, hey, this is this is me. This is everyone that becomes along with me. I think it's a very different approach in this landscape. Right in terms of how she's approaching it as well. So an honestly like how often do we get a chance to come together? And in like, just listen to one another. That's not happening often 'em where it's not like a panel of like all elected officials are all you know, it was it was such a diverse amazing. Remember? She was a or o six grade. Definitely choosing sixth grade was six I don't know if she's a sixty eight no she wasn't a she was young eleven or ten. Adult y'all. This is what happens. Between the ages of seven ten it's all the same. But yeah, no. There was like real. There was young girl. Who did a spoken word piece? Like, there was a trans woman activist who got up and talked about social media activism, there were panels about there's just so many different things. And it was so nice to see. Nine times out of ten white women. Not being on the stage. You know? Around. And we can't snow down. We are so excited to have you on the podcast today. Likewise, really happy to be here. So we attended she the people last year will know you and I did. And we just so empowered by by the speakers. But before we talk about that, we'd love to learn more about your journey and how she the people came to be pause. And I think about this. It's been a long I didn't politics for a long time and. A lot of the politics even from way back in college days was in organizing across race multiracial progresses political movement and really connecting movement. At that time. I remember my college campus was saving multicultural education. Because back in those days, you had a secretary of education who saying we gotta get rid of all these and go back to western, you know, kind of western culture education thing and rejecting the power of, you know, African American Latino and Asian American studies native American studies, and that was a fight we had back in the nineties and we organize both in the streets. But also as later, you know, I I ran for office as was student body president Stanford and still had those same issues. So playing politics on the college campus, basically practiced. That kind of politics until now, and it was very clear to me running up to the twenty sixteen election, where where you know, women were, you know, there's there's this like parlance or language that really suggests a understanding of the political forces. That's not real. So for a long time. I've known when you put me in a group as a black woman in a group called women, and you talk about the women's movement or the women's vote. I knew that that wasn't reflective of what was really happening on the ground that and twenty sixteen election, really bore that out. There's been a long trend of white women the majority of voters supporting Republicans and conservatives in embracing of, you know, a vision of the country's politics. I didn't align with myself with majority women of color, so after twenty sixteen I started writing a book. Culture, the people the new politics of women of color to create space for us like a, you know, look, we have our own unique intersectional nuanced vision of what we wanna get done in what kind of society we want. But who we are. And we insist on being acknowledged as the mo- the strongest Democrats as the fastest growing a group of voters in this country and the most progressive voters in the nation, and we want to acknowledge we want to be ignored not only as the powerhouse core. There's no democrat not in California. Not Georgia Florida, Texas, anywhere that will win without the enthusiastic support of women of color, and we wanna be acknowledged and seen, but we also want our leadership to be to be supported and we want. The the fact that are organizers on the ground are transforming democracy by bringing more people in we want that to be the playbook. The entire movement and Democratic Party, adopt. So I started writing this book. Yeah. It was it was to be the first book women of color in politics in our history. And I was like, okay. There was bridge. Call my back, which talked about a women of color as a or identity and personal political, but it wasn't expressly electoral politics, but a book takes frigging longtime. And there's a lot of things that you wanna be doing as well. Right. In the summer of twenty seventeen. This is kind of a long story, but I'm going to grow. This this is about so, please. So in the summer twenty seventeen a woman who was a fantastic leader in Georgia. Stacey Abrams who was already minority leader. She was already two leader the Democrats in this southern states that had been controlled statewide by the GOP for ten years. She decided to run for governor. And I saw that she was going to win. Her whole strategy was to focus on not only inspiring the base, she recognized that forty percent of the registered Democrats in that state were black women black women, and that if she spoke to an inspired black women as the core. But also reached out to people of all raises, particularly unregistered people of color, which are one point two million throughout that state. And that she had people on the ground and says spending millions on TV ad actually had people on the ground going door to door from from very beginning. Twenty seventeen I knew this woman was the future of the party the future of the progressive movement. This black woman represented the leadership that this country needed. And so I flew down to Albany Georgia, which is southern Georgia below the net line. And I'm like, I'm a I'm a bay area person. So I don't know I didn't know at that time tons about Georgia. But I knew to have Stacey Abrams declare her candidacy was historic. And it turns out that she transformed the electorate she faced incredible odds, the Democratic Party and Georgia ran a white moderate millionaire also named Stacy against her. And she not only bested her in a landslide in the primary, but she brought as many voters or more voters into a midterm election than in a presidential unit. Winning by what seventy something percents. Yeah. Okay. Isn't that? Right. But in general there was such rampant cheating voter suppression. The guy she ran against camp. He'd never sat down secretary of state, and he has a long history years and years of of suppressing the people of color, particularly the black vote. And so he ended up with the prize of being governor. But she ended up redefining Democratic Party politics. And who should be the leader? She just gave the the the nationals. I was just going to head to the Email. I know we're probably took it for us to jump around here a little bit. But really love to hear your your perspective on that set, you know, state of the union response, right? Because if you even look at the last like ten state of the union responses, whether it was a democrat or Republican, they usually aren't that. Good. Good. Right. And the truth is is that not only wasn't about good or bad. When when Stacy spoke, it was honestly, like somewhat speaking to the country like in all of its different, you know, niches and identities that that that we are. So I read it love to hear what your thoughts are in perspective on that on that. I'm species share race exactly because she was. She was outstanding for so many reasons look when I started twenty seventeen and she I knew she was going to be a game changer. Now, let's fast forward to her being the voice of the party and doing it from acknowledging her identity her personal story, her family and also being able to as she can and many many of our leaders of today can't draw the circle all these people are part of our coalition that we're fighting for and fighting with so you'll notice in her speech as in contrast to the way that Trump, you know, thinks about in talks about the population of this country. She acknowledged she knowledge migrants, she acknowledged LGBT. She talked about veterans. She talked about people from her own experience and people in the community have a hard time forwarding things that can't afford healthcare. She really sp-. Folk to us, and I thought she did a phenomenal job. And by the way, she's being recruited to run for Senate. So. I think. President. I have always in twenty seventeen. I started a campaign because I knew if the Democratic Party in Georgia wasn't going to support her. Let's get black women across the country to get behind her. And I did a campaign called getting formation. And of course, of course. Inspire black women because I already understood the role black women play in this election. The Democratic Party London. Can we put our power Noli voting power? Our money organizing to get the first black woman elected as governor. And so I did this campaign. I didn't realize that women from you know, different races. We're gonna come getting formation. I didn't I didn't know that she wasn't even known at that time. So it's like here she is. She is a person who has been elevated to the national scene. I think she would be a fantastic president, look she's still in her mid forties. So she's fairly young. When you look at the average ages of people in national office. She'd be fantastic. So she's being you know, she has some decisions to make in terms of if she wants to run for Senate in twenty twenty the past to the Democrats gaining the majority in the Senate, go straight through Georgia. So if she can use at Saint strategy build on the momentum and the infrastructure she built for her gubernatorial race, she could win statewide is a Senator and she could help Democrats take the Senate. So she could do that. Now, she could wait for years and she could run against Brian Kemp again for the governor's in the governor's race. But no matter what her star her stars rising. You know, I'm team Stacey Abrams. It's like, whatever. She decides. To do. I'm here for all of us. I feel the same way or these those of us that the also identify being hacked him say. She can do anything, and I will be like how much money do you need? Whereas the kickoff how many people can I bring them. They're they're saying I'm saying, and and heart of her success is in is in not trying to be anything. But who she is heard leadership her identity her hurt strategy all of that is enough. And I never wanna hear another black woman for sure or woman of color say, you know, I don't I don't know if I could be president because the person the president that's in the White House right now. I just never wanna hear anyone's not qualified. I mean. I mean. We're all qualified at this rate. This Ray, I just think the minimum is eligiblity requirements that the constitution says of a Matt let's just keep going keep it going. And I my my job she the people reason than I started the organization after all this experience supporting Stacey and other fantastic women of color who were running against all odds did not have their party support and had this amazing vision of racial, social and economic equality that was so inspiring to so many of us. My goal is is to bring in this kind of leadership. And I was like look when of color we need each other and the country needs us urgently. And so it's time for us to assert our leadership and to and and and to create a the kind of country that we can based on our vision. So that's where we see. See now leading into the presidential. Now, we see now we've had some success. What else can we do? And that's why I think we just continue the momentum. She's if people onto twenty twenty well that leads me to my next question, which is you know, we had this incredible historic. You know, number of women colored candidates. He wrote a great Huffington Post article in twenty nineteen about how the women who were elected were not cogs in the democratic machine. But people who, you know, our veterans and grassroots organizers who dismissed the Democratic Party. So we have a huge presidential coming up right now, there's at least one woman of color running. So my question is, you know, do we how do we support women the woman or the women of color who are running for president while also maintaining this like grassroots, you know, congressional statehouse state legislature movement is it one or the other or how how will we find the balance in that? Good question because we gotta do both and mentor of mine told me years ago like I was at that time I was sharing with her. Look, what do I do this or do I do that? And she said, Amy, you're not a one lane. You know, you don't one lane walkway. You're an eight lane freeway. You can have two great. Your capacity is great our capacities women of color to both. Dr these kind of voter engagement, basically what that means is registering talking to building alliances and coalitions not dependent on election day, but basically have permanent voting gave an attorney operation. Our capacity able to build those great anarchy passively to elevate leaders who have a background in movement building. So one of the people that early on inspired me before twenty eighteen was the congresswoman Pramilla jar poll of from Seattle. She ran she won. She ran and won in twenty sixteen. So he is an organizer organiz. Okay. Organizer organized. She comes from movement. She comes from the immigrant rights movement. And she approaches governance now in congress as an organizer. We haven't had a ton of organizers people who are in from movements go into elected office. Can you explain to folks that don't understand this like why having organizers in governance so important, right? Because we're folks like you like tune in. I we understand. But like explain a little bits where listeners why that's important. Well, okay. All right. So. I think I think the most important reason have an organizer in governance is they maintain a deep connection to the very people who have the skills outside of of, you know, elected office who have the ideas, the people you cannot govern without a deep connection to people who are victims of these kind of of the very policies that are hurting people in. And so when we talk about how are people going to how are we going to get legislation done the way that jar Paul has done things as she has worked to organize the the people that are holding office along with her, and she has she does a lot of work to connect them with movement. So her Medicare for all caucus was look in Seattle that was a popular idea in Washington. Popular idea to expand that care. So she was able to through her relationships her work her connections with people who are who do protests all of that in order to establish a caucus and get a set of legislators behind a solution to bring that care to more people more people have healthcare. So I I see that skill as or of organizing coming from the immigrant rights movement as giving her heart and also the understanding of how to get things done. And when we talk about how are we going to keep elected officials accountable. It's not like screaming in their face. Let's get let's get elected officials who come from movements that are deeply connected to movements. Then they then as legislators they come up with really, amazing ideas. That's awesome. That's so incredible. And it will be so exciting to see more. John Paul's Alex, Cossio Cortez's of the world, you know, come up and being empowered by by your gonna Zeeshan and other progressive movement's taking it back to twenty twenty really briefly, she the people is hosting the first ever presidential forum focused on women of color. So you know, what inspired this idea, and what have been have have there been any unanticipated challenges in putting together such groundbreaking event like this one? Well, okay last year when we you all we were all. Most of the women both, you know, there was significant number of young women, and as well as oggi's in audience, lavar OD's, okay, I guess I'm not now, you know, or one of them getting up there. But I heard from the women that room, you know, it's it's it's not often that I miss room that he's an embrace a kind of a loving embrace of women of color as the saving grace of democracy and sense of belonging a sense that this was a a movement to love and Justice and belonging and democracy. And so people came out of that and said, we want more of this. We want more of the space, and we want more elevation of our leadership and point of view in this country. My personal mission was to to change to tell a new story to the country, which is that women of color will lead. This country out of this mess. We will build a coalitions. We will provide moral courageous leadership. We will we will expand the electric. So I wanted women of color, unlike every other presidential year every other electoral cycle. I want us to be seen heard. I want our leadership to be acknowledged and one of the progressive moving the Democratic Party to follow our lead. That's what I wanted. So part of that goal was for me to start giving, you know, new research messages framing for those who cover politics because if I saw one more here's the here's women's vote, or here's the black vote, or here's a this is like poultry understanding of the real drivers and democracy. And I wanted to change that story. So that's the background. So I thought okay. What's the biggest thing that I I could aim for when you I think I love getting hanging. Yeah. What's the we can't think small this is not a time for small me personally or women of color, or you know, what's the biggest most important thing that I think I could do to toward that mission and a presidential forms. It. I knew there was going to be an unprecedented number of candidates in the primary. I knew that there were going to be more women and people of color that were competing for Democrats support in the primary. So I wanted women of color to hold an event that is about our issues that symbols explicitly like we're win have you seen presidential hopefuls in front of a room of twelve hundred women of color never ever it. So it's in Texas, Texas, went from a sixteen point vote gap to three point people point to bagel or you got people look at bit or work in. They say he ran a great campaign, which he did. And they say, that's why Democrats did. So well in Texas, Texas is a majority people of color state was black and Brown state and my tina's alone. There are three million unregistered eligible to vote by Tina in that state in a state that Trump won by less than two million. Holy the numbers really point to if we use the Abrahams kind of strategy in a place like Georgia. If we elevate women of color, then we have a different political possibility because Texas is about ground state for twenty twenty. So here's my thinking, we do we do this presidential forum for the first time, we focus the nation's press and so-called experts and pundits on the power of women of color. We focus on Texas and south and the potential for us to turn that state blue which is a big win. And we focus the presidential. Campaign's an hour issues, that's racial, social, economic and gender Justice. What do you have to say? Make your case to us. We are the core of voters that you need to convince. What the forums? Challenge you Jehovah the town. I got I twenty six to twenty candidate rolling eight campaigns because I don't have, you know, twenty four hours to do this thing. Right. But it's it's going to be fantastic. We'll have eight campaigns were were in talks with all the campaigns. Which is each one has their all, you know, big staff and all these considerations. But I don't think most of the campaigns will pass an opportunity to make their case for these. They're smart, not if they're smart arbit-, our network of networks, she the people's not we're not doing anything that other. We're like a big tent that elevates the work of women of color lead or centered organizations all over the country. We have groups like SEI, you Texas SEI, you that's a huge women of color union with tons of their members when color so SEI you Texas on on one hand and then ignite trains. Young women in Texas, including t issue that's black and Brown college girls in in young women and preparing them for public office. We have this like a very interesting combination of partners and those partners will both bring people in the room, and they have thousands outside the room, and we're going to be live streaming it. So each presidential campaign knows this is an opportunity to make your case. And I'm bringing in the the country's, you know, bringing in politico eight p New York Times, and I mean, all big deal. This is a very big deal. I mean, very big deal. It's a big deal for all of its an opportunity for all of us. But I want people to look back in early twenty nineteen and say, this is the point that women of color fully stepped in fully into their fierce and loving leadership and collective power. We are no longer going to be ignored dismissed or anything like that. We are the drivers of American democracy. And as we are empowered we can really shape, the the political future of this country for decades to come in the potential, do you have other other forums plan like this for the year for the people? So we're going to do we actually interestingly we are going to do some town hall state based town halls after the presidential and the next place. We're going is for genu-, which by the way, you come in your coming for him. I'm coming. We're going. We're going to be in may. Could we start over? If we start with women of color, what our best likelihood of progressive Bouba oriented women of color being in broiled in, you know, black face scandal races Daniels and and accused of rape. And all this terrible stuff. I. I just wanna start can we start fresh? I co-signed this idea. I am here for campaign restart and install women of color. That's the that's. Do over official. So this is amazing. So in these town halls you'll be focusing. We'll be more befo Kasan state based issues as it relates to the president. Think about. Texas swing state for twenty twenty but Virginia's got a general election this year, and we're working with a group of twelve fantastic women of color organizers in the state of Jinya who are doing everything from voter registration like tram win to other kinds of you know, work movement and policy work. And so the she the people town halls opportunity to elevate this group. Yeah. Great place for you guys to do this work the. Now with the progressive infrastructure. That's been really built there on the ground the last like ten twelve years as it's it's it's right timing for you guys. Honestly. Yeah. I, you know, in the vein of these amazing campaigns that we saw right like I say Abrams, right or even you know for us here in Massachusetts with with Yana Presley Erlich under costs court says a lot of these campaigns were redress by by staff in volunteers, it really believed in a different kind of playbook. Right. And you know, as we're seeing this primary field, you know, come together. What are your thoughts on like what young women or or women in general or women of color in general should be doing if they want to be working on these campaigns? Right. I think it's so hard sometimes when you're trying to figure out like I want to do this or not for our listeners like what is the best way to get involved in these campaigns. If you want to like become a staffer or become a volunteer one of these campaigns. I mean, there's a role for everyone I suggest that people wanna say do wanna play in this in the twenty twenty election figure out what candidate you want to be involved in and you can volunteer. You can just go to the website and sign up as volunteer and and have some role there. But there's also if we look at things very locally, there are political clubs movements and unions and organizations that will definitely have a role in politics over the next couple of years. So like, we have an organization called WAFA black women organized for political action. It's it said in the San Francisco Bay mostly Oakland super local, but it's easy to go to one of their meetings. And I would say she want to be a leader in these organizations. You know, you go to few meetings you run for some kind of role, you you you start organizing, and that's it. That's a great training ground. So you can organize. Very very very locally. You can join a national campaign, and those are a couple of ways, but anyone who's listening to you should consider what their role is in terms of leadership. I remember talking to Stacey Abrams. I I interviewed her anything like three years ago before she declared her candidacy for governor ostensibly to put her interview in the book, but she told me that her plan for running for office in in Georgia really wasn't many many years. And so she she sat down, and she really thought through you know, where she would live and what what position she'd run for and who were the influencers and things like that. So I think that this kind of multi-year planning and thinking about hey, do I want to be elected official myself? And what would be the past people have young kids? I go. I don't know if I could do it. People don't understand how much it pays or how they, you know, pay the bills. While they are in public office and a lot of answers can be explored through training. So I highly recommend that people look up the oh my goodness. I'm so you say, you're bug Wani. Is that head new new America maters leaders? No American leaders is in a training program for people in the immigrant experience to prepare them to run for office. And they have specific session for women. Then there there's training with higher heights higher heights. Zeh black women pack and voting gauge -ment organization. That's fantastic. Then there's emerged has a year long program for an state based. So these are three resources that people can look at to help prepare them for public service. And I really encourage people to to really seriously consider that either as an at every level of government. We really need new kinds of leaders to step up. I I'm curious to taking a step back, really briefly. You know, what you're doing to the three of us is the best thing ever, you know. But it it must be seem Radic. It must seem radical to people who have been an institutional politics for a long time, some curious like has there been pushback has their you know, what has been like interfacing with people in DC, you know, or do people see the writing on the wall. I've had. Yeah. Because it's there's a new political era that happening right now, we're in the midst of it. It's also new cultural era all of this is happening, and we're experiencing it from the inside. And some of the pushback is from traditional women's movement groups that are centered on in led by white women who haven't who are trying to, you know, trying to have a politics that it's you know, kind of narrowly focused on gender, but not acknowledging race and class and some of the other drivers of politics. So those are, you know, some people that are sort of Societa with that would say lie, not really sure. And this is the seems so I I also knowledge say sometimes that it's confusing when they hear you. I I'm very clear. It and you're talking to a woman. So I just wanted. You know, totally my I'm by racial my family, including my mother is whites. And so I always feel very confident coming in front of a group and saying this is what I need to tell you as white women. That that we that first of all women of color are should lead the electoral success. And then if you if you support and follow us, we will have victory in twenty twenty we can defeat Trump, we can defeat those, but you have to evolve your self conception, and your idea about, you know, what is this movement that that you're part of it was congressman congresswoman millage article that said to me two years back. It's like this is not the women's movement. It's a movement of women, and so white women have a role, and it requires white women who come who who there's been long history of, you know, like suffer jets who had been a traitor to the ideas of equality and raises and things like that that those old type of thinking is damaging to our movement. And so I am very confident about or. Denies ING a multiracial movement that will transform politics. And it's not like people always listen to me like, you know, five six years ago. I was on the periphery, and I was saying this is what we need. But now the moment is here. And it's our moment. I intend to make the most of our moment and to make it as transformational and pro democr- democracy is can. What inspires that persistency me? With this question. But I think it's something that it's it's important to share a little bit. My my whole life. I've had a heart for other people, and I've my whole life. I've had a heart for those who have been dismissed and downtrodden and overlooked, and I truly believe in politics. We haven't seen. And I am more in. I'm I'm more in myself fully myself expressed as the founder, she that people doing this work than ever have been in my life. I know this is what I was born to do my special and unique contribution to the world. What gets me every day is my gosh could to do this. So lucky because I see the beauty and power of all these women of color all over the country who've never had an opportunity people haven't listened to. And I get to be part of changing all that. I'm crying. That's fine. I like literally that is that is so beautiful and so incredible. And you know, it's I'm speechless shoes. Honestly, you know, it's just it's just I feel so grateful to have you as a leader in the space, and have you somebody who's pushing the envelope on this because I just, you know, maybe a white woman, but I know that women of color need to be on the forefront of social change, and they have been so blocked from it for so so long both institutionally and socially. But you know, to end on one note, we have two questions we're going to ask all of our all of our all of our people who come on our podcast. And my question is, you know, you are doing incredible fast pace work, you the worker doing his his emotional in intelligent and wonderful. How do you take care of yourself? How do you make sure that you sustain for the movement? I wait. I wait list for four days a week. I meet women there's a couple of different groups, I work with and we lift weights, we do hit workout like this morning. I met a good friend of mine, and we did dead lifts. And then we, you know, these big tires put these tires, and there's a there's a bigger group of people very friendly at the at the local YMCA here, I've been going for years, and so I, you know, workout, and then we go across the street to cafe and we sit around and we talk and drink coffee. That I've been doing that for years and that has both both because politics can be can it's hard. It can be very hard work, and your heart has to be healthy. And you have to you have to be physically healthy and also motioning healthy. And I stay connected with the women who I work out with and we talk about life, and I just I love that fellowship and community. That's how I keep going. And you know, I I think so much about politics is, you know, conceded like a zero sum gain, there's winners and there's losers, and you do power over other people, but there's other kind of politics heart politics, that's about love, and it's about really a working with when I say having a heart for people really just having a having a heart finding Wisconsin. Even with people. It's hard to be that kind of advocate without really experiencing in your own personal life. And my my world here in Oakland is multiracial and beautiful. And if I stay grounded net, I can go out there. I can go to DC into the lion's den. Talk to a reporter about with going on. I can I can go to a group of Democratic Party insiders and say, this is what I know to be true. And you and you may not see it. But you will you know. No, it's absolutely beautiful Miami. And it really speaks true to our hearts on the side. I often say if we're not engaging in politics that allows me and you to see the stake in each other than we're not doing this. Right, right. So I- deeply serves stars my heart to you. Here's say this, and you know, part of the inspiration for for wanting to to create a platform like this is really to shine a light on on all of us that are really doing the work to fulfill the promise of what our democracy should be in this country. And my our last call there were we will be our last questions. Use me is what's your call to joy and Justice. What's my call? What do you mean? Normally people would call it your your call to action. But over the course of last year, I've been really pushed by a lot of inspirational black women to really understand that it really isn't about a call to action. It's really about joy injustice when it comes to like working in our communities. So I switched it up a little bit. So my question is really rooted in place. So what's your your call to joy to join Justice? I don't know what yours. Who've who've got you got me. You got me there. You know, my call to join Justice in the reason, I have an answer right away. It's because obviously when you when you have a reflection question like this you thought about it for yourself to some degree my call to join Justice in work as a movement leader like yourself is to be my offense itself. I have chosen to compromise allies my identities and all of that that they bring to coach switch and do what I think was necessary to get a result. But it made me extremely unhappy. It made me unhappy in my Justice work, and it made me unhappy at home. So I'm learning to bring joy injustice into into what I do because it really has to do reconsider reconciling myself, and recognizing that it's my in my authenticity that I can really leverage my full power. And let your answer your answer. Was. A poster when I was in college I had a semester in Oxford. And I remember about this poster said just love togetherness despite the current difficulties. I'm I I mentioned I was by racial. I really do live to bring people together. And it makes me so very happy to to do it and still chills me with joy. I'm never quite myself. Unless everyone is there. That's wonderful. That's beautiful, Amy. That's so beautiful. Thank you so much for taking the time to be our first guest on the podcast. And you know, we are so excited to support you and support she the people last week. There was a article in the near times that was talking about these new presidential hopefuls and said as a matter of fact, well, all of these presidents were hopefuls will need to win over women of color. Who are in fact, the core the democrat party, do you realize that just as a that not a throwaway line? But it was like just background to some other point. But just to get reporters to acknowledge that it's huge. So we on doing so much mazing work and having the momentum. And I just anyway, I'm saying all that to say you gotta be there. We will be there. We will be there. And honestly, just like deeply, you know, appreciate you taking the time to do this with us in like all the amazing work that you're doing a no that leg. You are creating lane for us. Right. And we're like breaking down the walls, as we need to to make sure that this work happens away that we know we can and let stand it's all collectively San power and lead the country through this phase is all I have to say, okay. Well, we'll set but thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you. Deep democracy is produced and distributed by critical frequency producers are Amy westervelt. And Katie Ross. Our theme music is from origami pigeon at our cover art was drawn by Alejandra by fiddles. We hope you enjoyed the first episode if you did please remember to leave us a rating in apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And subscribe, so you won't miss our next episode in April. Thanks Cemex time.

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Police union backtracks after accusing restaurant of intentionally poisoning NYPD

All In with Chris Hayes

45:58 min | 2 months ago

Police union backtracks after accusing restaurant of intentionally poisoning NYPD

"On all in. Protest pushed the president of police. Reform Congressman Keith. Jeffries on whether the trump executive order means anything and the credibility crisis for police then San Francisco. Mayor London breed on changes she's already making in her sitting plus armed militia on the streets of Albuquerque and a protester shot Mexico's Governor Michelle Luhan. Grisham will join me. DNC Chair Tom Perez on his plans to bite fight, voter, suppression and Twenty Twenty, but all end starts right now. Good evening from New York. I'm Chris as right now. We're in the midst of a once in generational natural conversation about policing and race and justice driven by the ongoing protests that began after the police killing of George Floyd. For the first time in a long time, the fundamental role of police in our societies under question police are in the spotlight. Even Republicans admit things have to change. Something has to change and yet even now while we are all paying attention, all smartphones Iran while the lights are blaring. We keep getting new examples of police rushing to judgment or just outright lying to the public. Last night! The Labor Union representing New York City detectives put out a statement claiming that three officers were intentionally poisoned by workers at a restaurant. Manhattan called Shake Shack. The largest union representing police in New York City Police Benevolent Association quickly ran with a claim. An oddly worded tweet reading quote when New York City Police officers cannot even take meal without coming under attack. It is clear that environment in which we work has deteriorated to a critical level. The poisoning charge was then further amplified by people like Sean Hannity and Donald Trump junior and it produced headlines Conservative and mainstream media outlets, which mostly took the cops at their word. It's a very serious charge would be leveling just to be clear I. Mean I would not tweet out that a place poison me intentionally without really catch checking that out. And yet they just kind of ran with it. They got sick after some shake shack milkshakes, so they must have intentionally poisoned. We'll turns out. It was not true at all. After a thorough investigation y Nypd Manhattan south investigators it has been determined. There was no criminality by shake shack employees. Investigators believe a cleaning solution have not been fully cleared from the milk machine is what made the officer sick? which is bad? All around, but an accident, not an intentional poisoning as the police immediately claimed. And I know this story is kind of a small one that has to do with milkshakes seems kind of funny thing. But it's part of a much larger more important issue. The legitimacy crisis in American policing is facing in this moment, and we have seen example after example police, rushing to judgment or just out flat, lying to our faces and total trumpian fashion. There are so many examples of this just from the protests loan. Like for instance to pick one someone at random when Columbus Ohio police tweeted out a photo of this bus, which they suggested was supplying riot equipment including. Brock's weekly vers, axes and clubs Senator Marco Rubio Florida winter this and sarcastically tweeted by guests, still no evidence of an organized effort to inject violence and anarchy and the protests right. Well, certainly not in this case senator it turns out. The bus is by traveling street performers. Buses named buttercup. Clubs were juggling clubs. According to the bus, the hatchet was next to a wood burning stove. The bus use the meat cleaver was for my knife block used to prepare meals. The rocks crystals fossils. And there are police claims that are far far more sinister than this like for instance when the Buffalo Police claimed that a seventy five year old peace activists Martin Gavino. Tripped and fell when this video clearly shows, that is not what happened. He was shoved today. By the way Gino's lawyer said. Gino is unable to walk after what the police did to him in that video. Or in Louisville police reported the incident, re released the incident report in the police killing of twenty-six-year-old emergency room technician Brianna Taylor who was fatally shot by police in her own home, which lists her injuries as non even though she was shot at least eight times, and died in her hallway, Florida Pool A blood. Report also claims forced entry even though officers used a battering ram to knock in Taylor's apartment to execute a no knock warrant. And of course this national conversation we're having about police authority. It all started with the police killing George Floyd. Whose killing was recorded. WHO's killing prompted multiple nine hundred eleven calls including from an off duty firefighter who told dispatcher quote I'm on the block of thirty in Chicago. I literally watched police officers not take a pulse and not do anything to save a man adding this dude this they. They, effing killed him. Here's the audio of another call about George was treatment by police. You can call me nature to onto, but we have the camera up for three twenty call. I know if they had to use force or not. They got something out of the back of the squad and all of them on this man. That was just released. Tells Dispatcher there an officer quote pretty much just killed this guy that wasn't resisting arrest. He had his knee on the dudes neck the whole time. She got video of it, and you've got multiple calls into dispatch contemporaneous with the event, suggesting the police acted at the absolute very least inappropriately. Along with video, showing officer, kneeling George what snack until he couldn't breathe and surveillance video, suggesting he cooperate with the officers and did not resist arrest. And yet listen to this. This is the initial statement. The Minneapolis Police Department had the goal to release quote to officers arrived and located the suspect, a male believed to be in his forties in his car US order step from his car effort got out. He physically resisted officers. Officers were able to get the suspect in handcuffs, and noted he appeared to be suffering medical distress officers called for an ambulance. He was transported Hennepin County Medical Center by ambulance. died a short time later. As if he just happened to die? Because some sort of medical distress that just came out of nowhere as if the officer dirk show, but did not keep his knee on George Woods neck for eight minutes and forty six seconds is called out for his Mama and said I can't breathe. As, if people didn't see this. Clear as day. Of course, please like any institution any government body any brock REC-. You'RE GONNA make mistakes lots of mistakes, but he's just not acceptable to have police lying so flagrantly casually about matters, large and small, and they keep doing it. This. Crisis has gotten so bad that even Donald Trump was forced to act, or at least Kinda to go through the Facsimile of acting that he knows today he signed an executive order, which is largely a kind of typical trumpian thing, fainting and action, not really doing that much declaring mission accomplished. But consider how bad things have gotten that a president who presents himself as a staunch as possible allied police has been endorsed by police unions up and down the country who defended them every chance he gets, and even tells them to rough up suspects when he addresses them that man. Donald trump can no longer pretend to ignore exactly what we are all watch. Joined now by. Congressman Jefferies Democrat York and the chair of the House Democratic Caucus. Let Me Start Congressman on on where we started Tonight's open on the Police Union. Leveling this charge. It's a serious charge say we were intentionally. Poisoned by employees. What does it say to you about the culture of the Police Union? New York while more broadly that they were just throw this out there. I think we may be have lost the congressman congressman. How came Jeffries whose shot appears to be frozen to see if we can get him back or if we can get the next guest WHO's the mayor of San Francisco Democrat London breed. She is veal unveiled a roadmap for police reforms in her city shenanigans among many other things. The police will no longer respond to criminal. Call San. Francisco Mayor London breed joins me now, mayor I want to make sure I. Have you do I, have you? You have me. Okay, excellent Let me let me start on on this on one of the things that you announce which I think is one of the more interesting ways that reform can go, which is reducing the scope of police business, which is to say, there are many calls at come in to dispatch. There are many things that happened that people WANNA report that are not crimes in progress, and you have talked about taking the police away for being the people that answer those calls describe to me what that looks like. So for example I'm sure you heard just recently in San Francisco there was a woman who called the police on a man in front of his house because he was putting black lives matter on his property. That is a call that the police should not be responding to. We have people who struggle with mental illness and addiction who need treatment who need help who need medical professionals, and so our goal is to look at completely revamping our system so that when a nine one one call is made that our dispatchers are able to analyze at all and send out the appropriate response team, and that does not always have to be the police. Do! You have a sense of who that when you say appropriate response team right so if the ideas that sup there are lots of things that people are there, either in distress or someone notices an anomaly on the street or something that they feel that officials should respond to. This what the appropriate folks are! Do you need to like staff that up is that? Does that exist? Is that what else in your city or do you need to build a so it? It harshly exists, but we also need to increase our capacity. We have a crisis intervention team of medical professionals at work with the Department of Public Health they oftentimes are. Are the ones out on the streets. Responding to crisis centered around people who suffer from mental illness and substance use disorder. We have a street violence intervention program. These are people from the community who also respond to disputes that are nonviolent that are have no need for the police in various communities, and so it's really about restructuring what we already have available enhancing. What we have in order to respond to the situations that occur because in most instances. There isn't a need for police response. So how do we make those adjustments in order to eliminate the amount of calls that police respond to that are not criminal activities. Do. You have a sense of the numbers I know that we've quoted. We've quoted some sheriff I think from Louisiana and not mistaken new just said. The overwhelming majority of calls, he saw his multi decade career. We're not like uniform crimes as listed in the in the crime reporting of the FBI. Do you have a sense in your city? What percentage of these calls you can sort of? Take away from the police and put in in other hands. Well I think it's close to probably fifty percent of the call volume that comes in because I want to be clear. There are a number of crimes that still take place. We are a major city. There is a need for a police response, especially the round violence, or if there's any other situation of that nature, but again I go back to some of the calls, the increased number of. Of calls that have taken place for people who are homeless, mentally ill who have other needs that police officers can't provide support for that's what we can make the change, so I I think it will a dramatically decrease the number of calls that law enforcement response to in the city which will provide us an opportunity to also redirect resources to ramp up what we need to do respond. Final question for your mayor we've had you on the show before to talk about a covert and and your city. We've seen that California's had some rising cases, the most of those being generated from areas outside San Francisco. San Francisco doing. How are you doing? Well we are weathering the storm. We have seen a slight increase in the number of. Over the past couple months very low number of new cases, a decline in the number of. Patients in the people who are in ICU beds. We've seen a of deaths. Become steady, so we're in a very very good place here in San Francisco because of our quick action, and now we are pushing to reopen because we know. Keep more ready to get back to work, and we want to get our economy going, but we also want to make sure we do that safely. So we know that the protest and the other things that have occurred in our city you know it's important. People are provided that opportunity, so we appreciate your words earlier in the introduction of your conversation in and the fact that more people immedi are starting to highlight this conversation and the need to make sure that we push for reforms all over the country. Right San Francisco Mayor London breed. Thank you so much your time tonight. Thank you. Greg back to Congressman Hakeem Jeffries Democrat of New York, and I think we have you back congressmen. How are you doing? Great to see you Chris. Good I could see blinking, so let me let me start with with where we started tonight's program on. Since it's a local question for you. And I think it has broadened disability I've seen the tenor in rhetoric of police unions across the country doesn't matter where they are. They all basically the same. What does it say to you when the Police Union will go on and accused some random workers at shake shack I've intentionally trying to poison them without running that to ground like what does it say about the credibility of these people? Or their credibility is in question. They are police unions across the country, and certainly in New York City that have been a robust consistent, unnecessary, unfortunate obstacle towards reform and fought too often they express interest in defending brutal officers, violet officers and abusive officers as opposed to being part of the solution in terms of holding officers accountable. The president staged this event today to sign executive order on police force. Most people I have read on. It and I've read the text. The executive order say that there's some things that maybe a step in the right direction, but it depends on enforcement. It also depends on how seriously this ministration takes it. Do you see it as as something real to to to to deal with? It's a modest a set of measures. That at least. Relate to an understanding that there is a problem that have to be confronted, and as you indicated Chris, the President even has acknowledged that seemingly with these baby steps that he's taken today, but fundamentally if things are going to transform we need transformative laws, and that's why we're gonNA. Continue to push forward. The justice and Policing Act the House Judiciary Committee will pass it tomorrow. It will be on the floor next week and we need to change our nation's laws in order to change the mindset that exists in police departments across the country that violent officers will be held accountable, and that we want a mentality of policing that relates to a guardian approach. But not a warrior approach which far too often leads to tragic consequences. So so walk me through how this? This proposed legislation would would deal with accountability issue because there are so many examples of police Acting in a way that that provoke censure complaint, and then not being removed from the forest, or not, even being suspended or lying, and not having those a lies result in punishment. Would the legislation you're proposing do about that? Well two things wanted to establish a national use of force standard by which we're going to emphasize the escalation, and De emphasize the use of force that often results death or serious bodily injury once you establish that national use of force standard, and an officer crosses the line then it becomes a lot easier to hold them accountable. For engaging and brutality violence, we also expand the jurisdiction of the Department of Justice as well as state attorney. General's so that they can prosecute rogue police officers who brutalized the community and to increase the likelihood of criminal accountability on the one hand, and at the same time we reform, and effectively abolished the doctrine of qualified immunity on the civil side, so that when someone civil rights have been violated, there is a right that exists and a remedy. So they can be accountability on that side of the ledger as well. There was some conversation It was interesting to hear. Kevin McCarthy talk about some of this. The way things work in modern legislating is that basically the party's leadership will sort of move legislation through much. You're dealing with some big omnibus spending bill. Do you think you've buying from Republicans on any of this in the house? Judiciary Committee hearing that took place last week. They were House Republican colleagues of mine who express support for criminalising the chokehold, which is in the justice and policing act that was some expression of support for getting rid of qualified immunity, so we can promote accountability when a police officer crosses the line There was also Republican expression of support for maintaining a database so that you can have a rogue police officer fired for engaging in conduct that. That is abusive and then rehired in a neighboring jurisdiction that of course happened with Tamir Rice case and the Cleveland Police Department hired somebody who had been terminated, and then of course to memorize was murdered so there is some glimmer of hope that we are seeing that. My colleagues on the Republican side of the aisle recognized that this time must be different that we should act. We should act decisively and comprehensively to try to address this problem. Right Congressman Kim Jeffries of New York Thank you with me. Thanks risk. Next New Mexico protests that ended in gunshots, governor. Michelle, Luhan Grisham on the injured protester, the armed militia and the statue at the center of it all after this. Charmingly host of into America, a podcast from NBC News and MSNBC. Join me as we go into the numbers. Eighty percent of her patients don't have insurance right now. into the choices I have to plan a funeral in the age of the Keranovic's houses can work, and into away through the importance of music is to keep our spirits up into America a podcast about everyday people and the power that politics policy and a pandemic have in shaping our lives new episodes every Monday and Thursday. Everyone it's mainly MSNBC, correspondent and host of the podcast into America another unarmed black man was killed by police over the weekend this time in Atlanta Rashard Brooks twenty-seven. The officer who shot Brooks has been fired. The police chief had resigned while across the country protests continue. Why did it have to escalate? Why did there have to be a chase if he was running away? Run, why did it get to the point where you felt that? You had to chase after him and ultimately used? NBC News. Correspondent Blaine Alexander brings us. The latest from Georgia and we talk about the emotional toll of being a black journalist covering this moment. Search for into America. Wherever you're listening right now. It's subscribed. Terrifying violence seen in Albuquerque yesterday when people gathered to man the removal of statue of a brutal. Door responsible for massacring indigenous people. An armed right wing militia showed up to defend the statue and one are man shot a protester. Warning some people find the following video upsetting. Now. It's unclear what happened immediately before this. Here's the man the blue shirts Steven Baca junior was kind of defending the statue. Haka pushes a protest or the crowd turns on him. He said with a skateboard about fifteen seconds later a protest or tackled him, and then Baku got up. He was holding handgun and he fires four shots heard on the video. Shooting one protester who is still in critical condition tonight. Took into custody and detained several militiamen as well in a facebook post, the militia groups said Baca is not one of their members. Local news reports the right wing former city council candidate, joining me now New Mexico governor. Michelle Luhan Grisham governor. What is your understanding of what happened last night? And how is your state responding to it? Plans to things Frankly you got what we understand to be. The facts as we're starting the investigation. Exactly right. We are incredibly horrified and disturbed. We're about to go into a budget. Special Session starts on Thursday and. Police reform and racial injustice are going to be topics that we will get through in a couple of days to see if we can't. Do Better than the militarization of our police and having militia engaged to only to provoke violence at peaceful protests. These have to be addressed. The state has a clear role to make a difference here. Yeah I mean. In some ways. So unnerving about last night, and it's something that's been going through my head through. Much of this is you know things are just different? When people armed I think we would all agree right if a thousand people in the street protesting, that's one thing if a thousand people in the street protesting and they're all carrying guns. That's another if five hundred are on each side, and they're all carrying guns. That's another entirely like what do you? How do you understand this? In terms of the role that weapons play or coming arm to these kinds of events? So Chris. A couple years ago. I was talking to that. New Mexicans and folks across the country that this country it occurs to me, has a very negative gun culture, and when I became elected governor. One of the first things I did was instruct our department of Health to treat gun violence as the public health epidemic that frankly it is, and there is no question that when you are gathering or marching or protesting, and there's a group of armed citizens with automatic weapons who are completely. Dressed in military gear. Their only role is to provoke and to seek intimidation of individuals who are peacefully protesting and. This horrific example that played out in Albuquerque. I have been incredibly grateful that we haven't had such a situation given the last twenty plus days in this country and the incredible work of peaceful protesters, but make no mistake. This is not the first time this particular militia has been engaging in public and I think it's time we find a way to be clear. All our constitutional rights are valid my constitutional right to be safe in my community needs to be upheld, and we have got to stop this intimidation and stop allowing. Armed men and women whose only purpose is to create havoc and harm. At at these gatherings it's unacceptable and we even we have the ability to do something about it right now. In this country and New Mexico intense. I intend to do something about it. I want to read you something that a Simon Romero's New York Times reporter who had fought whose work I followed forever. He's been. He's reported in Latin. America of for years he said I've covered violent street protests in Caracas. Rio never felt threatened as last night in Albuquerque at one point. Our militia member taunted me working the New York. Times police for sight why wider the thirties cede control the scene to extremist gunman. Do you have an answer to that? Do you think it's a fair question? It's an incredibly fair question, and it's why the state is gonNA investigate. This action last night and not allow the investigation by internally by the local police. Why did they allow the militia to be present? Where were they? Why did they only show up? I'm hearing reports. Twenty one minutes after nine one one calls were made. Where were they when they showed up? It was more like a swat presence. Why were they shooting rubber bullets at a peacefully fleeing protesters? Why did they allow this? The shooter Mr Baca to engage with protesters before the actual horrific incident that has a young man fighting for his life in in our hospital. There were plenty of warning signs and I fear. That we have some folks in our law enforcement. Entities. Who I think CAV promoted potentially. The efforts of these laws. And we intend to independently investigate that in determine exactly what's? Going on so I agree with the New, York Times reporter. And I I'M A. Lifelong New Mexican lived in Albuquerque for. Decades before having this incredible job, and I've never seen anything like that. Anywhere in our state and no doubt, the militia played a violent role in what occurred and we. We will do something about it. New Mexico Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham. Thank you so much for an extra five restaurant. Absolutely. For inviting me. and. Thank you for every one of the country who's fighting against these racial injustice issues and making sure that we have a fair and just and appropriately. I'm engaged police force new. Mexico will do its part. All right, thank you governor. Negligence of president trump who decided the ongoing pandemic was boring and plans to hold a massive indoor rally instead the sputtering response in this situation, the Republicans who naval it coming up. Breaking news from the increasingly hit sunbelt. Texas and Arizona all set records today for the most new corona virus cases they have reported in a single day since the beginning of the outbreak, all three states reporting over two thousand new cases this point in the long battle against Toronto buyers, some countries have successfully suppressed the disease, and this is what the trajectory of new cases looks like in Italy and Spain, which were extremely hard at and Germany which was not that hard Ed. They've all come way down from there are peaks earlier in the year, and then on the right side of your screen. You see where we are in America just kind of a long plateau. In Spain Italy and Germany. New Cases are at least ninety four percent below peak the US. We've only seen a forty two percent reduction. We're increasingly acclimating to this plateau. Just accepting a world that no one else is really accepted. Were we still see around twenty thousand new cases per day now to be clear, it is true. A fair amount of that has to do with the fact that US really have ramped up testing capacity in this country took a while to start way too late, but gone up quite a bit. It's still uneven I got tested this week. It was fast and easy. You should do it if you think you have had any exposure. But increased testing doesn't explain all these cases once again. The government is trying to make excuses. Are Testing is so far advanced it so much bigger and better than any other country that we're going to have more cases. We're always going to have borne cases and. As, I said this morning. That's probably the downside of having good testing. Is You find a lot of cases that other countries who don't even test? Don't have you don't test. You don't have any cases. We step testing right now. Whatever if you cases if any? I mean how nuts is that? There is no downside to testing and finding out where the viruses. If we stop testing right now, we'd have very few cases. It's seems almost insane in June to have to say this, but the virus is the problem, not the measurement and identification thereof. Course Vice President is in lockstep. Trump's messaging pence told governors on a phone. Call Monday to adopt the administration's claim that increased testing helps account for the new corona virus outbreak reports. Even though evidence has shown, the explanation is misleading. Today pence. Bed and the Wall Street Journal Headline, there is no corona virus second wave which is. True more or less because again. We're still not out of the first wave. That's watching cross country. The evidence also shows increasingly masks really helped to stop the spread, but once again vice president pence, not wearing one when he showed up at a small cozy intimate restaurant, and I were today, neither was governor. Kim Reynolds for that matter masks problem. We continue to get a clearer picture about what is high risk and what's low risk. And it really does seem that wearing a mask and being outdoors those two things if you're wearing a mask if you're outdoors that's on the lower end of the spectrum, but on the other end is being inside. Packed in space with people talking loudly for sustained period of time well, that's about the riskiest thing you can do. A group of at least sixteen people learned that the hard way this week when they all tested positive for the virus after spending a night out at a bar in Jacksonville beach. Okay now magnified a bar by a couple of hours magnitude, and you get a trump rally. Thousands of people crowded inside the stadium, talking loudly for sustained period of time. That is the plan for Saturday and Tulsa. Oklahoma where corona virus cases are surging and the city's health department director says he wishes the president would postpone. President and his team don't seem to think the virus is a real thing that needs to be dealt with anymore for past that that's old news cycle there over it. They're not interested in solving problems anymore. They want to own. The libs create their own alternate reality. Someone is pandemic is the ultimate rebuttal that because it is very real stock going away. No matter how much they spend. Our testing is so far advanced it so much bigger and better than any other country that we're going to have more cases. We're always going to have more cases and. As I said this morning. That's probably the downside of having good testing as you find a lot of cases that other countries who don't even test, don't have if you don't test. You don't have any cases. We stop testing right now. Would ever if you cases if any? No no, that's not the way it works, even if you don't test, you still have the cases because that's the thing about reality. We one of the responses in the world to coronavirus, thanks in large part administration's ongoing failure to recognize the reality of what we're dealing with. It's part of this broader thing that's happened in the Republican Party, which is seems increasingly totally unconcerned with the actual work of governing. When it comes to dealing with this pandemic, their governors including some Republicans like Larry Hogan and Charlie Baker Mike Dewine of Ohio, who are on the same landmass we were on. The continent of people that are trying to figure out how to deal with the complicated problem. Then there are people that have just fallen off the landmass who appear to think virus can be willed away or ignored of just not engaging the same problem. We are and includes huge. The Republican Party. You're just no longer engage in dealing with the complexity of governing. Governing more broadly, talk about this phenomenon and joined by Stephen who writes and produces the motto blog, my friend and colleague Rachel Matto. You also has a new book out today titled The Impostors how Republicans quit governing and seized American politics and I thought we'd start on the corona virus issue because it does seem to me like there's a kind of split there. Between the kind of trump and impulse, and some things seems the governor's. In places like Mississippi and in North Dakota, Iowa and other members. Republican party who do seem even if they're not doing things away, I would like engaged in the general question of like. This is a hard governing problem. How do we figure it out? I think you're right. There are a handful of Republican governors who I'm happy to give credit to people like Larry Hogan in Maryland and elsewhere, but I think by and large. They are the exceptions that prove the rule. I think we, we can every Maryland. There's a Florida and in Arizona and Texas where we see state officials who are Republicans who are not taking the the crisis seriously and of course at the. Head of the Party of Donald Trump and we seek hidden meaning an operation and a White House that has been completely disengaged in policy making and I think you know when I was making. My book one of the things I kept coming back to you. Is that a governing party values, data and evidence and expertise and I think across the board when it comes to the coronavirus pandemic, those are the areas in which the administration has fallen short the worst. Yeah you've got this situation now. You just referenced Texas Right, so Texas has has. It's not just that cases have gone up though they have. Testing capacities of a bit but hospitalizations. There's there's some reason to think that things are not looking great in Texas. Just a little short while ago, the Mayor of Houston San Antonio. Dallas Fort Worth El Paso. Arlington Plano in Grand Prairie sent a letter to governor. Abbot asking for the power to require people wear masks publicly in their cities, which they don't have, which again like it shouldn't be that. This is a big fight. This is not. This is just a simple public health measure, and yet it perfectly kind of epitomizes your thesis, which is that? A party that won't do that is not a party. That's really actually committed to governing any railway. Exactly when the overarching point of my book is that Republicans have made this transition from the governing party to what I call it Post Policy Party and by that I mean they've given up on ticking, governing seriously or policy-making, seriously in any way they're just indifferent to the substance of governing and I think this is a classic example of that mean masters such a simple step, it would save so many lives. They would make such a difference in public health and yet. In so many instances we see Republicans and positions of authority. Just saying you know what let's that's too much. That's a stepper prepared to take even as local officials. Effectively beg them to more responsible they refuse. and. We're seeing that the also rally I honestly. I don't know I. Guess they're going to do this thing. But first of all the venue doesn't have any other events until two thousand twenty one because it's not safe to have them there, but this is more than just like well. We're no longer interested in policy. This is even one step sort of more nefarious, which is I'm going to convene actually unsafe, possible, super spreader event, which I could do outside, but I'm not going to. It seems almost a step pass post policy. Perhaps. I mean if the virus had had hired lobbyists to create an event for the virus. This is the event that they would hold now. We talked a moment ago about the about the expertise and data and the importance of evidence. This is a classic example. The data says that there is an increasing crisis in Oklahoma. The evidence shows that they're indoors with nineteen thousand people with no mitigating effects and expert. Local experts are saying. Please don't do this. It's dangerous for the community, and perhaps the country and yet because Donald Trump is leading this post policy government be because he's so indifferent to policy-making an expertise. They're going through with it anyway, and they don't seem to care. Is there a way to wrench them back I? Mean that's. The question right like they this idea that we can govern with forty four percent of the country and the electoral college and a bunch of our. Federal Society vetted judges on the Federal Bench and we can get away with it. Can they. Well in the short term, yes, I mean insofar as one of several elections, and they're in positions of authority. They've they're. They have power, so yes, they to that extent. They have had some success on this front. But in in the last chapter in my book I talk about some of the solutions, I think to the coast policy problem and the the the overarching solution. The key solution is at quarters. harveys chain voters tell parties they have to change and so I think right now we look at the polls. We see evidence that the Republican messages not working that voters are not satisfied with what they're seeing. I think that will change when when the part when voters tell them they have to in. November! We will say Steve Bannon. Who's new book, the impostors how Republicans quick governing and sees American politics today quite timely. Thank you for making time. Thank you Chris. Still Ahead the pandemic elections the brazen Republican effort to suppress vote while primary voters are turning out in record numbers DNC chair Tom Perez joining discuss after this. There have been plenty of grim stories as election year in the middle of the pandemic as people literally their health and their lives to wait in line for hours to vote. There's also been this amazing turn on happening. Despite the ridiculous hurdles I mean just last week, right? We saw these images of a complete systematic meltdown of the voting process in the state of Georgia, but it turns out that between absentee in person voting big D-. Democratic voters at a new primary turnout were wrecked record actually outpacing Republicans in the state. In Georgia isn't the only state that has seen record turnout borough to this month Iwa, said its own record for June primary, and in fact, the Republican Secretary, state, of Iowa who oversees the state's elections. He was bragging about it. Rightly, tweeting this firework Gif to I was voters we did. A Guy's got a lot of people to vote, but he apparently didn't get the memo from his own party. Because lots of people, voting is not what. Publicans one and so now they're moving to shut that down until they can figure out what's going on. Last week. I was Senate Republicans passed a bill that would prohibit the secretary of state. That guy with firework tweet from mailing, absentee ballot request forms without a specific request from voter. And then just before they headed off for some recess, the I legislature passed a measure to make voting even harder including requiring early in person voters to show Id. And I was just the latest example, this crazy situation where one party wants as many people as possible vote safely pandemic and one party just does not. Now someone from the Party. That does want people to vote on Perez Chair of the democratic. National Committee A do you? Do you see that way or is? It more were textured nuance than that. I know that like the Republican Secretary of state in Ohio. For instance has been you know mailing out absentee ballot applications and things like that, but but how do you see it? I think you're spot on Chris. I mean Republicans for decades have wanted to make it harder for people to vote and they're not subtle about it. Our leverage in the elections quite frankly goes up as the voting populace goes down, I don't want everyone to vote. Those are those are verbatim statements from Republicans from decades ago. That's the philosophy they want less. They want to make it harder for people to vote especially people of Color. That's why you have the Joni Ernst Protection Act of two. Two Thousand and twenty in Iowa because Joni Ernst is in trouble and they've got to make it harder for people to vote. That's why you see in Georgia. Another the latest chapter in the voter suppression manual started by Brian Kemp led by others. We see this everywhere. We saw the attempted weaponization of the pandemic in Wisconsin, but it didn't work, and that's the pivot. It didn't work because we are ready for it as Democrats. We are doing a number of things. We're filing lawsuits in Wisconsin. Forty two thousand people were able to exercise their right to vote Chris because our lawsuit organizing everywhere. We have a tool that we released today. Chris that it's going to help in every state you can. You can go into Georgia and say I want all the African American voters who have been taken off the rolls over a period of time in this tool will help you find that these are the tools that we are working with. Make sure we combat voter suppression. So, so so that tool would be for for for lawyers or for campaigns or public or civic groups that could just say could actually like that data is public public, but it's hard to access, and so this would be a tool to access to see. Chris one of the most important. A. Requirements affected voter. Protection is to make it easy. You can't have to have a PhD. In order to access these tools so. Civic Organizations Advocacy Organizations. Anyone can use this tool. We're now embarking in a massive training effort to make sure people understand this tool so that you can go in Georgia and say I want all the African American voters in Fulton. County. Who've been taken off the rolls and people need to learn this tool if you text four three three. Vote Two, four, three, six, seven. You can learn more about this tool. It's critically important. What One of the one of the lawsuits that the Democratic Party's involvement is in Texas where you've got this sort of crazy situation, which like Texas law allows senior citizens to have no excuse absentee ballot, which means anyone over sixty five. And, and basically the policymakers Republican policymakers in the state don't want to be the case that younger than sixty five people can can have that option. In the midst of a pandemic, an estate team gets cases. Go Up! You have sued. Is that correct to try to sort of force this issue? In higher courts at the Spring Court. The plaintiff in that case, the Democratic Party of Texas they are led by a great chairman and Twenty Sixth Amendment prohibits discrimination by age in voting so I think on the merits. They have a really good case. Here's the challenge. The Supreme Court justice that oversees the fifth circuit. Now the party won at the trial level, and then the fifth circuit, which is Darth vader for any voting rights They stayed the ruin of the District Court and Samuel. Alito is the person who will oversee the efforts on the fifth circuit so. You'll have to forgive me if I'm not holding my breath that Justice Alito is gonNA come to the rescue, but you know what we're GonNa, swing, the bat and I applaud the party for their efforts, because this is so critically important. Final question for you is on the aftermath of Election Day. What the new normal looks like! We saw him Wisconsin. It took a very long time to count votes in Georgia, we still have counties that have not fully reported. How important is it to you to acclimate everyone the media all the institutions of course to understanding that this fall we, there's a lot we won't know that night, and it's going to probably take awhile if we're looking at much much higher levels of APPs devoted. Organize organize organized Chris what we're doing now. We have our virtual clipboards out, and then basically every state. We are educating people on how to vote early vote by mail. The most important acronym in the State of Arizona is Pebble P. V., l., the permanent early voting lists. We're trying to get as many people as possible on the permanent early voting list, so you'll be mailed a ballot. You can vote early. Vote easy, and that is so critical. Critical that is we need to make sure we have to be prepared. Florida Texas and Arizona saw their largest numbers of corona virus cases Jay. We've got to be prepared. If you WANNA vote in person, you should be able to on election day. If you want to vote early, we should have maximum early voting days, and if you want to vote by mail, we should make it easy to do that as well. That's the definition of success. Or I. Tom Perez the DNC. Thank you so much for taking time tonight. Always a pleasure! That does it for all in. You can catch every weeknight at eight. o'clock on MSNBC. Don't forget to like us on facebook. That's facebook dot. com slash all in with Chris.

Chris one New York City officer president Party Donald Trump Albuquerque Police Union San Francisco Congressman Kim Jeffries Georgia America Governor Michelle Luhan Grisha Tom Perez New Mexico executive Texas DNC Florida Buffalo Police
Thursday, April 9, 2020

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

39:59 min | 4 months ago

Thursday, April 9, 2020

"Spending more time inside and alone than usual talks base online therapy can help you find the support and guidance. You need to feel less alone. Get One hundred dollars off your first month with Promo Code at talks base dot com or download the APP that's Promo Code Com at talks base DOT COM. He's an ABC News Special Covert Nineteen. What you need to know here is. Abc News correspondent. Aaron Katersky curve may be flattening but it took devastating the US economy to do it more than six million people filed new claims for unemployment benefits last week as the country. Shut DOWN TO SAVE ITSELF FROM CORONA VIRUS. That means in the last three weeks. More than fifteen million Americans have been laid off Rebecca Jarvis. Abc's chief business and Economics correspondent fifteen million. Rebecca is probably an undercount right. Will we are looking at more than fifteen million Americans who have been laid off in just three weeks and we know that that is underestimating. The number of real layoffs and the reason is people have been trying to apply for unemployment insurance but the state systems which are meant to deal with this. Don't have the capacity for it. We've heard about the websites crashing. They don't have the personnel to answer people's phone calls. I've heard from people who manage to get through websites at one or three o'clock in the morning and that was their only way after hundreds of tries so we know that these numbers under represent the number of people who have lost their jobs in recent weeks. Because of the lockdowns. In what we're seeing is there's been a bit of a shift where it started with the hospitality and Leisure Industries. People who worked at restaurants and bars the airlines naturally those industries. Were having to let some people go because of the fact that everything was on lockdown. But now we're seeing the effects on retail we're seeing the effects on doctor's offices areas that you might not immediately think would have an impact from the lockdowns. They've been holding out as long as they can. But this is hitting all aspects of the US economy at this point for those businesses and you mentioned retail that were teetering even before this. Is there any reason for JC Penney to open up again? Well this is the really difficult question because there's segments of the economy and retail is a big one that were already feeling pressure coming into this crisis and so for the retailers like the JC Penney's of the world who have had to furlough employees decided to make those decisions when you look at most estimates. They're not going to bring back all of their employees even if they do reopen and many of them will they're not bringing back all of those employees and frankly for a lot of businesses that have learned over the last handful of weeks how to do business more with less. It's something that we've seen coming out of the two thousand eight recession. It's something that we saw coming out of the recession in the early two thousands when a company figures out how to do more with less they continue to do more with less and add to that Aaron the fact that a lot of these companies when business reopens they will see a return of consumers to some degree but how many people are going to immediately. Go out and start spending money when there's been this great shock to the economy and there's so much uncertainty around the employment picture. How many people are going to really feel that level of confidence to say you know what I'm going to go out and spend my dollars again. There's not a lot of good news here. Rebecca one thing I will say what what you also are seeing though in the business community is remarkable resilience. And you're seeing businesses doing things. They've never done before they're getting into areas. They've never been in before the skin care. Companies that are now creating hand sanitizer because the demand is there for hand sanitizer but not necessarily for perfume right now the clothing companies. That are getting into the mask business. It is an incredible and remarkable thing to see what these companies are doing. What American citizens are going out and doing for their fellow their neighbors in their communities so as much as we're seeing worst of what's possible were also seeing the best of what's possible and that does give me hope that people will continue to do everything they can to support each other and especially to support their neighborhoods small businesses. Okay Rebecca let's hope. Abc's Rebecca Jarvis with unemployment skyrocketing numbers of Americans do need help feeding their families. Coming up more about a new. Abc News Partnership With Feeding America. First though our understanding of corona virus is changing. We knew it started in China. But there's now new research that shows most if not all cases in New York. The nation's hardest hit state originated in Europe. The research was conducted at the ICAHN School of medicine part of the Mount Sinai health system. And we have the scientists with US Vienna Simon and Harm Van. Boekel you trace infectious diseases all the time. What did you find with Cova? Nineteen th genomes that we see here from the cases in New York are very similar to genomes have been sequenced from cases in in Europe with tells us that the virus has arrived to New York through Through Europe essentially. So does this mean there's a separate strain of the virus that infected New York and a separate strain that infected say California now is this strange are all really similar. We can just look at small. Changes ends genome to pinpoint. And what is the closest relative? It's like a family tree and you can see who's related to whom by looking at those small changes in the virus so there's different branches in the tree of the corona virus family and we can by comparing how closely related they are. We can basically deduce from where they have been. Before strains in New York City intermingled very closely viruses seen in Europe so am the interpretation of those findings is that there has been an exchange of of travelers and is coming from Europe or New Yorkers going to Europe and That brought back the virus. When did you research show that this first started showing up in New York so the first sequence that we actually am analyzed was obtained from a person was cove nineteen end of February? The when I'm casting became widely available there was a lodge inc fees of Covert positive patients that were dead diagnosed and we used those sequences to to look at the relatedness of survivors and it appears that there is a significant amount of untracked transmissions in community and the most likely explanation for a number of Amtrak transmissions into community as that's the virus has been circulating in New York City for a couple of weeks undetected so our analysis suggests that the virus has been interested the as early as Late January so far earlier than March I which is when I think there was the first positive case exactly so it really was seated here before anyone was really thinking about the kinds of strict measures that are now in place. That's what our data suggest. Yeah I'm interested in how much more you expect to learn about the origin of this virus. So we this is early. Data and we still lack 'em sequencing information from different parts of the United States from different parts of the world more sequencing out of Europe will allow us to pinpoint more carefully am the spread of survivors here in the United States. We're also continuing to sequence here in New York We've already generated many additional genome sequences and that suit. Also help us get a more clear picture of his here in the city. And sort of extend off introductions into the city as well as any of that contradicting the initial finding. No we got to see the same pattern of the majority of cases are linked to European origin. Let me pull an ABC news contributor. Jon Cohen formerly the Department of Homeland Security because John the European origin of the New York outbreak seems to underscore why the China travel ban really wasn't effective well. This study confirms concerns that have been raised by Homeland Security and border security experts Over the last several months that the initial travel restrictions focusing exclusively on Individuals who were coming to the United States from China Were insufficient We knew by the time that these restrictions were put into place that people who had visited China Who potentially works posed and carriers of the virus had left China and traveled to Europe other parts of Asia and other countries across the globe so simply restricting travel for a subset of those people coming from China to the United States was insufficient to stop the virus from entering the United States. What should have happened what we should have done in late January Once we once concerns were elevated about does virus potentially coming to the United States is. We should have begun screening all inbound travelers coming to the United States from any last point of departure airport. Abc News Contributor. Jon Cohen along with harm done Baker and Vienna Simon from the Mount Sinai health system and coming up our partnership with feeding America. I'm Aaron Katersky. And you're listening to ABC News Special. You're listening to ABC News Special. Kobe nineteen what you need to know. Here's ABC News correspondent Amy Robot with me now. Abc Chief Medical correspondent. Dr Jen Ashton Dr. Jen let's talk about pregnancy. Maternity wards across this country are now obviously taking extra precautions but what we about the risk factors right now for pregnant women so what we know is that pregnancy definitely represents a situation where the immune system is compromised and we know from other viral respiratory illnesses. That pregnant women can be at increased risk. There is very limited data thus far on the effects of Kovic nineteen on pregnant women. So that's something that we're following really closely. What are we still learning about that impact? Well out of the very very small case reports that have been published thus far amy. It doesn't look like being infected with Cova. Nineteen increases the risk for a pregnant woman to get sick. We also don't know but don't think this happens that the virus can be spread via blood or breast milk but again so much that we still need to really study a lot of the focus. Understandably has been on women in their third trimester and who are about to deliver. That's understandable but we have to look at the beginning of pregnancy and so we don't yet know if women who are exposed to cove at nineteen or this. New Corona virus are at increased risk for miscarriage or preterm labor? So we really need to take it trimester by trimester. There's some suspicion that they might be but again we really need to study this much much greater numbers. All right. Dr Jen. We know you will be sticking around well. Since the onset of the outbreak New Mexico has been one of the state took advanced measures to flatten the curve and slow the spread Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham has been at the forefront of that battle. And she's here to talk more about the impact cove nineteen has had on her state. Welcome governor we appreciate your time and we just this past Monday. You extended the emergency stay at home. Order to April thirtieth. It had been at April tenth. Do you believe that will be enough? Time is really hard to say. I know that it's too soon to change what we're doing in terms of our instructions to stay home and we also limited further what we identified as exceptions to businesses that needed to be closed in order to make sure that folks are staying home. I think the whole country is looking at. When can we safely began to think about moving into going back to work and engaging with our families again and I? It's it's too soon to tell but April. Thirtieth is where we are today and we're prepared to make additional tough decisions if we need to. I know that you spoke with President trump about being very concerned for the Navajo nation. During the corona virus pandemic access to food is one of your greatest concerns. How are you addressing this? Well it's both food and water and just sort of essential services and supplies in New Mexico. We've got twenty three different sovereign nations native American tribes at the Navajo Nation area in their chapters. Which is their local bodies of government. You can have individuals that are forty miles from any kind of a grocery store gas station and so we are using the National Guard. Set up food delivery stations working on any number of sort of triage centers so that would limiting needing to come into get supplies. But we're also not allowing anyone to be in a situation where they don't have what they need to meet a stay at home instruction and it's really talk. This is an underserved population in every state. It's true the Mexico. All of our sovereign nations now. The Federal Trust responsibilities never been met. They don't have adequate healthcare and other supports. And so this is just an at risk population. We're beginning to see real risk to all of our sovereign nation. So we're doing extra community containment measures an extra supports and we're working very closely with any and all service to increase fasting for every single one of our pointless drives and speaking of all of those big needs. You have in your state. Do you believe the federal government has been responding with enough so far enough? And there's not a I think in the country is going to say it's enough. I will tell you that the federal government has been much more responsive about trying to figure out what we're GONNA do to adequately serve and protect tribal communities in this state and other states looking at a regional potential operation for Utah in Arizona the Navajo nation is in all three of those states. They have increased our opportunity by declaring a national federal emergency to the state so that we can call up more of the guard. They're making sure that we don't have an interruption in our food supply. They're giving US field hospitals. I think we're getting the right. Attention is any state in a to have security for food and E and related supplies. Now we are not there yet and I am aggressively working on additional testing. Even though we're one of the states that sun fairly well because we got into the game of testing early but until you do complete surveillance and testing in your state. You're not prepared to serve your stay out of the League and this continues to his source of significant frustration for me governor. Michelle Luhan Grisham. We know you are fighting. Fiercely for the people who you preside over so thank you so much for joining us and we wish you the very best thank you. Very much. With unemployment skyrocketing amid the pandemic an unprecedented number of Americans need help feeding their families and while organizations like feeding America are stepping up to help the cause. They cannot do it without support. So here share. How BIMBO BAKERIES USA is rising to the occasion is their vice president of corporate affairs. Dana Connors Dana. Thanks so much for joining us and I know you're a company overseas so many food brands we all know and love. Sara Lee breads Thomas's breakfast and so many others and because you produce food your employees have been considered essential workers during this. So tell me how you all have been handling this pandemic sure. It's been a crazy time as far as this for everybody but we have been operating at Bimbo Bakeries USA with one mission goose entire pandemic which is to feed America while keeping our associates safe. And it's been incredible to see. We have twenty thousand associates. Many of whom are out every day in the bakeries making your favorite breads and your and your sweet baked goods And then delivering them to the stores. So it's been really inspiring and humbling to see these people out every day. Just making sure that we're able to get food on the table for for everyone in this difficult time. Yeah it's remarkable and I know you've had a long standing partnership with feeding America. Tell us about that relationship. Sure you know with the work that we do. Our products are necessities. They're they're staples for breakfast. Lunch and dinner and our goal has always been for all Americans to enjoy them regardless of economics so it was only natural for us to partner with feeding America based on how they are able to help communities all across the country. We have communities operations in all fifty states and may have agencies in all the communities where we operate so over the years we've been able to donate on average twenty million pounds of food. That's the equivalent of twenty million loaves of bread. Each year to feeding America food banks while big numbers and as part of our day of hope we understand you actually have a big announcement to make so take it away. Yes so we heard firsthand from Feeding America. The need that they were facing both to feed those in need to the challenges that they had with supply so we are doing two big things for them. The first is per product donations so we are going to make sure that during this time all of our bread bagels English muffins sweet baked goods bon donations go directly to feeding America food banks and we expect this to significantly increase our annual donation by millions of pounds. And we also know that there's an immediate need for financial support during this time. So be makers. Usa is a proud to donate five hundred thousand dollars to the feeding America. Couvert Nineteen Relief Fund. This will help with putting together. Emergency boxes of non perishable goods immediately. We've also asked our associates. Our vendor partners are suppliers families to donate directly to feeding America to in just a few short days. We've able to raise thousands of we believe we're well on our way to donating at least if not more than a million dollars for feeding America during this time well Dana Connors. That wasn't just a big announcement that was an enormous announcement and so much gratitude for all that you've done and continue to do with Bimbo Bakeries USA. So thank you so much coming up next right here on what you need to know. Dr Jen Ashton joins us with the answers to your medical questions. Plus one man's mission to feed America leading the charge to help restaurant workers out of a job top. Chef's Tom Kaleo is here. Abc News Special. Kobe nineteen what you need to know continues after this life. Feels more stressful. These days stores are empty. Travel is on pause. Work is uncertain with social distancing. We need support now. More than ever talks base online therapy gives you the support. You deserve on a schedule that works for you. We all need to talk through. Life's challenges talks offers support. We deserve at a price. We can afford match with your perfect therapist and get one hundred dollars off your first month with Promo Code Com sign up at talks based DOT COM or download. The APP don't forget to use Promo Code. Comb for a hundred dollars off your first month. You're listening to an ABC news special. Kobe nineteen what you need to know once again here is. Abc News correspondent. Amy Robot and we turn now to Dr Jen Ashton. She has the latest batch on your questions from the corona virus crisis. So Dr Jen. Thanks for being with us again. And we're going to go to our first question. Which is this a resident Al Hospital tested positive for Copay nineteen? While waiting for the result they went back on a patient floor. All the patients that were in contact with this resident were tested and came back. Negative is it possible for these patients to become infected at a later date. It is amy and the tricky thing. Here is that just because someone has been exposed to a confirmed positive case is not an indication for testing right now because we don't know the value of routine testing in people who are symptomatic or don't have any signs or symptoms of infection. We need to get that information desperately and down the road when we have brought widespread testing the general population. Somehow some way will be able to find out the value of that but right now just because you've been exposed. It's not an indication for testing all right and then we now know that the CDC is recommending. That you wear masks if you go out so this question very pertinent. Do we need to be even more careful to not touch our faces when we are wearing masks since we might be applying virus particles directly onto the mask absolutely? And so you and I have talked about this before. Part of the reason why masks especially the medical version is not recommended for the general public is because people are not used to having something on their face when I do surgery in Obgyn. I'm trained. Once I have a mask on one side of gloves on I don't touch anything that's not sterile. Meaning the patient and the surgical field but the lay public is not used to that. So what we don't want is even with a Bandana for people to be touching their face more and introducing more viral particles to. What really is the danger zone? Eyes Nose and mouth right and there is a tendency to adjust. Because we're not used to it or it's you know it. It causes an issue or something. So it's something to really be aware of all right next question. Dube's Oh if as symptomatic carriers share any of the same traits characteristics for example. Do they tend to be from a certain age group? We don't know that and I know that's frustrating for people to hear but remember. The virus is less than four months old so we need to study people who we know are positive or infected and we also need to study people who have no symptoms but are infected and then we need to compare those two groups and in medicine and science. We make the first step of the scientific process with basic observation. And we're not even there yet. We do know however that twenty five percent of people who are known to be positive with Cova nineteen show no symptoms whatsoever. Dr Jen Ashton. Thank you so much we appreciate it. One thing we tend to take for granted is the service industry. Restaurants are obviously suffering a huge topic. Right now is food insecurity joining us now to talk more about this chef. Tom CALICO founding member of the Independent Restaurant. Coalition and judge on top chef. Tom Thank you so much for being with us and I know as food advocate you have worked for years to help end hunger in the United States. You're a big supporter for asking the government to step up. Tell us about your efforts efforts for the Independent Independent Restaurant Coalition. We started about Three or four weeks ago. We realized the enormity of the problem that we're facing and we knew that there was a stimulus package that was going to help. Small businesses and we We realized that we needed a place the table and so we we organized we found groups in Chicago that was working on the same mission. We've found groups out the south and referral these religions together and Very very very quickly. We we We hired a lobbying team calms theme. And we are having direct convert conversations with members of Congress. Let them know the issues that we have in the restaurant industry and also right now look no the the fixes for care for the Care Act. They don't really work in the restaurant industry right now. Last month you had to shut your restaurants down. You had to fire three hundred. Employees restaurants across the country are suffering. Just the same as you do. Have any inspirational words to to owners and to workers out there. During these times I had a layoff under fire. I actually laid off more over four hundred people and you know we we encourage them to get an unemployment especially in New York right now. Unemployment pay slightly over a thousand dollars a week. If you're not going out not spending money on various things that you need right now That'll get you by. So that's that's that's what we're telling people that's what's encouraging in terms of restaurants were encouraging people to reach out and try to get this this. Pp even if it doesn't work for you right now it may change so definitely sign up There's also a bunch of other things out there as well that that you can. You can apply for No this is going to be tough. This knocking easy. I still suspect that at least fifty percent of the restaurant will not get open and then the problem with that is. You'RE GONNA have a lot of vacancies on ground floor spaces. You're going to have You know our restaurants have become part of our culture even small local restaurants that we have and if they're not there when we come out of this where are we going to go and celebrate. Where are we going to blow off? Steam? Where are we going to get together? with each other and so. I'm really really concerned. And then you know the other thing. I'm hearing is. When do you think you'll open up and I don't think that's the question? I think the question is. When does the public feel confident and feel secure enough start gathering again in with groups of people so it doesn't really matter when we when we can open up so no it's tough right now? A lot of restaurants are trying to fill a GAP BY DOING. Take out or delivery. And that's really not moving the needle but I still think that In terms of feeding people restaurants can play a huge role in making sure that seniors are getting food and children who are who are living in household federal student secure adults living in homes are who insecure restaurants if they had proper funding through the government and the bill in Velasco Officer as small business for for the house where restaurants that they work for nonprofits from get about a half million dollars of money flowing the restaurant so we can actually turn restaurants community centres very very similar to it. Jose Andres doing role central kitchen. And so there's a role we can all play and it's just a lot of cooperation and we need smart government right now for years. We've heard about shrinking government and and governments fan. But what we what we need right now. We need smart government that is really responsive. They should listen to small business owners. They should listen to the people who are on the front lines of feeding people people who are taking care of people know how to get this done and so you know hope out there is. Maybe there's a silver lining where we come out of this and we have a very different society certainly helps Tom Calico. Thank you for all that you're doing and we certainly are sending our love and our support to you other restaurant owners and workers out there. Thank you for your time today. Thank you and there is much more ahead right here. On our day of hope the surprise message from one woman who knows how to put up a fight plus one company making sure your meal gets to your door now expanding their reach to so many. Americans in need and a Harry. Connex helping hand. We're back in a moment. Abc News Special Cove in Nineteen. What you need to know continues after this you're listening to an ABC special cove in nineteen. What you need to know once again here is ABC. News correspondent Amy Rohbock. Welcome back to our day of coq show joining us now is layla. Ali a longtime supporter feeding America. She sits on their entertainment council and mobilizes the public in support of their mission to end hunger in America. Leyla talk a little bit about why it is so important for you to be a part of Feeding America. Especially right now. Thank you so much for having me on. I've been supporting feeding America for so many years. Because they are the nation's largest hunger relief organization they support about two hundred food banks and sixty thousand food pantries and meal programs and now with you know. We're facing now. You've got kids home from school. People being laid off their jobs so that more than million more people that are in danger of being hungry so feeding America has some heavy weight on their shoulders. Right now. That's why join them to continually try to raise funds. I know you're a phenomenal philanthropist. During this time of crisis so talk about what you've been doing personally to help others and to encourage positively. Well you know now's the time we're all being tried really about to find out what we're made. Now you know this is the real deal. This is a real fight for all of us and for me is really about reaching out. Of course my family my friends. Of course we know how to reach out to seniors. Who can't just get to the store. Get items that they need so I have neighbors and friends that I bought groceries for friends that I've written checks for you know so I'm lucky to be in a situation of the able to help in that way. Sometimes just getting calling people I mean I think about people who live alone owner just in the house I mean I have my children and my husband which is amazing but not everybody has that you know so you really have to call check on your circle and everyone ask is do what they can right now and I also decided to give one hundred percent of proceeds from my organic. Leyla Spiceland to feeding America. Because I just thought that was a great opportunity for me to help. People live healthier on terms of spices but also to raise more funds for feeding America. That is awesome. And you're right. Everybody can do something and I know your father. Mohammed Ali was obviously great humanitarian. Certainly walking in his footsteps and we are very grateful that you're doing just that Leyla Ali. Thank you for your time and thank you for all that you do. I just want to say people go to feeding America Dot Org for more information or to donate. That's right great. And our day of hope rolls on with a company that has partnered with the nonprofit organization as we were just talking about feeding America in a very big way here to tell us more about it is the CEO and Co founder of door. Dash Tony Shoe. Thank you for joining us. Tony Tell us about your company's relationship with feeding America. It's an important one. It's good to be with you. Amy Thank you for having me absolutely. We started door dash really to empower local economies than we've always been committed in finding creative ways to take our technology and do good in the community so in early two thousand eighteen. We launched project DASH which takes our on demand logistics platform to power deliveries from those who can give such as restaurants that may have excess food on a daily basis organizations. That really need that food. Our inaugural partner was feeding America and since January of twenty eighteen. We've been able to donate together. Six million meals incredible and of course that that door dash that delivery is more important than ever right now. During these nineteen times you have a special fund raising campaign. You've been working on recently. Tell us about it during these times. I think everyone can play is very small part and together. We can do very big things. So as part of our. Do your part challenge. We launched a instagram live video stream in which we partnered with celebrities like Kylie Jenner or Stasi in which they would host a livestream and for every viewer that watched that livestream jordache would donate a meal to family in need. That's part of the a part of the very first livestream last week. We're able to donate two point. Three million meals. Wow I understand you have another. You have a big announcement that you WanNa make here today. Go ahead and do it today. We're very excited on. Top of the two point. Three million meals that we donated we want to announce another five hundred thousand meal donation in which were partnering with Feeding America. And you know. Take everything that we've done an extended into the future and so we actually will be extending our do your part challenge for weeks to come so on top of the five hundred thousand meals that were announcing today super excited to be doing the do your part challenge for weeks to come and hopefully together we can donate many million meals. This is fantastic. Tony Shoe thank you. So much You were helping so many people in need and you're continuing that I know for the weeks and months to come so we really appreciate it during this time and always thank you thank you and if you're in a position to give you heard. Leyla Aliyeva this as well but I'll say it again. Go to feeding America Dot Org feed the love coming up right here when we come back music to our ears Harry connick junior. Abc News special continues after this for so many of us it is music that soothes and comforts us. In Times of uncertainty and now some of our favorite artists are providing that much needed relief and today we turn to multi grammy and Emmy Award winning musician. Harry Connick Junior. I wanted to share with our audience. A clip of you at the LS Marcello Center. Doing what you truly love. You guys can do to stop that sort of violence going on out there and those things that make you scared and depressed is exactly what you doing right now. You coming to make yourself better. You're educating yourselves. You're taking responsibility on your shoulders to lift our newer there with the next generation of Musicians. You just lost your good friend and Mentor. L. S. Marcellus junior dacoven. Nine hundred thousand dollars. Would he want those students to understand about the importance of music? Especially in times like these loving ESI was he was tough on us and he made us learn the importance of frats and ownership and discovery and all the little things that with all of us to continue to keep the standard very high for these young folks and if we do that and we keep letting them know. What's possible if you believe in yourself work harder craft and I think he'd be very proud and we're going to turn it over to you. Officially Harry connick junior with. Yes we can can Smith. I'm not there asking. You miss a tape Okay AM lying. What do that was? Awesome Harry Connick Junior. Thank thank you for putting a big smile on all of our faces. That's our program for today. I mean he roebuck. Thanks for listening. Abc News honored winner of Four. Edward R Murrow awards. Abc News America's number. One News Choice. There's more anxiety than ever and after a while real time news updates can get overwhelming getting personalized support for your well being a top priority. That's why talks base pairs you with a licensed therapist. Based on your preferences they have thousands of therapists. In over forty specialties like anxiety depression relationships and more one month on talks base cost about the same as a single in person therapy session but with unlimited messaging access and daily engagement. No need to travel for support or wait for relief. Talks base therapists have experienced treating a range of issues including depression. Anxiety substance abuse trauma relationship issues. Food and eating and more security. Safety and privacy are top priorities that talks base their platform encryption securely stores all client information using the same technology used by the banking industry. We all need to talk through. Life's challenges talks offers the support. We deserve at a price. We can afford match with your perfect therapist and get one hundred dollars off your first month with Promo Code Com sign up at talks based DOT COM or download. The APP don't forget to use Promo Code. Comb for one hundred dollars off your first month so you just woke up. Your phone is lighting up with headlines and push notifications and text from your mom saying how do I click this okay? Maybe that's just me but if you WANNA get up to speed check out the new podcast from ABC News. Start here literally. The ground was shaky. I'm Brad Milkey and every morning. We're going to take you to the stories that matter with fast fresh in Silo Robert Muller Michael Cohen. Calling all in twenty minutes start here. Listen for free on apple podcasts. Or your favorite podcast APP.

America Abc News United States Abc Dr Jen Ashton Rebecca Jarvis New York Aaron Katersky Harry Connick Junior Kobe JC Penney Dr Jen Europe Cova Michelle Luhan Grisham Amy Robot amy
Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: News brief from Public News Service (August 13, 2019)

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:00 min | 1 year ago

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: News brief from Public News Service (August 13, 2019)

"Here comes again lunch will be the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican jerk turkey sub at firehouse up's freshly sliced smoked turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five for medium save time order the new jamaican can jerk turkey sub on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary for delivery here. It comes again lunch will be the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with a new jamaican jerk turkey sub at firehouse subs- freshly sliced smoked turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium save time order the new jamaican making jerk turkey sub on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary for delivery the public service daily newscasts for tuesday august thirteenth two thousand nineteen. I'm by clifford topping our news does he trump administration monday announced it would change the way the endangered species act is applied significantly weakening the nation's bedrock conservation law making it harder oh to protect wildlife of multiple threats posed by climate change that from new york times they report the new rules would make it easier to remove a species from the endangered aged list and we can protections for threatened species meantime our gen steadily reports massachusetts attorney general maura healey says she intends chance to sue the administration over the new rules the lawsuit she announced monday alleges that the changes are illegal and that the administration failed to review environmental impact and ignored public opinion the endangered species act was enacted more than forty years ago and since prevented the extinction of ninety nine percent of all listed species including including the bald eagle humpback whale green sea turtle and whooping crane. He says the new rules violate the axe purpose which has helped revive. Some of massachusetts endangered injured in threatened species. These projections were boosted our pipe and clever recovery increasing population here in massachusetts alone by five hundred percent in one thousand nine hundred us to be there were no peregrine falcons interstate but now state is home to more than forty breeding pairs of those falcon. He says the new rules pave the way for approval of oil gas and other development projects despite potential species impact supporters of the rules say they create greater peter transparency nutrition and immigrant advocates orchid giving a new rule. Did i green cards to immigrants who have received or might receive needs based public consistence. The rule should monday would force immigrants in families with citizens and legal permanent residents to choose between splitting their family up or removing the entire family from the country according to joel berg c._e._o. Of hunger free america that puts everything from food assistance to medicaid and housing support out of reach. It's impossible choice. It's cruel. It's counterproductive because it's gonna hurt our economy in hurt the ability of people to become economically self sufficient u._s. citizenship bend immigration services says the allows the government to insist that immigrants who come to the country will not be a drain on society but burg points out that immigrants pay hey payroll taxes sales taxes real estate taxes and even income taxes often covering benefits available to citizens they contribute far more to society overall they ever take out. This has nothing to do with budget savings and says everything to do with attacking people because they represent a different language or different skin color. I'm envious. Andrea sears reporting organizations that are opposed to the rule of vow to challenge it in the courts. This is the de risk of domestic terrorism to be discussed at a summit in santa fe tomorrow. The goals preventing a deadly attack in new mexico similar to the one in all paso texas governor governor michelle luhan grisham says she will convene legislators of both parties and others to analyze and discuss proactive measures university of new mexico professor. Emil necklace ackley says three factors are driving domestic terrorism the number of weapons available to american citizens pervasive use of social media's dark side and a more diverse u._s. s. population that creates fear among some people a public issue or is it with you who and i expect unfortunate glenn i expect domestic cattle than to including spoon silly as we move on the next decade luhan grisham signed to new gun-related bills this year including expanded background check requirements for firearm sales and prohibiting convicted domestic abusers from possessing guns earlier in his career naughtily tracked international terrorist organizations and says violence or the threat of violence is how they attempt to control others. He says domestic terrorists create fear among the nation's nations non white population which access a cancer on democracy and undermines a creative society the backbone of what has has made america great it only makes on earth that has been won't be followed by immigrant knock. Lee believes legislation should be pass to curtail some weapons excluding guns used for hunting or sporting activities. We are talking about deadly weapons that are web the one that invented and to talk to you still mystic since e._l. Paso shooting an apparent white supremacist premises the trump administration sent mixed signals as to whether new gun laws will be considered for public news service. I'm russ brown. Finally eric ticket reports today says largest free tax aid programs looking for volunteers at states like oregon for more than fifty years the a._a._r._p. Foundation taxation program has assisted people with low and and moderate incomes file their taxes. More than a thousand volunteers helped forty five thousand oregonians father. Two thousand eighteen returns this year. Bob bruce use a a._a._r._p. Oregon state coordinator for tax aide says despite changes to the code that some believe have simplified it folk still find filing taxes confusing and frustrating with the program filers get one on one attention. The program provides a way of personally helping individual families with their taxes and in some cases we'll help educate taxpayers vowed credits that they don't even know that they're eligible for so it's a very satisfying experience for volunteers interested. You said volunteering can head to the a._a._r._p. Website i by clifford from public service. We are member elissa support. It and we are online at public service dot o._r._g. R._g. Here it comes again lunch lippi the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican jerk turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast cravenly sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five for medium save time order the new jamaican jerk turkey sub on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary delivery here it comes again lunch will be the same old same old or you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican jerk turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five for medium save time order the new jamaican jerk turkey sub on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations limited time only plus tax prices vary delivery.

firehouse subs massachusetts new york america oregon clifford university of new mexico santa fe maura healey russ brown joel berg Bob bruce governor michelle luhan grisha Andrea sears attorney burg Paso mexico
May 2, 2020: Remdesivir authorized for emergency coronavirus treatments

5 Things

08:04 min | 3 months ago

May 2, 2020: Remdesivir authorized for emergency coronavirus treatments

"Good morning. I'm Taylor Wilson and this is five things you need to know the weekend of May Second. Twenty twenty here are some of the top headlines more than sixteen thousand nursing home residents and staff have died from Cova nineteen in the US about a quarter of the nation's deaths. Congress is investigating the large number of outbreaks on Carnival cruise ships. The House is requiring that carnival turnover all internal documents on Cova nineteen from January first until now carnival loans at least nine ships that experienced outbreaks and according to the toy review site. Tt PM puzzle. Sales are up about three hundred percent during the pandemic thanks for writing on twitter at USA Today. Podcast and shout out to recent followers Zoe. Diana and Sarah Greenberg. If you're not already be sure to hit that follow about it and to keep up with lots of great shows including all things five things that's at USA Today. Podcast on twitter now onto the show. Even as some states begin slowly reopening. The Corona virus pandemic is far from over a new report on Thursday found that the pandemic could last another two years and won't be halted until sixty to seventy percent of the population becomes immune. That's according to the University of Minnesota's Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy. Researchers also made it clear that it appears cove in nineteen spreads more easily than the flu because it has a longer incubation period spreads while people are ACM dramatic and has a higher average number of new infections that result from one infected per cent. Both there is increased optimism when it comes to treating the virus the FDA has approved the antiviral drug disappear after encouraging trial results president. Donald Trump announced authorization of the Gilead Sciences drug on Friday. I'm pleased to announce Gilead now has an easy way from the FDA FOR REMEDIES. Aveer and you know what that is because that's been the hot things also in the papers and the media for the last little while and important treatment for hospitalized corona virus patients and it's something I spoke with Dr Khan and Dr Fao G. I spoke with Deborah about it. And it's it's really a very promising situation we've been doing work with the teams that the FDA NIH and Gilead spearheading this public private partnership to make this happen very quickly. Meanwhile all eyes are on one of the worst outbreaks in the country in New Mexico governor. Michelle Luhan Grisham has invoked the state's riot control. Act TO SEAL off all roads to non-essential traffic in Gallup the town of seventy thousand borders the Navajo nation where a surging outbreak has led to a number of restrictions. She also required businesses in Gallup to close from five pm to eight am and the Navajo nation has imposed. Its own evening and weekend curfews. There have now been more than sixty five thousand deaths in the US FROM COVA. Nineteen and two hundred thirty nine thousand around the world. Pet owners around the country are increasingly worried about their pets. During the corona virus pandemic some animals can contract the virus and there are questions about whether or not they can transfer covert nineteen to humans USA. Today's Grace Hawk joined Corona virus conversations. This week on facebook live with host Ralphie Aversa to fill us in hand. Cats transfer the virus to humans. Grace what do we know about this? So we've been getting a lot of questions about pets Kennedy set. Can they transfer the virus from what we know now in this continues to evolve as we learn more about the virus hats? Don's ten not first to you but you can transfer it to them and they may be able to transfer into each other so We had reports that two cats recently. In New York state were actually symptomatic. We're having respiratory issues tested positive for the virus. One was living at home where other members of that family had already tested. Positive one was no one else. They're tested positive. Which seems to suggest. The cat may have picked it up. Elsewhere hadn't been able to transfer it to that family but that could change We had a story out today. Actually about how a pug with a family in North Carolina was also symptomatic tested positive and members of that family also sick so yes it is possible for you to transfer it to them but CDC FDA other health experts at this time there was no evidence yet. Your pets give it to you. Grace prefaced the the start of this show by saying we're going to answer these questions with what we know. Now what we know now about this is different from what we were hearing in the past about this from the CDC right great so at the end of February reported on a story out of Hong Kong that a couple of pets tested positive week. Pas a terminology they were using at the time for the virus in health officials in Hong Hall. Were saying that. They suspected there was some sort of environmental contamination. That's not pat somehow picked up some sort of substance or surface had the virus on it. And that's why they were testing positive. Not because they actually contracted the virus but now new evidence seems to cast doubt on that claim because some animals are actually being Symptomatic for this in. It's not just as environmental contamination that we suspect the pet has rubbed up against the virus in some way and so at the time in February W was saying we don't think can have this virus. There's no evidence now walks back. You can tune into corona virus conversations every Tuesday at twelve thirty PM eastern time on USA. Today's facebook page. Warren Buffett will host Berkshire Hathaway's annual shareholders meeting on Saturday but no shareholders will be prison amid the corona virus pandemic and. It'll all be online earlier this week. Buffet said that he and Berkshire vice-chairmen Greg. Able who oversees the holding companies non insurance businesses will answer questions from a reporter during the meeting but all other events surrounding the meeting have been cancelled. Normally some forty thousand people attend in Omaha. You can watch live on Yahoo Finance at four. Pm Eastern time the Kentucky Derby is going virtual the first weekend in May is typically dedicated to the horse race but this isn't a typical year and the vast majority of the world's sports are on hold so NBC. Sports will instead fill the time slot with a computer generated fantasy horserace. It'll feature the thirteen horses. That have won the triple Crown Secretary. One thousand nine hundred seventy three triple. Crown winner is a seven to two favorite. You can tune in at five forty five PM eastern time on Saturday followed by a re air of the twenty fifteen actual race with coverage starting at three PM. Happy Birthday Princess. Charlotte William and Duchess cates. Only daughter. Man. The only princess among Queen Elizabeth's great-grandchildren turns five on Saturday she'll celebrate privately in quarantine with her family at their Norfolk country retreat. Her family released new photos of her taken by her mother. And April as the family helped to pack up and deliver food packages for isolated pensioners in the local area. Thanks for listening to five things. A reminder you can subscribe for free and rate US and review on Apple podcasts. You can also catch US wherever you get your audio thank says always declare Thornton for her work on the show. Five things is part of the USA. Today podcast network.

FDA USA Today Grace Hawk twitter US Cova facebook Gilead Taylor Wilson Congress Twenty twenty Gilead Sciences USA. Today flu Zoe Donald Trump New Mexico Ralphie Aversa CDC Michelle Luhan Grisham
8-12-20 What's News

The Nicole Sandler Show

07:10 min | 10 hrs ago

8-12-20 What's News

"It's time for new coal. Sandler's what's news from Nicole Sandler Dot. Com and the progressive voices network. Democratic. Party ticket is set presumptive nominee. Joe Biden announced his choice of Comma Harris of California to be his running mate. The daughter of Indian and Jamaican Immigrants Harris will be the first woman of color on a major party ticket choices. Notably historic as the US is experiencing nationwide protests against racial injustice. Kamala Harris ran for the presidential nomination in a crowded field herself raising some eyebrows after a stinging criticism of Biden's record on school integration. During a debate, I do not believe you are racist and I agree with you when you commit yourself to the importance of finding common ground. But I also believe personal I was actually very. It was hurtful to hear you talk about the reputations of two United States senators who built their reputations and career on the segregation of race in this country, and it was not only that, but you also worked with them to oppose busing. and. You know there was a little girl in California who was part of the second class to integrate her public schools and she was bused to school every day. and. That little girl was me although trump reacted with his typical lies in attacks Senator Harris. Earned a reputation for aggressively questioning trump administration officials and nominees in Senate hearings extraordinarily nasty to. Cavan ordered Judge Cavanaugh. Then now justice cavanaugh she was nasty to a level that was. Just a horrible thing. The way she was where she treated. Now. Justice. Gavin. And I won't forget that soon. So she did very poorly in the primaries and now she's chosen. So let's see how that all works despite trump's assertion that Harris's quote just about the most liberal person in the US Senate she's actually more moderate, not doing much to help Biden with progressives on his left, but she was considered the strongest and safest pick for Biden the to will speak together in Wilmington Delaware on Wednesday and accept their party's nomination at the Democratic National Convention, which begins Monday. Harris will appear at a pared-down event in Milwaukee and Joe Biden will speak to delegates virtually from the East Coast on August twentieth. So the DNC has released its schedule for the upcoming scaled back fully virtual convention TV coverage has been pared down to two hours each night and all begins Monday with Bernie Sanders John Casick, amy, Klobuchar, and Michelle. Obama on night to Tuesday the speakers include Chuck Schumer Alexandria a Cossio Cortez former President Bill Clinton and Future First Lady Jill Biden Wednesday night. We hear from Nancy Pelosi Hillary Clinton Elizabeth Warren New Mexico Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham plus Kamala Harris and Barack Obama and it all wraps up Thursday night cory Booker Mayor Pete Buddha Adjudge Tammy Duckworth will all take to the stage before Then closes it all out. There's just one vice presidential debate set for this election. October seventh is when Comma Harris will meet up with Vice President Mike Pence to debate at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City still unknown is how mother will allow Mike Pence to be on the stage with a woman who's not her I'm guessing mother will be seated not too far away. So what happens to Harris's Senate seat if Biden Harris? Win. The election in November then California's governor. Gavin newsom would choose someone to fill the Senate seat until January twenty, twenty, three, my tweet suggesting congresswoman Katie Porter be appointed might just be my most retweeted tweet so far moving along as the corona virus rages across the country and Donald Trump keeps downplaying its dangers. The US government has reached a one point five to five billion dollar deal with drug manufacturer, Moderna to produce and deliver a hundred million doses of their forthcoming covid nineteen vaccine once it's approved. This is one of few big pharmaceutical deals made under the trump administration's operation warp speed their push to get vaccines and therapeutics to market. As soon as possible. Their stated goal is to get a vaccine to Americans by the end of the year. Meanwhile, Russia is looking to beat that timeframe and says, it's unproven vaccine could be available to other countries by November, but medical experts worry there isn't enough data backup at safety or effectiveness. The director of the national. Institutes of health issued a staunch warning against trying to release a vaccine. Earlier than safely possible for political reasons saying quote cannot be allowed to happen Donald Trump listen up. Tuesday was primary day in a few states including Minnesota where congresswoman Ilhan Omar easily won her primary against four challengers most notably beating back her main opponent Antone Melton Mo- by more than fifteen points. But on the other side of the coin in another high profile primary controversial Republican candidate Marjorie Taylor green known for her support of the Cunanan conspiracy theory that asserts that trump is fighting deep state Satan worshipping saboteurs who traffic children for sex. She won defeating equally pro-trump neurosurgeon named John Cowan. Green was ahead by about fifteen points. Early Wednesday when they called the race, she's all but wrapped up the election in what is a very deep red district. Now, this is interesting New Zealand's prime. Minister just into Ardoyne on Tuesday announced that she ordered a new lockdown this after confirmation of four new covid nineteen cases the country's first one, hundred and two days. All the cases came from the same household. In Auckland, New Zealand's biggest city. The lockdown will last from midday Wednesday through midnight Friday schools, most businesses, bars, and other non essential places will be closed. It'll be interesting to see if this does anything to once again eradicate the disease that had been effectively eradicated from New Zealand back in June got. And that's just a bit of what's news for now on Nicole Sandler. If you appreciate these reports, Nicole Sandler show I hope you'll consider making a contribution. My work is one hundred percent listener supported and I can't do it without your help find out more at Nicole Sandler Dot. Com please click on that donate button.

Senator Harris Donald Trump Joe Biden US Senate Nicole Sandler Nicole Sandler Dot US California Gavin newsom Jill Biden New Zealand Mike Pence Barack Obama Governor Michelle Luhan Grisha Auckland John Cowan DNC Bill Clinton
Amanpour: Dimitri Simes, Michelle Lujan Grisham and Jamie Metzl

Amanpour

58:12 min | 1 year ago

Amanpour: Dimitri Simes, Michelle Lujan Grisham and Jamie Metzl

"Hi, everyone. It's poppy Harlow on this week's episode boss files, CARA Swisher. Fearless tech journalist entrepreneur and founder of Recode she presses and she presses the biggest names in tech for answers. And a lot of the time. They hate that. But she still gets the big gets. So where did her unwavering confidence come from? I ask her plus though, she thinks we'd even be in this predicament today, if more of the big tech companies were founded and run by women, it's all on boss files. Subscribe on I tunes today. This CNN podcast is brought to you by American Express, my credit guide a free credit score. And report and other tools to help you take charge of your credit. Your credit score is greater than a number. It's your story. Hi, podcast listeners. It's been a week since the Muller report was released but its impact is far from over. I talk with Dimitri Simes the Russian American CEO of a Washington think-tank about what landed him in the four hundred page report. It's a really rare opportunity to talk to somebody who's actually named in that report with such knowledge of the Russia portfolio. Then the field of twenty twenty democratic presidential candidates is getting full an only expected to grow New Mexico's governor the democrat, Michelle Luhan Grisham joys to break down the current state of the party and the major issues facing her border state, and perhaps people across the country, and Harry has a fascinating and chilling conversation with Jamie mezzo about how DNA can be hacked for design a baby's enjoy the show. Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. President Trump says that he will fight congressional subpoenas to have his officials testify on the hill as House Democrats pledged to carry the mantel of special counsel, Robert Muller's investigation politicians, and lawyers and investigators are still picking over this report. And today, we have the rare opportunity to speak with a man whose interactions with Donald Trump's presidential campaign Jemma spot in that to volume tome Dimitri Simes immigrated to the United States from the Soviet Union in the nineteen seventies. And he would go on to run the center for the national interest. It's a Washington think tank that specializes in Russian affairs in April twenty sixteen months before the election candidate, Donald Trump gave his first major foreign policy address at an event affiliated with signs think tank, according to the special counsel it was at that event that Russian Ambit. The SOGA kissing the ad met, Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law and told him, quote, we like what your candidate is saying it's refreshing. It's just one of many interactions between signs and the Trump campaign. So to understand more. I'm joined now by Dimitri Simes who's joining me from Washington, welcome to the program. Thank you very much. So look, I mean, it's really interesting to have you to talk to tonight because as I've said, everybody's still poring over this. And we all want to know all the details. So here we have you tell me from your perspective. Just give me an overview short of the investigation itself. Well, this was a very humorous investigation. Clearly, quite deliberate. A lot of people involved who is manufactured sauce CT. I think that from what I understand several conduct people. In Washington alone were interviewed several dozen oil were subpoenaed to appear before the grand jury Newseum. You know, anyone else from the center of the national interest was one of them as the investigation concluded conversation who is special counsel people. And they were very nice saying king me, and my colleagues for our effort and said that they were Saudis that we had to go through this right and the hoped that if we see each other again, it will be under more pleasant circle. Stances tonight told them that while it was not my favorite form of entertainment. I understood that they were doing woodsy was supposed to do in their ear is sought. They were quite professional and responsible, right? So Dmitri, you have a great way with words and the great flourish. And you've given us a very interesting perspective. Were you interviewed? You say neither me know anybody from my think tank was quote, interviewed all subpoenaed. But you'll conversation. I mean was that an interview was the special counsel Robert Muller there? Did he ask you questions? Let me let it clear did not say, or at least I did not mean to say that. I was not interview obviously was interviewed. I meant that we were not taken to the grand jury to the next stage. We were witnesses were not a focus of the nation. No. I did not meet Mr. Muller personally. I met one of his deputies and several attorneys. Beijing school. Oil and system, and how extensive was the interview how many times did you sit with them over how long how much did? Well, I mean, we know from the from the report that they asked you loads of questions, but how long did it take? Well, I would rather not discuss specifics. Because understanding was that neither side would go into any details. And I'd understand investigation is over. But I also don't stand there will be investigations focusing Ghana's. We absolutely no reason to think that there will be any additional interest on us. But all I can tell you that I sought the interviews were extensive deliberate conducted inappropriately tough manner, but very professional. So let's go through sort of picked by some of the main building blocks. You obviously had contacts with Jared Kushner, and you created a relationship of sorts with him. How did that happen and described to me the nature of that relationship will think that the first things that needs to be served? The Muller report makes absolutely clear that means to me knowing descent of initial interest is a received any messages from the Russian government, didn't oh the campaign Albro messages rooms are complained to the Russian government. I think it should be stated very clearly adults that it's not my impression of what the special counsel. So about our all it was what the special counsel said very clearly at the outset of discussions, they interaction with us. And in terms of. Mr. Kushner, your skin, colour image. I'm asking you the extent and the nature of your relationship. How did that come about? You know in those months before the election campaign. I went went to Time Warner building. You know, it is in New York I entered the room, which was a dining room set colo- to Jeff Zucker, president of CNN who was there at part of a small group of people invited by Time Warner for a luncheon with our onery, chairman Kennedy Kissinger kitchens, you delivered a short talk and indicated his support of the center and encouraged us people also to be involved with us. We did not invite and you guess ourselves. They away invited by Time Warner Mr Kouchner was one of them. She was well known to them. I was not aware of human toll. He introduced himself. We had the conversation. It was on the aftermath of kitchen just presentation. And then we discussed call it to set in. Point. If I am in New York, we could get together. And then there was a follow up on Mr Kouchner spot. And we got together. I'm obviously, you describing kind of editorial meeting editorial board meeting, which is quite common and it's regular regularly done at various media corporations. But, you know, the Washington Post describes for instance, you as the Trump campaign's or the Trump teams Russia whisper up, what do you think they wanted from you will not see in this particular statement by the Washington Post, it is entirely false and offensive because first of all was not whispering anything to them. It was talking to them quite openly. And there's a role in the Princess of quite a few others, including a number former senior officials so it was. Wolman was very much an open book. The second thing is when your ask about what they want. I think it would be better to ask them. But you know, I was on your show in the past. I wrote for the New York Times for the Washington Post on many occasions, and that kind of sinkers at the people who are looking for him. Why expertise not only on Russia, but on foreign relations in general publisher and CEO of one of reading American foreign policy publications the initial interest, which by far as the greatest presidents of internet in terms of eight years, American or international publication. I don't think that it's appropriate to imply there was something unusual about the compaign being interested in talking to me. Okay. So let's just break it down. Then because there was clearly something enough inch. Interest that the mother investigation and the mother team talk to you and mentioned you quite so this just taking, you know, point-by-point then at one point in the report it says the u provided bullet points on Russia for Donald Trump to us is that accurate. Do not remember that particular portion of the report, but I did communicate with a campaign. Some of my colleagues people not associated to the centers, well, provided multiple impetus speech. It was agreed that she's fast speech on foreign policy would be delivered under the center almost Pacific law magazines, initial interest or specific, and they were interested in our input into speech in preparation of the speech together with maniacs organizations in Washington. So from this standpoint our involvement, my enrollment was spefically appropriate and normal for Washington syntax, and they don't seem to demolish reports imply Denison girls. About the speech at the Mayflower, which all of us covered because it was the first major Trump candidate foreign policy speech, and we all want to know what his priorities, and what is focused was going to be. We know now that Richard Burr, the former US ambassador to Germany, also, I believe a director at CNI, the think tank yours helped write the speech, and this is what he has said about it. And it's just play a little bit of a let's just play a little bit of what Trump said in the speech. I believe an easing of tensions and improved relations with Russia from a position of strength. Only is possible absolutely possible. Common sense as this cycle. This horrible cycle of stability must end. And ideally will end soon. Good for both countries. Now, obviously, I assume you agree with that. And that was clearly a part of the perspective here. But I just want to ask you a little bit about how this came about. Because again, it says in the report that you received subsequent draft outlines from Stephen Miller who is a prominent Donald Trump and remains upon prominent Donald Trump advisor, and that he and CNI executive director Paul Saunders along with Richard Burt spoke to Mila by phone about substance substantive changes to the speech, again, how appropriate is that. And why was that that degree if you will of kind of micro managing of this speech? Well, first of all, there was absolutely no micromanagement comes the speech to the extent that I did not when she is the final version of the speech. So I did not know what would be in the speech before it was delivered by by Mr. Trump, and I'm sure the disabled through with Mr. Saunders. That's what I thought. And I'm busted the bet when you ask appropriate. I will tell you. I think that, you know, Washington, and you do knows that Washington think-tanks are not only entitled but fully expected to help to the candidates and to assist them in developing programs in statements. It is a process with many participants. And it doesn't LSU MD is that if you helped in this process that means is that they went along with all your conditions, and that are responsible for speeches, which are not have seen before they were actually deliver. Just a very. Quick issue. He had me something tanks. Avowedly partisan others are not yours claims to be nonpartisan. So I guess what I want to know is why did you feel that you wanted to reach out and help this campaign? And was it like Russia felt you know to make sure that Hillary didn't win. And maybe there was be a different policy from the United States towards Russia. Well, say I you describe the beginning of Russian American will I was born in Russia. I am an American citizen since nineteen eighty and they think that by far the greater part of my life, and settling practical all my career took part in the United States. And you know, what I think when titled to an American who was born in Russia, and that's exactly how I feel and incidentally, when they feel and the Russian TV that's always how a position myself and Calway. Being user point number one point number two. If you're would look Damola reports, you would know that we help star inch a couple of dinners with a number of leading foreign policy experts. And there were chairs they were kind of presided by Senator session school late. Of course, became attorney general sessions for your understands in each of his Dina's where we provide our input to compaign fest. Everyone who attended his dinners with an exception of me who was a former here official or at least three or four star. General this dinner, civil included former director of national intelligence, second son of people who took part in the dinners at should or not Trump supporters at all they ended up being Cutie Clinton supporters. But we invited them to take part with a clear understand. Adding that we would not be called advisor to campaign is that people who take part in this DNS would not describe themselves as vice to complain. But we would be decades compaign, and which one final point eucheuma ask me, why wouldn't you do it for Hillary Clinton Wickham? Unlike chiller Clinton on a very senior level, unfortunately, she could not do it. But a month later, we had Tim Kaine who became of course, Hillary Clinton's running mate. No, just being speaking at the center being owner, the dissenter delivering the foreign policy speech and before that he spoke twice at the center. So we genu- new Andom partisan. Okay. You know, obviously, I've been reading things here to you that that that point out that the Senate did advise the campaign, and you also obviously arrange for instance, at that speech introduced Donald Trump to the to Sergei Kislyak the Russian ambassador. I mean, there are all these issues. You might call perfectly normal. But nonetheless, they've been raised in the course of this investigation. But I do actually to your points right now. Want to ask you them? Why you know, I assume having been Ocelot lot by the Trump campaign. You seem to have said to Jared Kushner that certain to close contacts would be quote, bad optics. Let me read you a paragraph from the Mahler report, the golden lot of attention Symes. That's you raise the issue of Russian contacts with Kushner advise that it was bad upticks for the campaign to develop hidden Russian contacts and told Kushner both the campaign should not highlight Russia as an issue and should handle any contacts with Russians with care. So you know, unpacked that for us because it seems to basically be your answer to some of the issues that people are asking you right now about the exceptionally close contacts with one campaign, which is the Trump campaign. Well, I I think that. The special counsel has described where a fairly my input to the Trump campaign in my suggestion that they should not have any secret contacts with the Russian government and more broadly is they should be extremely careful about any contacts with Russia during the campaign. I myself was not even a single time in Russia since Tramper became a candidate and till two thousand seventeen when radio was president. My view was that what Trump said about the personality of a better relationship with Russia from the position of strength is that it was appropriate. I did not think that he was always describing the reasons for this interest in a better relationship appropriately. When he talked about putting praising computing, calling Kim brilliant. I thought it was not what. The US interest was about the interest was about in having a relationship with another great nuclear power, which would allow the United States to have a normal dialogue and incidentally to extend the major substantive input. I suggested that Russia should be described more as an adversary that we should focus on continuation of American alliances boss Nate in Europe and US alliances in Asia. So while though I sold that what Trump for saying the mayor respects was refreshing and constructive, but I was simply did not agree entirely with his approach in particular with us rhetoric. I just very quickly. A given the way everything is unfolded over the last couple of years since Donald Trump has become president. Do you? Do you have any qualms or questions, and I'm not talking about Russia because we know that Russia into. Feed in the election. Do you have any qualms about that? You think it was the right strategy of the Russia's sought to help a President Trump in this in this election. Glad that you have a Smith. I wasn't a Russian TV this morning and reminded them again about the interference in US elections and the cost of this interference. I said many times on a Russian TV when I was invited to be the that. I think that the Russian interference was serious ordeal and came into considerable cost. I think that Zohreh this interference is described in the special counsel report is again, objective and well-documented. What is in dispute is why they were doing it? In the special counsel deserves credit for sayings of the Russian interference correction started not in two thousand sixteen not even in two thousand fifteen but in two thousand fourteen when Russia's settler was not aware of. Branding and becoming president. You could see from Missouri interactions to Trump with his business organization is ever not doing Trump any favors kill tomato. Less moment is option in most Moscow was that Hillary Clinton was very likely to win. So why was the Russians interfering? I cannot quote, you particular document, which I can cite as a kind of explaining all of this document coming from the Russian side, but they could numerous conversations in Moscow, and that things that this conversation's they impression which got is widely shared by US intelligence community impression number one is Russian wanted to respond to what they thought American interference in elections into your role in Ukraine in two thousand eighteen they sold that it was the payback time and they were doing in their own clone distant individually, often not very effective manner. Second is. Really despite Hillary Clinton, they were not so much thinking about coping Trump, but they wanted to do something to the Hillary campaign to retaliate against personality sold that she was particularly hostile to them. And that kind of retaliation was a part of the immigration. Okay. So I've got one last question that I need to ask you on that. Because clearly we know that Allah Gatien's the Trump administration was seeking so called oppo like on the Hillary clamp campaign and in this big volume one on the Russia collusion investigation. It says in the report that you offered Kushner details of quote, highly questionable connections between Bill Clinton and the Russian government. But in here, it's redacted. So you want to? Enlighten us. Well, what is not reducted? Of course is where good this information clearly the special counsel when he said that we will not delivering any, and I was not delivering messages for most co is made very clear, they did not think that I got any information from the Russians which relate to the campaign and in this, but equally instance in that paragraph is they mentioned who I come alleged. Leitch wasn't my sauce away could mentioned a former very senior intelligence official who before it was a Heaney national Security Council. Official. I it so happens that this fischel have just done an extensive interview with the Washington Examiner way goes for the confirmed that he was my soul is he'll was the one who brought this situation to my attention. It could nothing whatsoever to do is Russia. All right. It was talking to somebody who was forty member. We wanna feed the member of the community. But Dimitri Simes has been really interesting talking to you. Thanks so much for joining us tonight. They go. Thank you. Tired of spending hundreds of dollars for prescription glasses. Our friends at Zanny optical offer, a huge variety of high quality stylish frames and state of the art optics starting at just six ninety five. You can get multiple frames with this great pricing for less than one pair. Elsewhere start building your eyewear wardrobe from the comfort of your own home at Zanny dot com. With the latest trends in eyewear available and hundreds of frame styles and materials there isn't a better way to change it up for every season. Plus is any offers prescription sunglasses. Incredible prices visits any today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. That's Z E N N. I dot com slash C. N N. I'm Biagio Messina. And I'm jokin soon. We are the producers behind the H L N television documentary series unmasking killer. Join us as we explore the identification capture and arrest of Joseph James, Di Angelo the alleged Golden State killer in a special ten part podcast series unmasking killer, all new episodes premiering Tuesday. February twelfth subscribed today at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. The cases we gotta find who wrote this note, we do that. We find the killer. This science defined out. Police used Luminol a chemical which close when it comes into contact with the iron component in blood that drama, but where was the rifle, and which man was telling the truth for renchik files. The legendary true crime show is now a podcast. Join investigators as they take on the toughest cases with cutting edge scientific tools. Subscribe now with apple podcasts with new episodes every Monday and Thursday, you'll never miss out on getting your forensic fix. Now, we turn to one of the rising democratic stars will help define the party's future. Michelle Luhan Grisham became the Democrats. First Latina governor in the nation when she took office this January in New Mexico and quickly made national headlines when she ordered all national guard troops mobilized by President Trump withdrawn from the border in her state. She said her state would not quote, take pod in the president's charade of border fear mongering around the same time. She released this ad for her policy agenda with her own take on what to do with those walls. I'm Lou hunker. Sean New Mexico's forty ninth and employment and fiftieth for schools. We got a bus through some walls to make changes. Create public and private partnerships to rebuild our infrastructure. Really more apprentices and skill drinking. And the billions in the permanent fund to invest in schools and small businesses. And here's what I think of Trump's wall. Well, governor Luhan Grisham that is one heck of an entrance. Thanks for joining us from Santa Fe. Let let me just ask you very clearly. Yeah. Let me just ask you used to be a congresswoman, you know, all this Muller report is is being poured over in congress and what to do next. What is your take? What should congress do particularly the Democrats in charge of the house right now? And how should they respond to President Trump saying that he doesn't want any officials going even if that called? I think that the Democrats in congress are absolutely on the right track by focusing on accountability. We'll give nothing else. Muller reports showed a presidency in total disarray with the most outrageous unethical behavior. These are not standards that can hold in a democracy, and the Democrats in congress have got to use their majority to make sure that they continue to get information that allows them to hold this presidency and this administration accountable. Lemme ask you them because you bring up the Democrats clearly we've went out seeing a field of some twenty two democratic declared candidates. We know that form of vice president Joe Biden is going to announce tomorrow just give us your impression of the candidates, the quite different policy focuses, and what do you think the people want? For from democratic candidate in twenty twenty. Well, I'm going to do the last part of your question. I I mean, we're going to see what people want from these candidates as we go through the primary process. But I think that we're seeing clearly that there is a robust set of efforts to show that we've got policy ideas, the right kind of credentials that integrity ethical behavior that problem solving while most of them have specific nuances that are different between their educational platforms. And they're making sure that we are fully engaged in a democracy by voting what we're gonna do same day. Registration like, we're doing New Mexico, those kinds of issues, they're all focusing on the economy, college, affordability, dealing with healthcare, and that I think is gonna play out productively because Americans want these issues addressed and they are not being addressed. In fact, they're being worsened. In every way by this president so bring up that Willis talk now because that brings up the immigration issue and the border issue because you are a border state, and you have been very critical of this wall idea and of all that's going on and the tragedy of two children in your state who died because of you know, all sorts of issues with detention and other. It's really a real live issue. You all in New Mexico, and you ordered the removal in the withdrawal of national God that had been sent from other states into your area. How big a problem is it for you. Well, I do wanna talk about the challenges at the border New Mexico, if you will has become a Ellis Island, and we want to take that issue seriously, and we're not going to shy away that it presents significant challenges. But here's the difference. I'm leading the state with great support from incredible new Mexicans who are rising to this challenge and responding to a call for action. Unlike the president who is fear mongering who's creating tensions at the border who will not negotiate who will not work with congress will not invest in the issues that would prevent the kind of mass migration that we're seeing today will not do anything about dealing with serious problems like human trafficking and drugs coming into the United States in any number of areas, including the post office. Instead he wants to build a. A wall. So he declared he tried to declare a national emergency and tried to use our resources in order to justify that political rhetoric. Instead, the national guard isn't needed because they can't do immigration enforcement that is an unlawful act. And so I was refusing to participate in that where I am absolutely on the ground. Unlike the federal government, I have homeland security on the ground doing communications setting up a law enforcement support to our state police who were also there because having an influx of people creates a public safety challenge. We have nonprofits and local leaders and mayors providing housing and transportation and got my department of health who's providing necessary of medical services. I mean, these are folks who were dehydrated, and I can tell you what we're not doing. We're not putting toddlers in cages, we are working to make sure that we are respond. Bonding to a very real very real humanitarian crisis that this president is participating in and helping to create by refusing to hire border patrol agents, having them adequately trained keeping ports of entry open and allowing asylum seekers to seek asylum correctly inappropriately and providing visas on the front end and investing in the problems in these countries who are facing horrific violence, I expect congress to continue to work on that to secure the border to invest in smart technology, and in the personnel that makes a difference there and my state will participate in cooperate fully with those evidence-based smart reasonable, national security security and border security issues. And I'm not gonna teach treat children and their mothers as a national security threat in my state. You also just mentioned green energy and clean energy. New Mexico is a fossil fuel rich state. And you're in the midst of a boom that an oil boom, but you also have Oude to take on the issue of climate change. This is one of the one of the videos that you had during your campaign. Let's just play it. You don't see a lot of candidates for governor out here. Much less willing to climb a twenty six story ladder, but Michelle is no usual candidate as governor. She'd required that New Mexico. Get fifty percent clean and renewable power. She'd sell energy to other states to create jobs here conceal invest in job training. An apprentice shifts to teach these skills to more workers New Mexico should be leading on clean energy Michelle's got the guts to be a great governor. So that puts you your climate and environmental credentials out there. But since you become governor, you talk, you know, you continue to talk a lot about it. And you'll one of more than a dozen states sticking to the international climate demands from the Paris accord, but you also have got a windfall from fossil fuel and you've been able to invest a huge amount in education, which is a huge priority in your state. How do you balance the desperate needs of your state, which is some of the poorest results an infrastructure in education? And money that you need and you're now getting it from fossil fuels right now. We are. No question about that. This is the state. That's always been right about balancing interests, making sure that we invest, although I inherited inherited pretty desperate situation where we didn't try to move the needle in any context, including supporting an all of the above energy agenda, which allows us to do responsible aggressive work to combat climate change. So we're we are now leading the nation in carbon-free. We said by twenty forty five our largest utility company says that they could beat that by five years. It's the most aggressive agenda in the country, plus renewable portfolio standards that only can be matched by three other states in the country. And we're making that transition, and we make that transition by making sure that oil and gas is clean as it can be that they reduced their carbon footprint. That we have real teeth and our oil and gas oversight efforts, and that we're doing methane mitigation which creates jobs in really focuses on making sure that we're reducing our greenhouse gases and greenhouse gas emissions. We are all working together. We are demonstrating that you can take very very desperate right and significantly challenging issues. Mary them in a productive way. That allows you to make a real difference in your state, and you're exactly right. We took four hundred and forty six Billy billion. I wish a million dollars into public education and early childhood education. Because this is the state that is ready to make the kinds of changes where other governors are coming here to see how to get things done. And I noticed that is some bipartisan governments about that leading the country. Yeah, I'm that's great, congratulations. But it's not a partisan thanksgiving. I know that they Republican governors also who are in this in this move as well, I just wanna play for you a sound bite by the international activists. Now, the sixteen year old girl, Greta Thanh, who's just been in London with these climate protests, and she addressed the parliament, and it's just just play the sound bite. And I want to ask you about public opinion. Now, thank you. Many of you don't want to listen to us. You say we are just chilling. We are under the peaching. The message of the United counting science number. Probably don't even have future anymore. Because the future was so a small number of people could make unimaginable amount of money. It was so infamous every time you said that the sky was limits, and that you live once did you hear me? It's my English. Okay. Because I'm beginning to wonder. She's so impressive. And I know kids in New Mexico of getting on this who I can just in the short time, we have left your reaction to that. Look, this is a young woman with incredible, courage, and charisma exactly the kind of positive messaging we can address climate change. And we don't do that by ignoring it. It is real every state every community every person irrespective of age must embrace the fact that the science is real, and we must pivot and the best response to a fossil fuel industry is to immediately pivot to renewable energies and just watch New Mexico become the clean, energy state and a state that gets the storage and the wind energy, right? And that unequivocally makes the kind of impact that anybody else anywhere on the planet can also make governor young people are helping us get it done. They are leading the charge governor, Michelle Luhan Grisham. Thank you so much joining us from Santa Fe tonight now while the. Democrats jostle to try and shape the future of their party, the world of science is shaking up something even bigger, and that is the future of humanity DNA is becoming a commodity one that can be written in hacked, like a piece of IT, the futures, Jamie. Mattel says genetic engineering now threatens the very things that make us human in his new book hacking, Darwin he wounded could be honest for good all descend into a new form of a kind of an arms race, and he sat down to discuss this with Hari Sreenivasan. Right now when you are pregnant there are screening tools available to figure out if there's a horrible disease a hardship that you're about to face you have. A tool in the book where you look forward and into a fertility clinic twenty five years from now. Right. And you kind of lay out the scenarios help our audience. Explain what that could look like right now, most people who are pregnant in the United States have noninvasive prenatal testing to learn more about the embryo that they are carrying, and if there are significant problems, those parents, those mothers are often faced with a very difficult choice, and the choice is to carry that that embryo to term or to abort, and whatever anybody's us are of the politics of abortion. That's an extremely painful excruciating decision for parents, but we are moving increasingly towards using technology that already exists for preimplantation genetic screening. So rather than having to make that determination. Once the mother is already pregnant, let's say you have fifteen fertilized eggs, also called zygote s-, and you can screen all of those and you. Can figure out which are the ones which are perhaps carrying deadly diseases and not implant those and then going forward into the future because we're going to have so much more information so much more understanding about our own complex genomics, the choices that we're going to make that we will make in the context of decisions made at fertility clinics is not just about disease states, but about all kinds of traits, and then beyond that, and certainly within that twenty five year timeframe, we are also going to be able to do something that we already can do but not well, which is make a relatively small number of gene edits on these pre implanted embryos, either to eliminate risks or perhaps to provide enhancements. So let's talk about that. There's eliminate risk quotient that I don't think most people have a problem with right? But then there's this enhancement idea where people do have a problem with it. Right. When you can start to say selectively say, well, I want to go ahead and. If I had if I had figured out the gene combinations for longevity, right or for height or for IQ personality. Yeah. Well, I'd like to engineer my kid to give them an edge, or at least make them baseline. If that's what everyone else is doing and a lot of people. If you ask them, how do you feel about genetic engineering? We'll say exactly what you've said they'll say well uncomfortable with therapeutic applications and I'm not comfortable with enhancement. But when you push them when you say are helped me draw the line between where therapy ends and enhancement begins. It's really really difficult because there's a gray area in many many circumstances. Let's say somebody it looks like a child is going to be three feet tall. People would say. Well, that's really sure it. It's hard to live. If you're three feet tall. There's a lot of discrimination their health health issues. Does it make sense to use some kind of genetic engineering to make sure that you have a child? That is taller than three feet on. I think people would say well that maybe that sounds right because we mean being three feet tall. That's a difficult way to live, but not not everybody would say that. And then you well four feet tall. Or what are we going to define like a specific height where that's below that height that is therapeutic application and be on that height is an enhancement, and you can go to many many traits, but different societies will have different views and some societies will vary legitimately say. We only want to address the most dangerous genetic diseases and that will be fine. But other societies will say, hey, we recognize that there are benefits to be had that we think we think as society did maybe it's better to have a higher average IQ among our population. We think that will make us more competitive. We think that will help us have new innovations that will make life better for everybody. And so there's no right or wrong answer. But these will be real choices. Once you start describing the aggregate impact of what these tiny genetic modifications can do I think that gets very scary for people to say. Well, this is what I read about in college in the Uber Mench. Yeah. Right. This is a world like was describing the movie Gatica, right? All of a sudden, we have a society of haves and have nots based on whether you had access to this technology is more likely than not not going to be equally distributed to all parts of the world at the same time. Right. So we're going to have a class or a country or county of people that would have this access and then a generation later. They're perfect. You know, six foot tall have every advantage hierarchy you, and then here's a whole country or continent that doesn't have it. Yeah. I'm really sensitive to this. You this issue? I come from Kansas City. The reason I come from Kansas City is that my father and grandparents were resettled there after the war as survivors of the holocaust victims of Nazism, and what the Nazis saw themselves as do. Doing was applying Darwin's principles. And so for me as a child in many ways of the holocaust victims of the holocaust. I'm very very mindful that what I'm talking about could be interpreted as a form of eugenics, and that's really a big deal. But on the other hand when you talk to people, and you say, would you if you could choose from fifteen of your pre implanted embryos, and you knew that two of them were going to have some kind of heritable genetic disease that was going to been sure that they die before their ten years old. Would you choose to implant those embryos and most people say, no. And that's a whatever the word is that's a form of eugenics. So we are going to have to make choices. If you're worried about genetic inequality in the future. The best thing that you can do is worry about inequality now. Because if we if this is the we've we who lives the way we do we were perfectly okay for. To be born with very little opportunity or people who are born in places like the Central African Republic who in in effect have brain damage because their mothers are malnourished. And so their chances of success at life are so much lower than than our kids. If we're okay with that now, how can we expect that we're going to be different in the future? Our government's anywhere close to creating sound policy around this given that not everybody even understands the underlying science. Yes. Oh, some governments are doing better. Some governments are doing worse and some governments are doing nothing when I look around the world, I would say the United Kingdom is probably the best jurisdiction in the world where they are addressing these issues. Very thoughtfully. They have national forums on issues like Mike Okon drill transfer. They have a very effective body called the human fertilization and embryology authority that oversees these these many of these issues that the houses of parliament have had. Full body votes in both houses on issues like like meadow country drill transfer and they have a national health service, which allows rational decisions to be made on a national level here in the United States. The FDA is certainly an excellent and world class agency. But we don't have that level of government wide by let alone population wide by. And we don't have as informed of public on these issues and that certainly creates a danger. And then there are some countries that have nothing and the danger is that certainly in countries like ours, we need to do a lot more. But as these technologies become more widespread and come to be seen as more beneficial. Even if they don't prove to be people will go to where they can get get these benefits if they perceive them as as benefits, it seems like to me, there's three groups that are likely to abuse. This one is dictators who want to create an army of super strong, whatever people. Right. Another is rogue scientists who don't really care for the ethical standards. And we're starting to see a little bit of that. Now and three his parents looking for an edge. So let me quickly dispelled the first two and focus on. So I have advised the US military on this and have talked to them as they brought a group of futurist thinkers together. And my feeling is the real competitive edge is in just super soldiers. I mean, maybe that would be would be possible. But it's kind of a waste it's competitive societies. I mean, that's the which leads to your second point of dictators that if I was thinking, I've written a scifi novel Genesis coat about this about if I were a country. Let's just call it China and my goal was to be highly competitive in the future. And I wanted to use these technologies what might do. So what I would do is. I have a national genetic engineering program focusing on. Embryo selection, made with small amount of of genetic then I would sort people into categories based on their super capabilities based on their genetic profiles. But not just military or sports. It could be business. It could be engineering. It could be math. It could be all sorts of things and then put them into the equivalent of Olympic sports schools, but in all of these different disciplines, and then see who does the best and have a pyramid of these people who are having a genetic likelihood of being great at something. And then get a number of superstars in those areas and invest huge resources in building national champions. So that rogue scientists we've seen that in China last year, John que-, who is certainly a rogue. Scientist extreme doing extremely irresponsible. A work in my view of genetically engineering what became these two two Chinese girls, but they won't have the incentive to do to make these kinds. Of changes on a population wide scale. So they're going to need some kind of mechanism behind them which leads to your third category. Which is parents and everybody would agree that the kind of state sponsored eugenics of Nazism, or what happened in the United States is wrong. But this is going to be very different parents are going to demand these services, particularly once they see if and when they see that there are benefits to be having these benefits would be reducing the roughly three percent risk that parents now have that their children will have some kind of harmful genetic abnormality. And that will be a big driver. But also conferring certain kinds of advantages. I have a friend in Korea and his eleven year old daughter has twelve tutors coming to the house every week in Korea that they had to pass a national law closing their cram schools at ten pm because people are having their seven eight year old kids going to these cram schools seven days a week past midnight to prepare for college entrance exams. They were going to take a decade in the future. And when I asked his friend. I said if you could select your pre implanted embryos to give about a fifteen percent IQ boost to your kids, would you do it. And he looked at me like, I was some kind of idiot. How about everybody would you know that you would they do it. And again, he looked at me like I was like it was like, obviously who wouldn't do that. And so I'm not saying it's right or wrong. I'm just saying some people, and parents are going to want to do this and some parents and maybe countries won't, but there will be real consequences for those decisions. One of the things you keep coming back to his pre implanted embryos, which leads me to ask. Well, we just be having sex for pleasure. Not for procreation. I'm celebrity number of articles on the end of procreative sex. And I believe that whatever the year thirty years from now twenty years from now conceiving of child through sex will seem as dangerous to people as not vaccinating your children is today. Because when you think about it, not vaccinating your children, that's very natural like nature didn't invent vaccines. We developed them and again conceiving a child through good old fashioned. And sex is very natural. It's actually been a great strategy for our species and for all sexually reproducing species. But there are dangers associated with sexual reproduction. And we are going to be able to reduce and in some cases, eliminate many of those dangers, and that will be a choice, and so right now people are carrying diseases that won't exist twenty years from now or thirtyish registers like when you see somebody with polio. If you see a child with polio. What do you think you don't think? Wow. That's terrible fate that that kid has pull you you think we'll something went wrong because kids aren't supposed to have polio. And there'll be lots of genetic diseases and disorders that in the future. If you see somebody with that thing, you say white how did where did the system breakdown because humans in large part aren't getting those diseases anymore. You know, there's going to be someone who safer Jampel lives with a family member who has down syndrome. That's going to say listen. That person is an incredible human being they've grown up with these challenges and the way that we're designing these systems in the future. Aren't we valuing that person's life less than in a way, the compared to a much more perfect or normalized personal without any of the possibility of getting that, right? It's such a valid, and it's such an important question. And I've spoken with lots of down family families in preparation of this of this book, and certainly for any child that exists with down syndrome. They have the absolute right to be given every opportunity to thrive like everybody else and many parents with down syndrome feel that their children are true blessings, greater blessings, then and other children, and they are they are right. And so I would hate for people to feel that that what I'm talking about in the book and elsewhere is any way denigrating. With down syndrome or other disorders. But we have to flip the question because the question that parents are going to be asking is you have fifteen pre implanted embryos, and you could pick to implant any one of them, and you have all of this information. And you know, let's say two of those embryos have down syndrome, would you if it was a choice, would you affirmatively? Choose to implant the embryo with down syndrome when down syndrome, we know. I mean, we know all the high functioning children with down syndrome. There are lots of health risks associated with down the lifespan of people with down syndrome is on average less than than than everybody else. And when I framed the question that way to down parents, it's a different kind of conversation. But I'm really mindful that I because if I'm saying or if the implication of what I'm writing about is that we are going to have less incidence of down syndrome in the future. Which is just a fact. It's already happening. What does that mean? What's the message to people who already have down syndrome, and we just really need to be incredibly sensitive on those on those issues who owns our jeans, and one of the things that is underlying all of those is that we all have to be screened. We all sat right have it in a lab, etc. Cetera who owns I guess the parts of me that make me who I am. Right. And how do I have some atonomy right giving that away? So the easy answer. But it's too easy is obviously you own your jeans, and no one can take them from you. And yet we have ten million people who've done their cheap, cheek swabs and signed a little form and sent their genetic material to companies in many cases with no protection. And that these companies are then selling your genetic information to big pharma. And that's. A real issue. People don't recognize that your genetic information is more valuable to you than your Bank information of your credit card information because in the United States, we have a genetic information nondiscrimination act which protects you against discrimination in your health insurance, but not in your life insurance. So imagine if you sent in your cheek swab and your life insurance company buys it. And they know more than, you know, about when you may die whether you're likely to have a long life or a short life, that's really valuable information. And so a country like China that has very poor privacy protections could conceivably have a tremendous advantage in acid accessing these big data pools. And so there's a conflict between the personal need for privacy. And the societal need for this information to be shared the reason why I've written this book is that we need to begin imagining where we're going because we have huge decisions that we're going to need to make now. And we're really going to need to think deeply about who. Are we what are our values? How are those values expressed in the decisions that we are making today that will in many ways determine how these technologies play out in the future? Jamie mental. Thanks so much for joining us. My pleasure. Provocative. Indeed, that's all we have time for thanks for what chain by from London.

President Trump United States Russia president special counsel Robert Muller New Mexico Michelle Luhan Grisham Jared Kushner Dimitri Simes Washington Hillary Clinton Russian government Trump congress Washington CNN Santa Fe
Best of 2019

The Children's Hour

58:09 min | 8 months ago

Best of 2019

"Thank you to our patriotic listeners. If you haven't yet become a patriotic supporter go to Patriotdepot DOT COM slash. The children's hour. What do cats like on a hot day? I don't know why Mace Cream cones they started slowly wasn't the only who could right but don't worry there's no hurry time menu seen Xena all part of living something new not always know what to do It's good to get out of our comfort zone. Music helps us when we feel low number of grace now now face now. Learning to kid in this now started slowly wasn't Win Right but don't worry there's no hurry top and you'll see the it's all part of Levine's something new nod always knew what to do. I guess it's good to get et out of our comfort zone. Music illnesses feel now lines in my face up to make it in this Set off man. This is the children's hour. I'm Katie stone that was recorded at the East Mountain Library on September seventh two thousand nineteen today on the children's hour were taking a re- listen to some of our favorite clips from two thousand. Nineteen Seth Hoffman. Join US for a show that was live before an audience of kids of all ages including including commissioner. piss cody. She's the Burnley. Oh County Commissioner for that region. which is a mountain town? Just east of Albuquerque and we wanted to to find out what are some of the differences between city life and mountain life. I'll tell you it's tarantula season the tarantulas are coming out they will. We'll be all over our roads and a couple of weeks. I just imagining listeners. Listening from other parts of the country and thinking way Tarantulas visa visa that hood thing. It's definitely a thing and do you drive over them and squish them. I try not to squish them. Don't squish the Tarantulas Angeles. But what I do always wonder is because I see hundreds of Tarantulas on my road. I'm like where are the rest of the year. They're probably in my yard yard. Oh yeah have have anyone here in the audience. If you have say say somebody have you seen tarantulas out here. That's a mountain thing Tarantulas French snakes snakes snakes. What kind of snake we big bull snakes and they can be really long like five six six feet long and we love our snakes actually because they eat rats which we also have a lot of? Wow so east. Mountain living living is like snakes rats tarantulas. What are the great things about living out here in the east? Should we know about well. We have some really great things to we. We have we have the sunshine. We have the mountains we have all the great open spaces. Great places to hike or ride your horses. I have three horses and so so just the outdoor recreation is the best we have. All the seasons out here are summer was really nice and hot. But it was hotter in Albuquerque. Rickie so out in the East mountains. We're we're usually about ten degrees cooler in the summer. In the winter we get snow days. water water everywhere in died. Adopt a spare water around the ground ball air air raid never goes away those on your baton tap into your anonymity Bernita to clean. Bobby McLean for thinking that with us. Typically Bobby Bobby import you help judy out with these. Do you could try to. The words aren't hard. You did a good job. Well you can take a shower. You can wash your hair. You can wash your clothes Washer tabby bear but really clean. Water is getting rare in Bonn Sabin a bit dated to me panel a Ford you journey with news again Gab do Good job now. I could use your help in a different kind of way on this next part. I'm going to leave out. The last word of every couple braces and your job is to to figure out what the missing words are and jogged about good loud. Finish my sentences for me so are you ready. That's what I like to here. The rain water the flood water turns dirt into sometimes owners blue sometimes sometimes water's dirty but we like water clean typically for you ought to be clean boarded a last chance in two nine two of a kind was recorded in our sunspots solar studio in the fall of two thousand nineteen today on the show. We're taking a look back at twenty nineteen and some of our favorite things that happened. We're going to be playing music from live. Shows where bands were performing alongside of our crew. Last winter we talked act with some seven eight and nine year olds from the global warming express. Now you are experts at this point in clean energy. Would you explain what you mean. By clean. Energy Clean. Energy is something that dozen pollute route any our environment or like doesn't send carbon dioxide into the atmosphere so what what kind of energies are considered clean well. An example is solar energy and another example is Hydro Electric Hydroelectric Electric like collecting the energy off of a river. Is that how that works. That's pretty cool. Yeah and there's also wind energy. Can you talk about why. Why is it so important to have clean energy in addition to not spewing carbon dioxide but what what is the next? Why is it so important it will help us succeed made in to trying to make this earth better place trying to get it more into a stable place where we can actually try to save it because because earth is kind of in a crisis point right Nara were global warming is kind of taking over? Explain that use you guys use a car. Co Two from your cards cards. The gas inside your car. In lifts up to into the air and creates an atmosphere around our Our Earth and then when the when the Sun reflects flexible it it makes Earth really hot in some places. The climate change is like an Antarctica where some penguins and some some polar bears and the North Pole to their Over the snow or their icebergs just melting under their feet and the cubs can't Get around without their moms and the MOMS are drowning. It's sad and so the solution you are saying. The solution is within reach. We you just have to commit to doing more clean energy. Is that what you're saying. What are you guys GonNa do? We're talking to politicians. We're talking to the public trying to get them to vote for politicians that will Make good decisions for our climate if we don't act soon. Are we at a place you said we're in a crisis when you were talking about it and are we in a place. Where if we don't act soon soon really bad consequences will happen for your future is that is that why you're so engaged in this? Yes yes are you worried about your future yes yeah See are the politicians are just when they're talking about making us kids Like giving us a better future whether stealing our future in front of our very eyes. It's like they're just saying okay. Let's burn fossil fuels. It's it's not good for our earth and they're stealing our future right in front of our very eyes and you want them to stop doing what politicians do. Well as as you're talking about clean energy they can try to change to clean energy and tried to like do the simple things like recycle and compost and stuff like that. Yeah you know I was studying clean energy before the show and I was looking at how energy is consumed consumed and you know some of it is flying in airplanes and driving cars yes. A whole lot of energy is consumed in manufacturing and in business in fact more is consumed by big industry. How do we convince them to go to clean energy? How do we convince them? it's worth the cost of investing. We just kind of have to talk them and tell them they don't have to have a choice like if they want people all to live after they're gone. They have to stop doing that now. And they don't have a choice to say. No we have to tell them. They can't say we know they have to do it. It almost seems like the cost today might be large to feel large and seem large. But if you look at the cost over time you guys when you kids are all forty and if we don't do anything we're we're in big trouble we're in very big trouble. It's not it's not like we can trash. The planet then moved to Mars. It's we need to keep this planet healthy healthy clean. We can't just move to another planet. I mean scientists are trying to figure out if we can try to move to a different planet earth. No we can't just abandon our earth like that. Mother Earth gives us a lot of things food water fun and then by repaying. Her Burgess trashing it and that's not fair for her or for the earth it's just not and it's also not fair for the animals because it's not just us on this planet it's us in its animals and it's bacteria and plant and it's it's so many things so many things so we can't move everything to another planet you're listening to kids who are from the Global Warming Express cactus tractor fun Yoshi by bill too so you didn't see nationally. Nash created. Yeah Yeah Art in a team. Oh okay You space you have Bro God and and then spraying and uh-huh ah ah they McCann in the It is yeah. Dan from from a taxes tractor on the children's hour. You're tuned to the children's hour and we're playing some clips that are from the best of twenty nineteen sticking with the subject of climate climate change and the fall. We had Dr Dave Guts Ler. WHO's a climatologist? Is there any way to stop climate. Change Nope it's happening bening rapidly right now and because of the Greenhouse gas emissions. We've already put up into the atmosphere. That's not going to stop anytime soon. However there's a lot we can do over the time scale of decades to to slow the rate at which were emitting greenhouse gases and make the effects of climate change much less going out got into the future so when we talk about climate change policy? It shouldn't be thought of in my opinion in terms of stopping. Do things right away but more in terms of long-term on the scale of your lifetime Trying to do what we can to minimize the amount and rate of climate change. That's going on. What are some of the things that we can do to help? Well locally we all of us can do what we can to reduce our footprint on on the on the world and on the environment So we can try to use energy and water conservatively Everything we do you to make our lives more efficient and in terms of energy consumption And water consumption Helps to reduce use our impact on the environment over the long term over the course of decades if we really want to do something. Globally to reduce the rate of climate change will have to cooperate across the whole world and make a global double commitment to reducing our greenhouse gas emissions. You're listening to the children's hour. That was Dr Dr Dave guts learn from the University of New Mexico's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences before that cactus tractor recorded at the Albuquerque Botanical Gardens Fantasy Garden. We're doing some of our favorite clips from twenty nineteen. The children's hour is listener supported. Kids public radio produced used by the Children's Hour Inc a nonprofit dedicated to producing high quality. Kids public radio. Learn more at children's our dot Org Wolf is a proud supporter of the children's hour. meow wolf creates immersive experiences. The transport audiences of all ages into Kaleidoscopic thicke realms of story and exploration learn more at Biao Wolf Dot Com. You're listening to children's hour is probably great. We'll be right EH Yeah in nine you Auntie do see you are me. That's why you don't do. You mean that's that's what I said I am you. Don't you say I am you. That's what I said I had you Army don't you interesting because don't you in a the report so the take me inside inside my we were you. I said you don't seem to care about take a it off. Yeah you me off head inside my reports from the sub spying on you. Aw Inside Research Search search side John. Aw Aw coach was the albuquerque piece choir and before that Rob Jennif- a middle school teacher and an incredible violinist both the piece choir and Mr John were guests on the show. We did at the open space visitor's center back in June of two thousand nineteen today on the children's hour. We're taking a listen to some of our favorite clips and music heard in twenty nineteen in January. Our kids grew went up to Santa Fe New Mexico to interview our newly elected governor. Michelle Luhan Grisham. We wanted to find out. What role does a governor play in government today on the children's hour we have governor Michelle? Luhan Grisham Here with us. I'm Leela Allen and I'm Sienna Allen describe the job of a state governor and the balance of powers hours between you and the judicial the legislative branch. Well so we'll do the latter question. I we operate much like our founding. A father's for the US Constitution that. If you're going to have an effective government with write checks and balances. Right you've got policymakers the legislative branch. Those are our representatives and state senators Then you have to have an executive so they set the policy and then I have to implement AH policy so it's my job to take every idea that they pass and if I think it's a good idea I sign that bill into a law and I have to then meet the requirements environments of that law so I operate the government and then the judicial branch is really that check and balance there. The oversight function make sure that if there are challenges challenges or questions about. Who's doing what that there's someone who can make a final decision And you have that kind of accountability and oversight so so all co-equals were all independent. I can't boss them around directly. They can't bus me around. It is really the hallmark of an effective effective democracy. Otherwise you have all the power focused on one person or one entity and it is not a fair representation to the people that you are serving so I think it's very effective model and I get to do the fun work to implement all these good ideas. Uh Home Salomao Window and they saw the zone saw armageddon maximun so sweet. Little girl snuggled sideshow McConnell. say food but it saw. Oh Aw aw as say. Don't think it's strange records on even song you go and Faded jeans you get your dreams just Vangelis Song Sky Sunburn. Zombie Lonely Cincy in Iraq by the same social net though serve some new got a laugh bad afro man. I say third things seem so long stays say it say the guards on so favorite saw faded jeans. John Chains Take Your Gun Vandross of Song Song was say bidding in some Nasca thought when you run is sued on even and zero consume you. I just John. It's you charge faded. It'd get trains just ahead. Let your good Samantha dates and Lisa. Donald on the children's hour performing at a library in Albuquerque in two thousand nineteen eighteen in the background the youth jazz collaborative in a live show. We did at the outpost performance space coming up one of our crew members. Emma stone is a young woman men with cerebral palsy and back in April she had something to say to our audience about her disability. It cerebral palsy is a group of motor disorders. It affects over seven hundred sixty four thousand people in the United States alone there are several types of CPA that can affect a person in their lifetime. CPA is most common among young infants and children around and ten thousand babies are born each year with C.. Cerebral Palsy is the most commonly diagnosed childhood motor disability. In the US. I perform this poem yesterday at my school. And I'm going to perform it for you today. I wrote it myself when I was a child. I was diagnosed uh-huh. CPI what does this mean. It means. I'm different unique and I'll be different for the rest of my life unseen my right hand and right side sometimes ZAC strangely. Most people don't notice or even see it changes me. CPI doesn't always affect people this way it's spectrum like any other disability okay. I CanNot Count The Times I've been told you can't do this. People can be ignorant to the way those words impact forwards hit. Sometimes I dream and pretend my right hand in works because I'm so ashamed that it hurts hurts to feel this never ending disappointment that I'll wake up and remember my joints and close my eyes and call my mind and breathe. I remember I am not alone. There are thousands like me Sesame Veronica Wyatt people. I only see every other year. They are like me. They have the same fears. I am not alone and this is what keeps me going. I am not alone and I am not slowing slowing my practices to get stronger and louder. Because this this who I am and I could never be prouder mm-hmm burn allowed me the fire and the from the children. I'm tryin talk to you and don't give up. Don't give up don't give you don't give letcher on in the sapling melillo roots steeped as as we are Tom. Storms push against I by adding we take we. They don't give a dome dome. They don't slower metabolism humans. This into the songs inside your hire support is all around you. We will never be a pie in. Don't give up they don't give Don't give Yeah that's Eileen in the inbetween from show at the outpost performance space in Albuquerque. Kirke New Mexico recorded in the fall today on the show. We're doing some of the clips up the best of the children's hour some of the things we love the most that happened this ear on the show while we were at the outpost. The director of the outpost performing space has a tiny little chee-wah name Maxi and Max is a singer owner. Really right here on the children's hour south a couple of jokes for you guys. What does the cloud were under his coat? I don't know why thunder what kind of music scares balloons pop music. What do you call a toothless spare? I don't know I a gummy bear. Why can't dogs dance by two feet? Did you hear about the population of Ireland. It's Donlan Marquette. The Mary Dean and now for a silly little song about our big silly dog. One Day Rolling Rolling Data Pumpkin by them Mustang gave him a tummy ache aged rolling data. Pumpkin Pie and Now for a silly little song about our big silly dog one day role data data Pumpkin by them Mustang it gave him a tummy ache at one day role data Pumpkin Pam Roll Twenty. This show is made possible. Thanks to generous support from the county of Bernallio Burn Co Dot Gov and thanks to listeners. Just like you. You're listening to children's our kids rate right Rohan McKinsey within original tear. That was recorded at the Museum of the American Military Terry family and to harass New Mexico in November in honor of veteran's Day you're listening to the children's hour and we're doing a show that some of our favorite clips from twenty twenty nine. This past summer we sent one of our kids crew members Sienna to the Santa Fe opera. First off what is opera. That's a really early great question. Santa can I ask you what you think operas I and we'll see if your idea opera myopic idea of opera lineup. Well I think that most kids think that. It's it's a bunch of people in crazy costumes singing but I don't know what it really is crazy costumes. A lot of times. That happens and singing like that that kind of way that we think opera singer saying Anapa fide and really like large sound. That is a a big part of what we do. My idea. What oper- is is three things? Opera is story and music. It's spectacular nature bigger than life and and opera plays with time. There's temple disparity it wasn't incredibly fascinating experience to go backstage and to understand what it takes aches to put on an opera and to get behind the scenes tour during opening week from the Santa Fe Opera in Santa Fe New Mexico for the children's hour. I'm C. Alan My my Falcon is one of the children's our crew members playing the entertainer. The Scott Joplin song for us at the Las Vegas Library Ashore. We did back in the spring of two thousand nineteen. We're playing some of our favorite clips from from twenty nineteen. There actually were so many. It was really hard to choose what we wanted to put on this show and interview that Julia did with a World Renown Award winning poet and author Kwami Alexander. Take a listen. I'm Julia and had a couple of books by Kwame Alexander including his his newest one the undefeated and I'm honored to be given the opportunity to talk to him today about his stories so Alexander. Can you tell me a little bit about your a new book the undefeated. Why inspired you to write this tribute? And why did you do in inverse. It's a pleasure to be here. I wrote this book because I wanted to write a story worry about the journey of African Americans in this country. I wanted to write a story about the history of America. Erica wanted to write a love letter to America and I wanted to do it for my daughter. WHO's now ten but in two thousand eight when she was born? Our president was Barack Obama. And I thought wow my daughter's being born into a world with an African American President and I want her to know how we got to this point and so I decided to write this poem about it which was almost like a prayer and it was for her to to be able to Have as proof of how we got to this historic moment so I wrote it as a poem. It was called an American poem and over the years. Ears kind of evolved into the book that we now have which is called the undefeated and now we have this This really just beautiful book of the historical figures depicted in the book. Who Do you relate to? Most there are extraordinary. People in this spoke like Langston Hughes and Michael Jordan and Billie holiday and Madame CJ Walker and ordinary people who are nameless. But you know they remind me of my great great grandparents. They remind me of my grandparents parents. I think was really cool about this book is that there's like tragedy but there's triumph there's pain aim but there's progress and hopefully we all can be inspired by this journey. This story as my Angelo says though we you may face defeat we we must never be defeated. And that's something Julia I think we can also learn from mm-hmm in your Eh. Oh Aw aw uh-huh aw. Aw Aw Go on uh-huh Bomani. Uh Oh oh Oh oh tie cow home I bet to own Eh John Paul Steven Toya Roya and his grandson and his son at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in a live show that we did there the summer. We're playing some of the best of twenty nineteen on the children's hour and this fall we got to go to a world music festival with more than fifteen hundred kids in the audience with the band that wrote the theme music for the brand new PBS. Show Molly of Denali Bomb Ua there from Alaska and their native band and we just loved what we heard. Sir Uh hey we her you are we will ah do being ooh Charles should we not. It is By the yeah yeah they are not woo eh Through tonight we the whole mouth UH the game blue being we we take off. We Lina Tina got a vacuum cleaner. Dropped around gotTa back. got a vacuum cleaner. Manchego in downtown is a single mother with a teenage dawn such drives around plead in cleaning down Mead King of the guilty Lina need. It's the same with the teenage daughter. Uh Dr Plead supplement that income Draft Downtown Donald draft picks downtown take Anita pita the seen some ups and downs cements announced smaller rounds but she keeps search keeps a good attitude she gets a vacuum cleaner. It can clean it in the background Joe. West and friends recorded the neons Wolf in Santa Fe in February of two thousand nineteen children's hours written by me Katie Stone with a lot of help from the kids on our crew. Thanks for listening to our best of twenty nineteen nineteen show and Children's hours produced by the Children's Hour Inc a nonprofit dedicated to producing high quality. Kids public radio. Learn more at children's our dot org support for the children's hour provided by listeners. Just like you. And by the county of Bernallio New Mexico burn earn co Dot Gov. meow wolf is a proud supporter of the children's hour. Towel Wolf creates immersive experiences that transport audiences of all ages into kaleidoscopic realms of story exploration meow Wolf Dot Com support also provided by the infinite gesture fund at the Albuquerque Community Kennedy Foundation and by the Living Refoundation. Our theme music was written by C K. Barlow we'll be back next week for another edition of the children's hour our children our.

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The pick to be Joe Bidens running mate could very well be down to a two-woman race

Meet the Press: The Lid

04:35 min | Last month

The pick to be Joe Bidens running mate could very well be down to a two-woman race

"Welcome to the LID from the press. I'm Mark Murray well. The field of top candidates to be Joe Biden vice presidential running mate is getting smaller. And you can make the case that it's become a two woman race. On Thursday night Amy Klobuchar withdrew from consideration to Joe Biden's pick. Saying that this is a moment to select a woman of color given George Floyd's death, and the black lives matter protests across the country. Club exit from consideration follows other democratic women who've removed their names including Nevada Senator Catherine Cortez, Maskco, and New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen. While NBC News has identified at least nine women who are in contention to be Biden's running me. The ultimate pick could come down the to Democrats California. Singer Kamala Harris in Florida Congresswoman Val demings. Now if you follow politics, Harris has become an obvious front runner. She's well known. At fifty five years of age, she represents a new generation. She's African American and she's run for President before, so she's gone through the vetting the negative stories and the scrutiny that comes with the presidential bid. demings however isn't as well known. And Sixty three. She's younger than Biden but older than Harris. But demings brings other strengths to the table. She's from battleground Florida. She's a former police chief which might have extra resonance in this current. News Environment. She's a mother grandmother. An avid motorcycle rider. She got. Attention is one of the house impeachment managers against President Trump. In like Harris. She's a woman of color. Harris versus demings is an interesting choice. California versus Florida. Former state attorney, general versus a former COP and police chief. Senator versus congresswoman. Now I'd be remiss if I didn't mention that. There are more than two women under consideration. Including other women of Color you have Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth and her former military service. Atlanta Mayor Kisha Lance bottles. Who's been in the news lately with a tragic shooting death of Ray Sharpe Brooks. Former Obama National Security Adviser Susan Rice New Mexico. Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham. Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin. And, of course, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren. And I can already hear the complaints now mark if the V.'s stakes, race is between two women right now. Aren't the top contenders. Comma. Harrison, Elizabeth Warren, and it very well could be. But because of Massachusetts Republican governor. Because of the special election to fill any vacancy in that state, I've always believed that if Warren was going to be the pick, it would have to come sooner rather than later. To time the special election in November or get the Massachusetts legislature to change his vacancy law. and. If Biden's pick is really going to be a woman of color and especially an African American woman, then the two leading contenders could very well be Kamla. Who's been the front runner for a while now and VAL demings. WHO's a longer shot, but someone definitely keep an eye on. That live for us. We'll be back next week. Be sure to download us on your favorite podcast APP. Be Safe be healthy and be well. Hey. It's Chris. As this week on my podcast wise. Is this happening I? Sit Down to talk with Marian Kaba about what it would be like to get rid of prisons and policing altogether restorative justice is, people would say a set of ideas, ideologies visions of the world that determined the ways in which we will interact with each other went. Harm occurs. It means that people who were harmed are centered in terms of their harm, being seen and valued and address it. It means that bystanders are called to be part of encircling that person, and it means that the person who's harmed is also called in to take count ability for what they've done, so it's a very different model than the adversarial system that we currently have harms occur in the states intervenes in this case, the idea is that you have a community of people who will intervene this week. UNWISE US happening. Find wise is happening wherever you get your podcast subscribe now.

Joe Biden Kamala Harris Senator Elizabeth Warren Senator Jeanne Shaheen Senator Tammy Duckworth Senator Tammy Baldwin Senator Catherine Cortez Florida Massachusetts Senator President Trump Amy Klobuchar George Floyd Mark Murray Governor Michelle Luhan Grisha California NBC News Democrats New Hampshire
Hard Factor 3/13: Congressman Rodney Davis Joins To Talk Nickelback, Plus A Lightening Round

Hard Factor

17:28 min | 1 year ago

Hard Factor 3/13: Congressman Rodney Davis Joins To Talk Nickelback, Plus A Lightening Round

"Wooded you Joe, man. Randy savage this factor in the risk. No one that does better. Like now what he does a better repeat myself. Go ahead told me something right now. Moderate. Another episode of heart back there. It is Wednesday March thirteenth, and we have a very special episode today. We've got a very special interview in house, Pat, Mark and west are going to take you on an interview with congressman Rodney Davis, a famous defender of Nickelback from Illinois. Yeah. See I of March, right? There's no thirteenth of March. Is that what it is? Is. It is the ides thirteenth Saint Patrick's Day the seventeenth. I I think the ides thirteenth. I'm not sure you might while dropout. And don't know that what we crossed the Rubicon and got our first congressman, let's talk about congressman. So I don't know if you guys were there last week when fifteenth of March. Our boy Roddy. Davis Representative rob Rodney Davis from Illinois. I don't know if you saw last week, but he took to the house floor and defended Nickelback publicly when one of his colleagues from the democratic side of the aisle compared Nickelback or fans of Nickelback or the amount of their of them to a level of who would support that vote. Exactly they were trying to say not a lot of people and Davis came in and said, I love Nickelback we have that guy on said, why would you insult one of the best bands of the nineties? But here's very important. What we did with him during the interview his favorite song favorite Nickelback song. And it's on his running playlist is if today was your last day. So we took the lyrics of if today was your last day, and we incorporated them seamlessly into our question. So if you hear that means that we are trying to incorporate a leering from that song into our conversations tried to trick them. And see if he got tricked did. All right. Yeah. That'll be fun. And then I'll take a lightening around other headlines. Take it over to the interview. Welcome to the show a Representative from the thirteenth congressional district of Illinois serving in DC for over five years. Now is that correct? Congressman little six, but feels like ten little over six thirty go. He's our here's Roddy Davis. He's a three time election champion an internationally famous defender of Nickelback welcome to the show congressman Rodney Davis. Thank you guys. You know, what my daughter who's in college? Now thinks I'm cool because I'm talking to you again. There you go. That's all you really want to do as a father it. That's great. I finally made it actually come home and see me again. So let's get into its recently gotten a little bit of debate on the congressional floor with a Representative from Wisconsin. And I think it started as a discussion about the census and ended up as a discussion about Nickelback. Can you explain to us what happened please, you know, what I was on the floor for a few hours debating Bill that was just a disastrous Bill, and and all of a sudden, my my buddy, Mark PO can't from Wisconsin decided to come in. And and talk about an issue that you know, I disagreed with him a little bit on. And then he had the audacity to compare a poll that had been run to Nickelback fans or very very much a lack thereof. So I defended Nickelback actually Nickelback fan, I'm a, you know, the child of the eighties, but I really liked the nineties and early two thousand music to who doesn't I must have had seventy nineties rock CDs. At least we've looked at your playlist, and there's some there's some great great selection throwback. I sense the sarcasm in your vote. No, yes. So we're just going to jump right in so Catholic, right? I am what did you give up for Lenz and wasn't Nickelback. Or was that just too hard to do? When you gotta play list like mine, you can't give it up when you're working out. So I'm trying to give up foul language, but it's not working to you came on the wrong podcast. We'll swear. Around you, sir. But so I gave up I gave up alcohol clear alcohol made from grain. So dislike I can only drink wine and potato vodka tequila. So I wanted to go against the grain going against the grain is the way of lifer for us at hard factor in me personally. Budweiser drinking right now, you wouldn't have I couldn't have it. It's made from grain. That's with the grand not again. Wind energy. Oh, no corn syrup, but we also on a diet. So we have to drink Miller lakes. It's got less carbs. That's true. We're down two hundred pounds congress. So real quick might my best friend gave me the best advice. And it was about picking your battles. Did try and fight. Mark PO can after his Belgian comments about Nickelback. Or did you let it slide? If that day was his last day tomorrow never came, you know, he'd never had this debate again, right? Exactly. Not sure what you're talking about. Congressman I'm confused. You gotta get good lyric. The rest of the alphabet ask you what you think about who could be the Nickelback of today, what about imagines could you say goodbye to yesterday embrace the new style of mega rock bands. Like, imagine dragons. I've I've never heard of a magic dragon. No, I got another one for you. This is this is Mark. Have you gotten a oh sees autograph yet? No, no. I met her. I've met her one senior almost I you know, in state of the Union Day, my guest in her guest. And I am AFC. We almost ran into each other turning a corner in the capital. So. So I get a chance to introduce myself and talk to her talk to her guests at the state of the union. You know, she's been elected by her constituents. Just like I have. And she has a right to be there though. I don't agree with some of the things that he puts forth. Brad to have as part of congress. It's nice that you say, she seems like the type of person that would donate every time she had though, but whatever congressman in your opinion, leaving no stone unturned eight anti office, who's your favorite democrat on the hill. Man. I got a lot of friends on the democratic side. You know, Marco can is as a good friend of mine and the guy that we debated with Jimmy Panetta, California. I mean, there's a whole host of folks, you know, I really miss the new governor New Mexico. Michelle Luhan Grisham that governor Michelle could play the best practical jokes on everyone. Classic New Mexico Virginia, Texas, any a congress people from Virginia, Texas, those are states that are cool. We've lived into you know, answers. No, absolutely not. Now, a lot of good people from Texas in Virginia. Very one thing that we feel really a strongly about on this podcast is is the legalization of marijuana. What is your stance on marijuana? And how how do you vote on that issue for states rights? I think the states that have decided to you know, via referendum or via, you know to the lawmaking process. Have the right to to be able to try to legalize marijuana? And as a matter of fact, we ought to be able to make sure the federal government can't come in. And and take away the the banking opportunities for those companies who operating legally within those state laws, you know. I I for for many of my Republicans who wanna talk about states rights until it's an issue that they may or may not agree with like marijuana legalization in states like Colorado, Washington and others congressmen. Are you saying that when Merrill one is legalized federally that you'll smoke do with us. Oh god. No. I'm saying is right now. Absolutely not. You guys should be talking about some imagine dragons stuff. For sure hold Budweiser. At least it's good because I mean, so Illinois doesn't have legal marijuana. So the first step, you, take the longest stride. And and getting your opinion out. There is really important for the legalisation. So we really appreciate your support. Hey, don't be talking about Budweiser during lent, man. Hey, real quick. So you ran against and beat Miss America winner. Erika Harold we're things cordial during the racer was the kind of thing where you just leave old pictures in the past and pretend like she was like any other opponent. She's much better than a photograph than I am, obviously. Yeah. You're a good friend of mine. She does a great job. She's an attorney and fan or Bannon, and you know, what she's, you know, one of the folks that I hope as we move ahead. She's one of the future Republicans where we can begin to to rebuild our majority not only in Washington, but in the state of annoys people like her that need to continue to stay engaged in politics. What would you say to your constituents if today was your last day in office? What is the most pressing issue for the people in the thirteenth district of Illinois? You know, the most pressing issue is making sure that we're able to continue to grow jobs in our district. Make sure we keep the unemployment low because God knows you guys doing this. Cast isn't gonna make any money. One day you're going to be on them employment. Made sure we can find your good job. Appreciate that. Villanova or do you wanna move the Texas? More catches moved Illinois congressman back to Nickelback real quick. So we all saw the playlist, and we know that you work out to Nickelback. But let's be honest. Have you ever made love to Mickle back? Not that. I can remember it was that good. Hang on. Let me ask my wife. Yeah. Yeah. Laughing in the background. No, it looks like a member of the veterinary medicine caucus. What is that? Do you guys read a bunch of complaints from Petah? Oh there. No. I just wanted to get it free para gloves that they use on large animals. Did you see what Peter did on Stevens birthday crocodile hunter crocodile hunter Steve Irwin? Oh, okay. Well, I mean pitas got their own opinions. I don't necessarily agree with them as a big stake last night. Thank you. How'd you cook? Your state, congressman, medium rare. You oh, I'm I'm a medium guy. I'm a liberal cauliflower steak and. I like my steak is rare as they come. Pat, Pat is the resident liberal in the show. Yeah. On the punching back have you ever gotten to meet with Trump directly one on one Louis? How does it go? What what what's it? What's it Trump meeting like actually, really good? I mean, he's he's somebody who, you know, wants to get things done. He's actually pretty funny when he's when you're meeting with them one on one or small group, and you know, what it's always great to go to the White House. You know, too many of these folks that that wanna play politics out here. They don't wanna go to the White House. They don't want to sit down with the president. Heck, I would've sat down with President Obama. But he never invited me the President Trump and his team. They're good people, and they really wanna make things better for the country. And I'm glad I got a chance to work with them. How long have you shake hands for on average? Hold onto a handshake for a good ten seconds. Oh god. No man has hold on the pretend seconds kinda weird. Damn right. President trump. We kind of have a bet going on how much you ways. What do you think he weighs? 's are one sixty five if you cut them in half. Oh, he's probably to sixty something. I don't know what you guys look like. So I can't harass you. We don't look great, sir. I could sense the app. Yeah. Maybe in the nineties when I was listening to Nickelback. But not not now. Hey, seriously. Thank you. Rob me on it's an honor. And Mike might think I'm cool again. Well, thank you. Hopefully, we can help in that in that small regard. And we're glad that you sense to the apps if you ever get to be president, you got invited to the White House is that a deal. Oh, guaranteed. But as long as I get a callback number. So when my kids don't believe me that I talked to you, you guys gotta verify we're gonna give you PF t- commenters personal cellphone. That'll be cool for your kids. Ask them about that. They'll like it. All right, sir. All right. Let's take it to the lightning round. Usable lightning bolt. And I do not apologize for that. I up Brexit continues to be an international laughing stock as Theresa May's second. Brexit deal was rejected by parliament by one hundred forty nine votes on Tuesday, close one real close. Just squeaked it out to reject. It apparently Brexit slated to become even more drawn out and boring than it already is thanks to upcoming legal delays gonna face. So Wes as the Brexit expert. Would you care to comment? Not really I mean, it's it's clear that she is just failing miserably. So that's pretty much the only take away you can have from this vote but west what's really going on with Brexit can exit. No, well, the EU wants. The Great Britain to come up with a great plan, and they're not supporting it so far. So that's what's happening. There you go. That's our resident Briggs expert expert opinion on Brexit. Cardinal George pal of Australia got six years in prison for sexually assaulting a group of thirteen year old boys. He caught drinking wine long ago. Six years for the whole group group yet, I don't know how many words in there. But three years of boy war too. A year caught them drinking wine, and then he used that as his molestation. Here's what happens little that drink wine. Yeah. This is what happens in one of the kids got them sound writer. He has to serve at least three years and eight months of that sentence behind bars, except he's definitely going to appeal. It a sea of lawyers. So who knows what will really end up facing the end who is financing. This bullshit these lawyers. Imagine the church. I mean, the person has ever been employed by right? He should have to serve some of it with the fathers. Oh my God. That's what should happen Melissa child. You gotta do at least a month your time. And I'm sure the fathers would volunteer to be there. They would happily take a month off work at least an hour. One hour on our the damage will be done. Then. News broke on Tuesday about a multimillion dollar scheme where parents could pay to get their kids accepted into pretty much any college. They wanted by falsifying learning disabilities to be able to cheat on the SAT's and ACT's. Okay. So did you guys catch that all that what happens there? So did it mean like they got to take an easier version let let me tell you as a child with a learning able to get special testing conditions. Right. Get you could cheat longer period. Marked you remember when we drove together to the SAT's, and then you left early and I said go on without me. That's because I have a learning disability. And I was untimely. It didn't work as they would say for me gave you gave me more time to to fail. Shitty answer. I had more time to fail it with a guy. Like already wasn't good second guess yourself. Anyways. That's what this guy was doing for them, except I'm sure yet other ways they would sheet to the guy who ran this company called the key. That's the name of the company he had famous clients like actresses, Felicity Huffman, and Lori Laughlin the compla- themselves in the movie you guys getting your SAT's just out of curiosity. You're really wanna talk about that on the air kind of one and a higher than you. I'm sure we'll get. I'm not going to say what they got. They know what I got. We don't know what you got. You're really outside here. You would you didn't graduate with us based on the Brexit? I'm going to one thousand eleven ninety. I've got the exact same SAT score north eleven ninety nice that which makes me feel bad for some reason. They're they're they're younger. They looked that was on the twenty four hundred points. Finally, Michael avenue took to Twitter to inform the world that as of February nineteenth. He's no longer. Stormy daniels. Lawyer so thank now. Now, he does it you needed to know that information every good ride must come to an end at some point. And that's it for hard factor. Thank you for listening and following on Twitter and Instagram and get ready for another live power hour this Friday night from headquarters, featuring PF commenter or think we're doing a civics quiz with Marty mush and much more. Most importantly have a fantastic day. Arrive. Fans be. Back last. I I. To say.

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What I Learned from the 2018 Midterm Election

The Point with Chris Cillizza

07:50 min | 1 year ago

What I Learned from the 2018 Midterm Election

"Support for the point comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans who are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate showed approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part. If rates go up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down, you're right. Also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash the point tired of spending hundreds of dollars for prescription glasses. Xeni offers thousands of affordable. Eyewear styles starting at just six ninety five. No ridiculous markups. No hassles. Just quality affordable. I wear delivered right to you visits. Any today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. Welcome to the point. Pour Wednesday November the seventh the day after the election. I'm Chris cillizza cutting through the political spin bring you the news you need to know. All right. Let's get right to it. As you may. Or may not have heard the twenty mid-term elections were on Tuesday night. It is not Wednesday night. I have not slept. But I am able to bring you seven things. And I think we should learn lessons or take away from the twenty thousand election. Let's jump right in number one the year of the woman. So this was an election in which female candidates and female voters mattered, hugely more than a hundred women incumbents and challengers who won will be sworn in to the next congress. That's the most ever the previous record was eighty five. And if you're looking for why Democrats took over the house, you don't need to look any further than women. They made up fifty two percent of the overall. Electric and they voted for democratic candidates over Republican candidates by nineteen points. Take number two a Trump referendum. So Donald Trump's are went back and forth over the last week of the campaign over whether or not this election was a referendum on him. And I think actually for both good and bad for Donald Trump. Eat was the bad in the house. He was very unpopular in suburban districts with women as I just detailed and that hurt a lot of incumbents trying to get reelected in the suburbs of Miami. And Kansas City and Minneapolis Saint Paul and Philadelphia that was a problem and Donald Trump was that problem. But on the other hand, this was a referendum on Trump at a positive way. When it came to a lot of those Senate races were Democrats were in states that Donald Trump at one by double digits Trump made three stops in the final day of the twenty eighteen campaign on Monday. He went to Florida where Rick Scott appears to be. Be the winner over Bill Nelson. Although that race isn't called yet. And it's likely headed to a recount, but Rick Scott's ahead. He went to Indiana where Joe Donnelly lost to the Republican candidate, Mike Braun, and he went to Missouri where incumbent Senator Claire mccaskill was defeated by Republican attorney general and Senator elect Josh Holly. Donald Trump also helped the North Dakota where Kevin Kramer beat Heidi Heitkamp in Republican areas. Donald Trump helped number three takeaway Mitch McConnell is still the smartest guy in politics. Look say what you want about Mitch McConnell over the summer. There was a lot of panic when Tennessee and Texas looked like states that Democrats might just be able to steal didn't happen, Marsha Blackburn. One in Tennessee. Ted Cruz beat Beto Iraq in Texas and McConnell, never panicked. And as a result. He's going to have a larger Senate majority in the next congress, which means more wiggle room, less dependency on placating moderates, like Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski, and probably even better working. Relationship with this White House. Takeaway, number four Sherrod Brown. Is someone democrat should listen to more? So Donald Trump wins Ohio by nine points in two thousand sixteen Sherrod Brown. Democratic Senator has his race called almost as soon as the polls close on Tuesday night. How did he do it? Well, he did it by running a mid western populist, and I wanna read something he said because this very interesting when it comes to maybe shared Brown in the future, quote, let our country our nation citizens are Democratic Party. My fellow elected officials all over the country. Let them all cast their eyes toward the heartland to the industrial midwest to our Great Lakes, and we will show America, how we celebrate organized labor and all workers the waitress and date in the office worker until Lido the nursing Columbus, the mine worker and can shocked in that is the message coming out of Ohio in two thousand eighteen and that is the blueprint for our nation twenty twenty and quote eyebrows, raised I think shared bound be an interesting darkhorse in two thousand twenty take number five the twenty twenty race started tonight. Okay. So I've already mentioned Brown but Kirsten gillibrand of New York and. Amy klobuchar in Minnesota, both won election convincingly. No one expected that they wouldn't same with Elizabeth Warren in Massachusetts. But it shows they will use these races these Witcher's springboards, financial and political and from a policy perspective. I think to run I think you're gonna see a huge field. It's an include a number of people who got reelected to the Senate in two thousand eighteen number six takeaway, all of Democrats big national rising stars got wiped out. So look quickly name the three biggest challenger names on the democratic side in the twenty thousand election, you almost certainly named in some order Beddoe Aurore can us Andrew Gilman, Florida and Stacey Abramson Georgia. Well, Iraq, lost Gillam lost and Abrahams is very likely to have lost though. She's not conceding it because it's possible that Brian Kemp the Republican nominee his vote share could could maybe drop below fifty percent. And then there would be a runoff in less than a month's time. But remember the politics aboard a vacuum. There will be. National rising stars for Democrats coming out of this election. I would suggest Gretchen Whitmer who just got elected governor in Michigan Jared policy new governor of Colorado, the first openly gay man to be elected governor and the new governor of New Mexico. Michelle Luhan Grisham all think all those people people keep an eye on and my last number seven takeaway Republicans won the biggest governor's races in the country. There were two governor's races. I think that matter more than any others, Florida and Ohio Republicans won both. And I'll tell you. I think they matter more both are huge swing states in twenty twenty. And you always want to have a governor's political operation, helping your nominee. Donald Trump will now have that the other thing both of those states will be at the center of redistricting. The once a decade redrawing of the nation's congressional lines having the governor in that seat. In your party means your party will likely fare better in that redistricting process, and that could make a big difference in just those two states in the battle for control of the house in. Thousand twenty two and beyond. That's all the news. You need to know for this November the seven four much more police on it for my daily Email newsletter. We're gonna keep it going, even though the election's over CNN dot com slash the point sign up. There a Senate he Monday through Friday by seven thirty PM eastern time. You can also subscribe to this audio briefing, Stitcher. Spotify apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcast, and you can call it up under Google, home or your Amazon echo device. Before you go. We wanted to let you know that we just launched the ability for anyone to advertise on CNN podcasts. You're just a few clicks away from reaching millions of people in a way that you never have before advertise for a business event or kick off an awareness campaign for your brand start today at pure winning dot com slash CNN, integrating podcast into your marketing. Mix has never been easier. Go to pure winning dot com slash CNN to get started.

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Monitor Show 08:00 07-11-2020 08:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | Last month

Monitor Show 08:00 07-11-2020 08:00

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