38 Burst results for "Michelle"

Fresh update on "michelle" discussed on Good Inside with Dr. Becky

Good Inside with Dr. Becky

00:34 min | 40 min ago

Fresh update on "michelle" discussed on Good Inside with Dr. Becky

"And then they designed for it. And Gavin can be super fun. Like the worn out mom hoot nanny, she made it up. You know, I'll get, can I give one more example? Yeah. So again, on the guesting side, there's the guy named Michelle lapri. He's one of the people I interviewed in the book. He was a circus so late choreographer, but spent all of his time choreographing shows for his work and realized he hadn't been home in months. He's Canadian. He hadn't, he had a bare bones tree. He wanted to trim it. And so he invited ten Friends who didn't all know each other to come and help him trim his tree. And he said, and then we'll eat together. Could you send me two photos of moments of happiness from your last year? Ahead of time. And when they walked into the room, there was an ornament making table set up with all of their photos printed out to glue onto the ornaments. And people walked in and they gassed with joy and they didn't all know each other, but it gave them a conversational context. Oh my gosh, Boris, how good you look and your acrobatic outfit. Oh my goodness, Julie, you

Michelle Lapri Gavin Boris Julie
What Does Former Senator Jim Talent Think of the 'Hugh Rule'?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:08 min | 5 d ago

What Does Former Senator Jim Talent Think of the 'Hugh Rule'?

"Jim talent. Do you know Mike Rogers, the former congressman from Michigan? Yes. He's considering a run for president and I know Mike and Mike's been a gift. I would not let him on the debate stage. I've got a new I call it the Michelle bachmann rule, which is if you don't have a path to the presidency, we're not putting you on the debate stage, no matter how well meaning you are or what you can contribute if you don't have a path, we're not doing it. What do you think of the hue role? I like it you, although what we could do and I would prefer this format anyway is to break them up into three or four candidates at a time and do a more informal sort of sit around the table, have a discussion with good moderators. And if you did that, you could loosen it a little bit. People who were legitimate, I mean, really sound people, but didn't have a didn't have a payout. But no, I think we have to begin exercising discipline in debate formats. I mean, the point is to inform the people not to give everybody who wants one, you know, a few moments to talk about what they believe.

Michelle Bachmann Jim Talent Mike Rogers Mike Michigan
Fresh update on "michelle" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "michelle" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Not good enough to not be on at all times. We're not at that level where we went, okay, we can turn it up now and we can go. Can't flick a switch against the Celtics home tonight against Minnesota, Marilyn women defeated Pittsburgh, Serbia, Cameroon, a three three tie at the World Cup right now. It is South Korea and Ghana. Dave Johnson, a TLP sports. The top stories we're following for you this morning on WTO, a small plane crashed into power lines in Montgomery village last night, leaving tens of thousands of customers in the dark. The plane is down now and power has been restored everywhere with that accident took it out. However, Montgomery county public schools are closed today, two people who were on board the plane are in a hospital with serious injuries. The lame duck session of Congress resumes today and lawmakers hope to get a lot of things done. That includes passing a government funding bill and finishing work on a bill that would codify same sex marriage into law. Democrats are also hopeful they can pass a ban on assault style weapons and raise the debt ceiling, but that might be a bit of a long shot. Stay with us for more on these stories coming up. The Annapolis ban accused of shooting and killing the mother of a naval academy midshipman last year is scheduled to go on trial today. Police say 31 year old Angelo Herod reckless recklessly fired a gun at least 5 times killing 57 year old Michelle Cummings as she sat on a hotel patio along west street in Annapolis last June. The Louisiana woman was visiting to watch her son's induction ceremony into the naval academy and was not the intended target. It's 8 18. Traffic

Montgomery Village Dave Johnson Cameroon Celtics Serbia Marilyn Ghana South Korea WTO Pittsburgh World Cup Minnesota Montgomery County Angelo Herod Annapolis Congress Michelle Cummings Louisiana Naval Academy
Who Is DOJ Special Counsel Jack Smith?

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 6 d ago

Who Is DOJ Special Counsel Jack Smith?

"What happened here In this case several years ago about The Republican governor Bob McDonnell who had a hell of a political career ahead of him Bob McDonald took a lot of gifts Mostly his wife did too At the time there was not a legal in the state of Virginia Was a wise No Did he commit a federal offense That's the issue The public integrity section of the criminal division of the United States Department of Justice was headed by this guy Jack Smith Jack smith's wife just done a documentary on excuse me Michelle Obama And is donated heavily to the Biden campaign So these are radical Democrats very very partisan You can assume this U.S. attorney or this head of the public integrity section is the same So what happened Well there's a definition in federal law in terms of bribes official bribes There's a definition for it In the bribery statutes in the interpretation of it Basically it's an official act The official act done on behalf of somebody as a result of receiving a gift a quid pro quo There is no evidence whatsoever The governor MacDonald had done an official act for anybody That there was any quid pro quo But that didn't stop Jack Smith the new special counsel investigating Trump From expanding it

Bob Mcdonald Bob Mcdonnell Jack Smith United States Department Of Ju Michelle Obama Virginia Biden Governor Macdonald U.S. Trump From
Fresh update on "michelle" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "michelle" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"WTO P news. 6 23 now, that small plane that was stuck for hours midair after crashing into a utility tower yesterday has finally been freed and brought down by Montgomery fire and rescue and work crews. The pilot and passenger who were trapped inside were also rescued. They were taken to a hospital with serious injuries. This happened about 5 30 yesterday afternoon in Montgomery village near the intersection of rothbury drive and goshen road because of that crash and the power outages that resulted from it, lingering into the early morning hours. Montgomery county public schools are closed today and all campuses of Montgomery college are also closed. The incident caused widespread power out of just throughout the Cuddy. A county at one point, Pepco reporting tens of thousands of customers in the dark by Pepco says everyone who lost power in that incident has now had it restored. Maryland state police identify the pilot a 65 year old Patrick Merkel of D.C. and the passenger as 66 year old Jan Williams of Louisiana. The Annapolis man accused of fatally shooting the mother of a naval academy midshipman last year is scheduled to go on trial today, police say 31 year old Angelo harad of Annapolis recklessly fired a gun 5 times at least killing 57 year old Michelle Cummings as she sat on a hotel patio along west street in downtown Annapolis last June. The Louisiana woman was in the city to watch her son's induction ceremony into the naval academy and was not the intended target. COVID, SARS, Ebola, all epidemics of the 21st century. 30 years ago, HIV aids was topping the headlines. So where are we today in the fight against HIV aids? Although age related deaths have declined dramatically over the past few decades, one Washington based aids organization wants you to know as we approach world aids day. There are some real issues around equity and justice that need to be addressed if we're going to effectively end this epidemic. Paul kawada executive director of the national minority aids council says he's also troubled by recent violence against the LGBTQ

Montgomery Annapolis Patrick Merkel Jan Williams Rothbury WTO Montgomery College Angelo Harad Pepco Michelle Cummings Maryland State Police Montgomery County Louisiana Aids D.C. HIV Naval Academy Ebola Sars
Melinda Gates, Amal Clooney and Michelle Obama Have Joined Forces

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

05:45 min | Last week

Melinda Gates, Amal Clooney and Michelle Obama Have Joined Forces

"Also a writer, they talked to none of you are going to remember this, but you should. You should look her up. Selma diamond. You know, back in the day, there were ten sitcoms. And each sitcom had ten writers on the show. That's a hundred writers. Only one was female, and that was Selma diamond. Could you imagine the story she had to tell? She became a prolific comedy writer, worked on a lot of shows and these shows normally only had men, tough fall, broad, New York City, Jewish chip, she didn't give a fuck. I just wish the women today could sit down and watch a couple of hours of Selma diamond talking about what it took to make it in the world. But nowadays you can watch Amal Clooney and Melinda Gates and Michelle Obama talking about their problems. I put up an I put up an Instagram with these three rules, their picture saying, please remind me not to watch this. They've all announced a collaboration between their foundations to advance gender equality and get this to end child marriage, I didn't even know we had a huge problem with child marriage. Is that a new thing? Is this the next thing? Is that going to be a new ribbon? What's that gonna be colored? Magenta? Child marriage, what is this all about? You can introduce all these new things to me. I know these three women don't care about the price of gasoline, how much groceries cost and living paycheck to paycheck has never ever happened in their lives. So they got bigger issues to tackle. I mean, Melinda was married to Bill Gates, one of the wealthiest men ever in the world. Also a man who knew of Jeffrey Epstein's predilection for underage girls and still made him a best friend. Also a man who has his hand in vaccinations and is treated like some kind of king when he goes to the G four summit or other smarty art functions. Why is Bill Gates treated like he's an elected official? It's a fucking computer nerd. With money. So listen, ladies, pay attention to what these women have to say. Especially Melinda Gates. Here's what she said. About, what is the issue? Of our lifetime. She said, my mom always told me, set your agenda or someone else will. A bullshit, your mother didn't use that expression. No one talked about agendas in the fucking 50s and 60s. It's a lie. She never said that. Set your agenda. That wasn't an expression. It just wasn't. It's like saying nowadays, oh, you gotta go to the link and cut and paste the link and we understand that today. one would have understood that in the 60s. No one heard set your own agenda. She's full of shit. And she said, and the agenda of our lifetime is making sure women can take their full power in society. Women have these unpaid burdens. Take our children, of our elderly parents, but what I want to say to women is you need to take care of yourselves first. Once you do that, then you can fully take care of others. But if we name the unpaid labor that we do, society can help us. And if good policies are put in place, it makes our jobs easier. Everybody has agency. Hate that expression. Everybody has agency, but being able to use our full agency to be fully in our female power isn't always possible. But if you start and empower someone else and they're going to empower everybody around them and you'll see what happens. I don't know where to start. I don't know where to start. I love our female power. Imagine if I began a speech by talking about our male power, I'd be booed off the stage and pelted with old bread and eggs. Such a double standard of bullshit and then what she's saying is something I haven't ever seen with the women who raised me, maybe you did, did you? I don't think you did. I didn't, did you? My sister rosalie takes care of all of us or two sons, her husband, her fucking brother who's on his ass and not knowing what the fuck's what two grandkids or 6 dogs and anybody else who wants help or attention. I've never heard her say, um, I can't do anything until I take care of myself first. But rather, the companies coming over in 15 minutes, what can I do? Didn't you hear me? I'm taking care of myself. I'll be down when I'm down. Don't imagine my mother when I was ten years old or so. Mom, you didn't pack a cold lunch. And I got no money for a hot lunch. What do I do? My father takes me, she's like, your mother is taking care of a

Selma Diamond Amal Clooney Melinda Gates Jeffrey Epstein Bill Gates Michelle Obama New York City Melinda Rosalie
Dinesh and Debbie Dissect the South Texas Elections

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Dinesh and Debbie Dissect the South Texas Elections

"Let's talk about some of the South Texas races because I think that Republicans overall appear to have gotten 38 to 40% of the Hispanic vote over all, and that's huge because that bodes very well for Florida for Texas. It actually begins to shift the politics of California if it stretches over there. Let's talk about, I mean, we were disappointed, of course, that Myra Flores lost, there was a kind of troika Myra Flores, Cassie Garcia, Monica de la Cruz, but we didn't we didn't lose all three of those races. Yes. No, Monica de la Cruz, she won her race 80,000 votes versus 67,000 votes for Michelle Vallejo, the Democrat, so she definitely made some headway there and very, very happy about that. But with mine of Florida's, I think we should encourage Myra to maybe run again in 24 because, you know, she really only came within 10,000 votes of Vicente Gonzalez. And that is huge in the valley. What people don't understand is that in the valley, the Democrats have been an institution for over a 150 years. So the fact that Republicans are even competitive as competitive as they have been, is huge.

Myra Flores Monica De La Cruz Cassie Garcia South Texas Michelle Vallejo Florida Texas Vicente Gonzalez California Myra
Michele Bachmann Is One of the True Heroes Out There

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Michele Bachmann Is One of the True Heroes Out There

"To say, Michelle bachmann is one of the true heroes out there. As I've gotten to know her over the last few years, I've just been amazed at the depth of her faith, and because, you know, when somebody says, oh, I'm a Christian, or to me, that no longer means anything. They can still be crazy and off in every way. Michelle bachmann is really, she's been a hero. As you mentioned, she's at regent university. I wish she would run for governor or senator of something.

Michelle Bachmann Regent University
The Ideology of Wilson and Obama

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:33 min | 3 weeks ago

The Ideology of Wilson and Obama

"The ideological roots of the book is about, well, there's a lot of Hegel in history. There's a lot of Lincoln in the founders. There's a lot of Woodrow Wilson and finally someone is explained it. Now, Jonah Goldberg has tried a few times. Fine writer, under the shell, no he's a friend of yours. He's tried a few times in big books that only people like me read to explain where this came from. You went back and tried to do it again. Would you explain to people why you think it's important that they get what Wilson was and why it matters and why the framers Lincoln and Reagan are different from that. I think it's important to understand the ideological roots of the decline in American sea all around them. As I said, Barack Obama is the most ideological president since Wilson. Now Barack Obama's are careful though to mask his ideology. Sometimes he let the mask slip like for instance when he was attending Jeremiah Wright's church for all those years. Jeremiah, I remember the infamous pastor who said 9 11 was America's chickens coming home to roost is that God wouldn't bless America but rather damn America. This is not some passing relationship. I mean, Barack Obama saw down his church satin skews for years, even had him officiate his wedding, Michelle Obama. Or when Barack Obama said that America wasn't an exceptional nation. What he wanted to say, we're going to fundamentally transform America view. Now, I don't know about you, but I don't know many people who think that if you love something, you should want to fundamentally transform it. I can't imagine the fetching this Hewitt would take too well if you said honey, I love you, but I want to fundamentally transform you. With Obama, though, it's somewhat rare that that ideological slips. With Wilson, you see it out in the open. The first openly, the first president who was openly hostile and opposed to our Declaration of Independence and our constitution. He said they were outdated. They were obsolete. They belonged to a Newtonian age of checks and balances, not a Darwinian age of evolution. He said that the moral basis of our nation, the natural, equality of mankind, that none of us as Jefferson said are born with saddles on our backs to be written or spurs on our heels to ride. Was outdated as well. He had this conception of history with a capital H that it was evolving and therefore mankind could be thankful that we could have heaven on earth that we could achieve. Utopia. The founders knew that this was all nonsense. They understood as Madison said in the federalist papers that government is the greatest of all reflections on human nature. And our nature, nature is that we're falling creatures.

Barack Obama America Wilson Lincoln Jonah Goldberg Woodrow Wilson Jeremiah Wright Reagan Jeremiah Michelle Obama Hewitt Jefferson Spurs Madison
Exhumations to resume; Bid to ID Tulsa Race Massacre victims

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Exhumations to resume; Bid to ID Tulsa Race Massacre victims

"Efforts to identify victims of the 1921 race massacre until the Oklahoma continued today with the exhumation of remains that had been exhumed before 19 bodies were previously taken from a Tulsa cemetery and city spokesperson Michelle Brooks says 14 of those bodies fit the criteria for further DNA analysis she says at least some of those 14 bodies will be exhumed a second time starting today Historians believe 75 to 300 people died in the 1921 Tulsa race massacre in which more than 1000 homes were burned hundreds were looted at a thriving business district known as black Wall Street was destroyed The exhumations will be followed by another search for bodies in an area south and west of the area's previously excavated in 2020 and 2021 I'm Donna water

Michelle Brooks Tulsa Oklahoma
Rapper Coolio dead at 59

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 months ago

Rapper Coolio dead at 59

"One of the biggest rap stars of the 1990s has died Julio is dead at the age of 59 the death of the rap stars being announced by his manager who says Coolio dined at the home of a friend in Los Angeles no cause given born artist Leon ivy junior Julio is best known for the song gangsters Paradise which sampled the 1979 Stevie Wonder hit pastime Paradise 1995 hit earned him a Grammy for best solo rap performance The song was also featured on the soundtrack for the Michelle Pfeiffer film dangerous minds Coolio was nominated for 5 other Grammys during his career Born near Pittsburgh Julio moved to Compton California where he attended community college he also worked as a volunteer firefighter and an airport security before forging himself a career in hip hop A Moscow's

Julio Coolio Leon Ivy Grammy For Best Solo Rap Stevie Wonder Los Angeles Michelle Pfeiffer Grammys Compton Pittsburgh California Moscow
Is Selma Blair Unfairly Profiting Off Her MS?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:45 min | 2 months ago

Is Selma Blair Unfairly Profiting Off Her MS?

"You see Dancing with the Stars. Oh my God. So sour Michelle gallard. Started crying because she watched Selma Blair's very energetic performance on Dancing with the Stars the other night, cameras caught her crying in the audience getting very emotional, we all know that Selma was diagnosed with MS back in 2018 and she wound the crowd to the goddamn cartwheel into a split during the jailhouse rock, excuse me. You have an S you can do a cartwheel into a split, now something something's wrong here. Something's off. You know, I know, I know soma. I consider a friend we've talked many times, et cetera. I haven't talked through it a while, but I was talking to the wall she was suffering this and I thought she was very brave to go through it that actually went through it. But this is getting ridiculous now. You know, Sarah Michelle galar is like, oh, I'm so happy for her. She kept a smile on her face the whole time. You know, to do this 25 years after we worked in a movie, it's just amazing. I can't believe how brave she is. Okay. And someone admitted that the rehearsals were extra hard on her this week. That's a challenging, you know? I've got my muscles have to rely on muscle memory now and my body can shift at any moment because of the MS and she was nervous about nailing the fast paced movements of the dance, but guys, I'm sorry, you know what? I said this from day one from day one I said she's not going to get to the end. She's going to get into the middle of the season and then they're going to go, you were great. You showed everybody that MS can be something you can defeat if you just have the right attitude and you just have the right thing. It's horseshit. Selma Blair is not being completely upfront and honest. I know she adds stem cell treatment. She had that docu drama, whatever it was, a year or two ago in which she talked about it. this is not really fair. She's getting treatment that other people with MS can't afford and she's, you know, kind of profiting from it. I've seen MS up close. You don't go from a cartwheel to a split if you've got multiple sclerosis for God's sake.

Dancing With The Stars Michelle Gallard Selma Blair Sarah Michelle Galar Selma Sclerosis
AJ Reminisces About Dating Michelle Brando

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:05 min | 2 months ago

AJ Reminisces About Dating Michelle Brando

"Now I gave you a bunch of Brando stuff the other day. I obviously am fascinated by him. I'd be lying if I said, I didn't, I'd be lying if I said part of the reason why I dated Michelle, his daughter, who was beautiful, gorgeous. But part of the reason was, if her last name was Michelle pinsky, or Michelle Obama, I wouldn't have ran after as quickly. But to know that that's Brando's daughter and the fact that she was conceived while he was making The Godfather with some Japanese woman that he had a had a shine to. I had to go after her. And we had a great time and she was a great chick. She's married now with a little daughter. She's great. We talk all the time. But me being the guy that first let her see her father's movies, blew me away. I felt that was like a cool thing in my life to turn on Brando's daughters to his movies. And one of the first shows I did a couple of years ago. Maybe it was too soon for the crowd I have now, but many of you probably didn't hear, but when Michelle and I were dating, and she wouldn't care that I tell the story. We go back to my house and, you know, we're messing around. And back then, the FX channel was running The Godfather marathon. They would play it all day. So one day we're hanging out and I said, good, the godfathers on, you gotta watch your father's movie. He's the reason why a lot of us move down to LA in the first place. We all wanted to be Brando. You're like, okay, I'll watch it. I'm watching godfather. And after a while we stop fucking around, we start making out of the couch, whatever stop getting into it. And then we take it to the bedroom. And I put the bedroom TV on, and that also has The Godfather. And the sounds very low. Michelle starts to do her thing for me, and she stops and she says, you know, I can't do this. And I'm like, why? And in the back rugged hero father going, you know, look how they messed up in my boy. And she goes, I can do it, I'm about to do for you, but I can't hear my father talk behind me. And I never dawned on me. How it must have felt for her to hear a father talking behind her while we were messing around.

Brando Michelle Pinsky Michelle Fx Channel Michelle Obama LA
Martha's Vineyard Deports the Illegals to Cape Cod

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:40 min | 2 months ago

Martha's Vineyard Deports the Illegals to Cape Cod

"In my fingers, grace baker just had to be the breaking news alert. It appears that Martha's Vineyard is now deporting the illegals. That's right, ladies and gentlemen, a breaking news from Martha's Vineyard. The illegal aliens, and by the way, if you listen to the mainstream media coverage, as I was doing, as I was driving back across the states of Alabama and Mississippi, if you believe the mainstream media coverage, I just thought there were idle hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens that have been dumped in Martha's Vineyard. Which, by the way, is not necessarily a bad thing, in my estimation. But it turned out to be only about 50 people that were that were sent there to Martha's Vineyard and the rich white liberals got triggered. Now, I want to try to approach this from the mindset of the rich white liberal who lives in Martha's Vineyard. Now these are the people that are out there telling all the rest of us that we are not diverse enough, we're not tolerant enough, we're not, we're not our skin shade is not dark enough. Trying to find a nice way to say it. That's why I was hemming and hawing. All the while, these people are lily white liberals. I mean, these people, the only blacks, the only people of color on Martha's Vineyard, besides Barack Hussein Obama and his wife, misses Michelle Obama. Would be the help.

Vineyard Grace Baker Martha Mississippi Alabama Hawing Hemming Lily White Barack Hussein Obama Michelle Obama
Tucker Carlson: Barack Obama Is Racist

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Tucker Carlson: Barack Obama Is Racist

"Obama's were in fact despised immigrants. So when they moved to a $12 million seaside compound on Martha's Vineyard, the point is not to live in luxury with other rich people. No, obviously, the point is to diversify Martha's Vineyard. To strike a blow for justice. That makes sense to us and we felt better. But then last night happened and we started to rethink our assumptions about the Obama it's about a lot of things. Because a plane load of highly diverse immigrants arrived on Martha's Vineyard to join the obamas, but the obamas didn't welcome them. There was not a word from Barack or Michelle Obama. Barack wasn't waiting at the airport to greet the diversifiers with flowers. He didn't issue a statement of congratulations. He didn't invite a single Venezuelan to his home. How come? Could it be that Barack Obama isn't really actually in real life in favor of diversity at all? Could it be that Barack Obama strongly prefers blond SoulCycle moms in Lululemon to sweaty third world campus sinos and dirty work pants? Could it be? We can't say. But we can tell you that if you want to find out what people really think, go ahead and ignore what they say and watch how they live. And by that measure, the one that matters Barack and Michelle Obama are every bit as bigoted as any board member in any restricted country club in the Deep South, assuming those still exist. Those people, they're not dating my daughter, I can tell you that. In other words, we learned this week that Barack Obama really is a racist and not in the way you've always assumed. Obama may heat white people, he certainly seems to, but he also demands to live around them and only them. But the obamas to be fair are not alone in this. His friends at the news networks in Washington, New York and Los Angeles feel exactly the same way because they're exactly the same sort of people. You want to talk real fierce Tucker's fears. There's a lot of fierce voices in America

Barack Obama Martha's Vineyard Obamas Vineyard Martha Michelle Obama Deep South Washington Los Angeles New York Tucker America
No More Boys and Girls

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:01 min | 2 months ago

No More Boys and Girls

"So you have two parents in Texas, for example, one says to their 12 year old girl, you're not a boy, darling, you have your struggles and we will work through them, but God or nature made you a girl, you are not a boy. And maybe social media are encouraging you in that direction. But you have no idea what you're getting into if you start taking puberty blocking hormones. The other parent says, I affirm you. You say Michelle, you say you're a boy, then you're Michael. Of course. You're, you know a 12 years old, what your sex is, absolutely. You can't drive, you can't drink, you can't smoke a cigarette. You can't vote, but you can change your sex, of course. You know best you're 12.

Texas Michelle Michael
Michelle Tafoya Reflects on What She's Learned From the Sidelines

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:44 min | 2 months ago

Michelle Tafoya Reflects on What She's Learned From the Sidelines

"One of the things you learned from the sidelines or from the reporting side of sports that his impact did you sort of, one of those lessons, it may not have been in a book, it might not have been something that just hit you overnight, but over time you say, this is what I've learned. Yeah. Oh, so much. I learned so much. I learned about what it means to be part of a team and choosing your spots. You know, I was sort of like a kicker. I had to come in in moments when it mattered, and gosh, that ball better go through the uprights or, you know, you're gonna be the goat. And not the Tom Brady kind of goat. The other kind of goat. So, you know, in a way, like an offensive lineman, do no harm. Alan Chris were the stars, the game was the star. I had a role. And I accepted that role. There were times where I was frustrated. I didn't get as much air time as I wanted, or I had this great nugget story. I wanted to I wanted to get this story in so bad. And it never made air because you know why? Because it didn't fit in the moment. We couldn't, we never force things in. It wasn't about me. It was about the team. It was about the game. It was about the overall product. I think that's something that's the people have to learn. It's been really fun, therefore watching my son go from really having no role on his varsity football team last year to having a significant role this year and the joy he's getting out of that. And how it's growing him. And that he still keeps going back even when there's frustration. So I mean, I think that was that was a big lesson.

Alan Chris Tom Brady Football
We Can't Judge Historical Figures by Today's Standards

The Doug Collins Podcast

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

We Can't Judge Historical Figures by Today's Standards

"Biggest mistake we can make is to judge historical figures by today's standard. Not to say that they were not evil not to say that they were not good, but you take them in the era in which they take policies in here and it doesn't make them right. It doesn't make them wrong, but you say at this point in this time, this is what was happening. And it's almost like trying to take airplane travel. You and I both have been on planes a lot of our adult lives. I can remember flying in the 80s in the 90s. And it seemed like all the thing they would do is fly into thunderstorms instead of around them. Now, you know, at least they know they got the radars, they fly you around and it's relatively, you know, good flights. All right. To compare that to flying in the 1920s or 30s is just, I think we have a perception problem here.

Michelle Tafoya On Americans Losing Sight of Their Country

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Michelle Tafoya On Americans Losing Sight of Their Country

"Why is it in our country right now that we seem to have a group of people who say, well, we're good, we might be good, but we're not good and look at the other countries. They're okay too. It's like, wait, when did we lose this idea that we've been given a great gift? The very reason you can go off saying that is the country that you have, but yet we're tearing it apart is if we want to be like everybody else. Well, I think a large part of its stems from the, whether they're financially elite, educationally elite, and they feel guilty. And, you know, there's that book white guilt, it's this notion of, we have it really good here. We do. Not everybody. There are people struggling. Look, we acknowledge all the imperfections, right? Given that, given all other things, we have it pretty good here. And the people that I hear from the most, shouting about how much how bad America is or how we stole this or that or built everything on slavery, our people, a lot of them wealthy, a lot of them well educated, a lot of them who maybe just aren't facing a struggling anymore, so this is the best adversary they can come up with. I don't know, maybe that's simplifying it too much, but it seems like every new generation. When I was growing up, you remember roots that special and everyone in America seemed to be watching that. And we all sort of shared this sorrow and guilt about our history together. Okay, but that's not enough. Now, the next generation comes out, they don't know about roots, or they didn't watch it. So now they've got to have their outpouring. And they're, you know, they're catharsis. And then that goes. And then the next generation comes out and they learn about it and they say, well, we haven't paid enough of a price yet for this. Let's keep paying.

America
When Did Differing Views Become 'Evil'? Michelle Tafoya Weighs In

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:54 min | 2 months ago

When Did Differing Views Become 'Evil'? Michelle Tafoya Weighs In

"Did we lose sight of the fact that a view is what you believe. Now we've seemed to have been attaching evil to either side if they disagree with what you say. You say that more and more happening now and it's sort of the cancel culture mentality of if I don't, it's not that I just disagree with you. I want to take you out and destroy you. Absolutely. And it's by design, because then people will be less inclined to talk, and share their opinions, although your dog is sharing an opinion right now. And I'm glad I have earphones in because my dog's sitting here and would bark right back at your dog. So they would have a debate and who knows who'd get canceled. Canine cancel culture. It's really, this is bad. And when I have friends telling me they're afraid to post something on social media, they're afraid. Doug, this is America. You know that better than anybody. You should not be afraid to post your opinions, your thoughts, your your point of view. Someone can disagree with it, but this threat of just having the rug pulled out from under you losing your job, losing your Friends. It's crazy. And I've seen it firsthand in my extended family, I've seen it among my Friends. I've seen it happen to people, and I don't know how we resist this and get back to normal except by having people say, you can't cancel me. Because I'm not going to allow you to do that to me. And I'm going to stand up and you can say whatever you want. I think there is a growing chorus of voices who are want to say, go ahead. Try it. See if you can. And they're not going to allow it. I

Doug America
Michelle Tafoya: From the NFL Sidelines to the Podcasting Frontline

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:19 min | 2 months ago

Michelle Tafoya: From the NFL Sidelines to the Podcasting Frontline

"People have watched you for through the years. You've been one of the, you were at the top of your profession. I mean, in sideline reporting, reporting and sports reporting, it was just a name. And now you've hit the ground running with a podcast, you know, talking about current events. If you would, just sort of catch us up. I mean, because a lot of people, I've talked to, they said, I'm a told them I was going to have you on the podcast where I was on yours. They said, wait, and she still doesn't football. Talk a little bit about where we're at right now. You know, it was funny. I was checking out of the grocery store the other day. And the woman checking my groceries said to me, my husband was a huge fan of yours. He passed away, and I said, that's so nice, and she said, are you still doing football? And I said, no, I retired, and she said, that's just not right. That is not right what happened to you. And I said, what happened to me? And she said, yes, this is just wrong. And I said, well, hey, hey, hang on a minute. I chose this. And this had been in the works for several years. So I like to clear up that misconception. I think because of an appearance on the view, where I said maybe some things that some people thought were controversial, people thought I got pushed out at Sunday Night football. It is just not the truth. I've been planning on this departure for several years and the story of how it ended why it kept getting pushed until this year is too long to tell Doug, but that's where I am. And the reason I want to leave was because I wanted to use my voice for something that I really care about. And it's not to say that I don't care about sports, it gave me a great career. But I'm really, really, I'm really concerned about the state of our country, the division in the country, the, you know, I'm not sure if it's real or imagined still that how divided we are. I think it's closer to real than imagined, although I don't know, it's sometimes you go to a baseball game where you go to the park and you feel like, I'm getting along great with everyone here. What's the story? So this is why I made this choice. I want to be able to speak when you're on the number one show on television, which was Sunday Night football. You can't do that without drawing some controversy to the show and I had too much respect for the people who created and run that show to do that. And

Football Doug Baseball
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

02:03 min | 8 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"Hi, so I read the article by Michael soon published in 2013. This looked at the relationship between text messaging, telemedicine, and emailing with ethical challenges and guidelines for that. I do think this is a really informative article just because a lot of times, which also they mentioned in the article that state boards and things like that, they don't necessarily talk about telemedicine just because it's rapidly changing and that it's hard to make guidelines for something that's constantly changing, but there are some guidelines that are just kind of follow along with the ACA code of ethics, like don't do harm and form your client of the purposes of counseling and things like that. But this article was really informative and it looked a lot at like text messaging, telemedicine, and emailing. I was kind of thrown off with text messaging. I never thought that counselors would participate in text based conversations with their clients. I do think that this will be very challenging from both aspects of it. I feel that for me, if I were a client, I don't know if I would be as truthful just because for me, I know it's easier to communicate with someone face to face, especially when something's really bothering me. So I do think that could be a challenge in the article also mentions that a lot of people feel abandoned by their counselor. And that they don't really care about them just because they're in this text messaging world. And that they don't see each other face to face ever. And then it also goes the article also talks about a lot of ethical concerns and confidentiality and it's really hard to maintain the confidentiality with text messaging. And there are the article does go into ways.

Michael
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

04:31 min | 10 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"It's good evening. My name is Nicole, and I'm here to talk about the definitions about the Christian counselor and integration about with professional counseling. According to the introduction to counseling of integration of faith professional identity and clinical practice by Robin Simmons Stacey lily and Anita kunle, I most closely identify with the lay counselor. Which basically just means that people come to me for it advice and all my Friends, I think that I'm a good listener and have some sound advice because I am very non judgmental. I come from an outside point of view, I try to ask them the questions that they should be asking themselves. Instead of trying to give them solutions, that's always important. Now, when it comes to. The issues regarding the Christian faith and professional Kathleen and how that I will navigate that, I don't find it a huge problem. I do not have any kind of religious background or not a religious person at all. So having to make sure that I am not putting my morals and values on somebody else will not come difficult to me at all whatsoever. I'm a non judgmental person. I understand people have their beliefs and just restart that they have, I believe, and it doesn't matter what those are. Now, according to Sally Maximo who did a study called Skopje review of ethical considerations in spiritual and religious counseling and psychotherapy. She states that individuals are influenced by their spirituality, and counselors who take this into account are better equipped to understand clients, more fully and respond accordingly, I totally believe that. I think that is true. If you go back to our textbooks, it says that spirituality refers to the interpersonal spirit. And as generally used of nurturing or growing the inner person and doesn't necessarily equate to religion or a person's religious beliefs. She also states that counselors and clinicians must refrain from imposing our values onto our clients, which undermines the moral principle of autonomy, which is core to the code of ethics to be a professional counselor. You have to make sure that you are not imposing your or your own morals or beliefs to the client. So that is a complete Lee separate thing, again I would not have any issues with that I also believe that I would be very open minded into helping somebody who has those religious beliefs. And making sure that I refrain from my own point of view. It's also important that showing the sensitivity of religion or spiritual spirituality towards another person pre verbs preserves human dignity. Which is also important with the ACA code of ethics. Again, like I said, I don't believe that would have. I would have any issue in regards to the ACA code of ethics and my own beliefs, I'm very open minded and I don't have a judgment towards anybody, no one is should have any kind of judgment whether they are religious or not religious. So that is my stance on integration of. The Christian model into professional counseling. Thank you..

Robin Simmons Stacey lily Anita kunle Sally Maximo Nicole Skopje Kathleen Lee ACA
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

04:43 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"Going to emerge <Speech_Music_Male> are really <Speech_Male> tied around <Speech_Male> this integrated <Speech_Male> piece of how do we get <Speech_Male> medical <Speech_Male> folks involved <Speech_Male> at behavioral <Speech_Male> healthcare sites <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> how do we get those behavioral <Speech_Male> healthcare professionals <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> involved in <Speech_Male> the primary care <Speech_Male> arena. <Speech_Male> So I've done a lot <Speech_Male> of consulting with this <Speech_Male> over the last few years <Speech_Male> and have worked <Silence> in medical systems <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> and I can <Speech_Male> tell you every time I've <Speech_Male> talked to a physician, <Speech_Male> like let's take a pain <Speech_Male> management center, for <Speech_Male> example. <Speech_Male> And I've gone in <Speech_Male> and said, look, <Speech_Male> I know one of the <Speech_Male> biggest factors you guys <Speech_Male> are scared of is getting <Speech_Male> sued. <Speech_Male> You're dealing with opioids. <Speech_Male> You're making <Speech_Male> prescriptions. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That are for pain <Silence> management. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> you need substance <Speech_Male> to be a screening. <Speech_Male> You need to know about <Speech_Male> the mental health issues. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So I would say, <Speech_Male> okay, so what percentage <Speech_Male> of your patients <Speech_Male> have mental health issues? <Speech_Male> And the pain <Speech_Male> doctor says <Speech_Male> almost consistently <Speech_Male> for pay <SpeakerChange> doctor retained <Speech_Male> doctor a 100%. <Speech_Male> Oh, <Speech_Male> wow. <SpeakerChange> Yeah. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And I'll say, <Speech_Male> you know, <Speech_Male> I'll start the process <Speech_Male> of talking about <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> studies <Speech_Male> that I was mentioning <Speech_Male> here in the podcast <Speech_Male> and predicting. They're <Speech_Music_Male> like, no, we already <Speech_Music_Male> know. <Speech_Music_Male> When can you start? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> so when <Speech_Male> I was at my last institution, <Speech_Male> we were placing <Speech_Male> interns <Speech_Male> in oncology. <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> were placing a placing <Speech_Male> them into rotations <Speech_Male> in the primary <Speech_Male> care doctor's <Speech_Male> office. So <Speech_Male> what would happen is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> they put you in the waiting <Silence> room to see your physician, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you sit there by yourself. <Speech_Male> You wonder if the doctor's <Speech_Male> ever going to come? <Speech_Male> What time is going <Speech_Male> by instead of that, <Speech_Male> the behavioral <Speech_Male> health clerk care <Speech_Male> clinician goes in? <Speech_Male> The counselor. <Speech_Male> And says, so <Speech_Male> what's been going on? Let's <Speech_Male> do a little stress assessment. <Speech_Male> Let's do a <Speech_Male> substance abuse assessment. <Speech_Male> Then when <Speech_Male> the physician is able to <Speech_Male> rotate runs the <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> council rotates <Speech_Male> out, goes to <Speech_Male> the next room. Yeah. <Speech_Male> If there's a <Speech_Male> follow-up needed, you have <Speech_Male> extra office based <Speech_Male> on the whole. <Speech_Male> You could have clients <Speech_Male> that just <Speech_Music_Male> come in to see you. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So the model <Speech_Male> worked really well <Speech_Male> and started <Speech_Male> to just <Speech_Music_Male> blossom <Speech_Music_Male> in <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the area we were in in <Speech_Male> Texas. <Speech_Male> And so I started consulting <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> larger healthcare <Speech_Male> organizations <Speech_Music_Male> and the <Speech_Music_Male> fact was that there <Speech_Male> were more <Speech_Male> demands <Speech_Male> than we had the ability <Speech_Male> to think. <Speech_Male> And that is <Speech_Male> where that's where it's going. <Speech_Male> And the federal government <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> the U.S. is <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> driving a lot <Speech_Male> of the change <Speech_Male> in larger cities. <Speech_Male> Now they're funding a lot <Speech_Male> of grants to <Speech_Male> force integration. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> what has to catch <Speech_Male> up <Speech_Male> is the insurance <Speech_Male> billing. At this <Speech_Male> point in the U.S., <Speech_Male> there's only <Speech_Male> a couple of insurance <Speech_Male> companies that <Speech_Male> have changed <Speech_Male> their models <Speech_Male> to meet integrated <Speech_Male> care practice. <Speech_Male> There's a lot of stipulations <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> if I provide <Speech_Male> service on this day. You <Speech_Male> can't get service <Speech_Male> from your doctor on the <Speech_Male> same day. <Speech_Male> Which <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> puts a roadblock <Speech_Male> into some of the integrated <Speech_Male> practice. But <Speech_Male> a couple of organizations <Speech_Male> have <Speech_Male> evolved to <Speech_Male> develop integrated <Speech_Male> models. And <Speech_Male> I think over the next 5 <Speech_Male> years, ten years, you're going to see <Speech_Male> the full spectrum <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> reimbursement for <Speech_Male> those services <Speech_Male> that is commensurate <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> what happens in a

U.S. federal government Texas
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

03:43 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"Differential equations that predict when the counseling relationship is going to be successful when it's going to fail? So he calls up gottman and says, can I work with you? Voting system and do this. Well, guess what? Carbon said, yeah, they started partnering together. Paul's now producing these differential equation models that are that when we come to the conferences and he's showing the videos encoding them and showing the differential equations that could predict changes in the therapeutic relationship pretty wild stuff and it's hard science. Yeah, yeah. Not soft science stuff. Yeah, that's amazing. And you mentioned the focusing on neuroscience. We're going to start doing a bi monthly, I always forget which one that is every other month, whatever that one is. Highlight on neuroscience and research is being done in the field of counseling. Around that. So I'm trying to take that seriously because it's quite important. Did you just say the field against them? Oh no, you got me. I was doing so well until the very counseling profession. I get that down. Okay, my last question. Where do you see the profession in ten years 20 years? This is a part that I really truly believe is going to emerge and become a central point of what, especially from the mental health side, okay? Integrated behavioral healthcare. Where we're seeing the evolution of what primary care does from the medicine side, this is not new stuff, about 30 years ago, there were some studies that looked at the liability issues of primary care docs. And what everybody knows to be true is that a lot of physicians don't have the people skills. To make patients feel comfortable and to feel heard and to feel supported. And that's not part of their training. They're actually taught a lot of detachment. That doesn't mean all physicians. There's a lot of great personal physicians out there. But it's been a part of a stereotype of physicians that has some basis to it. And so the studies that were done could actually take video of patient and physician interaction without sound and by coding it and looking at the interaction styles could predict who we get sued. And very accurately predict two can get sued. Well, it turns out.

gottman Paul
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

05:53 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"It. Right. Well, if you had Spanish speaking countries that's often the case too, that there's not an actual word in Spanish that fit well for the counseling profession. If you say sequel to here, most people know what that means. Okay. Spanish speaking country. But if you're talking about a counselor that could sometimes be somebody in the religious sect and for a lot of different things. So it doesn't clearly identify somebody from a mental health standpoint. Yeah. That makes a lot of sense. How do you see that international part affecting the profession as a whole? Because in the U.S., it's still in process really, you see a positive negative or just something we need to pay attention to. No, I see it as positive. And a lot of organizations doing international work to grow at ACA as you mentioned doing the conferences, NBCC consistently doing work and right now about 40 different countries. There's a lot of people doing fulbrights and going abroad and all these efforts educate people about the profession and help them create that foundational building block process where it just continues to spring up. And so like with NBC's MHS, you've got counselors going and training and support counselors being infused into those cultures. And becoming more aware of what that is. And so actually, in Africa, they're just the first international it's the African university for counseling and guidance was created. Oh, wow, okay. And it's the first counseling specific university in the country. Wow. I mean the world. And that's pretty interesting thing. Happened. So I think that's a clear product of the process of infusing people into these cultures to help. And the language that we use to describe what we do starts to become a part of their vernacular and you can see this institution and grow as a result of the years of effort behind all of the elements..

NBCC ACA African university for counsel U.S. NBC Africa
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

05:01 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"Guy. And Ted and I had the same doctoral chair. Okay. He was one of Larry lash's students. And, you know, Ted was an executive director at ACA at one point. So he has some different perspective than idea about the government from his experience. But what I would say is that there was back in the 90s a real change between the structure of how ATA operated and in terms of the divisions. Okay. He's had a much more clear tie with ACA in terms of governance. And there's been an evolution of that over the years. And I think some of that evolution has left some sense of disorganization or lack of collaboration. Yeah, yeah. Well, I don't want to switch gears too much, but something that struck me as I was preparing for this conversation was that we're going to kind of at the moment at least talking exclusively about the U.S. and the counseling profession seems to be growing all over the place, not just in the U.S. and I noted that ACA did second annual Asia Pacific counseling conference in Singapore last June, which unfortunately didn't get to go to. But hopefully, if it's annual, I can go to the next one. So counseling seems to be as a profession growing all over the place. And I'm just curious, this is kind of a big question, but as it grows, do you see that same growth or would you call it growth in the counseling profession and how do you see our identity changing if that is if it really is growing? With NBCC, we do a lot of work internationally. We have a division national board for certified counselors, international NBC CI. And NBCC does a lot of work with different countries on their needs.

Larry lash Ted ACA U.S. Asia Pacific Singapore NBCC national board for certified c NBC
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

03:57 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"And wanting their own autonomy in terms of their mandates for what happened in their state. So there was some protectiveness about that within state boards. And I think that there's been some evolution within AAS CB, the American association American association of state counseling boards to be more open to meeting with other organizations again and sparking this discussion about how do we get to a place that will portability is possible. And so now the other organizations are getting back into the discussion process and this is not a formal 2020 any longer. It's more of, hey, you know, we've been talking about this for a long time, how do we move it forward? And so one of the things that happened just this past year is ACA said in their process of the governing board that cake rep is the gold standard. So that's those are the words they used. Yeah. That was a very significant notation from a portability standpoint because some states have equivalent is what they called in the license law. And if you go to K corp there, Kate kreb does not view anything as being equivalent. And so when ACA said Kate crap is the golden standard. That was a huge movement toward saying we're getting behind the idea that there has to be kind of a unifying principle..

American association American ACA K corp Kate kreb Kate crap
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

04:56 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"The three of them put together the wheel of wellness and really made that a cornerstone for where we built a lot of the models from there. And you kind of alluded to this earlier, but a bunch of organizations and people within the profession agreed on this definition, but a lot of people didn't or at least there's a significant group or body that didn't agree with this definition and kind of provided critiques of it. Could you speak to some of those critiques? Yeah. You know, I think that one of the critiques in general was about the real deference or perceived differentiation between what happens from a school counselor role and a mental health council role. Okay. And that's not a new issue within our profession. If you go back into the 90s when we had a lot of turmoil within ACA and honka and Asuka talked about seceding and moving out of the organizational structure, that was really a sign of how divided we became. And they're still a lot of underlying issues that.

honka Asuka ACA
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

05:24 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"That's really cool. Well, maybe tell me if this would be better maybe a better direction to go if we look at the definition because you were just saying that all these organizations were earlier having their own idea defining idea of what counseling is. So this consensus definition seems to be pretty profound. Yeah. You know, I don't know if we can actually call it a consensus definition because not everybody signed it. It's a good point. The fact is that the vast majority of organizations did and what I believe is there's two that did not. So near consensus definitions. Right. And the issue is that I think we're still looking at how do we get the words that match what we think we do as an organization into that definition. And when you have 31 chefs trying to create a three, four sentence definition, that is a very difficult process. And that took a lot of years to come to the signature process on the definition. That's not surprising. Imagine getting 31 or chefs in a kitchen in the starting on one single recipe nearly impossible. Yeah. And I don't know that we anticipated as a profession, the difficulty in coming up with the definition. And this is not taking a perspective on the definition, but saying, you know, from the argument on the side of the school counselors was more of what school counselors do a lot more group work. They don't do individual. And we don't want the focus to be individual counseling and mental health counselors and well, we want to have individual in group involved. And so there were even just the idea of what type of service do we provide when we talk about it became a very difficult and sometimes contentious discussion. I was president of the assessment division at that time AARC..

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

05:20 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"If you come in with a bunch of different lingo that nobody understands or you're coming in with multiple people saying different things, it's really hard to see anything unified. So I've been make sense as the profession becomes more unified. These opportunities like these grants are going to become more and more present. One of the things we're kind of talking around, but we haven't touched on yet is what are the actual components of counselor professional identity? Legislators have a hard time seeing what's the difference between a marriage and family therapist counseling psychologist and a counselor from your perspective in the field what really defines us as unique among the helping professions. Well, I think there's multiple parts to your question there. And first, I think there's a lot of things that make us similar to other groups and what make us distinctly as a profession, which is an important element. Are we a field? Are we a practice? Are we a profession? I really strongly believe we're professional. And partly not partly, but some of the pieces that go into it are the fact that we have a professional national organization. We have a code of ethics. We have licensure laws. All those elements really make a similar to any other professional body. And so that way we have standing. And I think that's important before we even get into the idea of then distinguishing yourself from other progressions and helping people making it clear that you are a profession. And so the reason I'm bringing that up is because I still I still hear even colleagues at the PhD level talking about us as a field. And as an editor, I served as associate editor for the journal of counseling and development for the past 5 years. And as a research editor, whenever I see those manuscripts come in, it just and I see those words field kept the counseling..

journal of counseling and deve
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

05:59 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"So I got an opportunity then to go and test a testify in front of a state Medicaid ready and I had done numerous testimonies as expert witness on these kind of things. And it just was an exciting opportunity to take that interest at all and apply it. Yeah, it's kind of cool so you didn't have to leave that behind. It kind of came full circle pretty quickly after your doctoral program. Yeah, it did. It was actually pretty quickly after the dark program. And then that just built on it. I spent time over the years going to legislative activities, lobby on Capitol Hill, and just working on behalf of the profession in a number of ways. Yeah. That's cool. It's something you touched on when you were going into your master's degree to really have a good idea of what the profession was about. I assume most people going in for they want to be a people helper or do psychotherapy or counseling, but they don't actually understand the differences between what a counselor is versus a marriage and family therapist, et cetera. And so that this is my segue into my question for today. We're going to be talking about today because I went and it wasn't until after I finished my master's program that I really started to form as a counselor in particular. And so we're talking about professional identity today and you're obviously what really great person to be talking to this about. So when you're writing or talking about professional identity from your perspective, what do you have in mind? What are we talking about when we're when we say we're counselor professional identity or professional identity development? Yeah, I think you made a great point to start this with the idea that folks don't understand the difference between the various professions that are out there. And I spent a lot of time talking to students about that. But not only that, it's colleagues. So even in a university setting, helping other professors from different departments understand why we're different. Why do we have a psychology department on campus and a counseling department? I have people all the time. Oh, I was reading this article about psychology. And I appreciate the interest in trying to start a conversation..

Capitol Hill
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

03:55 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"He wrote the team chair handbook for K crap. And just a gentle soul and somebody that you just want to get to know more and have that conversation with me and I just felt like one of those first times in my life where I felt energized about really getting involved in something that, you know, and I didn't have that feeling about law. I knew it was something I was interested and wanted to do. But this was really about passion. That's what he conveyed really quickly. Yeah, that's really neat. Has that interest in law come through and your work in the counseling profession at all? Consistently, yes. Okay. So you haven't had to leave it behind entirely. No, and I didn't realize that at the time, either. You know, I went to duquesne and they were a very experiential counseling program. So that was my introduction. We did a lot of gestalt work. We did a lot of psychodrama. And there was a side of me that was so different from what I was preparing for with thinking about a law career. And I enjoyed that. I enjoyed Tapping into a different part of my being. It wasn't until I got into my doctoral program at the university of Florida. And started to really look at the underpinnings of the profession. University of Florida has a long history of being a key player in the educational world for counselor education. And so some of the folks that were there when I was a student had been drivers of the development of the profession itself. So Joe Whitman was on my doctoral committee. Larry lash was my doctoral chair. Eventually Harry Davies became a co chair for me. And so Larry lash and Joe Whitmer both founded Kaiser maio along with Jane Meyers and Tom Sweeney. So the four of them were very involved with that. And it Larry wesch wrote the national counselor exam for NBCC and I don't know your certificate for becoming a nationally certified counselor. There's a number. And that number is where you are in terms of the number of people that have been certified before you. His was number two. It was number one. Do you know who number one is? Yeah, it was the first director of NBCC. Okay, okay. Yeah, so it was kind of a toss up of who was going to be one and two. And so I had this early introduction to the profession. My first professional conference I just got introduced to so many big players that it just kept lighting up my passion about getting more and more involved in the profession. And so I got introduced to NBCC, I got introduced to K crap and the legislative aspects of what it went into advocacy. And so right after my doctoral program, I got put on appointed to be on the board of directors for the fair access coalition on testing. And I don't know if you've ever heard of that before. No, I know I haven't. Well, it's a group of organizations that we had onca ACA. But also non council organizations like the national association of school psychologists. Speech language. Hearing association. And all these groups that had some form of professional testing as part of their scope of practice. And so we got together. And whenever a state related issue would pop up where there was an attempt to restrict practice of one of the members of the coalition from a professional standpoint, we would go testify in state Senate and House work on behalf of state organizations and do lobby efforts, do a lot of education..

Larry lash NBCC university of Florida Joe Whitman Harry Davies Joe Whitmer Kaiser maio Jane Meyers Tom Sweeney Larry wesch fair access coalition national association of school Hearing association Senate House
"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

Michelle

02:13 min | 11 months ago

"michelle" Discussed on Michelle

"Phoenix, Arizona, and vice chair of the national board of certified counselors as well as a past president of the association for assessment and counseling and education. Girl, thanks so much for joining me on the podcast. Oh, I'm happy to do it. Thank you for inviting me. Yeah, this is really neat. So we had that we had Donna on probably a month or two ago, I guess. And I was just quite interesting. I talked to Donna right after the election, and I'm talking to you right after the inauguration. There's something interesting there. That is interesting. Yeah. Well, let's start out by just hearing how you got into the counseling profession. Well, it was actually not something that I was headed for from a professional standpoint. Early on in my probably early high school, I decided I wanted to be an attorney. And everything from that point on through college was geared toward becoming an attorney rather than a counselor. And when I got accepted to law school, I realized that I didn't have the finances to do that first year tuition. And so I decided to defer my admission for a year and I got a job working with adolescents who were first time offenders. And apparently I was pretty good at it and we had a unit that provided educational services within the juvenile fender facility. And one of the teachers said, I have a friend who is at duquesne university. He's the chair of the counseling department. You should go and talk to him. And I said, I'm going to be an attorney. You know, I'm not really interested in going to get a master's degree. He's like, you work with these kids really well. Why don't you think about just talking to the guy and you know, it's just a conversation. So he hounded me for a couple of months and finally, I said, okay, I'll go do it. And I went in December to talk with him. And I left his office registered to start classes in counseling in January. That's how I got into the counseling profession. He must have been very persuasive if it was. His name's Joe Mayo. And Joe is kind of an icon in the counseling profession. It's been very involved with aces, the association for counselors and supervision..

national board of certified co association for assessment and Donna Phoenix Arizona duquesne university Joe Mayo Joe association for counselors and
"michelle" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"michelle" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"But i know they still are recorded. Because you don't you don't know what gym you're gonna catch right. Even though they caught cuts right is like ni- they might still be record. We went over. Production sounds so many times because we couldn't come out of things especially the church scenes. Yes i wanted to speak on that. And those church scenes in a few other scenes that i'm i'll get to after this question. You went to some deep emotional spaces in the film. Respect right And i know sometimes for actors. Doing film is therapeutic in quite healing. Because maybe if you're not an emotional person in or you don't have anybody to imo to on a daily basis. Sometimes this you're able to do it in your art right. And i know you are extremely careful about what you give to the public regarding your private life as public figures. Sometimes our private lives are made public. You're not able to grieve certain losses. The way someone else would be able to write. So i would like to ask with some of that. The vessel for some of the emotional places you able to go to in the film you know is a lot of things to me like sometimes you as an actor. You don't realize how much you're going to be affected are how much you have to give a what it requires of you until you're in that moment you know and then i i like i like real things and so i wanted to come from the most and real plates and i felt it was necessary because it's like her story is vulnerable to in order to tell her story in the most careful respectful way and i need to bear myself as well. Do you find yourself able to bare yourself in real life. I feel like it may come out vulnerable. Yes and no yes and no hands varies but after like it comes out most through my artistry you know which can still be healing but it costs so much like like each tiered. No that's real. That comes from somewhere within that act. I'm telling you jennifer. I said this is so real even as audra mcdonald who is brilliant. Who plays your mother who plays a wreath mother. The way she was holding you on amazing grace now. I don't have to ask. Because i believe. I know i just wanna say i saw you and it made me marvel at your grace and poise. Even more i promise you. This is what i wrote. Well well i said. I marvel at your grace employs even more because i know what it costs you costs. Thank you thank you michelle while like it's real and you know. What can i say this. It was that moment for me.

audra mcdonald jennifer michelle
"michelle" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"michelle" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"Think so i was like. Did you have to work with the culture or were you just like i got it. I watch her. i'm studying her. I got it team ahead of acting coach dialect coach movement coach and i added the piano teacher. So all of that but you play piano and rely but see. Listen michelle i know. You understand his at peck a wreath. The play okay. Let's be clear. So all i i've always had ear to play majority of people in miami play. Even my son plays the piano by ear to start while. But i never develop that because my passion light in singing at an passion for planes idea singing so now at the plan is franklin like a is given me a new passion to want to enhance that So now you see me on the piano a little bit more and this more about finding a confidence because it freaks me out like i was so crowded myself of the night on kobe. Show jennifer relies. You play the piano in front of people musicians over your head like that was a major step for me and miss. Franklin inspired me to want to do that. yeah. I don't know if this is exclusive. So are you saying when you're ready to tour again or put out a new album. That will be some playing the piano. Yes the bid abid now now now now now goat so far with it but you know i was the kind you will always see me try you know in grow. That's how you grow. You continue. Try and i believe in taking baby steps. I don't think i know always So it's like okay. am i. The anywhere Miserably though far from it. But i just it. S a actress. I felt it was my duty to learn that element of her which is I couldn't say. I play aretha franklin without learning the element of the piano. And that's what i started with. I also worked with a dialect coach. Tom jones to help me develop. You know my version of your isa on screen. Yes and yes. Studied our instruments as a singer. You know like. I was like okay. We'll we discover like okay. I voice can our built differently but they can lancet thinks you know he things from the he says she thinks from the top of her head with her approach announcer widow. I think from what saying from feed naza. Okay what does that mean so. I don't know how you know because we were born. It's way i didn't train for any of this. So it's like. I don't think at least my perspective instruments study like this was interesting. Yeah that's so good. And i hope that there are people listening that a lot. I mean i'll just specifically for jennifer. Is she just said. She did not have training growing up. But through the years because of the profession urine you've had it refine but you haven't let anybody strip you of like you said i mean when they say using from your toes best that old as they used to say back in the day cut bookie she says stance left-foot insane. Come on. that's it you don't need. You didn't need a track and we were brought up. Where if the track went out. We knew how to do it. Acapella o you stand flat for the say whether the data is there not is many times. I don't have the whole down. Soprano section by myself. We get through the surface. Okay listen let me tell you some. It should be jennifer quote soprano section all by herself. Hudson listening listen. How was it to work with sakon and haley. They are gyms..

jennifer michelle kobe franklin miami aretha franklin Franklin Tom jones Hudson sakon haley
"michelle" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"michelle" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"And that's all. I'm so about that. Yes a real thing. And it's real for millions and millions and millions and millions of people in real thing is such a real thing in like. I try to be as informative as i possibly can. I actually did start going back to school for psychology Yes i really not not necessarily to be. there is even on. My therapist tells me that. I need to be a therapist. I'm way amber. let's open a practice. Listen i mean like i. It was for me to just understand more because i like to learn and i want when i share. I wanna know what it is. And i'm talking about. You know what i'm saying. I'd take this platform very seriously in. I take other people's mental health. Know very very seriously. Because i've been too late. Add to stop because as working. But i'm gonna i'm gonna stay each because I i just. I feel like this is a this all happened. Me for reason absolutely ends the end and i. I know that that that part of my life is a part of god's purpose for me on the planet. I go by the name of charlemagne god with at and t. black future makers presented by at and t. dream in black which talking with black creatives who are shaping. The now the new and the next coach is black business. Ya baa is michelle williams without mainly thing is. I haven't done music like that in a long time. So michelle williams without music. She's blessed she's thriving. She's happy a coffee. Junior healer a teacher author the eh a sister a friend..

michelle williams
"michelle" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

05:57 min | 2 years ago

"michelle" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"Listen up. This is going to be such a fun. Episode of checking in with michelle williams. I've had a few moments with my guest. June ambrose as it relates to mental health and fashion and there was an episode that we filmed on his show she had on. Vh wild cod style. By june ambrose. I was so insecure. Because i was coming out of well. It'd been a few years. Since i was a solo artist. And no longer touring. They're singing with destiny's child. I was trying to find my style footing outside of the group. How was trying to refine. It actually couldn't refine it. Because i had to define it and june. Ambrose really really helped me with that. Will we found out that it was deeper than defining my fashion sense. We discovered so much fear in me of walking alone doing something by myself so she said to a place where it was a cia trap. He studio where i only thought that. If you're training for gymnastics or the circus that you should only be going to these types of places but going into that trap appease plays when you have to stand on the ledge. I literally burst out in tears. Because i had a revelation that i was scared to take the leap by myself. That was just a personal nugget. I'm just so thankful to june for helping me discover that once again at went beyond anything that she was going to put me in fashion wise. It went beyond anything that surge on the makeup artist was gonna do with my makeup. It went beyond any even. They dyed my hair but none of that mattered. If i was going to continue to walk around with so much fear hours just literally gonna look fierce and be fearful and wanna be fearful some just so thankful to june for helping me take that leap of faith. Now i want to welcome to my podcast. June ambrose and amazing style icon herself but she has made her clients to be celebrity style icons as well especially in the hip hop world for superstars like missy elliott and jay z. And so many more. She's also the creative director for the global brand puma. And when she's not on my podcast she's an n. b. man costume designer for some of the biggest music videos and tv shows. But let me tell you something. She's also just a fabulous friend wife and mother please welcome. I can call her my friend. Y'all please welcome june ambrose. How category. I absolutely absolutely. I really wanted to just speak on your joy. And also the psychology behind your styling. But as i was thinking of people to be on this podcast especially those that are walking their journey to have a better quality of mental health. As said june. Ambrose is always smiling. June ambrose is always full of joy and i was like i never see her in a bad mood and i just wanna know june. How do you keep your joy. It's really exhausting. To be sad it'd be sad instead of the other way around. Yeah like it's. I find that you know i. Smoke is joining that. Were on in life. The cycle we think it's as we're living but it's going very slow but it's actually going really. It's a short trip you know. We're lucky we get a hundred years. You know so. I tried to make everyday count. I try to even on my worst date on on our bed. Dang something happens that may be upsetting or disappointing. I know that it won't that you know there's always a tomorrow. Hopefully yeah if. I want there to be if there isn't gonna make this moment joyful. Yeah i just to tap. And i think since memories really help you to kind of stay happy you know when you tap back into those moments that joint like always tell people that hate taking photos if you feel awkward and uncomfortable in front of a camera tap into like sense memories and think about the feeling the emotion not about. What's in front of you but think about what's inside of you. You know that constant reminder that technique is something that takes practice so if you work on tapping into the joy. When you're in pain you'll be able to call on it even if it doesn't it doesn't sustain you for length of time. At least you know you have the ability to tap into a good feeling. You have that choice now. Some people struggle with not being able to tap into their joy. You know for for many reasons. But i recognize that is one of my superpower so i like to share it and it's just again. It's less exhausting. it's more fun being degi. Hear what she said. Did you get those nuggets. I mean because i feel like you were saying even if you are having a bad day you don't you're not gonna let it turn into your worst day and i also feel like if you're having a bad day some people will let everybody know around them that they're having a bad hair then you make everybody else have a bad day for michelle is kind of also you patient than than a man in space and i'm in creative space also working with celebrity talent and working with corporate big companies beauty brands in different scenarios and being on camera you after how to put that away and not bring that into the space right. So it's like you can't walk into a classroom day you know. You can't go on camera with a day. You have to find a way to pack away.

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