19 Burst results for "Michelle Li"

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:05 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"It's got all the mellow drama. It's got the emotion. It's got the surprise. Yeah. I mean, honestly, I have literally been like, I don't know anyone in, I mean, I'm sure that there are, right? But I don't know very many people who've lived with their biological, like I've lived with my sister. I helped her move to Seattle, and she lived with us for a while. I put her on a dating app and she goes, oh my God. Yeah, but telling you Michelle. You know what? I need to be me here. It's just. No, no, I've got my own story. I mean, I love hearing adopte stories and like, you know, the twinsters, you know, that story, right? I mean, the two, oh, there are two girls. I shouldn't say girls because they're not girls anymore. They're women. They're identical. And I think one was adopted by family and friends. Yes, I do know that adopted by a family. Yeah. And it's weird that I said when you were telling me about Dan and I said, is this name, Dan? 'cause I literally, that was in the back of my brain. And it just came out. I probably haven't seen one of his DNA K and, you know, YouTube videos for like 15 years or something. I mean, it's been a probably maybe not 15 years, but a long time. So it's just weird how you store all that stuff in your brain because you want to see other stories like yours so much that you're like that you hold on to those. So anyway, that's just me thinking about Dan. I'm going to spend the rest of the night. I will definitely send you the link to this episode. Thank you so much. You've been running on empty here. You've had a long day in the middle of sweeps. And we had to jockey our schedules in order to make this happen. Yeah, but I so appreciate you. I appreciate who you are, who you've become, the role you've had in the Midwest, representing Asian Americans. And.

Dan Seattle Michelle YouTube Midwest
"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:37 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"That was my fantasy too. When I was always, yeah, and it's interesting because his twin brother, his parents, his story, I'll send you the episode. His story is his parents had twins, and he was very sickly, and so his birth parents, they were struggling with life, and they said, we can't possibly take care of him. So they were already married. This is the same day. Dan Matthews. Yeah. I know him. So he's kind of made a career out of his early part of social media. It was Dan AKA Dan, right? And that he got reconnected. So I had to ask him, it's like, so your parents, they were already married. They kept one and gave you up that's like, how does that feel, right? And he's like, yeah, it's hard. You know, I'm very grateful for the family that I have. Kind of like what you said. And so I think it's extra level weird when you find out you have a twin anyway. Genetically, this is my clone. And then to compare what things do we have in common, you know, and that kind of stuff. But he had made a lot of peace with it. And, you know, I'm always glad when I hear that. Because life is hard enough and then to try to navigate life with all these kind of extra challenges. There's an old saying whatever doesn't kill you can make you stronger. And you know, he's now a rapper and he produces other people and all the kind of stuff. And so, you know, I think all of us, regardless of our stories, we bring that stuff with us wherever we go, and so the fact that you have brought it back to the Midwest, it just kind of ad libbed it into that New Year's Day repartee. That to me just is signs of that you've just kind of re embraced all of this stuff. And a, is everyone gonna like everything? No. Yeah. Right, right, right. But you like you. You know what? You know, it's so funny when I say things like in the movement because it sounds so silly. It's not so dorky coming out of my mouth, but you know, out of this movement, so many people responded, which was incredible. And really around the world. I mean, Korea, Germany, Holland, Australia, Canada, McKinnon. I don't really feel like Canada's far away. But I was kind of shocked. And then when I started really looking at the messages, a lot of people messaged me who were transracial adoptees, a lot of people who are mixed heritage, a lot of people who might be in the LGBTQ community, there were a lot of messages from people who were like, I never felt like I was Asian enough to be a part of something and when I heard your story, I felt seen. And it's crazy to me because I don't think I'm that person, you know, to be to, you know, to help people be seen. Especially because you think you're just out there living your life, you know? And struggling every day to get your kid to school on time and get dinner on the table and get your deadline in for your stories. I have also felt empowered by hearing those stories. Because I do want to take back this insecurity that I've had my whole life of not being enough for some people and being too much for others. You know, and so like, yeah, I mean, a lot of people have lifted me up in this moment and I think, you know what, I'm tired of people telling me who I am because that's what has caused so many problems in my adult life. I've had a lot of therapy, a lot of grief work, you know, in general, and so much of it originates from my childhood. So much of it originates from just kids being kids in some ways, but also because so many parents were horrible to me as a kid too. So it's like in your adult and your adult life, you're like trying to correct everything that happened in your childhood, like these childhood traumas. And so, you know, I just hearing other people's stories has lifted me up to be like, you know what? I walk out on the street and I'm Asian. Like I go on TV, I'm Asian. I don't need someone to tell me that I'm not Asian because I had white parents. I know who I am. And I think that's the nice thing about what's happened. And one more thing, I was just thinking about this when you were talking about Dan and just having some comfort, you know, the one thing that I think is very interesting is that my siblings, they were also jealous of me. My biological siblings were so jealous. So, you know, you think that this is about you as an adoptee like, you guys threw me away. I'm here because of your crappy decisions. You know, but then you're like, but thank you. I'm glad that I'm here. But you know, you think, I'm the only one in this, you know? Like, I'm the only one who feels this. And then my sisters, like my second oldest sister home, really close with, was like, Michelle, we were also jealous of you, because we wanted to be adopted. We wanted to be in the United States. We wanted to have a car. We wanted to go, whatever. Whatever it was. And my sister was like, we wanted a family that was loving. Because Korean families can sometimes be a little harsh and our family has definitely been harsh. My sister was like, I don't think my parents, I don't think our parents have ever said that I love you. And I'm like, what? And I love my Korean parents and they do save it. They love us, but you know, when they were kids, they were really struggling. You know, they were really financially struggling. And probably and they said that my birth mother would always get depressed. You know, at a certain time of year and stuff, probably because oh yeah. You know, my birthday or something. So it's like, you know, you don't think about how these siblings, like they see the United States as this great place and everyone's rich, you know? You're a news anchor now. Right, right? You know? So they were all like torn, I think, about me too, because they were like, I wish I would have had that life. I don't think they think that now, but you know, when you're when you're a kid. Sure. So you just don't realize how much adoption impacts the whole family. You know, it really does. Here's the germ of an idea. When you do have free time, you're past sweeps. Someone needs to write up your story as.

Dan Matthews Dan AKA Dan Canada McKinnon Midwest Holland Korea Germany Australia Dan Michelle United States
"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

03:58 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Think that's exactly what it is because, you know, you put in and it's not even, you know, like you said, like I have a lot of a lot of friends who are Asian American women who have Asian American parents, you know, and immigrant parents and they are often like we relate in so many ways about searching for culture or like not knowing our native or not knowing certain languages and whatever. So when you are so intentional about bringing culture into your life and finding things that you really enjoy about certain things about culture and then bringing them in and making them new traditions and making them traditions for your families. It's just crazy because, you know, it's just always a reminder that no matter how much work you put in, it's just gonna be belittled by somebody else, right? So I guess that's what hurt because I was like, man, if she really knew me, she would know how country I am or how country I grew up, you know? I'm probably more redneck than a lot of people, if you really want to look at some of my Missouri roots, you know? I mean, I'm not like saying that with a pride. I'm just saying, there are a lot of things that I'm like, wow, okay, that's who I'm related to. And that's how I grew up. But, you know, like, it's kind of a reminder that even though I grew up white, even though everyone in my family is white, but me, I got in the world and I'm still seeing as like, that doesn't protect me, not that I would want it to protect me, but people just could never see me as like one of them. You know, or I say people white people, you know? And that bothers me. And then it bothers me, yes, like you put in all this hard work to be comfortable with who you are because there is some sort of vulnerability and risk. When you're just putting yourself out there, trying to learn Korean or trying to learn about foods or maybe going to Korean church, you know, like there were lots of years where I was like trying to go to Korean church on my own sitting there in the pews, not understanding anything that anybody was saying, you know, but then I'd be like, can I have the headphones? Oh, you don't, you don't do the headphones. Okay, well then I'll just sit here for two hours, you know? You know, we're like, you know, trying to get into like Korean dramas, you know, so that just picked up like language and I took two years of Korean classes. Yeah. And it wasn't to be an impostor. It was really to learn, you know? And see what stock and all those things and also because I knew I had this connection with my Korean family, so I wanted to try to feel what that was like. They were reminded me of them, you know? And so you put in all this work for yourself and, you know, you're just going to get criticized for something as simple as existing being variation or being very Korean or eating some soup, you know? It was just so, yeah, it hurts. It hurts for so many reasons because it's like, man, can't you just be, you know? Can't you just go through your life with either being seen or unseen? You know, sometimes in the Midwest, I was thinking like, I'm always being seen. I want to be unseen. But then you can make the argument Asian Americans are invisible in many ways too. So I don't know how much sense I'm making, really, but you know, I don't want to always take out like a sore thumb, but if I have dumpling soup, I don't think it's a big deal, you know? If I want to learn about my Korean heritage, I don't think it's a big deal. And what is it to you? So that's why, yeah, definitely, it just hurt on so many just at the core, I think, for me. One of my guests, I think two years ago, he's a queen adoptee also adopted by white American family. I think in Ventura county, and then in his 20s, went back to Korea, went to the agency, I don't know if it was holt. But discovered he has an identical twin brother. See,.

Missouri Midwest Ventura county Korea holt
"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:49 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Oh, wow. And then the remaining pages, he painstakingly copied a song out of the Bible that has like 30 verses. Oh, wow. Okay, so I didn't know if this was the content of the letter when I didn't want to supersede it. So when it came, I gave it to her. She read her dinner bedroom and she comes back and she just moves it at me. She's just like, he's such a jerk face. And I'm like, oh, well, let me see the letter, right? I think there again, her fantasy of what would be like, is she reconnecting with her birth dad? It was shattered by the reality of, you know, where he's at at this point in his life and who he really is. And so then I'm kind of left to pick up a piece and I said, I know why you're upset and you know, I just think that was very insensitive with him to just fill all of these pages. Right. The stuff he just copied from the Bible, okay? But I will always be grateful that somehow he saw fit to not put an obstacle in the way of your birth mom when she contacted him, even though they weren't speaking to say, I've got this couple, they're in LA and they're willing to take our daughter and to have an open adoption with me and he waved his rights right away, right? Yeah. So she still has that letter. I pretty much made sure she didn't burn it. Because, you know, it is his handwriting. And you never know what's going to happen, but in the meantime, I think by the time she hits 14 or 15, she had gotten close enough to her birth mother who had gotten married and then she had two kids of her own. That she's been out to stay with them. Oh, wow. You know, 7 ten days, several times. And so I see when I pick up our daughter's phone, she's got her half siblings pictures on there and stuff. But, you know, my wife and I, we don't feel threatened at all. It's just like, we're just happy that she's made this connection with the source. Yeah. Right? So anyway, adopting comes with some interesting twists and turns, doesn't it? Yeah, it totally does. Oh my gosh, that's really awesome. You know, it's funny to me that you mentioned just like having the letter, right? Kind of having the disappointment. I think that disappointment is good. Why do you say that? I found that it was good for me because it helped me live my life. You know? Because what if they were really rich and smart and beautiful and royalty somehow, you know, or whatever, like all these things and I would be questioning who I was and who I became. And so for me to just see normal people. And I hate to even say that because I always think like, what if they were listening to this podcast? But I mean, just to see regular people living regular lives, nothing special in terms of the great house or something, you know, I had nothing to be really envious of, it just had to have acceptance of. You know, like I was like, oh, we're just normal people. Now, every time I've gone back to Korea, I've had feelings where I have had different feelings. Just whatever is going on in my life, like sometimes it's like it's a really great trip. Sometimes there are moments of deep sadness. I remember when I was probably in my 20s, I went back and my sisters were just all just talking, talking, talking a mile a minute in Korean and laughing, and I was sitting there in silence like this sucks because these three young women have each other, you know, and I didn't have that. You know, and now everyone's like, you know, we're all in our 40s. So now everyone's doing their own thing. You didn't grow up with other siblings. You were an only child. I was an only child. My parents actually, so my parents actually, they were in such a small town that there was a, like, I don't know if it was like DSS, contacted my parents and said, hey, there is a boy who is mixed race and he's Japanese and we know that we heard that you have a Korean dollar. Yeah. And so would you be interested in fostering? So they fostered him and in hopes that maybe they would adopt him, but unfortunately he basically tried to kill me. And so when he tried to kill me, my parents got freaked out. They were like, it's not a good fit. So they were like, you know, we recommend that he's an only child, you know, where people can get. And they don't have sharp implementation around the house. Yeah, and that's not his fault. He was like four or 5, and I was two. And. His dad was abusive to his mom. So really abusive. So that's where he got that, I'm sure. So, but yeah, so I think that my parents were like, you know, our family is complete. We just don't, we don't need to do another. And what's enough? I mean, as I have one, I'm like, one is enough. One is a lot. So again. For the listeners, you're sharing your backstory of just your adoptive parents following instructions, trying to assimilate you, which is basically saying, you know, just help her feel like she's white. Like the rest of us, like you are, right? And so you went on that journey. What do you know? And yet you're still not looking coming across his white and especially in rural Missouri, right? And all of that stuff that you shared earlier. And I think even not adoptive Asian American kids, we go through this thing where we wish we were white. We have kind of white proximity. And then we have these rude awakenings. I remember I had this red haired freckle face little girlfriend and second grade. And, you know, that means, you know, chasing each other during recess and pulling each other's shoelaces, but then one day she comes to me and she says, you know, we can't do this anymore because your Chinese and.

LA Korea DSS Missouri
"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:24 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"I said, can you find my birth mom and the woman, she was pretty young, was like, no, that's not how it works. You've got to go back to the U.S. and then we do a search and if we find that person and you can come back. And I was just so emotional that day that I went, I think I was emotional because when I opened up my file in Korea, I saw all these pictures of myself growing up because my mom Sharon had sent pictures to the agency and then they forwarded it to Korea. So she did that in the event that my birth mom might swing by. So when I open up that file, I was like, oh my gosh, like my mom was really, you know, really wonderful that she did that, you know? So that kind of made me emotional. And then this woman was like, no, you gotta go back to America and then we do the search for you. I like just bald. I mean, I was like, you know, I've never come back here. You have to help me, you know, that kind of stuff. Yeah. And you know, they were like, I'm really sorry, we can't. And so I left that office thinking, okay, well then this isn't God tans. It's not really, you know, maybe this is not what I'm supposed to do. And so I remember I had talked to myself and give myself a pep talk like you've got to leave this year, you know? So I left. But like two days later, they called me and they were like, we've located your birth mother, would you like to meet her? So basically, the social worker. I mean, she probably was like 23 and I was like 18, you know? She went rogue. And that's how I think by the agencies I was like, don't tell people. Because she went on her own and just did a search and looked at my birth mother's name and put two and two together and made the phone call. But that in itself is an interesting story because my birth mother and my birth father were still married. I have two older sisters, and I have one younger sister. And so the story is that my mother was pregnant with me, so her third child, and my father was working on a ship. I mean, she had because we're all really close in age, so I mean, my oldest sister was probably three. My second older sister was probably one and a half. And then there was me on the way. And my birth mother was like, I've heard a lot of different stories. So that's another thing about adoption that kind of stings, 'cause you can know your birth family, but really not get the full story. But I think that she was like depressed. I think she was probably like overwhelmed. And then when no one came and visited her in the hospital, she was like, I can't do this. I'm just going to relinquish my baby. So she told her husband, my birth father, that I had died at birth. Oh, wow. So when he came back home, he got her pregnant again. And then there's my youngest sister. And we're only, I think we're only like 14 months apart. I mean, it's really, it's really not much. Now I can't. See, I said 14 months and I was pretty sure it was 14 months and then I'm like, maybe it was a little bit longer than that. But I was born in October and she was born in December, but I think she was born the next year. Anyway. And I was like, it's real close. Yeah, yeah. But I feel like maybe that's not right. So anyway, we're at least one or two years apart. So in that whole time frame, my birth mother had to tell her husband that she had lied to him for 18 years, and then together they had to call my two older sisters back home from college and tell them. You know, I mean, it was a really traumatic event for them. And then they actually took like an express train or something from Busan to Seoul. But because of the way our tour was scheduled, I literally was on a bus to go to Busan. So we missed each other. So they were like, you know, several days of like trying to reconnect and eventually we met in Busan and that was wild. I mean, it was just totally wild, but. No, was it just your birth parents? Or was it also some of your birth suits? Oh, it was everybody. It was my first time. Everybody. Did you see physical resemblance with yourself? Not at first. No. And that's what's funny because even if you don't want to, you still kind of think like, I bet my Korean family is rich.

Korea U.S. Sharon Busan Seoul
"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:08 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Those will not be used to wash cars. Now, in particular, there was this outpouring of support and people were sharing foods. In fact, when you and I met on that Instagram Live, and you were asked to talk about that, I was like, you know, I don't remember eating Chinese foods on new year's because my parents are second gen, but then I married a third gen Japanese American from Hawaii and like clockwork every year's day. She's up before my daughter and I and she's making this soup. It has mochi in it, right? And then it's got the daikon that's sliced and it's made with the dried shrimp with the broth and then we have little sweet beans, right? And so I don't know what Chinese traditions are, but we definitely have this Japanese New Year's Day tradition. I love it. Yeah, and so, you know, it's kind of fun, and my daughter will get into this later, but she's half Cantonese half Taiwanese, but that's her tradition. That's our Asian family tradition. That and scouring the house before the end of the year. Which is a lot of work. Just a lot of work. But there's a reason why that I would love for you to get into in your personal story, why hearing this criticism that you're too Asian Michelle. There's a reason why it really struck deeply because of just how you came to this country and how you grew up. And I'd love for you to share that. Okay. Yeah, I mean, I think it does because I think it hurt in so many ways because I was born in 79. So when I was adopted, there was so much work that my parents had to do. They had to give me naturalized. You know, I'm technically an immigrant on my papers. And they were told, like, the actual term was, you know, you have to assimilate her. Like, I didn't even know what assimilate assimilation was. But I remember my mom as a teenager, you know, telling me, well, we were told to assimilate you, you know? So that was an actual term that people used. And you know, it was hard on me to be different in many ways. I took it really personal and I just never understood why people couldn't see that I was just like them. I worked so hard in many ways as a teenager and as a young adult and a kid to erase like who I was. You know, I didn't want anything to do with being Asian. I was ashamed of it. I just felt like it was going to make me more different. And it was hard. Like even in dating situation, you know, as I got older, like dating young boys, like their parents would say stuff, you know? And even to be honest, when we talk about the hypersexualization of Asian women, I mean that starts so young. You know, I was in great not grade school, probably junior high. And I remember the year that full, what is it full metal jacket came out? Yeah. So I remember that when it came out on HBO, because everyone was watching it. And the boys in my class through money at me. You know, I would say like $5, sukiyaki, and like all this stuff. And so I would get upset and I would say like, F off, you know? Yeah. And I would get in trouble. I began trouble because I said the F word, you know? Yeah. And so I was like this bad kid because I was always like, mad, and I was always like, you know, you know, telling people to stick something up, something, you know? And whatever. Shove it up. I remember the principle was like, well, next time you get called in here, you're going to get Corporal punishment, but I can't remember what they called spanking or whatever, you know. And I would say, yeah, the paddle. And I would say, well, what about this kid in this case? Because they were the ones who started it. And he was like, I don't care. You're the one who cussed. You know, so it was like, so stuff like that, that I just never felt like fully accepted, even though I will say I had a pretty good childhood. I just, I just never felt a 100% equal, you know? And so I was just so, in many ways, wanted nothing to do with Korean heritage and being Asian. As I got older, I was like, well, why? I was actually interested in I started going to Korean heritage camps and I was like 14. I bet so many other adoptees and I loved them. They were just like me. It was like, I didn't care about the Korean culture necessarily, but I love the fact that I can meet other adoptees. And then we would, you know, do things together, but like over kimchi and Barbara, you know, and like bulgogi and all those things. And then we basically all started going to Korea, you know, like one by one. Oh, I should say when I went back to Korea, it was like 1998 for the first time. And I met my whole entire Korean family. So how did that happen? By accident. I mean, really, when I tell my story, I always feel like the agency is like, don't tell people that. Normally, it shouldn't happen. Yeah, it shouldn't have been. And basically, I went to my agency and I asked to look at.

Hawaii Michelle HBO Korea Barbara
"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:39 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"You know, that was kind of my feeling. Even though there's so much racism everywhere. Yeah, right. I mean, it's Seattle. You know, the difference is in Seattle. There's a Chinatown international district where people are getting beaten up. Or worse. So the difference in St. Louis is that, you know, you might have a couple of incidents. But in Seattle, you know, people were carrying around confederate flags too. You know, so it just happens, you know, everywhere. But the difference was that I saw so much activism in the AAPI community. You know, city leaders, county leaders, people who could say like, well, my family was the first Filipino family to own land in Seattle. People could have these like really deep connections to activism and history. And it was a sense of pride for people. In the Midwest, you can say, oh, we had a Chinatown in the 1860s in St. Louis and people will go, no way, really? You know, so people just don't know history in Missouri. If it's not their history, if that makes sense. So when you posted it to Instagram, Michelle, did you come up with the hashtag very Asian? No, no, no. So I posted something like we should all be able to bring our full humanity to the table, something like that, 'cause I was, I struggled on a caption for a long time. You know, I think on Instagram, that's what I said. And then on Twitter, I said something like, I wish I could say something or you know, so I said like two different things. Yeah, yeah. And then a colleague of mine, a friend of mine named G of ang, who is the morning anchor in Minneapolis. She retweeted it with moan foods. And then she wrote hashtag variation. So she's the one who came up with a hashtag. Okay. Yeah. And she's your partner in this T-shirt business. Yeah, she's stuck with me forever now. That reminds me when the Randall park movie came out. Gosh, what's he playing against Constance Wu, and he wore that old T-shirt to stay angry? Yeah, yeah. Right with that Korean image on there. Then all of a sudden, because I know feel you, they angry and then all of a sudden he was in the T-shirt business. He was having so many headaches just trying to keep up with the orders. Yeah, yeah. The first night we sold something like 1300 t-shirts, I think. So it was a lot. For people who have day jobs and are not in that space, it was like, what do we do with this? I think if we would have let it go on forever, we would have had a lot a ton more. But it was another collector items, right? You guys are so shrewd..

Seattle St. Louis AAPI Instagram Midwest Randall park Constance Wu Missouri Michelle ang Minneapolis Twitter headaches
"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:45 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Some funky Wi-Fi. I don't know. I know I don't know. So I'm hoping that doesn't happen with us today because you're at work. But we're invited to be on an African Americans podcast. It was an Instagram Live, which was my first experience doing that, but he's really passionate about unity between African Americans and Asian Americans. And so that's where I found out, oh, this is the woman. This is the woman that incidents sparked this whole hashtag very Asian. So, you know, I'm such an opportunist. I'm like, oh man, we're done with this. I got to work it out with both of our schedules. I got to bring Michelle on to talk about this. That's so nice. Yeah, I don't know what was going on with my Wi-Fi that day. I swear, I've never encountered that before, so I apologize. It was goblins. It was in the ether. You are based in St. Louis, Missouri. Yes. Okay. Yes. And you're with an affiliate of CNN. Is that? Well, I'm in at the NBC affiliate. So we're in NBC affiliate. Okay, because there's different things all over the Internet. We are a CNN affiliate. We can run CNN stories, but we're known as an NBC affiliate. Got it. Channel 5. So take us back to what sparked this angry voicemail. What was going on on air? Well, it was really such an eventful story. We do like these 22nd VO type reader stories where it's just like, well, you know, Americans eat. This for New Year's Day, they eat greens for wealth and cornbread for coins and pork for prosperity. And so I just threw in like an ad libbed line that I ate, dumpling soup because that's what a lot of Koreans do. And really, Koreans eat duck goop, they eat like rice cake soup, you know, with mandu in it, but I didn't say any of that. I just had dumplings. And really, I should have said probably rice cake soup. But you know, I said dumplings. And that was it. That was it. I mean, the whole thing lasted maybe 25, 27 seconds. It was, I don't want to say it was a nothing story, but it was kind of one of those stories that everybody does. And you could do without, you know? Yeah, yeah. So then one of your colleagues said, hey, we just got this voicemail left on the stations. A number, and let me read it. Hi. This evening, your Asian anchor mentioned something about being Asian and Asian people eat dumplings on New Year's Day. And I kind of take offense to that because what if one of your way maker said, well, white people eat this on New Year's Day. I don't think it was very appropriate that she said that. And she was being very Asian. I don't know, she can keep her Korean to herself. All right, sorry, it was annoying because if a white person would say that, they would get fired. So, say something about what white people eat. All right, thank you. I mean, that last light, I ever made one really talk about that last line is like her white supremacy, white racism kind of just left it there because it's like, okay, you can talk about what white people eat. Even though she earlier sit if a white anchor said that they would get fired, but if an Asian American anchor talks about what white people eat, you know, that's appropriate. How did you receive that? And then how did this go viral? Well, I mean, because now voicemail doesn't even come on a phone anymore, you know? So it comes in an email and we can play it and it was just interesting because my assignment editor is an awesome person. Would never hurt my feelings or anything. He was just like, oh my gosh, can you believe this? You know, kind of. And so when I played it, I was like, what? What? What? You know, I just couldn't, I was in such disbelief. I thought it was kind of comical, really, you know? And then I was like, man, I'm just gonna, you know, take myself, listening to it, because I had heard it once before, so I was like, I'm just gonna, you know, do this. And tape this so that people can hear it. And then posted it on Instagram with the little captions. That's why some of the captions are wrong, because Instagram did it. And then put it out and posted it. I didn't even really think about it to be honest. I knew enough to not put her name out there or anything like that, right? But I shared it because I was just like, man, I don't know if anyone would believe that this kind of stuff happens unless you hear it for yourself, you know? And I just thought she's very confident that she's in the right. You know, she speaks with such conviction that I was just being very Asian and I just needed to keep my Korean to myself and I thought it was also absurd because she said, you know, if a white person talked about white food, they'd be fired, but I literally just talked about white foods. You know, and how many times do we talk about turkey on Thanksgiving or, you know, what have we never talked about other holidays that maybe people are celebrating? I shouldn't say never, but we don't talk about the Korean Thanksgiving. You know, they're just certain things we don't talk about. And it's really, even the lunar new year, I still think people are like, what is the lunar new year? You know? So anyway, I didn't think it was, it was funny. I gave it some thought, I mean, I was intentional about posting it, but I didn't overthink it. I just shared it. And I guess in some ways that is a good sign because I felt protected, you know, like I would be protected if I shared this. But later on that night, I had to get ready for the 10 o'clock news, and I just started feeling very down. I did kind of have a breakdown before the ten. And then got through the ten, you know, it's only a half hour or whatever. And then went home and just thought like, wow, I just, man, I don't know if I'm cut out to be back in the Midwest. That was kind of my thought. To be honest. And I also started thinking like, you know, is this the kind of future that my son is going to have, like, this is exactly, well, there was a part of me that was like, this is exactly why I didn't want to come back to the Midwest. Granted. You've been before this. Seattle. Seattle. Okay. So I grew up in Missouri and I was highly motivated as a kid to leave Missouri and never come back. I ended up coming back for my second job. And so I worked in southwest Missouri for about 8 years. So from the time I was like 23 to 30, it was almost 8 years. So it was really 7. But I had experienced stuff in southwest Missouri that I had never experienced in any other market either. Because that's a different kind of market too. But I love Springfield. I had some really great friends in Springfield, but it was just a little, it could be sometimes a little difficult to work there. So I just was kind of like I've never coming back. I'm just never coming back to the Midwest. I just don't want to do that. And of course, here we are in the Midwest. And it's not fair because the Midwest is actually the things that I actually really like a lot of things about the Midwest. I love the Midwest sensibility. I love the kindness in the Midwest. I love the convenience of the Midwest. And food is so much, I mean, food is so good in the Midwest. So I mean, there are lots of things I do love about the Midwest. But there was a part of me that felt so empowered when I lived in Seattle. That I was afraid that I was going to lose that empowerment, leaving the West Coast. And so when that voicemail happened, I was like, I was right. I shouldn't have left..

NBC CNN Missouri Midwest St. Louis Michelle Instagram Seattle Springfield West Coast
"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"In Missouri received a voicemail based on a program that she had recently done that deeply hurt her, but ended up gathering all of this positive support from Asian Americans. I'm thinking across not just America, but around the world, we have that news anchor here today. Her name is Michelle Lee. And if you have seen that hashtag variation, this is ground zero, Michelle. And Michelle, you and I are both proud and grateful members of the Asian American journalists association. So it's even more special to have you on the show. Oh, well, thank you so much. You know, AHA is a very special organization. And so I love to hang out with fellow AHA ears. Yeah, I know. It's not something that just easily flows off the tongue. In fact, if people out there have bought the T-shirt, hashtag very Asian, it's actually to support AAAA. Yes, that's right. We've donated, well, we're in the process of donating all the proceeds to aja. You know, it's only been this thing only happened like a month ago, but we just have to make sure that all the taxes and everything accounted for so that we don't go bankrupt, but yes, all of the proceeds will go to a AJA. You know, I have personally benefited from AHA as a journalist, but really I always try to tell people like, AHA's work impacts everybody, you know, because they call out organizations when something is wrong. They try to give guidance to newsrooms. They try to ensure fair coverage and bring equity to newsrooms. So I just, I really love AJA quite a bit. Now, you and I met virtually because we were both guests and you kept going in and out because of.

Michelle Michelle Lee AHA Asian American journalists ass Missouri America
"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:34 min | 4 months ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Everyone and welcome to Asian America that can find podcasts where our mission continues to be to invite Asian American culture makers and shapers to share their stories with us. And as always, I'm your host, Ken fong. Welcome to episode 357. My guest this episode is Michelle Lee, a news anchor for CNN affiliate in St. Louis Missouri. If you kicked off this new year following the viral hashtag very Asian, then you might know that some racially cringeworthy criticism that Michelle received on New Year's Day this year and how she responded to it were the catalyzing agents of this trending spirit of Asian American solidarity and pride. What you might not know is how her journey as a transracial Korean adoptee made this racist attack even more triggering for her. As a fellow Asian American journalist, I know what it's like to say things off the cuff only to be caught completely off guard when someone is offended by something that I said very casually. And as an adoptive father, my heart was immediately softened and opened as soon as they learned that she'd been adopted as a young child. As you'll soon see, she's a delightful human being, and we quickly established a warm and mutually affirming rapport. A huge welcome to those of you who are first time listeners, and a warm welcome back to all of you amazing regulars and especially to my growing circle of faithful monthly patrons. A quick technical note. Not long ago, I mentioned that I was able to pick up two new pieces of recording equipment to improve the quality of my host tracks. If you're one of my patrons, thank you so much for helping me buy this gear. Since I'm teaching myself how to use these new gizmos, there's been a bit of a learning curve. No surprise, right? Like if I don't want an annoying and loud hum to distract from what I'm saying, then I'll need to make 1000% sure that I've pushed the plug all the way into the socket, because when I don't, I get this annoying hump. I mention this because I made this mistake on episode three 56 last week with Sean Lou, and this one. So the tracks I recorded of myself turned out to be unusable because of the obnoxious hum throughout my track. Great. Fortunately, the app I used to make remote recordings of.

Asian America Ken fong Michelle Lee CNN St. Louis Missouri Michelle Sean Lou
"michelle li" Discussed on Glowing Up

Glowing Up

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"michelle li" Discussed on Glowing Up

"Today we have a guest that iconic doesn't even begin to describe it I feel like we have to get into this. . Yeah. I. . . Mean as per usual who wants to hear from you and I were disgusting trolls we have to. . Fight. . The woman who is here today? ? It's potentially going to change all that today. . No promises, , but baby. . Today we have on the editor in chief that's e I see. . Okay. . That's industry slain of Allure magazine. . Honey it's Michelle. . Lee. . You guys this is Michelle welcome to the show I am so starstruck grew up reading magazines on Friday nights. . So the fact that I'm speaking to an actual editor in chief I just I'm like Holy Shit like she's she knows it all she has I'm so cluttered what an introduction and I don't want against her up too much. . But please if I may gas a little more. . This woman the. . Incomparable Michelle Lee. . Has worked at some of your favorite magazines not only are you the editor in chief of a law, , which is like unbelievable I'm salivating I have. . I'm Fan girling your editor in chief of nylon correct I was I was that was my job right before Lor and for that you've worked for Britain for like a million zillion different publications glamour you are on the founding team of I want to say COSMO Girl Yep. . Yeah. . Do you remember Cosmo girl? ? Do I S- I was the third higher at Cosmo girl. . We created the sticker is we did the whole thing. . So <hes> no innovative remember what magazines used to have stickers. . I just thought about member lucky I mean, , of course, , Michelle, you , remember Lucky magazine of course, , the stickers I love serious by it. . It was like they had like three options. It . was like I think about it don't buy. . Could you imagine like going through your magazine and being like I'm not going to buy that can put a sticker next to it. . That sounds so fun. . Anyway Michelle. . You've seen it all you've written for it all and you know so much about beauty and we're so honored to have you on our show. . Well, I , am so honored also because I am a gloomy I'm a huge fan I seriously has done a whole marathon literally almost every single episode and I could listened I talk about you guys all the time I do like in the office attack about you to other people I'm obsessed I'm also. . So embarrassed of all the things united me right now so Let. . On, , sorry yeah. . Learn a lot about La 'cause I don't know that much about L. A. Things. . So like Erawan, , I feel like I've learned so much about oat milk from you guys. . You would think there's not that much to learn when it comes to oats and water mixed together but. . Lord knows Esther and I. . Found the crevices and like some. . A lot of stuff to talk about when it comes to. . You wouldn't gosh I'm fan growing and I'm embarrassed I mean Michelle you know too much about ministers bodies. . That my worst. . About. . Yeah. . I I'm speechless. . We had to make good use of this time her okay. . So Let's just start by talking about. . Your instagram which I really recommend everyone go follow I. . Believe it's Hey. . Michelle Li Yep. . Your instagram is a treasure trove of so much stuff your interests when it comes to beauty or far-ranging particularly I, , feel like what? ? I think of Michelle, , Lee think of nail art and ask for. . Today was staring at your nail since meeting. . Oh good podcastone. . SURPRI-? ? I'm so genuinely minor Kinda. . Jenky like don't look through closer little crumbly idea your on. . Let me say I who I do my own nails. . You'll notice. . They, , look cute Think-i esters. Got . Some. . Cutie I do I started doing <hes> at sea press on meals? ? And I'm a I'm enjoying myself I'll say, , Oh, , you know I did press on nails for the first time recently Chill House No Chill House released on. . It's very cool salon in New York. . City, , and they have I think they used to have two locations there now down to one and they just made these very cool press but they're very <hes> like a lot of the nail art that I have my instagram. . They have as well because I get my nails there quite a bit but they're cute cute like really minimalist. . Designs. . Oh. . I. Love . that one you posted of the Purple Marble yes. . That video is so cool. . Yeah. . I. . It's like I do a lot of reposting of other nail artists to and I went down this rabbit hole of Russian. . Nail artists are next level like the way that they do marble nails and other things. . It's just like stuff you've never seen before. .

Michelle Michelle Lee editor in chief instagram Michelle Li Zoya Allure magazine Lucky magazine Erawan New York Miss Pop Britain Lor Deborah Lukman Lord L. Polish Amazon Esther Neil
Skincare Journey with Michelle Lee

Glowing Up

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Skincare Journey with Michelle Lee

"Today we have a guest that iconic doesn't even begin to describe it I feel like we have to get into this. Yeah. I. Mean as per usual who wants to hear from you and I were disgusting trolls we have to. Fight. The woman who is here today? It's potentially going to change all that today. No promises, but baby. Today we have on the editor in chief that's e I see. Okay. That's industry slain of Allure magazine. Honey it's Michelle. Lee. You guys this is Michelle welcome to the show I am so starstruck grew up reading magazines on Friday nights. So the fact that I'm speaking to an actual editor in chief I just I'm like Holy Shit like she's she knows it all she has I'm so cluttered what an introduction and I don't want against her up too much. But please if I may gas a little more. This woman the. Incomparable Michelle Lee. Has worked at some of your favorite magazines not only are you the editor in chief of a law, which is like unbelievable I'm salivating I have. I'm Fan girling your editor in chief of nylon correct I was I was that was my job right before Lor and for that you've worked for Britain for like a million zillion different publications glamour you are on the founding team of I want to say COSMO Girl Yep. Yeah. Do you remember Cosmo girl? Do I S- I was the third higher at Cosmo girl. We created the sticker is we did the whole thing. So no innovative remember what magazines used to have stickers. I just thought about member lucky I mean, of course, Michelle, you remember Lucky magazine of course, the stickers I love serious by it. It was like they had like three options. It was like I think about it don't buy. Could you imagine like going through your magazine and being like I'm not going to buy that can put a sticker next to it. That sounds so fun. Anyway Michelle. You've seen it all you've written for it all and you know so much about beauty and we're so honored to have you on our show. Well, I am so honored also because I am a gloomy I'm a huge fan I seriously has done a whole marathon literally almost every single episode and I could listened I talk about you guys all the time I do like in the office attack about you to other people I'm obsessed I'm also. So embarrassed of all the things united me right now so Let. On, sorry yeah. Learn a lot about La 'cause I don't know that much about L. A. Things. So like Erawan, I feel like I've learned so much about oat milk from you guys. You would think there's not that much to learn when it comes to oats and water mixed together but. Lord knows Esther and I. Found the crevices and like some. A lot of stuff to talk about when it comes to. You wouldn't gosh I'm fan growing and I'm embarrassed I mean Michelle you know too much about ministers bodies. That my worst. About. Yeah. I I'm speechless. We had to make good use of this time her okay. So Let's just start by talking about. Your instagram which I really recommend everyone go follow I. Believe it's Hey. Michelle Li Yep. Your instagram is a treasure trove of so much stuff your interests when it comes to beauty or far-ranging particularly I, feel like what? I think of Michelle, Lee think of nail art and ask for. Today was staring at your nail since meeting. Oh good podcastone. SURPRI-? I'm so genuinely minor Kinda. Jenky like don't look through closer little crumbly idea your on. Let me say I who I do my own nails. You'll notice. They, look cute Think-i esters. Got Some. Cutie I do I started doing at sea press on meals? And I'm a I'm enjoying myself I'll say, Oh, you know I did press on nails for the first time recently Chill House No Chill House released on. It's very cool salon in New York. City, and they have I think they used to have two locations there now down to one and they just made these very cool press but they're very like a lot of the nail art that I have my instagram. They have as well because I get my nails there quite a bit but they're cute cute like really minimalist. Designs. Oh. I. Love that one you posted of the Purple Marble yes. That video is so cool. Yeah. I. It's like I do a lot of reposting of other nail artists to and I went down this rabbit hole of Russian. Nail artists are next level like the way that they do marble nails and other things. It's just like stuff you've never seen before.

Michelle Michelle Lee Editor In Chief Instagram Michelle Li Allure Magazine Lucky Magazine LOR Erawan Britain New York Lord Esther
"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

"24 Hour News Station Co Moh news 1000 FM 97 7, Thanks for being with us this afternoon. I'm ELISA Jaffe. Jeremy Greater is our editor. Kelly Blair is our technical director. Among the stories we are following Vice President Mike Pence, says he thinks the Trump administration is staying put. The former Indiana governor made a stop in Pennsylvania, where he expressed confidence and re election for the president, arguing Americans wouldn't be safe. With a Democratic presidential nominee. A good chunk of Americans are expressing concerns about losing their jobs during Corona virus pandemic. A new Gallup poll shows. More than a quarter of U. S workers have fears of being laid off for having their hours reduced. Getting reduced paycheck is also making employees nervous. Ah backlog and naturalization applications could have an impact at the ballot box in November. Michelle Li has taken a closer look at all of this for the Washington Post and spoke with come was Villa Neil. We shall explain held, his backlog could impact the election. There are hundreds of thousands of immigrants who are waiting to be naturalized as they many of them have been waiting much longer than the five months that the government tries to get the naturalized during And these immigrants are really a growing electorate in the country. For the first time this year, Naturalized citizens are going to reach one in 10 eligible voters, and that's a really record high number for this group of Potential voters. Yet this backlog that has been getting worse and worse over time that existed before the Trump administration, but there have been policy changes and budget cuts. And then the coronavirus. That really exacerbated this backlog and means that many immigrants will not be able to vote as they had hoped. This November. It sounds as though this backlog has been around from multiple presidential administrations. Now, is there anything being done to try to move these applications along a little faster? The thing is, even though these backlog have existed, there are still lots of people applying for naturalisation infact after President Trump was elected. There was a surge and applicants many people who were motivated by President Trump anti immigrant rhetoric to try to become that is either out of concern for their safety or because they wanted to go and Vote against him. And even though there has been a surge, the USC I asked the agency that natural eyes is immigrants has not up at three sources in order to meet that demand. In fact, there has been a potential for loads of employees of decreasing revenues. There have been policy changes under President Trump that have made it Difficult for people to be naturalized in time. It's taken longer for people to naturalized, so the policies have not met the demand to really decrease the increasing back. Clark. Of course, some will always look for the politics. And all of this has urban any accusations that this backlog might be intentional at this point in terms of allowing it to continue to keep certain votes from being cast There's definitely our political concerns, certainly from the advocates who want to see more immigrants naturalized, even though you know there's kind of spotty pulling around us, but in general Naturalized immigrants tend to vote Democratic. It's not always the case, but it leans more that way. And so there are concerns among immigrant advocates that by allowing this back off to increase by not really addressing it head on the Trump administration is especially allowing for foreign foes to be disenfranchised because they may be cast against him. Although there's you know, it's hard to prove that there is no proof that this is an intentional political efforts is the press boats. But certainly that is a major concern among people who want to see immigrants be moved through this process in a more efficient way. That's political reporter Michelle Lee remora online at washingtonpost dot com. A sad day. At the point of, Iet's do an aquarium in Tacoma, Boris. The zoo's 34 year old polar bear was euthanized because of a significant decline in his health. Boris was rescued from a travelling circus in 2002. He was malnourished and mistreated at 30 for zoo officials say Boras far surpassed the median life of 23 a half years for male polar bears and human care. And they usually live to be about 15 to 18 years old in the wild. Boris had arthritis and liver disease. He was the oldest male species of his kind him the world. Come on news time..

President Trump Boris Vice President Kelly Blair Mike Pence ELISA Jaffe Clark Michelle Li Jeremy Greater President Indiana liver disease technical director Washington Post editor Iet U. S Pennsylvania Michelle Lee
US citizenship applications are backlogged, prolonging the wait for civil and voting rights

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

02:06 min | 1 year ago

US citizenship applications are backlogged, prolonging the wait for civil and voting rights

"In naturalization applications could have an impact at the ballot box in November. Michelle Li has taken a closer look at all of this or the Washington Post, and she spoke with comas Bill O'Neill. We shall explain how this backlog could impact the election. There are hundreds of thousands of immigrants who are waiting to be naturalized as they many of them have been waiting. Much longer than the five months that the government tries to get the naturalized during and these immigrants are really a growing electorate in the country for the first time this year. Naturalized citizens are going to reach one in 10 eligible voters, and that's a really a record high number for this group of potential voters. Yet this backlog that has been getting worse and worse over time that existed before the Trump administration, but there's been policy changes and budget cuts. And then the crooner virus. That really exacerbated this backlog and means that many immigrants will not be able to vote as they had hoped. This November. It sounds as though this backlog has been around from multiple presidential administrations. Now, is there anything being done to try to move these applications along a little faster? The thing is, even though the backlog have existed. There are still lots of people applying for naturalisation infact after President Trump was elected, there was a surgeon applicants many people who were motivated by President Trump's anti immigrant rhetoric to try to become that isn't either out of concern for their safety or because they wanted to go and Vote against him. And even though there has been a surge, the USC I asked the agency that natural eyes is immigrants has not up its resource is in order to meet that demand. In fact, there has been a potential for loads of employees of decreasing revenues. There have been policy changes under President Trump that have made it Difficult for people to be naturalized in time. It's taken longer for people to naturalized, so the policies have not bet the demand to really decrease the increasing back. Clark. Of course, some will

President Trump Michelle Li Washington Post Bill O'neill Clark
"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

"O'Donnell, 79 degrees in Olympia, and we've got 82 degrees in Seattle at 5 35 We've all heard President Trump's concerns about voting by mail in November. Most experts say worries about fraud or unfounded. However, there's a very real concern growing over a backlog at the U. S Postal Service, which could mean delays in the delivery of mailed in ballots. Political reporter Michelle Li has taken a closer look for the Washington Post and spoke with come was Bill O'Neill. Michelle Tell us about this backlog and some folks around the country beginning to get a little nervous about it, too. Yes, there's a lot of anxiety growing among those voters as well as postal workers. Who are you Exactly how this could go wrong in November. There is a new postmaster general. He is a top donor to President Trump that already comes with some political questions about the motives of the postmaster general. And he put a new procedure is just a couple weeks ago, which are already reading two days long backlogs. He says that it's supposed to cut costs for the postal Service, which is already fired a debt and they're doing a lot of things. Now that Isa actually contributing to a backlog that is really concerning for the workers know what if anything, is being done about this? At this point at the moment? Nothing is really being done that we can tell to shorten these backlog. What the Postal Service has said, is that these changes that they're making are ultimately supposed to really make the Postal Service financially stable and that there may be some temporary impact of these changes, but that those changes are just going to be temporary. It's going to be fine in the long term. The question is, at what point is it actually going to stabilize and well, that happened for the November election? And no one really knows about that? Just how messy might things get? If these issues are not addressed in time for Election day, right? I mean, election's officials across the country are preparing for a massive influx in mail in ballots. Because of the current virus, and people are just too afraid to go to the polls and show up in person just in case something Congar wrong, So we're already seeing a lot of people request absentee ballots or the fall. But then you add on top of that. He's delays that are already taking place and without knowing when they're going to stop, and then you can kind of see the ingredients for a potentially chaotic November. The funding is always a tricky question when it comes to the Postal Service, But is this something that might lead to additional cash for them ahead of election day ahead of election that That's a little tight, Teo really see major and tax. The Postal Service is billions and billions of millions of dollars and that and that It had a financial problem for a decade. So any sort of changes they improved. The organization in the next couple months is not going to make a bet and how bad its finances are. So you know, it could make a big difference many years down the line. But before election day, though, that's unlikely. That's Michelle Li read more online at washingtonpost dot com. That is Como's Bill O'Neill. You've heard the reports about strange packages of seeds from China showing up in mailboxes. Comas. Manda factor has a new warning from the BBB. What should you do If you get one of these packages do not open. Those thieves Do not plant he been Spradling with the better business Bureau says Hang on to them and contact the U. S. Department of Agriculture. And Here's the new warning. If somebody has your address information to send these packages, they may have other information as well, including credit card information. Passwords to mean commerce sites like Ana Guys battling says now is the time to be vigilant change Some of those path words with your credit history and be on top of things when it comes to some of your financials, because it's scary situation right now, he says. They are getting more reports of these packages here in the Northwest. Manda Factor. Camo News and American views of China have continued to sour throughout the pandemic, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center. Senior researcher Laura Silver says there's a widespread belief that China mishandled the initial response to covert 19 which led to mass exposure to the virus. 73% of US adults have an unfavourable view of China, which is up 7% points since March alone. Monju Kulkarni, executive director of the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council, says those changing attitudes have led to increased attacks against Asian Americans, She adds. It's incumbent on everyone to take a stand against the spread of racism. Justus people are working to prevent the spread of covert 19 Come on news time it is 5 40 Let's connect with comas bills worth of the Harley Exterior Sports desk. We've got a baseball game tonight in Seattle, but back about four months ago. That was not his certainty. But the Mariners were set to play their home opener at 6 40 tonight against the Oakland Athletics. The EMS managed three wins and four losses in their first road trip and last night's winning pitcher Marco Gonzales says there's a great chemistry building on this young team. We've got a lot of good energy right now. Really good culture of guys who, uh, who works out of the ballpark prepared and I'm proud of the guys were getting their opportunity and seizing it. So you know a lot of guys that feel really confident right now and I can't hold on Major League Baseball at a crossroads weakens the Miami Marlins have 20 Corona virus cases among their players and coaches and the ST Louis Cardinals have two players with positive. Koven 19 test their game tonight at Milwaukee. Postpone Pac 12 has released its conference. Only 2020 football schedule. 10 games were each school starting September 26. Washington State cookers would open at Oregon State. Washington House Stanford. Brendon Todd has the second round lead by two shots at the ST Jude Invitationals in Memphis Sports Update to 10 and 40 after the hour. Bill Schwartz Comeau News summer is the perfect time to tackle those indoor projects on your list, like escaping the heat and refreshing your home with new paint. Lows as he covered with our number one best selling color, agreeable.

postal Service Michelle Li China U. S Postal Service Bill O'Neill President Trump better business Bureau Seattle Michelle Washington Post fraud Bill Schwartz Comeau Olympia O'Donnell Washington reporter Ana Guys Brendon Todd
"michelle li" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"michelle li" Discussed on WTOP

"Legislation ensures the rights of families to privacy and allows them to be part of the decision when the footage is released. This, of course, is a developing story. Stay with us here on W. T. Oprah will bring you more as we get it. 12 12. Now former President Obama issued a warning at the funeral of Congressman John Lewis yesterday that voting rights are being threatened by those in power, pointing in part to the U. S Postal Service, which is closing post offices despite increased mail in balloting that's expected for the November election, even undermining the The service in the run up to an election. It's going to be dependent on mail in ballots so people don't get sick. Joining us live now to talk more about this. Washington Post political reporter Michelle Lea Michele, the Postal Service says. These air cost cutting moves tell us how the USPS is scaling back and where it's doing this Well, it's just been two weeks that these new procedures under the new postmaster general have been in place, and it's already left two days long backlogs in mail delivery, which is really concerning for both voters for postal workers, who are very frustrated with the changes. What's happening is that they are not allowing the pay of overtime, and the Postal Service is only requiring the postal workers to pick up mail in the morning. So anything that comes in during the day is just sitting an extra day. They're shutting off machines early, presumably safe money. But starting off machines means that postal workers have to sort everything by hand, which could also lead to errors, which has asked to delay so it's already quite chaotic, and postal workers are very concerned about what it could mean for the November election. And is it significant? The states where we're seeing this happen? The most We are hearing scattered reports of these delays from all across the country. We have reports from at least 6 to 7 different states where we have heard from either postal workers are voters. And some of these are key battleground states like Michigan, North Carolina. For presidential races and voters. There have been telling us that they're worried that these delays could be a political attack on their state because they know it's important in the fall. We don't have evidence about, of course, but it is a legitimate concern and does the concern about political motivation also stem from the postmaster general's connection to President Trump? Yes, That's a big connection there that both internally and externally of within the United States Postal Service that people are paying attention to you. The new postmaster general who took the job last month is Luis the joy And he is a major donor at fundraiser for President Trump. In fact, he was the lead fundraiser for the re election of the GOP convention for the president's reelection, and he has donated more than $2 million Republican political committees just in the past four years. And this prominent donor has taken charge of an agency that is already politicised by the president. Hey has the president has called the United States Postal Service a joke? That it should be charging more for companies like Amazon, which he has had a new issue with for many years, and the fact that this is a major donor in charge is something that is definitely worth paying attention to Michelle. Thank you so much. We appreciate it. Washington Post political reporter Michelle Li there a quick check of the Dow Jack label that was down 193 points. Money news in 10 minutes on sports at 15 and 45 powered by Red River technology decisions aren't black and white. The Nationals, Marlins Fillies and Blue Jays are the only teams taking tonight off ST Louis in Milwaukee's game was postponed after two Cardinals players tested positive for covert 19 nationals have the weekend off after splitting their four game. Siri's with Toronto They host the New York match Tuesday. Orioles tangle with Tampa Bay this evening, Eh? NBA wizard Resume there suspended season this afternoon when they face Phoenix coach Scott Brooks Focus. We're gonna have to take care of the basketball that's going to give us extra possessions to score when we're not getting our Point shot and be nice if we can hit you No. 10 to 12 threes a game. You want to shoot No. 30 35. We got to somehow get some stops on the defensive end for PM Tip off on 1500. AM WN ba mystics or three. You know, after last night's win over Seattle aerial, Atkins and company are averaging a league high 95 points per game. Just think we're finding a way. Um, We're not getting stagnant where China's move the ball as best we can and trying to listen to coach and don't let me ask you tomorrow. They played two in one Chicago world Golf Championship. ST. Jude Invitationals second round Brendon Todd leads at minus 10. He's four under par through 14 holes today. College Football's Big 10 preseason poll Maryland's picked to finish sixth in the East Division or how state and Wisconsin the division favorites this fall. Women's college volleyball Georgetown promotes assistant coach David Heller to head coach. Boys went 13 and 19 last season. Dave Preston w T o p. Sports.

United States Postal Service president Postal Service U. S Postal Service Washington Post President Trump reporter Michelle Lea Michele Congressman John Lewis W. T. Oprah Obama Michelle Michelle Li Amazon China David Heller Michigan Dave Preston basketball
"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

"Be in the stands next month to cheer on the Indy 500 race capacity was first cut in half but is now limited to 25%. Organizers say masked will be mandatory and temperatures taken at the entrance and environmental group has filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration for failing to release public records on the termination of a programme to restore grizzly bears to the North Cascades. President Trump's campaign, the Republican Party and two affiliated committees have But more than $983 million since 2017. That's a record breaking amount toward a reelection effort. At this point in a presidential campaign, Michelle Li has taken a closer look for the Washington Post and spoke with co most Tom Khullar. Lots of money being spent on this reelection campaign. You know that just last month, his campaigns that 240 million and Joe Biden Camp, no slouch either they coughed up 165 million spending by the Trump campaign has been going on since 2017. You point out that's much earlier than previous presidents began spending Yes, we're on track to have the most expensive presidential election to date, and, as you can see from these numbers will run well, on our way, Tio billions of dollars being spent. President Trump is nearing a $1,000,000,000 just himself, along with his committees, and that's about twice as much as President Obama had had spent at this point. Unlike any other in common, President, President Trump had been spending and raising money toward his reelection earlier. Earlier and pretty much since he became president on DH. You know the results of that He has a huge war chest, and he's been spending tons of it and what he's really gotten for it. So far. That's AH, still question because Accuses slipping in national polls, Approval approval ratings have been going down, so he's not getting a ton of money at the moment, though, right? You quote Michael Malvin, the cofounder of director of the Campaign Finance Institute on Trump's Need to Maybe change is messaging or approach, especially regarding the pandemic because They can spend all the money they want. But the numbers are not good, right? You know, money will only get you so far in a campaign he can pay for ads, and we can try to shift the message. But it's really gonna be have a public feels about the way he's handling that pandemic and the way the economy is hurting voters, and he really has to be able to target Voters and specifically swing states better or make sure that his policies are rippling and more positive ways moving forward for the next couple of months before the election. Micheli with the Washington Post is where this year paper has an analysis showing. That President Trump has a narrow path to victory via electoral college majority. So in this analysis, things do not look particularly bright. Yeah, you know, we're still four months or so before the election, So you never know how the puzzle change, but There seems to be some stability in Biden's lead in certainly the national polls as well as in state polls, and that's something that the president is obviously closely watching and how his Policies are affecting, specifically voted in the states. He's bringing back the virus briefings, which he believed project strength and authority to the public, and he's Trying to make that ship turn around. All right, Michelle, thanks So much for being with us. Your pieces in The Washington Post talking about the president's unprecedented campaign spending at this stage of the re election campaign, and it's a washingtonpost dot com again. Michelle Lee And that's Como's time Hustler. The continuing Corona virus pandemic will bring about 100 layoffs to U. W Medicine comas. Bill O'Neill has more official site financial pressures caused by the continuing Corona virus pandemic as the reason behind the cuts were told, The layoffs are based on an extensive review. Hundreds of workers have already been impacted by sweeping furloughs announced back in the spring. A majority of those workers facing a layoff have already been notified and all notifications are expected to be complete within the next two weeks. Impacted programs include lab medicine, population health information technology. Involuntary psychiatric care. Colonial camo news.

President Trump president The Washington Post Joe Biden Campaign Finance Institute North Cascades Republican Party Michelle Li Michelle Michelle Lee Obama Tom Khullar Como Tio Michael Malvin Bill O'Neill
"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

"Stay informed. The Northwest's only 24 hour news station Coma news, 1000 FM 97 7 Good afternoon. Thank you for joining us on the CO Moh afternoon news. I'm Rick fan sites with ELISA Jaffe, Our editor is Jeremy Greater. The House Republican leader expects Congress to pass the next Corona virus relief stimulus bill in the first week of August. When it does he wants more money for testing and environmental group has filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration for failing to release public records on the termination of a programme to restore grizzly bears in the North Cascades. The lawsuit seeks documents related to the administration's longstanding opposition to Grizzlies in the mountain range. Coming up on camo news. I'm her Weiss bomb with new research that shows the importance of wearing a mask to help stop the spread of covert 19. President Trump's campaign, the Republican Party into affiliated committees have spent more than $983 million since 2017. That's a record breaking amount toward a reelection effort. At this point in the presidential campaign, Michelle Li has taken a closer look for the Washington Post and talked about it with Cuomo's Tom Hudler. Lots of money being spent on this reelection campaign. You know that just last month, his campaigns for 240 million and Joe Biden Camp, no slouch either they coughed up 165 million spending by the Trump campaign has been going on since 2017. You point out that's much earlier than previous presidents began spending Yes, we're on track to have the most expensive presidential election to date, And, as you can see from these numbers were one well, on our way, Tio billions of dollars being spent. President Trump is nearing a $1,000,000,000 just himself, along with his committees, and that's about twice as much as President Obama had had spent at this point. Unlike any other common president, President Trump had been spending and raising money toward his reelection earlier earlier and pretty much since he became president. On and you know the results of that He has a huge war chest, and he's been spending tons of it and what he's really gotten for it. So far. That's AH, still question because He's been slipping in national polls. Approval approval ratings have been going down, so he's not getting a ton of money at the moment, though, right? You quote Michael Malvin, the cofounder of director of the Campaign Finance Institute, on Trump's need to maybe change his messaging or approach, especially regarding the pandemic because And they can spend all the money they want. But the numbers are not good, right? You know, money will only get you so far in a campaign he can pay for ads, and he can try to shift the message. But it's really gonna be how the public feels about the way he's handling the pandemic and the way the economy is hurting voters and he really has to be able to target Voters and specifically swing states better or make sure that his policies are rippling and more positive ways. Moving forward for the next couple months before the election. Michelle Lee with the Washington Post is with this. Your paper has an analysis showing That President Trump has a narrow path to victory via electoral college majority. So in this analysis, things do not look particularly bright. Yeah, you know, we're still four months or so before the election, So you never know how the political change but There seems to be some stability in Biden's lead in certainly the national polls as well as in state polls, and that's something that the president is obviously quickly watching and how his Policies are affecting, specifically voted in the states. He's bringing back the virus briefings, which he believed project strength and authority to the public, and he's trying to make that ship turn around. All right, Michelle. Thanks So much for being with us. Your pieces in The Washington Post talking about the president's unprecedented campaign spending at this stage of the re election campaign, and that's the washingtonpost dot com Again. Michelle lied And the president was in the news today, certainly as well with the first Corona virus briefing from the White House in months, we're going to have a closer look at that coming up in about 4 15 right here on coma news that interview.

President Trump president The Washington Post Joe Biden Campaign Finance Institute Michelle Grizzlies CO Moh North Cascades Michelle Li Michelle Lee Republican Party Obama Rick Weiss ELISA Jaffe editor
"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"michelle li" Discussed on KOMO

"Only 24 hour news station co Moh news, 1000 FM, 97 7 Thank you for joining us. I'm Rick fans, Things with ELISA Jaffe. Busy at the editors. Terminal is Jeremy Greater announced. A U. S attorney who investigated President Trump's Associates is set to meet with House Democrats. The Hill reports. Jeffrey Berman will be interviewed one week from today. Berman was looking into Trump's personal attorney as part of the Ukraine scandal. The city attorney in Seela, Washington near Yakama, says a family who put black lives matter cha cart on their street could face prosecution. If they do it again. Chock drawing on streets is a gross misdemeanor. Seela City crews washed away that chalk art. Even though the convention's haven't even happened yet former Vice President Joe Biden and President Trump are raking and piles of money ahead of the general election. Michelle Li has taken a closer look at the June numbers for The Washington Post and spoke with combos Taylor Vance ice. Let's start off with those big numbers how much money came in and which campaign did best. This is the second month in a row that the Biden campaign actually outraised. The Trump campaign, which is pretty remarkable. Given that the Trump campaign had already raised a really eye popping number. They raised 131 million, which is really a huge Figure for one month. But then the biting campaign came out, saying that they actually outraised them by 10 million at 141 million, and these figures are just they're astronomical. I mean the Obama campaign, for example, and at this point in 2012 and Joan only drew about half of that at 70 million, so both campaigns are raising a lot of fight in good better past months. Unemployment is high right now. Individuals having a hard time paying for essentials. Is it clear where the majority of this money is coming from? Is it individual donors? Well, A lot of this money is being raised from welcome doctors who are able Teo give 60 years to either. Either. By Donald Trump. There is a new way for donors to give. Now that's been really increasing over the past elections where these donors can write, you know, $1,100,000 checks at a time and be ableto. Inject the campaign with these massive checks. But the interesting thing on the Trump side as President Trump has actually a huge online donor base where very, very avid trump supporters have been giving lowest $5 sometimes $50.100 dollars just to show support for President Trump. So even though both sides are raising tons of money, several millions out of time from very wealthy people. President Trump has an advantage and that he has a very wide small dollar donor base giving and very low sun that seems like that would be really helpful during the pandemic, where people can't normally go out to, you know, fundraising rallies, and all that is the Biden campaign, able to do that kind of fundraising to provide campaign has a decent online fundraising base, but it could be doing better. In the past month abiding campaign benefited from a handful, really major fundraising events where he had very high profile surrogate. He had a fundraiser featuring President Obama. Another one with Senator I Love Warren, another one with somewhere Kamala Harris, and these events brought in Several $1,000,000 out of time by himself does have an online fundraising operation. But he's certainly benefited from these high dollar events that he's been doing a lot lately. Nowadays, he has three or four fundraisers a week, and there's which is charging like 5 to 6 figures. Her donor. Whereas President Trump has largely not been fundraising in person he held to imprison hungry there's last month, but for the most part, he's been relying on his online 100 Micheli with US on coma.

President Trump President Obama President Trump trump Joe Biden Vice President attorney Jeffrey Berman ELISA Jaffe Rick Michelle Li Kamala Harris Teo Ukraine Yakama Washington Taylor Vance Seela Senator