32 Burst results for "Michelangelo"

"michelangelo" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

07:40 min | 5 d ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Out of that money. Can you give us a flavor of? The kinds of you you've heard from this group among the Royal Academy NHS. The academy itself was very strongly come out against the idea of selling, but but Caen I'm not. I'm not clear on what the kind of community of academy is like in terms of what we know of the official comittees, we know of the the the overall body but are there cliques within the academy missions if you like who are like minded who? Have certain agendas Wa lobbying for certain policies or whatever. You can give us just a flavor because it seems it's an amorphous in my mind and I can't really I'd like you to sort of mail a little bit of how it works cap missions. mcadoo missions of A. Lie All artists. If you try to get them together. It's like hurting cats I mean. Whole off in. All sorts of? Directions. They're all very well meaning I. Mean I don't think there's malign person amongst who's tried to. I'm. The effort by these Kinda missions is to secure the future of the World Academy so they. They're thinking about the World Academy. So it's not that, but it's just. Not, the big augments going on. But it's just that this understanding the future, the world academies dependent upon all sorts of things. Artists getting younger artists in there making it lively putting on extraordinary exhibitions but. Also about the legacy of the love and understanding of art, and so I the does is totally in that area you know it's a peculiar institution at all the volunteered missions all in a way. A small or large business people working away trying to keep their own stick going. But I bet I, bet none of them the ones who own have assistance working for them would've dipped into their own funds. To to pay their assistance that they would have furloughed them using the government scheme and they will be thinking about what to. What to do now as the whole of the art world is and it's a crisis, it really is a crisis because the end of the furloughs scheme. Means horrible nasty decisions or a new effort a new art fund. You know we need a new effort to try and think about. Wages. M Allison new you're working as we speak cutting an issue, the newspaper to bed, which is dominated actually by the crisis in UK institutions walks. You will have been in touch with with with the MS over the last few months asking them what's going on? Can you give us a sense of what the response from government is to the crisis? Do you feel they are doing enough? What are they doing? There obviously sympathetic and there is a one point. Five seven billion emergency fund. But know with this second wave coming. And the latest announcements is looking even worse really for the arts and the hospitality sectors. So there needs to be a concerted. Effort with government and Philanthropies I think to help the outs through this really difficult situation. And you know to consider selling off your treasures this time. would be madness. It's you know set a very dangerous precedent which I'm sure no other museums would want to want to follow. And it is the only Michelangelo Marble in. Britain. Bob Do you want to add to that? Yeah I just want to agree. And just and just say the Tondo is an extraordinary thing we fought to. Old Flow all flow is a similar kind of image in a way it's. A powerful image of. You know woman be all flows Madonna Image. It's an incredibly powerful and beautiful thing, and it needs to live at Brindisi live at the academy and and it's a it's a lovely ad inspiring thing made by human being. So you can fall in love with Michelangelo and full enough of the images an incredible thing. The thank you very much and let's see how the government responds. X. Thank you. You can read more about the story and the UK outs funding crisis in the print edition of the newspaper, which is out next week online newspaper, dot com or the APP and Alison calls. Book. The today Tondo is published by the Royal Academy in Price Twelve. Pounds Ninety five. Margaret Kerrigan took the legacy. Russell in a moment. But first hear a few of the top stories on the newspapers websites week. The New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced this weekend but a permanent memorial statue to Beta. GINSBURG, the supreme. Court justice he died on the eighteenth September will be installed in Brooklyn where she grew up as Helen. Stolis reports Komai suggestive Brooklyn Bridge Park as a potential location and said, Ginsburg selflessly pursue truth and justice in a world of division giving voice to the voiceless and uplifting those who are pushed aside by forces of hate and indifference. eulogists working in northwest Argentina have discovered an unknown Inca settlement. Thanks to the help of local high, school student Gary Shaw reports the previously cord it site could settle can motto but mountain comprises various incongruence stands at the southern frontier of their empire archaeologists led to the structures during the workshop by particularly kings didn't Cook Lewis and. And finally, Maurizio Catlin's comedian infamous banana take toward shown the our Basel. Miami Beach Fair last December has been given to the Solomon Guggenheim Museum. In New, York. The donation does not include the original banana itself. Oh the duct tape that was used to attach it to the wall. It consists of a certificate of anticipating and a long list of instructions with diagrams about how it should beans. Donor, the work was anonymous. You can meet these stories and much more at these pavement dot com. We'll be back after this. We cannot is sponsored by Christie's this awesome Christie's presents an exciting calendar of options an phase. Works by G, Reilly Patrick Coalfield Graham. Sutherland Boo in the modern British art show in. London on the twenty ninth of September. Christine is proud to support to international affairs this season who stayed on the innovative digital platform currently open forbidding. Paris landmark event featuring works spanning four thousand years of history from forty two world renowned galleries, and from the sixth of October discovered over six hundred works from exhibitors, showcasing artists from across Africa you and North America at one fifty, four online powered by Christie's. Refresh scheduled compliments. Christie's private sales bid Bayat at anytime and from any way, find out more on Christie's DOT com..

Christie World Academy government Royal Academy NHS UK Tondo Wa Caen official GINSBURG Michelangelo Royal Academy Michelangelo Marble London New York Governor Andrew Cuomo Brooklyn Reilly Patrick Coalfield Graha Bob Do
"michelangelo" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

15:43 min | 4 months ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"We've been rather short of good news recently on the weekend art but we begin this week with the story. That's prompted a lot of joy among art lovers the once in a Lifetime Exhibition of works by Raphael at the scooter. Rear Kitty Nali in Rome. Which only open for three days before being closed due to covid. Nineteen in March will reopen on the second of June and run for three months until the thirtieth of August. The show is the jewel in the crown of the celebrations across Europe and the US marking the five hundredth anniversary of Raphael's death age. Thirty seven famously. If perhaps inaccurately because of exhaustion caused by night of excessive sex with Margarita Lucci or laugharne arena one of his most famous portrayed. The Rome Exhibition begins with Rafael Death. Moves back in time includes works online for fifty two museums and galleries including the Louvre in Paris. The Prada Madrid a National Gallery in London National Gallery of art in Washington. Dc. And the feats he gallery in. Florence which is lent fifty works including paintings drawings and sculptures all. The museums have agreed to leave their works in Rome until the end of August. Cheering -Ly Mattioli from Coney Director of the scooter. Edict clearly said that there's a new sense of community in the museum world. Everyone is feeling the only way to get out of the crisis. Together is to al-roa in the same direction. I spoke to Hugo Chapman. The keeper of prints and drawings at the British Museum and Rafael specialist about the artist fame has somewhat unfairly been eclipsed by Leonardo and his great rival Michelangelo. He go in civilization. Kenneth Clarke says that Raphael was prima harmonize her and that made him less suitable for our current age than other renaissance painters artists. What do you make of that? Is he more suitable for our age? Now Clark have a point. I think Kenneth Clarke definitely had a point in that Rafah's extraordinary meteoric success Does not kind of accord with our sense of of how artistic careers should be the troubled Michelangelo Forever Brooding and falling out with people or the Raleigh consulate tree and mysterious genius of Leonardo. I think hold much more facination than Rafael. Who was born in court and from a very early age understood how courts and powerful men worked and SORTA work system extraordinarily successfully and then it goes died relatively young thirty seven So he didn't have the struggle that we like But having said that I still think the more one knows about Rafael one does realizes is incredible autistic mind the that underlies his amazing success. I think that's right and certainly. That's my impression from everything I read is that is that you know. He's he's one of the great polymath isn't here. I mean we think of Leonardo is a great polymath but reptile himself turned his mind. He's talents to so many different disciplines. He did although having said that. That was rene sauce where there was no training to be laissez an architect you just you just sort of to to stonemasons and and you learn how to do it I mean to some degree. He was less of a polymath in some of his contemporary. Sir I mean. Everybody was less of a polymath. Leonardo of course And he was extremely brilliant architect although very little of his architecture survives he was. He tried his hand. Poetry With I don't think great success because whether that was sort of because Lear Michelangelo was was very good poet But I think above all he was he was a great painter was certainly more than Michelangelo. Who who who did paint Barat kind of grudgingly. He was was always Michelangelos school tour. I think what well Rafael can do in paint. is still one of the most Thrilling things both in oil paint and also in FRESCA. He really is technically absolutely brilliant and concert. Turn his hand to everything and is much more sort of varied in his output. And are there are beautiful landscapes is great portraitist You know big sort of historical dramas and in a way that I think Leonardo and and and Mike Lynch Lendu really can't match. Let's talk a bit about about his origins. As you said he was born. Essentially at his father was a court painter. How much did he learned from his father? How and how quickly did he surpass him? Well of course. His father isn't around for for very long but I mean everything that we know about. Rafal is it. He's a frighteningly quick learner. He absorbed sings at an amazingly rapid rate And I'm sure you know. He took on his father's mantelet a very early age. He he kind of understood what his father's art was about and then very swiftly kind of surpass it and look for other models but I think that court training in beano which was a very sophisticated humanistic court the Rafah's Z's with mixing with a people socially much hira up up the pecking order and his ability to talk to to literary men. All of that came out of his training in being so I think it was a kind of ideal place for a future world beater to be born so he was very lucky in that respect. Obviously not so lucky that his father died and his father to be. Frank wasn't a great a great painter. He's more famous for his his poetic Kind of biographies of of artists of his time. But you know he was a perfectly. Decent Artists who Rafael would have learnt the basics of. But I didn't think Giovanni Santi even his greatest Mara would not put him amongst the Pantheon of great for Nissan's artists and that precociousness referrals was extraordinary because he was a master basically before he was in his twenties. Yes I mean he you know he's he was. I think he you know he's one of those artists who who kind of realized his amazing talented. He had this sort of searching intelligence and desire to move. I mean Beano is anybody who's been there is rather difficult place to get to even now It's not the center of anything and I think. Rafael quickly saw that If he was going to make his way He needed to leave. Be No and And then he spends time in an umbrella him improve GER which is a much bigger place on a place where he can learn more from from From from Pera Gino and others And then you know he then move onto Florence and then to Rome. He's you know he's somebody who's always interested in in looking around and saying what's the most interesting artistic trends and wanting to be there to learn from it. I mean if you Michelangelo and I can't help thinking Michelangelo. On his sort of Mount Olympus cloud wherever grey his go must be laughing himself fit to bus that poor raffles celebrations fifteen. Twenty eight of being completely over turned by Covid Because because Michelangelo Hated Rafeh with a kind of intensity that I think appropriate Jersey even in in the in the next world. Can you explain why because there's obviously complex but why did Michael android hate? Refer so much while it's I think it was based on Michelangelo. Feeding the Rafal had looked at his art and kind of stolen His style you know. He says one of his letters. Everything that Rafal highs he has for me I think is true But Michelangelo kind of addressed sees only his own art there. I mean what's as as you began said what Raff are supremely skilful at is taking taking aspects of of lots of different artists. Molding it into an individual. Very personal style. It's not all for Michelangelo for Michelangelo's particular perspective. That's the way he saw it And yes and Rafeh was tremendously successful. Rafael is ascendant in Rome. The young artists coming to Rome. And in the end. Lear the tenth combat. They're kind of in a war between the two of Florida up for these two artists. And he sends Michelangelo Back to Florence to work MEDICI projects and there is Rafael at a very young age. He is the top artists in Rome which means he's the top artists in Europe so it is an incredible success. You know we. We have very little in terms of documentation to show what. Rafael is doing behind the scenes but once suspects you that he was sort of talking to the right the right cardinal at the right time he was very good at playing politics in a way that. Michelangelo wasn't because for so he says that this is the thing about Rafa referrals. He just seems an almost like a perfect human. In sense of he's got he's got this extraordinary courtly manner you know he's he's an impeccable man. He's incredibly witty. This is good looking. He's he's witty. Yes I remember the other side. I think you can see him and I think one of one of the things that Thome Henry and Caroline Carol Platt Salsa did in the National Gallery show which was involved in was to kind of suggests that actually there's an athlete ruthless side of Rafah. He moves in and he then becomes whether it's in Arruda he sort of moves in as he does in Rome and and sort of becomes the top artists. And I kind of you know very sort of Cuckoo. Like way he's sort of comes in and you think. Oh there's poor Rafael. He's just a little sort of young provincial artists and by God. He's sued he. He's he's he's taken over all the plum commissions and he's forced you out so I mean there is. There is a ruthless as about Rafael. And I think he's the brilliant Rafal is that he sees that in order to succeed in that he has to have a really really productive and brilliant artistic studio behind him and this is the difference between him and Michelangelo. Michelangelo always surrounds himself until right to the end of his life where he changes his spots to a degree. But he's he really is so paranoid he surrounded himself by artistic nonentities because he's so why are they going to steal ideas from him? Rafael is so supremely confident of his own skills. That he hired. He's very very young. Very talented Giulio. Romano Penny Perino Varga Who are really really top rate artisan and have distinguished careers in their own right but as Rafael at the center of the artist's studio in Rome. Who is making them work And produce work in his style and he's amazingly productive whether it's cartoon designed whether it's architecture whether it's tapestries. He's he just sort of covers the whole lot and I think that sort of entrepreneurial spirit of Rafah the idea of sitting at the center of his judo being this sort of chief designer of a variety of different lines Is is very modern and I think Rafael would be. If he was alive today I would be sort of a film director at the same time is he's right here novel etc etc. He just. He was just extraordinarily creatively. Brilliant aunt and sort of understood how production worked Gonna. That's the thing is ultimately he's brilliant. He's what got him all those commissions because if I mean is is utterly extraordinary that he hasn't really done any significant public commission before he took on the standard which are one of the greatest works of all time so it seems to me that yes he could. He could have been as charming as they liked. But if he didn't back it up with this unbelievable brilliance. Then it wouldn't. It wouldn't have mattered. No I think that's very true. I mean I think the problem. Both of Leonardo and of of Michelangelo to an extent is is is the delivery breath. I mean they the ideas. They were as brilliant as as as anyone who's ever been in terms of ideas but often in the in the delivery because both in a sense quite solitary and light to kind of produce their own work Meant that their production was was quite limited That wasn't the case of Rafael. He he he learned to to get a very productive studio Producing work follow following his drawings and drawings was absolutely fundamental to Rafael. I mean and I mean for me. I mean the reason why I'm working in the British Museum. I mean sons bit kind of weird to say but it is because Rafah because when I was at university studying ruffle I find him. This is back to kind of spotty. Nineteen year old Hugo I found RAFFLE IS PAINTED. Really quite difficult to get my head. And I didn't find him very sympathetic. He seemed to perfect to idealized too so rarefied but but when Through the the the call set the then Westfield College and University College we were taken to look at joins. The Menashe met at the ash million Byron suddenly another aspect to Rafael. Came out this extraordinary mind. The way that he's pushing himself through drawing to analyze to understand how the work of Michelangelo and Leonardo much much more sophisticated than him when he comes to Florence. How he uses join to kind of what they're doing and then to kind of absorb it into his own style to me that was just a revelation is suddenly. I could see this amazing mind work. Which anybody looking at a drawing by RAFAEL CONC- Incredible creativity you he. He I mean what the difference is that Rafah then goes onto use those drawings to actually produce work software with my cleanser and Leonardo. They've produced wonderful joins but it doesn't actually materialized into a finish work whereas Rafael is absolutely bent on producing from this drawing. I will then go into painting. I'm going to produce. And that is why he so loved by patrons because on the whole if he said he was going to produce on the view heap actually did produce it So that's that's quite a killer Combo. That's one of the wonderful things isn't it?.

Rafael Lear Michelangelo Rome Rafah Leonardo Florence Rafael Death Raphael RAFAEL CONC Michelangelo Forever Brooding Europe Rafal Westfield College and Universi Rome Exhibition British Museum National Gallery Louvre US Kitty Nali
Essence

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:05 min | 5 months ago

Essence

"Come back to daily bread. Deepak Chopra these weeks. We have been uncovering hidden dimensions of life. I just wanted to remind you that. This whole daily bad series on secrets is actually drawn from my book. The book of Secret. So if you feel inclined you might want to get the book as well to reinforce your in descending this week we reach the core of our exploration this is that everything is pure essence so pure awareness pure consciousness. Essence is the ultimate mystery because it manages to do three things all at once. It conceives everything in existence. Imagine anything in existence I imagine a rainbow imagine sunset. Imagine the face of your mother or the sound of voice. Imagine listening to John Lennon. Imagine the song itself. How does it start you start? With the conception and intention an conception awareness modifies itself is the concept it turns wattage has imagined into reality. So you imagine creating a great Sculpture What Did he looks at the stone piece of rock a marble piece of marble and imagines David and that's how he starts. What is imagination is turned into reality? Any great piece of art starts like that. The Mona Lisa Michelangelo's Beautiful Sculpture Does but even scientific discoveries Einstein imagined that he was writing on the beam of light from there can the Tiriac relatively so imagination is stunned into reality and then it enters that reality and keeps it alive so essence our consciousness or awareness has conceived constructed imagined governed and then it becomes what we call reality because awareness is embedded in what it has imagined saved simply put I exist. I am an I create I exist. I am aware 'cause I am is the beginning of awareness and then from there on I conceive construct imagine govern and create these The three qualities I exist. I'm aware I create frequently referred to in Sanskrit Nanda South is truth of existence. This awareness on under the joy that comes from unlimited creativity

John Lennon Deepak Chopra Sanskrit Nanda South Mona Lisa Michelangelo Einstein David
"michelangelo" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

09:47 min | 6 months ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Then it also reminds me Miles when I think about the situation of the replica of David in front of the old palace the fact that the renaissance was a great cultural thing but it wasn't for the Commoner. So much was up in the higher floors of the palace there with the windows just out of stones throw reach and I believe that the story is. They're having a riot and people broke into the palace. And the through furniture out the window at actually knocked off. Part of the Statue Michelangelo's precious David and they realized they needed to put David safely off the street and into a gallery. Is that your understanding of it? Well that happened actually years later it was damaged and interestingly enough the great art historian and sort of disciple of Michelangelo Save the arm and preserved it until after the riots were over and then we attached it but it did stand out there for a couple of centuries more before it was brought in I think in the nineteenth and to preserve from the mostly from the weather revolution and other other damage. When you see that the David today you see almost like it's an church like it's the altar of humanism under this amazing Dome Well it's really been transformed from a and this is the way art often goes art particularly it's made for a particular political or religious purpose. It's often nowadays. We're used to seeing things in museums. Or they're SORTA sanitized and separated. We look at them as aesthetic objects first and foremost and this is certainly one way to look at them. But I think it's also important to understand the way. They functioned within society at the time as propaganda as patriotic or religious symbol. They were not sort of separated from life the way they are now in the kind of climate controlled atmosphere of the museum. You know I think that is so important to understand the context and who paid for it and why. What was the agenda? Because this art took a lot of money and people hadn't agenda and in so many cases like David had a a real purpose miles Jay unger explores how Michaelangelo redefined what it meant to be an artist and why his works are among the highest achievements of Western civilization in his book called Michelangelo. A life in six masterpieces unders earlier works. On Renaissance. Italy are about Machiavelli and Lorenzo de Medici. His website is miles. Jay UNGER DOT COM. Well let's talk about the PGA. There's three or four Michelangelo Pietas Beautiful. Of course the most famous one is in Saint Peter's but a beautiful peter is in the Museum of the Walmart of the Cathedral just behind the cathedral and that's one of the highlights in one of the less appreciated masterpieces by Michelangelo. I would say yeah. It's partly because it was never finished. In fact he wanted to destroy himself. This was the statue that was meant for. He meant for his own tomb but he was working on it late in life. And it was a very complex figure grouping with four figures including his own self portrait as Nicodemus. Who brings the body down from the cross but he really had a hard time with that he at one point he smashed the. It's the right leg of Christ in anger because he couldn't get it right and he wanted to throw it out in frustration anger of but fortunately was preserved and it is a very moving both the unfinished self portrait as Nicodemus. Plus the the body of crisis one of the most wonderful passages and all sculpture But it is an incomplete in probably uncompleted sculpture which is why he himself was so furious and frustrated by its execution. I find it so touching because I'm looking at that portrait that face of nicodemo which is actually the very old. Michelangelo looking down at one of his last major pieces of art in. And you have this beautiful piece below him and Michaelangelo as naked. Mrs Looking down over it and then maybe cap your visit to Florence with Michelangelo theme by going to the Santa Croce Church. Because there you will find Michelangelo's tomb surrounded by all the other Great Florentine big names of the renaissance and it is quite a reminder that this was a time of great energy and things coming together a perfect storm of creativity and artistic wonder. What do you see when you go into Santa Croce Miles? I Love Santa Croce. It's one of my favorite churches in Florence. I love the square outside Santa Croce as will But it was used as the MEDICI for longtime tried to make it into Pantheon of Florentine Greatness Machiavelli is buried there as well. It was also the church that was the one of the sort of parish. Church was right in their neighborhood. It was the one that Michelangelo himself felt most closely tied. But it really gives you a sense of the kind of constellation of genius was created in a city that in Michelangelo's time was no more than fifty thousand maximum people but you know the number of great artists and poets and philosophers. That came out of there is true. I think the only city that I think in history that could rival that record would be Athens in the fifth century. Bc It was just one of these moments where everything came together and you really see in the merger Santa Croce so there in Santa Croce. You've got really that celebration of all the greatness that came together that perfect storm of creativity and genius and civic pride that put Florence on the map miles. Jay Unger thank you for writing. Michaelangelo a life in six masterpieces. And thanks for giving us a better understanding of how we can enjoy the brilliance of Michelangelo. Next time we go to Florence. Thank you Cameron. Hewitt is senior researcher. At Rick Steves Europe and he joins US ON TRAVEL WITH RICK. Steves from time to time. Last year Cameron stayed at a farmhouse agritourism allowed in the Italian countryside. Tuscany but he didn't have to worry about getting bored. He files this report for us. One of the activities guests are invited to join in on making homemade pasta. The old fashioned way a Tuscan agritourism. Oh tourist farm really puts you in touch with local traditions. I'm staying at a farmhouse that purchase on a Ridge just outside of Piacenza as the sun sets it casts warm orange light on vibrant greenfield in the glass in Verandah a dozen American travelers huddled around a table. Our hosts are about to show us how to turn a few bags of flour and some eggs into a traditional Tuscan feast. Hi I'm Cameron Hewitt. It's Thursday night and here at Crayola agritourism. Oh Thursday night is pasta making night a few years. Back City slicker Isabella. Mary Country Boy Carlo. They turned his family farm into an agritourism. Oh and today. They fill their guests. Weeklong stays with vivid experiences. Everyone's favorite activity is learning how to make a traditional noodle called Peachy Isabella and her right hand woman. Carlotta stand over an oversized cutting board and address the group on a record we need to clean that toward perfectly from August. Now rests okay but like the bumps and we don't want we reduce the roughnecks here okay so first Carlotta dumps out four bags of flour. Dredges out crater turning your mountain into a volcano. They crack seven eggs into their powdery reservoir. The KIDS HELP. Leeson okay now that it changes the sound here and couldn't inside okay. Okay now we try another one. They beat the eggs with a fork and speak in a few drops of water slowly. They pull in more and more flour from the lip of the crater and gradually the EGGY goo turns into a hunk of sticky dough. We with the thing that you lifted up you wrote it back a little bit and the hand heels gently push forward than the thing. Tips Roll it back. Peachy is a peasant's noodles. It's not neatly extruded from a metal tube. It's rustic and hand-rolled here's the technique you cut off a hunk cadeau. Hold it in your left hand and use your right hand to roll a little tale from the DOE against the cutting board. It's trickier than it. Sounds too little pressure and you get thick ropes too much pressure and it breaks into bits but if you do it just right you get a noodle shape like a three foot long earthworm. While everyone's making noodles. I had outside to find Carlo at the grill. We're his ribs and pork sausages sizzle. According the Choir Chai only evil chip sausage in the Little Garden shed nearby Isabella poorest three generous handfuls of salt into twenty gallons of boiling water. Then she drops in the handfuls of the noodles squirm around the bubbles like miniature heels so when it really starts to. Falmer from that point we wait another minute now. Begins to see what happens in a few seconds and in just a few minutes. It's done cooking is Bella tosses the peachy with some meat ragout. She's been simmering all day long and everybody gathers on the Veranda and we all dig into our hard earned feast the peachy our firm but tender. Each noodle clings to just the right amount of sauce. Just like it was designed to do. Is I enjoy my favorite meal of the trip. It dawns on me here in Tuscany. Traditional ways still really are the best ways.

Michelangelo Florence David Santa Croce Statue Michelangelo Cameron Hewitt Michelangelo Pietas Beautiful Peachy Isabella Jay Unger Santa Croce Miles Tuscany Isabella Nicodemus Santa Croce Church Rick Steves Europe Crayola agritourism Italy Jay unger
"michelangelo" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

08:52 min | 6 months ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"By breathing human sensibility into the religious themes of his sculptures and rescues. We'll explore how his hometown of Florence is the ideal base for you to enter into the world of Michaelangelo next on travel with Rick. Steves when you get to see one of Michelangelo's masterpieces in person could be his frescoes in the Sistine Chapel or his famous statues of David. Or you're seeing works of art. That are not only beautiful. Their revolutionary in the height of the Italian Renaissance Michelangelo Buonarroti of Florence added a humanistic sensibility to the religious art. That he was commissioned to create he fought with his patrons to create. What his inner. Musa Michelangelo left us. A legacy. That touches the deepest cords of the human spirit. Five hundred years later miles. Jay Unger spent five years in Florence in preparation for Writing Michelangelo. A life in six masterpieces. He joins US now on travel with Rick Steves to tell us how Florence is an ideal place to understand Michelangelo. That's because Florence retains much of the character that framed Michelangelo's World Miles. Thanks for joining us. Pleasure you know something striking and something you mentioned in your book Michelangelo a life and six masterpieces is how Florence today to a large extent. Feels like Florence in Michelangelo's time five hundred years ago how so it's Been preserved very well in part because it. Shortly after Michelangelo's death it sort of slid into irrelevance. It was a nation state city state on the decline and so it did not have the great post Michaelangelo building boom that Rome had to with all those wonderful baroque churches and palaces So it in a way. It's was a city frozen in time and today when you visit to Florence you can walk within. What were the city walls Very easy walk. You can cover so many dimensions of Michelangelo's career. If you were to be our tour guide and design of visit in Florence to just pick up on the genius in the wonder of Michelangelo. How would you structure it? Where would you go? I think the place to start is the cousin of one or not which was a property. He purchased himself. It's not where he grew up. And it's one of the palaces. He purchased as soon as he had some money there. They had some of his earliest works. Particularly the battle of the centers and the Madonna of the stairs which are his two earliest sculptures. So I think that's a good place to start. It wasn't necessarily his boyhood home. It's treated like the House of the Bonar. Ot family if there is a Michelangelo Museum in town that would be it a nearby center. Perito and Central Spree tow is seems like another church but it has actually some of his work. Insitute doesn't it it has it has a crucifixion. Though I have to say that this is disputed not everyone believes this is a genuine Michelangelo Most scholars do button. Most people think it was a work. He did as a young man after he did a number of dissections in the church there in the mortgage and in gratitude for allowing him to do this which was not really considered a kosher back in those days He carved this nude Christ for the Church. Which is still there in an hangs on across to this day. Five hundred years later and that's a good point. Michelangelo had that Renaissance Appetite and curiosity for understanding. What's under the skin and it was very dicey to be dissecting corpses and If you had good connections in the church you could probably have access to some corpses and that let Michelangelo do his research and it shows in his art I would say. I think it's exciting to see a Michelangelo. Actually not in a museum but in the original place it was intended to be artistic term for that. I think is in C two and a beautiful thing about the crucifix in Santos Burrito is. It's that slender less muscular. Michelangelo that you see in his early years and later on. He got into more massive and big bodied work. The bargello the former prison in Florence is a tube statues. What the Uffizi is to painting? Isn't it was one of the great collections of renaissance particularly early Renaissance Sculpture? And you WANNA see the sculptures of David that Michelangelo was looking at when he sculptured his own. David there a couple of wonderful ones the DONATELLO's there wonderful bronze Donatello David and the video David as well but In terms of Michelangelo's the most important works. There are the early bacchus which was the first working in in Rome and again not the kind of over muscled figuring that you expect to Michelangelo and also one of the early release. He did of the mother and child the Piton. Does there as well. So that would be on your list. The bargello and you mentioned something really that I hadn't even thought of miles petit appreciate Michelangelo. Appreciate the art that inspired him in the Bargello. You could see those earlier. David's by Barocco and Donatello was Michelangelo actually inspired by those masterpieces. He was very inspired by Donatello. In particular who know Florentine sculptor could sort of escape the legacy donatello but I think he was. He wanted to do something very different. His is a much more monumental figure. It takes a different point in the story. It takes the the point before. David has defeated Goliath. So he's looking at. Donatella but I think he's trying to do something very different. Any certainly did you can almost psychoanalyze the tenor of the age by looking at the treatment of David from one generation to the next of course. Michelangelo is a renaissance genius in almost by definition. That means you are a master of different media. And he was a architect he was a sculptor and a painter. And if you WANNA see I think the only painting I've ever seen by Michelangelo's in New Jersey. Yeah it's the only painting on panel if you don't include the great frescoes of course right In the Sistine Chapel and the last judgment it's the only panel painting and described it. He famously did not like painting. And even though his trained as a painter in gear on dial studio he kept saying. Oh it's not my art and trying to beg off various projects but he was as you can see if you look at the holy family of highly skilled and trained painter. But when you look at the holy family you feel like his heart is in sculpture because the figures he painted have that sculptural kind of depth. Don't they they do Unlike his great rival and the person who was looking at when he was painting this he was looked. Definitely looking at Leonardo Davinci's a wonderful family groupings and trying to compete with them but whereas Leonardo's painting these soft misty his famous snow motto. Everything in the holy family. Is You know as if lit by Clegg Lights just harsh bright light and I always think it's interesting that when all this controversy happens a couple of decades ago about cleaning the Sistine Chapel and people saying Oh we'll all the you know if you clean it off it's way too garish. I was thinking to myself. What just look at the holy family in the feats the and look how how Garish. These colors are bright. And you know these lines marines and purples are very much the colors that popped out after. The Sistine ceiling was clean. This has traveled. Steve's for talking with Miles Jay Unger Miles is book. Is Michelangelo a life in six masterpieces and were traveling through Florence right now dropping into all the sites that have Michelangelo masterpieces and of course people go to Foreign David. David originally was positioned outside of the City government building on the DILLARD's in your area and it ended up a replica there and the original nearby in the academia gallery. Talk for a minute please. Miles about the Piazza della senior and how that relates to Michelangelo. The Piazza del senior year and the Palazzo behind were the seat of the Florentine government and Florence at this time was a separate nation. State with a proud centuries-old history but it was beleaguered on all sides by much larger foes who wanted to swallow it up and the David was sculpted as he patriotic symbol and it was placed in the center civic center of Florence it had actually originally been commissioned to stand on top of the Tribune of the Cathedral but the city fathers quickly realized it would be much more effective as a patriotic symbol. If it sat there in the Civic Square so today you can see a very good copy of the David standing where stood for many centuries and then One can go on to see the original in the Academia Museum a few blocks away where you see this sort of exquisite art of the original the subtlety of the carving the beauty of the surfaces. But you need to keep both aspects of the sculpture in mind both the sort of profanity and as a work of art but also as a kind of civic patriotic symbol..

Musa Michelangelo Michelangelo Italian Renaissance Michelange Donatello David Florence Michelangelo Museum Sistine Chapel Rick Steves center civic center of Florenc Church Jay Unger Miles Renaissance Sculpture US Foreign David Jay Unger David Rome Piazza della
Saints of Spain; David Suchet  Footsteps of St. Paul;  Michelangelo In Florence

Travel with Rick Steves

07:50 min | 6 months ago

Saints of Spain; David Suchet Footsteps of St. Paul; Michelangelo In Florence

"Whether you're looking at Michelangelo's magnificent statue of David or you get caught up in a ruckus crowd at a street festival in Spain or even if you just listen to the wind whisper. What life was once like among the sun bleached ruins of the Mediterranean? Your travels can lift your spirit in many ways. Hi I'm Rick Steves in just a bit. We'll take a closer look at the world. Michelangelo lived in influence. Five hundred years ago and actor. David Suchet tells us how he retraced the route that Saint Paul traveled through the eastern Roman Empire. Nearly two thousand years ago. Let's start the hour with a look at how people in Spain honor the lives of important figures from their past. There are actually hundreds of national and regional saints in Spain. And you'll find that many of them get a festival that brings their communities out into the streets to celebrate to explain the role of Saint in the culture of Spain. We're joined now by tour guides or hate Roman from Madrid and Francisco Gloria from pump. Lona or Hey in Francisco. Happy Easter Thank. You thank you so. Spain is a Catholic country in in the church is a huge part of the political and spiritual past. To what extent is the Catholic Church? Still a big part of Spanish society. Today it is. I mean now. The government that we have now is very conservative and they relates a political issues with the church. Not Everybody is happy about that but still part of it and also the most of the celebrations in Spain national holidays. They advocated saints. Lady's name names. I think a lot how. How does the naming of children work compared to the Catholic faith? I mean you're or hey your Cisco do they have any with your parents. Passion for Saints a Whole Mike. As many Ms Francis Xavier because your middle name is executive because for some frantic savior was born in my town so and he was the first Jesuit Right. He was one of the founders of Jesuits Yep okay main signatures which is a very common name. Ignatius and Francisco Xavier. That's a common name where you come from pump loan and actually my name is the ACLU into English degeorge and is the only saint in the Catholic Church actually wasn't a saint also warrior that killed the Dragon Saint George killing the Dragon. Yeah it wasn't saying actually but so there are a lot of festivals when you travel in and almost all of them seem to be related to the church. Talk about a couple of the the great festivals in the Saints Days. That are important in your life in your travels Francisco I am from component the running of the Bulls on what we celebrate. The death of Seinfeld mean so. It's like huge huge celebration. That week starts July six hundred ends July fourteenth saint for me and I. You wouldn't even know who saint for me unless you went to. The running of the Bulls and pump. Lana developed comes from employees. They don't even know who he is attacked because everybody wears the red Kerchief around their neck and when people go to the running of the Bulls they wear this red neckerchiefs symbolism planet. We are under two hundred thousand people. I didn't know we. We welcome one million people and everybody's wearing white unread and nobody knows why like. Excuse me you do get excuse me. I'M A tour guide. I want to explain to you why. You're wearing this red handkerchief. That was the first person that was baptized employees and they cut his head for the recent. So what we represent the white outfit Represents Holiness and the Redmond nights the blood coming out of his neck so he was an early Christian. Pump Loner who was beheaded. Yes he was. We hit it. We say that he was beheaded any Pamplona although history tells us that he was beheaded in France. But Hey ho hey. From Madrid what festivals would impact a traveler when that we should know about quite Madrid? Not Maniacs you say but there is one very close which is Toledo the Corpus Christi is the big the there in Corpus Christi in Toledo is and that's the the corporate the body the body of Christ that's correct. Yeah and that's the Big Day in Toledo and they do bring some things to parade around. And he's part of a could be the equivalent of the beaches. Pelton SPAIN LIKELY. You have here states them. They're very conservative in there. That's interesting because in the United States We've got a region called the Bible Belt in Spain. Is there a region that would be the Bible belt get could be the political? Be One of them if you go around. Let's say like half Mouche from Madrid to the West from Madrid to the West Toledo Arbella. Salunke that part of your Browning what do you? What is your image of being? We'll have to think that we had the Muslim heritage Muslim heritage started to come down of it from the north down. Thanks Community Santos on James. Drake has just for the historic context. The Muslims came in and took over Spain and Portugal in from the eighth century until fourteen. Ninety two a good part of Spain was ruled by Muslim overlords. And then for centuries there was the RECON keystone reconquering has finally fourteen ninety two. The last Muslim was pushed out of Granada and back into Africa. What I make the difference that the Community Santiago okay. The origin was by the coast and it was the beginning of the Spanish reconquista. So this is the Camino Santiago. This is the big pilgrimage trail that cuts across from France all the way across north Spain the major city in the north west of Spain Santiago de Compostela. They'll go and How what's the historical roots for this pilgrimage? Because thousands and thousands of people make this high out there still do it people at the beginning they did it by the coast so those kingdoms those ancient kingdoms there the realize that whatever was going there were no Muslims so th would they decided to push it south and south and south and south until the Camino we know today so I am from the north in the north we barely have any Muslim heritage. We were more Christine. Must time before. But if you go down to under Lucia there you find. Churches generally built upon a mosque. Correct and mosque was built upon a church than they destroyed. If you go to civilian you see them at Nickerson Tarver. A Cathedral Tower actually was the minaret of the old mosque. So there's this layering of history. And what's very poignant to me? Is We hear about people. Being beheaded today in this struggle of fanatic Islam and Christians and so on but if you go to a church in southern Spain it's very common to see a man on a horse with a big sword cutting off the heads of Muslims and at the feet of the Horse. There's six or eight heads of beheaded Muslims as correct. Lose this man that is son James. The son teams we're representing three ways bishop as more slayer the more slayer so his. His nickname was saint. James the slater the more killer. Well enter the Moore's for the Muslims. Yeah most of our lives and today's politically incorrect. So we're beginning to cover those heads on the floor seriously. Some of those old statues and paintings are getting with put flowers well enough so you hide them so you hide you see a guy on a white horse with a sore but every time a Christian is just so disgusted by a Muslim fanatic. That cut off one of his people's heads we've got to remember. This is nothing new in history Spanish. I consider myself Catholic. We've been the worst ever I mean. We've inquisition the request. We have expelled. The Jews I mean with excuse of religion with Don's much bad. The inquisition is Sort of gift of Spain to the rest of Europe. What gave yeah. I poisoned gift. Would you describe the The inquisition you see the palace don't you out l. escorial that's right correct. What is the inquisition? Mean to to church history It's a sad episode. I mean this might personal opinion. Very site I mean also gave us practical thing. But it's a very very sad history. Every time I talk to them to my travelers about inquisition unites ties with Catholic moral and they kept going on.

Spain Madrid Saint Michelangelo Saint Paul Rick Steves Spain Santiago De Compostela David Suchet France Catholic Church Ms Francis Xavier Bulls Francisco Aclu Roman Empire Toledo Pamplona Cisco Saints
Raphael's tapestries return to the Sistine Chapel

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:42 min | 8 months ago

Raphael's tapestries return to the Sistine Chapel

"Finally on. Today's briefing few visitors to the Sistine Chapel of ever complained about a shortage of astonishing treasures but the Vatican's embarrassment of riches in this respect has just been significantly further engorged all. Twelve of Raphael's tapestries commissioned. Of course by Pope Leo the Tenth Have Been Hung on the Sistine Chapel's lower walls for the first time since Michelangelo was at work on the ceiling this is by way of commemoration of the five hundred th anniversary of Raphael's death. I'm joined now by Monaco Culture editor. Kiara a minute self-evidently. If this hasn't really happened for several hundred use kind of a big deal but but how big a deal is it. It is a very big deal. And when you think about the fact that this was how the Sistine Chapel was originally commissioned to be and how was intended to be as you say you know you'd be quite hard pressed to believe that there was more to go in there that the plan actually included extra ornamentation United States. Yes quite. I think it's worth the money of the ticket and but it was originally intended to the tapestry. Was were were commissioned so not to leave the the bottom half of the of the walls bear so speak and so It's it's really great to be able to finally see the vision that was originally intended for Sistine Chapel so for people who are fortunate enough to go and see these things. Do we entirely understand what they will be looking at? Yes so these are ten main tapestries into border tapestries. That were woven in Brussels to paintings originally by Raphael and they they are as usual. Kind of Obviously of of Religious subjects is moments of the life of Saint Peter and Paul and they are clearly very impressive. I think what's most interesting about all of this? Whole issue is that development clearly has so many of these treasures and it's a little bit of the paradox of of conservation that some of its most important treasures are the ones that see the light the least often because by nature of of them being so precious. They can't be shown to light very often. So these these tapestries will only actually be on display until the twenty third. And then they're gone again that will therefore one would think prompt cues round the block but my question is will many. Italians actually be in them because I growing up in cities in Australia for some big international artwork comes to town. It was a huge huge deal which is not to say a strenuous completely culturally impoverished but relative to Italy. You know what I'm saying. Do Italians get complacent about this? Italians are are you fellow. Italians reading stories of refugees. Half Millennia old tapestries. Whatever I think definitely we have a little bit more of a habit to We're just a little bit more accustomed to to renascent masterpieces. I do think that this is a particularly think interesting showing in that. There's also a bit of a quirky history to it in that. Michelangelo and Raphael were historically rivals and during the renaissance period. They were rivals for the pipes commissions. And so it's interesting to see. Michelangelo was really jealous. Rafael Rafael was younger and Raffle was basically Plagiarizing him and so. It was quite jealous that he did get the commissions for tapestries but then the ceilings of the stained chapel obviously make Michelangelo's suitably famous around the world to be able to think now of Rafael looking up the ceilings while Michelangelo was painting

Sistine Chapel Michelangelo Raphael Italy Rafael Rafael Pope Leo Monaco Culture Editor Kiara Brussels United States Raffle Saint Peter Australia Paul
"michelangelo" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:19 min | 11 months ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on KGO 810

"With the the image but one has to wonder what Michelangelo was thinking right what you put god in the center of a human brain well and what was the same what he did that there was a person is is god the creation of the human brain probably yeah anyway so I I love that picture so much I put it on the front cover my books science and faith and every place Adam with Einstein so I started to reaching out there god and god is reaching out to Einstein and so very clever how science and faith can be compatible let's go to my on our wildcard line to Tampa Florida hi Maya hi your character sheet your gas thank you so much he's a he's one of the your keepers that's for sure yeah interesting discussion just on the point you mentioned I had never thought there but as far as name being made in god's image the Bible clearly shows it's not as physical image because he's the he's invisible nobody has seen him but he has all of these more than four votes for Dominic qualities of love how are we stand and that that was the other one was but NY and has it has the power to create things we have a mall that's right yes so as far as that and interesting thing I thought you might be interested in because you were saying George how how can we know how can we know you're white we can't know everything imagine hello and he's saying this is the world this is the world well the answer for the Knicks knowledge a child when the child there the question of why is the sky blue and he's pretty small we give him the simplest answer he can understand when he gets older he can understand more science and so forth we want to know and so what the Bible has done is it's given us what we can understand right wow there's a scripture I believe it's in the book of psalms if if it from one thirty nine like that six where you need it set to guide your how amazingly were made because you're I thought even as an embryo this is all its parts were written in your book the second best CNA regarding the days when they were formed any of its parts existed before any of them existed so he's talking about DNA so we can find hello so much from the Bible but we need like guidance to find that out and as far as state that's why Jesus and his apostles to teach with another scripture I think you send the photo thank it where Frank Zappa faith follows the things hurt so they were to teach and people could learn it is not you have to have faith and you have to pull it out of the blue it's one we read these things in the Bible and we can not them it is amazing and it's discovered so many things and the more they discover kind of like your guest one out it becomes evident that this planet could not be supporting line without eight eight creator what I I I think you're I think you're absolutely right Marcia something is behind this fueling all this is it conceivable that if you look at the Bible Robert as a science book it would help with some of the answers well I don't I very much liked what Maya said about if if a child asks what is why is the sky blue you give them an answer that they can appreciate not necessarily.

Michelangelo
The Care and Feeding of Data Scientists: Recruiting and Hiring Data Scientists

Linear Digressions

07:59 min | 11 months ago

The Care and Feeding of Data Scientists: Recruiting and Hiring Data Scientists

"Hey everyone instead of your regularly scheduled programing with myself a ban This week has special gas Michelangelo. Dr Casino he is the senior the senior director of the Shar vp by my former boss great the scientists ed he and I together Britain and a Riley report that covers a lot of the managerial aspects of do that we thought you would be interested in so Colangelo thank you for joining me again reporter so this week we will talk about how we think about recruiting and interviewing and hiring folks you're listening to a nearby Russians so a little bit sitting here so you have data scientists who you work for you say you're presumably involved or have been involved in recruiting interviewing hiring let's the team I think there's a director and seven folks but I think they're really well have been part is that I started here about two and a half years ago when there was no data science team at all so I I was hired to basically build the team from scratch and so that involved a whole lot of all all this stuff we're about to talk about it tell me a little bit about how you started to break apart into pieces yeah it was really interesting experience because because so as Katie mentioned we worked we worked together before at our previous company our company had its historical origins and the Obama Campaign in two thousand twelve and so we have a lot of like favorable publicity and I would say we didn't have to try very hard to recruit the people like we have a very active top of the funnel We're good luck candidates were just pouring in and so our main job is basically like sifting through those candidates to find the people that were really really good and then convincing them to come come work for us but it wasn't like a demand generation problem When I started here I had almost completely the opposite experience so we had no data science team in place we were known for data science the company as a whole was probably ably like forty or fifty people then there's probably two twenty five now so so we were small and we didn't have a huge name and so the top of our frontal it was like almost completely dry or like the things that were coming into the top of the phone or just sort of garbage and as an asylum topping here so you're gonNA company I do you can shop runner I that would probably be some useful usual context listeners to have yeah so I I started the data science team at shop are Chicago based e commerce company that kind of like to second elevator pitch of what we do that we run across retailer Amazon prime like service for obviously non Amazon Company so we have millions of members and over one hundred retailers are members get free today shipping and returns kind of across that network so my team works with can imagine there's a pretty interesting amount of behavioral data we can collect from across that network and so my team works on building data products on top of all that data cool so yes assembling from the business mental life pretty strong product but you're still Chicago is unhealthy data science teams but I wouldn't say it's the same order that you say that they are worker Boston or some think I think there is healthy competition for what talent is here in my experience so yeah so that's that's a little bit of the environment in which you've found yourself trying to start up this T- yeah the backdrop so actually it was interesting when I started at a shop owner we had just hired a new seat CEO and our headquarters was actually in the bay area and the CEO decided to close the bay area headquarters and move it to Chicago and his which I think is actually born out is that you you know in the bay area the the supply of great engineers great data scientists is quite high but if you're a small fish in a big market and you don't have a name or like you're you're you know you're not on the front page of the newspaper all the time or you're not something like super cool APP that people are using all the time it's very hard to attract really good talent and so his bat was that and we could come to Chicago and get some of the best people in Chicago and actually ended up being in a much better position I think that that's sort of born out but to go back to like the challenge which of hiring the team like a lot of the the issue is that people didn't know who we are and you put job postings out there and you create people how jobs already or they they're on the market for a very short period of time and they're probably just not applying to your job post and so how do you actually go out and recruit and find those most people and I think one of the we talk about a handful of strategies and the report but I essentially like I did two things one was like I drank in insane amounts of coffee like literally anyone that would that would talk to me or anyone that ever sent me an email I wanted to chat I would go and have coffee with them because I think like having network and trying to like build up those connections like matters a lot because I I can tell them a story about like revision about what the team is going to do in in the future that they don't get a job hosting necessarily even if I wrote the job host in Jackie jobless things this is Joplin and it's rare that I see one of the lake really captured I think what it would be like to work somewhere so I I get so much more of an impression flavor from actually the jobs I yeah absolutely so I like head coffees with anyone that would have copy of me I and then the other the other piece was kind of like investing a way to try to get our name out there I guess so one of the things we talked about in the report is like using open source as a tool in your arsenal so actually open source sort of like a silly Jupiter Notebook widget actually very early on in my time here but that got kind of noticed noticed a few places and has hundreds of hub stars and started to get our name out there a little bit and we wrote a couple blog post initially started going to more conferences invents and that actually like slowly started to pay off a little bit so the the first data scientists we hired someone who is I saw was giving a talk at of meet up and a local meet up in town and I sent her an email and I was like hey you're talk like super interesting like would you like to have coffee hiring you're interested and it happened that like she was on the market and she's kind of like ultimately ended up hiring her she was kind of like the foundation of team she's now a manager managing other folks on the team but like a funny thing we one of the other things we talk about the report is Mike is Diversity techniques for recruiting diverse team and and one of the things we mentioned is that large laundry lists of skills in a job posting tend to turn off women and minority candidates more than non women I'm and non minority candidates lots of reasons for that but sort of just a fact and this candidate in particular had seen job hosting and thought she wasn't qualified and didn't apply but then randomly I had center this email and we had coffee and then it turned out she applied and was like amazing so that was just sort of sort of a funny little side story all right but we hired her and then the other person who is our second data scientists with someone who just randomly reach out about coffee and it was like hey I'm dropping out of the PhD program and I'm curious what inch what opportunities are in Chicago we had coffee and ended up hiring her and then slowly kind of built from there her

Dr Casino Senior Director Britain Riley VP
Jury recommends death penalty for "The Hollywood Ripper"

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Jury recommends death penalty for "The Hollywood Ripper"

"The jury's recommended the death penalty for the so called Hollywood Ripper as the verdict was read Michael goes you low stared straight ahead showing no emotion the defendant Michelangelo guilty of first degree murder and counts for and having found the special circumstance is true fix the penalty at the we the jury having found the defendant Michael Kors a little guilty of first degree murder and counts six and having found the special circumstance is

Michelangelo First Degree Murder Michael Kors Hollywood
Live from TWIMLcon! Use-Case Driven ML Platforms with Franziska Bell

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:55 min | 1 year ago

Live from TWIMLcon! Use-Case Driven ML Platforms with Franziska Bell

"Kind of paraphrase your role a little bit want us is yes see lots of demand on that front and then the third dimension really is the res ability of the else and methodologies we apply again with forecasting a common framework that is needed to build forecasting algorithms is back testing framework understanding the accuracy of your forecasts and that really is needed for any step along the forecasting journey and so having comments central paralyzed language extensible back testing framework is something that's really important so your team out evangelizing the community platform is and looking for customers that are already working on things that meet these criteria or are folks coming to us hey we've got these problems help them how does the relationship with your ultimate customer evolve yeah absolutely so we have a lot of the product teams coming to us with use cases at the same time because we are this horizontal team that spans across the entire company across all lines of business we have a very unique point as well and so we can also gently nudge some of the product teams to come and join us in this journey as well okay and so when you identifies a problem space that it makes sense to platform is how do you approach that you just jump in and start building star coding or what is the methodology look like yeah that's a great question so the way we built platforms is a use case driven manner so that basically means that with every use case that is strategically chosen we oak meant a platform reuse as much capabilities as possible from the platform and that really allows us to have wins very early on and learning from this we actually now have a three phased approach to plot from his ation so step one is really consulting so we have these deep domain experts in particular us of data science on the team and so we embed them with particular areas of the business where we see opportunities of having use cases in these areas and so that has a couple of advantages firstly the domain experts learn more about the business about the opportunities the pain points and really can bring Doc these learnings to then drive the best design for these platforms it also allows us to tackle these use cases early on and really show insights and gain the trust of our partners and leadership on that front that of course is not a scalable approach this is why we set out to do platforms in the first place but it's a very good starting point and so the second thing that we usually do is template so what I mean by this is we build recipes whether it's form of documentation for example I python notebooks providing talks and educational aspects and this really allows us now to have one too many multiplicative effect ugh throughout the organization mostly to other data scientists that are dedicated to these business areas and then over time as we're taking on or more of these use cases we will expand our platform to become more and more self service and work towards that vision of really providing it at the push a button with out domain expertise required of course encoding best practices and guardrails in the process so in introducing you mentioned Michelangelo Uber's love a machine learning infrastructure platform over was one of the first companies to publish about what they were doing to automate machine learning I interpret your linked profile correctly you were at Uber doing applied machine learning platforms before at least before that article hit early before the Michelangelo effort even started what's the relationship between these two teams yeah we have a fantastic working relationship if Michelangelo as well as the Organization Engineering Branch that we also work with very closely to platform is and we have three modes of interaction here the first one is s ahead of plot from science I get pulled in into the strategic and vision setting when it comes to Michelangelo working closely with their engineering and product bleed so right from the start is really great collaborative relationship that we can build on and then we have to other modes that have evolved over time the first one as Michelangelo was more niece and deeply embedded folks from our teams into the Michelangelo Group so for example the customer obsession ticket assistant example that I mentioned earlier this was actually the first steep learning algorithm that ran on Michelangelo and so as you can imagine a lot of eighty features required for doing deep learning we're in a very nascent state at the time and so having data scientists working on this particular problem deeply embedded Colangelo group and working together with the engineers and product miniature stare to bill capabilities not only to solve the custom obsession ticket assistant as but also more generic aspects that then really benefited the community more at large to build deep learning algorithms and framework it was really important here

What Does the Statue of Liberty Stand For?

Laura Ingraham

11:21 min | 1 year ago

What Does the Statue of Liberty Stand For?

"It give us your tired your poor those lines etched on the statue of liberty by poet Emma Lazarus are part of our common understanding about what America is what it has stood for since its founding yesterday a top immigration official in the White House can Cuccinelli said he's quote certainly not prepared to take anything down off the statue of liberty but at the same time a new administration role will fundamentally change who gets to come to this country okay since when since when have we been the country that says Hey come here for free stuff Hey come here if you can't afford things in your country come here because we're going to give it to you for free since when now they will argue that that is the Emma Lazarus poem give us your tired your poor your huddled masses that is not what that palm means and we've talked about it before but it is important that you understand it so you can teach it to your friends they're never going to get it there's never there I have yet to see the anchor or anyone from the left that will honestly say you know what I was wrong I learned something I I see this in a different way I had a misunderstanding I have not seen that from the left I have seen that from the right we've done it on this program it's important if you don't do that you're not learning anything so the misunderstanding is it the statue of liberty the emphasis is always on she's the mother of exiles she's this mom and she's saying give us your poor your tired your huddled masses because we're a giant hospital that's not what she's saying that's not what America is what in what world including the world of Jesus Christ in what world does a messenger say Hey if you're really poor and you just can't make it and you wanna live off the fruits of somebody else come here come here in what world does that work in what world is that financially reasonable in what world is that spiritually reasonable that rushes people the statue of liberty is eight Allen she holds imprisoned lightning what is imprisoned lightning what does it mean her towards his cold imprisoned lightning isn't lightning is leading the way of a brighter tomorrow it's not just it's not a flame that claim that torture is imprisoned lightning imprison lightning talks is a direct reference to the to the discoveries of the age imprisoned lightning is another way of saying a light bulb it is the invention of the time that is moving things forward she is the mother of exiles but let's just look at her for a minute what is the crown it's not crown it's a misinterpretation have you ever seen the Michelangelo sculpture of of Moses that's sculpture of Moses it's sitting in Rome in a church it's beautiful sculpture but it is weird as hell because Moses has horns look it up he has two horns coming out of the side of his head you're like what it why this Moses ham horns because it's a misinterpretation of a word it is easily I can't remember the word but it is easily translated to horns but it is not horns it is a range of light so it's not a crown it is the light behind the statue of liberty she is standing as a guard in front of something that is all I don't know dear I say a shining city on the hill the light behind her is reflected in that crown that is a crown of rays of light and she is standing at our son said wash gates she is standing like the Colossus of Rhodes but the Colossus of Rhodes which was one of the wonders of the world the Colossus of Rhodes was holding a spear and a shield it was a warrior and the ships would go in between his legs and he would stand to add more roads this great old port and people would come in and that Colossus was saying don't screw with us it was meant as a warning but is it Emma Lazarus says here it our son said washing gate's stands the mother of exiles now the mother of exiles also has chains around her feet but they're broken chains they are broken chains not just as a reflection of of us breaking the chains of slavery in eighteen sixty five it's not just that it is breaking the chains of slavery because of pomp and circumstance circumstance and and and your heraldry it's it's breaking the chains of you can't do it because you're not a lord a lady landowner and what breaks those chains is what she's holding the law so if you understand the Emma Lazarus poem it is not it is not ever to be read this your poor your tired your huddled masses just send them here we're going to hold them that's not the way it is meant if you listen to the whole poem you'll understand not like the brazen giant of Greek fame with conquering limbs astride from land to land we are not conquerors every war have we conquered and we did we conquer Europe or did we conquer tyranny and given that land and that government back to the people we are not conquerors that take land so not like the brazen giant of Greek fame the Colossus of Rhodes with conquering lambs astride from land to land here at our C. washed sunset gate shall stand a mighty woman with a torch now does that sound like your mom she's not my eighty mom that is standing there with a pie or a mom who is standing there with a teddy bear and a blanket this is a mighty woman with a torch whose flame is the imprisoned lightning the ideas of tomorrow that are happening today and her name is the mother of exiles all that sweet from her vegan handed glows worldwide welcome her mild eyes command the air bridged harbor the Twin Cities frame those Twin Cities The New York harbor that's that's New York City in Brooklyn she's standing there in between the Twin Cities and she's welcoming people but how is she welcoming them with my old eyes that command command what commands that you listen to what she's saying your ancient glands in your store read on so in other words I don't care what your history is I don't care that you have lords and ladies I don't care that you went to the right college the right university you have the right papers your in the right guild you're in the union so you can do it I don't care keep all of that keep your ancient lands in your story pop crises she was silent lips give me your tired your poor your huddled masses yearning to breathe free the wretched refuse of your teeming shore she's saying here I challenge you I challenge you send all the people that you say you can't do it please send me all of the people that you are holding down because they're just riffraff they're not the right people they'll never make it send those people to me send those people to me the homeless the Tempest tossed the people you don't want to send the garbage that you don't want why so I can hold them no because I lift my lamp beside the golden door the rays of light reflected from behind her the you see in the crown the rays of light she's standing behind or next to a golden door she is a guardian of that door there is something special on the other side of that door something behind her then a shining so bright send them here because the promise of what you can do I don't care who you are if you apply yourself you'll make it here that's what America is that's what the statue of liberty stands for not this bull crap of we're going to hold everybody who just can't make it and doesn't want to do anything for themselves and they just want to sponge off of us that is putting a chain around their legs and a chain and a ball around our children's necks that's not what the statue of liberty stands for she says she is the breaker of chains but she's only let you through the door you have to do

Emma Lazarus America Official White House Cuccinelli
London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:01 min | 1 year ago

London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

"Returned to Artemis Magenta Leschi in two thousand eighteen the National Gallery in London announced that it had bought Genta Leschi self-portrait to sink Catherine of Alexandria that work has just been on a tour of unusual British venues from Glasgow Women's library to a doctor's surgery in Yorkshire a Catholic High School in Newcastle and a prison in send Surrey Tori is now back at the National Gallery ahead of a survey of gentlest work that opens at the Gallery in twenty twenty in January nineteen. I was joined by not at Travis the National Gallery's curator of later Italian Spanish and French seventeenth century paintings to talk about Artemisia and that remarkable new acquisition the teacher. Can you tell me I more we're about Artemisia. Gentle Leschi the woman and the artist. She's obviously a name now that many people have heard of not just people sort of in the art world or interested in art and I'd I'd say that's quite a recent occurrence <hes>. She was really sort of rediscovered in a way <hes> in the nineteen seventies. She featured an exhibition in L._A.. On women artists artists and a number of her works exhibited then and so she sort of came to the fore then and number of feminist historians focused on her and her work <hes> throughout the latter part of the twentieth century but it's only really since she started being the subject of shows monographic show in two thousand and one in New York and then more recent exhibitions that I think she really came to wider public. I think now she is not necessarily a household name but I think people have heard of her a third of her as an artist but also her life story and I think a lot of the interest around her sort of people's view of her as a kind of empowered women derives from her biography rather like carbohydrate zone biographical stories somewhat somewhat sort of overshadows the art but I think Artemis as an artist now is coming to the fore and I think that's I'm looking forward to working on this show in two hundred twenty because I think it's very much focusing on her. As a painter ops you can't ignore what was happening in her life and the big events that the that obviously influenced that's how life in Harare but it is very much artistic abilities. Can you tell us something of that biography then before we get into into the to the painting the nationals occurred. Uh ultimately has seen very much as a sort of exception. I think it's important say she was quite exceptional that she wasn't the only woman autism the seventeenth century. I mean there had been other successful artists before her. Aha but she was born in Rome to Aratu gentlest who was a well established painter in Rome and a lady prudence and Artemis mother died when she was just twelve so she was actually brought up in a male household so brutal by her father and she had three brothers she was in fact one of five to two died <hes> and the brothers and Artemis rule trained by rats here in his own workshop but it's clear that she was the one that he saw had greater talent than than the brothers <hes> and a and sort of everything changed when she was raped by Agostino. Tassie Passy was <hes> an extremely successful painter of SORTA Trompe l'oeil architecture and who was working at that time without C._E._o.. On a large project the casino limousine he was brought in to teach Artemisia Perspective and he raped her <hes> and they Taylor have sexual relations for some months and then he was brought to trial buyouts and this is very famous as perhaps the most famous episode in Artemis Life because remarkably all the trial documents actually survivor a large portion of survive so you can actually read optimizes own words in the witness box and you read the accusations against us. It's quite extraordinary to have that kind of sort of documentary evidence still survive from the seventeenth century and he's effectively found guilty of de flowering her because what what is bringing against Casey is the fact that not only did he rape his daughter but he didn't do the honorable thing and marry her afterwards and this is sort of idea the lack of honor the the so dishonor on his family. That's very much motivating the trial so he's found guilty although his punishments never enforced and Artemis married off two days as later to the brother of her defense lawyer and with him moves to Florence and obviously this episode was obviously a great tragedy in her life when she describes in in her own words is really violent attack on her. It is quite harrowing but I think if that had never happened. Her life would have been very different. She would have carried John. Working probably in her father's studio in Rome but as a result herbs sort of enforced moved Florence really was the making of her and it's incredible things that how she turned the situation around and really I mean I like to think in Florence. You really became Artemisia. She found her own sort of autistic voice and it's why she really gained independence in Florence and she's there for about seven years and then she comes back to Rome very different sort of person she's very much in demand very successful and we know this from letters says from her husband that survived saying you know they've got cardinals and princes around the house all the time. She after music doesn't even have time to eat. She's so busy and then in sixteen thirty she settles also in Naples where she lives till the end of her life at least sort of twenty five years and runs a very successful workshop. I says you pretty much stays in Italy except for a brief trip to London in the late. Sixteenth extent thirties which in itself is quite unusual for women to be traveling internationally. Elaine indeed just one thing about the biography that makes her have a certain currency. Today is as you say in those documents around the trial. It's clear that she is being put on trial. In the trial and and in fact is is is tortured a- as as part of that process I mean laws be made of that and I think there's been a very much more measured reading of those documents in a wider sort of frame. If you like particularly particularly <hes> one social historian Elizabeth Cohen quite a lot of work on actually the documents relating to the trials of young virgins in Roman that period and it seems as a sort of standard way of leading these trials and actually it falls quite within that I wouldn't call it a pattern but within that but if you really read carefully the words mean she was tortured by using the which were these ropes tightened around her fingers while she was in the box but the judge also beforehand is it will right if we do this and it's clear if if you really read the the original Italian it is clear that it's in a way that they're asking if they can torch her to in a way prove her innocence in a sense sort of <hes> just to make sure that what she's saying is actually true and and it is while she's the torturing her with a C._B._S.. That she says you know it's true. It's true it's true. She repeats the what she says is true and so I think in a way it was sort of in supportive her innocence in this situation. I think you can already read in the language. That's used that. It's in a way away to catch tassie out right now. The the making of her in artistically say was was her moved to Florence say something about her experience there what kind coin of Education for instance did she did. She have there and will she in another painter studio straight away. No I think the really remarkable thing is that she sets up independently. She was trained in her father's studio. You know these sort of kind of family workshop tradition existed since the Renaissance and not just in Italy but it was often a father to Assan workshop so it's quite new female members of the family would be involved but as I say after means is not the first loving Fontana. Her father was very successful. So do you know in a way has sort of training. Rome wasn't unusual as perhaps be unusual because she was a woman but the whole learning from your father your trade from your father wasn't unusual the fact of her moving moving to Florence and having to set up independently is the thing that really made her. I think we have no real indication of having a student with with pupils assault. She worked effectively from her has junior. It wasn't her home. Her husband was apparently a painter but very sort of modest kind of renown. She was the very first female MEL member of the Academy in Florence. She was member from sixteen sixteen so you know she. She arrived in around sixteen thirteen within two three years. She's already really established herself. That's a really shows incredible determination but also kind of recognition of her skill and I think it's partly to do with her resilience. I think it will start to do with who she came into contact with in Florence. Not you say how education but also the circles. She moved in one of her great sort of protect us. There was Michelangelo Buonarroti younger who is the great nephew of Great Michelangelo and Artemis is only documented picture in Florence is in the ceiling of one hundred thirty still today and there she is alongside other Florentine artists of her of her time so she seems to have integrators of quite quickly and Florence <hes> and one of her close friends was Christopher. No Laurie won the greatest painters in the seventeenth century in Florence who is also godfather to her son Christopher so she clearly immediately set us you know sort of entered into autistic circles intellectual circles because she was a friend of Galileo and she worked for the MEDICI and did did she carry her Caravan Jasko style that she would have learned in Rome with her two phones or did she very much incorporate new styles and influences from her surrounding same sex. It's such a hot topic. That's so discussed because she has been called a chameleon and and I think as a result of this now many pictures get attributed to her that aren't necessarily by her because you can still use it as a dolphin well. She's communiqu. She changes all the time I think in the kind of broad sense she is quite community. She can adopt US style but it's part of her sort of business strategy. I think so you know she spent twenty five years. Working in Naples pictures look look really neapolitan but of course they would. She's been living in Naples. She's working for Nipples and patrons and I think when she moved to Florence. I think actually more than Caravaggio it is her father is rats. Here's pictures and rats. Here's handling of paint that's most of present in her mind and in the picture the the National Gary bought <hes> <hes> you know the thing that became very clear as as the pitcher was being cleaned as just that technically the way she paints the flash and so on. It's very ratu still very present in her mind. I think we'll sure influences. She's looking at these Florida artists. She's frequenting. She's using Carter analogy that you see in Florentine painting at that time she's also painting pictures for Medici tastes so that it also makes sense but when she comes back to Rome in sixteen twenty that's when Carava Chisholm off to Caravaggio is death ten years after is when cartridges is really the height of its popularity and I think there is definitely a renewed interest in this heightened naturalism start lighting and you can see that in the pictures of the sixteen twenty s can can you say more about the circumstances in which he would have created the specific work which the national now has well. The conservations been really interesting because you know I think a lot of living has been spilt on Artemis but not a huge amount of being written about her technique and I think this is actually played such an important role in actually understanding after media. It's been a lot written about you know dating's and attributions and also sort of the Mall gender-specific interpretation of her pictures in the iconography but I think had technique is absolutely fundamental understanding astounding to me. It's not Jason. Weeding out the pictures that aren't by her that are currently sort of sitting in this sort of limbo so during the conservation the National Gallery painting. We noticed similarities with obviously rats. Here's painting technique we notice differences. The pictures very closely related to two paintings one. That's in Hartford <hes> Connecticut at the Wadsworth which shows is a self portrait of her playing the lute and the other is a sin Catherine in New Jersey and the the suit of similarity between these pictures is not just sort of superficial fullness similarities but she's taken direct borrowings from one and the other. This is almost kind of amalgamation of these two other pictures which she knows sheds. It's light on her practice. You know how did she did. She transfer these designs to choose tracings. I mean we know how far the rats here uses tracings a lot <hes> did she have these three pictures which is in the studio once <hes> did the pro sort of composition evolve in the national painting. Does she know exactly what she was doing. From the very beginning I mean there are certain technical aspects of the pitcher the suggest it did evolve into Katherine. I'm perhaps didn't start its life as Catherine so I'm very interested also in how she uses her own image so the picture in halt that is clearly a self portrait very characterized face and all is a little bit idealized and I think there's been too much discussion in the post about whether picture easel isn't a self reporter. I think there's a kind of disguise self portraiture in a lot of her works where <hes> she would clear have expected people to kind of vaguely recognize her features a note. It was painting by women of a woman who looked like Artemisia but it doesn't necessarily have to be a self Putin a very literal sense. I think that's that's a really interesting aspect isn't it because how much of it is in that is almost like an advocate for for her capabilities and also for for her personality for her strength or strength of character and it's very easy easy to read biography into it isn't it because it's such a striking image and we know about this history of hers. Yes I mean I've had inquiries from the public. Since we announced the acquisition was saying you know other you know signs of torture on her fingers.

Florence Artemis Rome National Gallery Naples Artemis Magenta Leschi Tassie Passy Italy London Harare Caravaggio Artemis Life Travis The National Gallery L._A Alexandria Newcastle New York Genta Leschi
How to Use the Word "Distinguished"

BM English Speaking Radio

05:00 min | 1 year ago

How to Use the Word "Distinguished"

"The meaning of distinguished is very successful Vel known or commanding, great respect with beaming list. Speaking radio channel loan one. You would every day and impressed the world in this English. Whoa. Cabinetry lesson. You learn how to use the word distinguished reassure that this lesson will help you to enhance your English cabinetry, and speak English, fluently, and confidently distinguished is spelt as Deeks I s d I am g. You. I. S H E D. Do you agree that today? The world is one global village all countries need to cooperate with each other to develop and prosper will to achieve this objective. The distinguished leaders of the world meet every year at the economic conference in Canada, the exchange of information and ideas between the global leaders helps the world to progress for the listen carefully. How we can use the wood distinguished in eight different situations in eight different sentences example, number one off eight the principal missed a Maury decided to celebrate sanskrit day in his college. He consulted his teachers and decided to invite professor they're a distinguished scholar of. Sanskrit language, the professor gracefully accepted, the invitation and his speech, really inspired the students example number two of it. Have you heard of Michelangelo? I bet you must have he was distinguished Italians copter. Painter and architect. His works can be seen in room. He remains an inspiration for artists all over the world moving onto example, number three of it. Dr our retired from the government hospital last month. He served there for thirty years and had a distinguished career the hospital requested him to offer his services as a consultant boast retirement moving onto example, number four of it Malini distinguished herself in the field of dance and music. She was trained by several Gruz since the age of eight despite a busy career as a dentist. She never lost touch with dance and music today after thirty five years of dedication and commitment. She is respected for her contribution to the field of dance and music. Do you know venue, speak English, fluently, and confidently it opens new career opportunities and hands as your confidence. Build your socializing skills and help to become a global citizen to know more about English fluency causes log onto our web site, WWW dot B M consultants. India dot com. Example, number five off eight one of the distinguished members of the biotech research committee will be visiting Mumbai next week the purpose of his visit is inculcate. Do remember this one the purpose of his visit is to inculcate the spirit of science among students from several schools in Mumbai example, number six eight Mr. Richards, attended an important meeting with his guests from overseas means from other countries later in the evening, he will traditional clothes of the host country, which really gave him a distinguished look example, number seven eight a famous motivational speaker suggested that anyone aiming for a great professional success should pay special attention to development and communication. Skills. This will make them look distinguished among their peers. This is interesting, don't you agree rental? Rin begins cooling normally there is a common education system for them. However, we come across children with learning disabilities that are teachers who have distinguished themselves in offering special attention and care to saturation today. Relearned

Malini Mumbai Mr. Richards Professor Maury India Dot Canada Principal Consultant Gruz Research Committee Thirty Five Years Thirty Years
Rohingya in Bangladesh will not be forced back to Myanmar

BBC World Service

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Rohingya in Bangladesh will not be forced back to Myanmar

"Peter ever homes is a professor of clinical anatomy, biathlons live certain anatomical features are very specific to him. This big I o which is a short the second tower, which is long the Greek ideal. The second thing is the pubic hair in this statue, and in Michelangelo's David is currently and going in the correct direction up towards the bellybutton, not as most classical sculptures did at that time shave a line across the pubic hair ABC news. Thanks for that. Good morning and welcome. It is Newsday from the BBC World Service on walk ins and Hayes Lawrence Paulos Q very much. Indeed for joining us. Yes. Indeed, another half hour of Brexit and more. It's not only Brexit. We have to say the UN says, it's very worried about Bangladesh's plans to embark on a forced repatriation of range of Muslims who fled across the border from me. And Mark and MP's throwing projectiles at each other. It's nothing to do with brakes. What's going on outside the Sri Lankan parliament? And why is it always Florida that gets recount? We start with the main story

Pubic Hair Hayes Lawrence Paulos Peter UN Professor Brexit Michelangelo Newsday MP ABC Bangladesh Florida BBC Mark David
Tom Brady calls Aaron Rodgers 'inspiring' ahead of rare matchup

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Tom Brady calls Aaron Rodgers 'inspiring' ahead of rare matchup

"Doesn't do that very often. Like, he'll give some platitudes. The platitudes aren't quite that strong. He's not saying he's better than me. He's saying if anybody is on my echelon or close to it. It might be Aaron Rodgers all I think he's saying naturally. He's the most gifted quarterback. He's seen. I think he is saying that he's well we anonymous anonymous sources have said I think was Ian O'Connor who said I'm not sure in o'conner reported with anonymous sources that Tom Brady has said to an NFL coach that Aaron Rodgers is a hundred times better than more more talented than he is. When Tom Brady's calling. You your play inspiring. Cosso complimenting Michelangelo those times. I don't know if those time periods you understand what I'm saying Tom Brady telling you that you're inspiring as a quarterback. Is the highest of compliments? It's also a waste of Chuck solid. Doors time. Show on ESPN radio. Trade pros Ferguson's proud to be a part in what you do. And it's our aim to be the easiest one of your long day on the job one thousand one stop shop counter. Locations expert associates had an unmatched collection of Goto and hard to find OEM repair products. You can depend on us to do our part

Aaron Rodgers Tom Brady Ian O'connor Goto Espn Chuck Ferguson NFL
"michelangelo" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"That's why we have such a variety, in our society if everybody only only thought like Michelangelo. I don't know if we'd. Be. Where we are? Today maybe it's not all good I think. Much better place because, when you look at something. That Michelangelo painted, you say oh look there's, a person like that's a that's, a painting someone painted a painting of a person wow isn't that amazing this is, this is a paper it's like Brown paper like packing papers and it's it's and there's holes in it they popped. Holes in it and. That's. In a modern art museum so like come? On that's just a purely subjective like I said though that to me you, you can take somebody who's talented. Who understands. The basic elements of design and they can, use color, Serey balanced? Texture, all those things perspective and create something beautiful that might reflect something in their, heart about something they've seen in nature. What I'll come on okay how about the Los Angeles museum. Of art this isn't even modern art, museum museum of art and the piece levitated mass which. Is a big giant rock Yeah yeah There's so many extremes when you talk. About, arts no you can't say that's. A big that's a. Big rock I can't look at that and. Compare that you. Mentioned Michelangelo Michelangelo took a rock and turned. It, into Mary and Jesus and. David, and sculptor of sculpture you're like..

Michelangelo Michelangelo museum museum of art Los Angeles museum David Jesus Mary
Clippers, Harry Marshall and Paul Manafort discussed on Armstrong and Getty

Armstrong and Getty

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Clippers, Harry Marshall and Paul Manafort discussed on Armstrong and Getty

"Year, old at the hacking convention, Defcon managed to, change election results on a replica Florida state website and under ten minutes, so probably nothing, to worry about wow well to? Me that just speaks to the fact that the the whoever put that stuff together probably today really really. Bad job of it when

Clippers Harry Marshall Paul Manafort Jack Armstrong Jose Canseco Sean Michelangelo Marshall Phillips Michael I Google Butch Florida FCC Diseases Cancer Mark Eleven Year Ten Minutes Two Weeks
Ira, Joe Getty and Jack discussed on WBZ Morning News

WBZ Morning News

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

Ira, Joe Getty and Jack discussed on WBZ Morning News

"Here's your host for final thoughts joe getty thanks jack let's get a final thought from everybody marshall phillips final thought please special iconic video game birthday today the fortieth anniversary of one of the most iconic games of all time space invaders terms forty that's a good one i'm pretty good at space invaders positive sean your final thought yeah also video game related based on the the world health organization saying that the video game is an addiction and the unfortunate anecdote of some players apparently playing soil if nature calls when you're playing a game take it from me gamer positive sean go to the bathroom i live by michelangelo your final thought this is an example of a safe joke now a twenty one year old man puts a thousand dollars an ira turns sixty to fifty thousand dollars hey yet.

IRA Joe Getty Jack Marshall Phillips Fifty Thousand Dollars Thousand Dollars Twenty One Year
"michelangelo" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Fourteen hundreds and early fifteen hundreds to completion of the saint peter's basilica was the goal of each of these pope's often with short terms and it was paul the third and michelangelo who together put in motion the completion of of a true gazon koonce furka a total work of art which is to actually return to an earlier design for the basilica much like a greek cross rather than a latin cross so even arms and each of the arms having a kind of apps unified by this enormous central dome which was at the time the tallest building in the world and the largest on earth so these extraordinarily achievement in yet you know it i think it was a fractious relationship and and then as my curators say yeah but you know imagine working with michelangelo you know he's a genius he knows what he wants and everybody wants what he has which is the ability to render these extraordinary projects and to imagine i just sort of see him you know like zeus with nude figure springing from his brow oh my gosh the way you know the way he could conceive the human figure in motion how he could i think more than anyone before him express both in idea and emotion through the pose of a human figure and it's one thing to have someone pointing at the sky and say you know heaven or it's another thing to have the body contorted with the finger pointed to the sky to understand something you know to have the accompanying emotion with the idea and that was the singular genius of michelangelo and he was even able to impart that to architecture.

michelangelo saint peter's basilica paul
Young people give Pope Francis a piece of their mind

Speaking of Art

01:49 min | 2 years ago

Young people give Pope Francis a piece of their mind

"Collaborative exhibition traveling exhibition we might actually have three people and that's going to have to be recorded and that's going to be a challenge because as everyone knows when you interview people on speakerphone it's usually a disaster so it will probably be each time though the hold the phone and then hand it to the other but to be able to have gary intro the director of the museum of fine arts houston with his curatorial colleagues at the same time talking about this great exhibition michelangelo now you're probably saying is this the exhibition from the met in new york city which has broke all records has been just absolutely fantastic it is not the same exhibition here's the twist this is about the relationship between the mature michelangelo in the fifteen forty s in pope paul the third the pharmacy pope came from a very very wealthy art family of connoisseur ship and patronage in the arts the great farnese palace in rome just think of that he becomes pope in the fifteen i think in fifteen thirty two sometime around there here's the pope who presides over the first part of the counter reformation trying to bring the faithful back to the catholic church after the successes of fifteen seventeen and martin luther and the protestant reformation as you all know it is a period that i particularly like in terms of the arts in terms of all the arts that hundred years from about fifteen fifty to about seventeen hundred most people think oh if it's not the high renaissance i'm not really interested i'll tell you the theatricality the beauty the costumes the poise of the human figure in mannerist and baroque painting alone and sculpture is enough to say this is a totally different direction these people were modern artists and they were pushing the boundaries at the.

Director New York City Rome Pope Mannerist Gary Houston Martin Luther Hundred Years
"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Angela was free of his obligation with the tomb of pope julius albeit through a compromise that he was less than happy with while he might not have been fully satisfied with the finished product michelangelo's contribution to the tomb was magnificent all the same after more than thirty years michelangelo could put the tomb to rest with the obligation of the tomb out of the way michelangelo went back to work on the mural in the sistine chapel which he eventually completed after about seven years of work in fifteen forty one michelangelo completed other works in this time as well including the conversion of saint paul in the martyrdom of saint peter kann devi one of michaelangelo's biographers described the work says stupendous not only in the general exposition of the histories but also in the details of each figure not bad considering michelangelo was well into his 70s at this point and that he didn't even consider himself a painter was around this time that michelangelo's health started to decline but he kept on working just like always in fifteen 46 pope paul appointed michelangelo as architect and chief for saint peter's basilica the church and been undergoing major reconstruction a project that had taken up more than fifty years everyone was hoping that michelangelo would be the one to finally wrap up the project but many were doubtful some even thought he might pass away before its completion the project having passed through so many hands was a mess but michelangelo being a man of many talents spearheaded the completion and managed to finish the construction to the surprise in relief of many but something was brewing beneath the completion of the construction the previous chief architect a man named antonio da sangallo had worked on the project for nearly thirty years the entire construction team was made up of people sangano had hired there's reason to believe that much of the money that was spent on the construction of the basilica over the last thirty or so years had been miss.

Angela michelangelo sistine chapel saint paul chief architect antonio da sangallo saint peter kann devi saint peter's basilica thirty years fifty years seven years
"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Of the sistine chapel michelangelo moved to roman fifteen 34 to start initial work on the project as michelangelo was preparing to start the mirul pope clement died and fifteen 34 leaving the paople seat open once again michelangelo mourn for the loss of his friend but in the wake of his passing michelangelo thought he would be relieved from working on the mural and could finally get back to working on the tomb of pope julius the second but the new pope pope paul the third had a different plan he wanted michelangelo to work for him and was determined to have him by any means but michelangelo was also determined he was going to finish the tomb of pope julius even if it meant this obeying the newlyappointed pope michelangelo told pope paul that he would love to serve on but he still had a previous contract to finish the tomb of pope julius in couldn't freely abandon it as one can imagine the new pope didn't take too kindly to not getting his way as pope paul said it is thirty years that i have cherish this desire and now that i am pope may i not indulge it is the contract i mean to tear it up after clearly upsetting the pope michelangelo entertain the idea of going into hiding in staying with an old friend of pope julius the second while he finished the tomb eventually decided against running and incurring the wrath of the current pope then one day pope paul surprised michelangelo at his house in rome accompanied by about ten cardinals they examined the statues the michelangelo had completed so far for the tomb and upon seeing a statue of moses one of the cardinals called out quote that peace alone is sufficient to do honour to the monument of julius after exploring the workshop pope paul decided he would amend the contract for julius as tomb he told michelangelo that three statues would be more than enough and that he would contract another sculptor to finish three more michael.

sistine chapel michelangelo michelangelo pope clement pope pope paul cardinals julius rome moses thirty years one day
"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Nso during this time in the fifteen 30s michelangelo spread himself thin by taking on multiple jobs it got so bad that pope clement wrote him a letter saying that he was worried for his health and that he should try instict only working on the additions at san lorenzo but michelangelo was stubborn he continued to work more he poorly and sleep less everyone grew worried that he would work himself to death again pope clement wrote him a letter this time a bit more stern he ordered michelangelo to put aside all work that wasn't related to san lorenzo and if he refused than he would be excommunicated from the church and did he listen not at all michelangelo continued to be stubborn and take multiple commissions in spite of the threat of excommunication during this time he was traveling back and forth between rome and florence taking on whatever jobs he pleased he state pretty busy almost all the time then in fifteen 34 tragedy struck michelangelo and his family his father ludovico passed away this was a devastating loss for michelangelo and left a devastating sense of loss in his life one of the many poems written by michelangelo throughout his adult life discusses his feelings on the loss quote your splendor with the night sinks not in shade nor grows with day however that son ride high which on our mortal hearts life's heat hath raid thus from the dying i now learn to die dear father mine in thought i see they place were earth but rarely lets men climb the sky and quote it was around this time that michelangelo finished his work on sale lorenzo to the great relief of many pope clement wanted to make use of michelangelo's talents commissioned him to paint another mural in the sistine chapel the mural would depict the scene of the last judgement from the bible and was to be painted in fresco just like the other mural michelangelo had painted on the ceiling.

pope clement san lorenzo michelangelo ludovico sistine chapel florence
"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Ordered michelangelo to start working on the building at once michelangelo still upholding to his contract with the previous pope argued that he wished to finish the tomb for pope julius pope leo wooden hear it he sent michelangelo to purchase the marble for the project michelangelo spent the next three years procuring marble and building mock ups for the pope after three years of nonstop working the project eventually fell through due to lack of funds thanks to an ongoing war that pope julius had started years prior this was a time of great stress for michelangelo as he was working constantly on multiple projects thought up by pope leo that all that would stop in fifteen twenty one when pope leo died at the age of forty five he was succeeded by pope adrian the sixth pope adrian only reigned as pope for two years before dying and fifteen twenty his time as pope was too short for him to start any major projects or make use of michelangelo's skills after adrian's passing a new pope was picked cardinal giulio domenici another old friend of michael angelo's was chosen as the next pope taking the name clement the seventh compared to his cousin leo pope clement was a bit more respectful to michelangelo assigning him more reasonable and less physically demanding projects michelangelo hopes that he would be able to return to his work on the tomb of pope julius but clemett had a few projects that he wanted the artist to finish first specifically additions to the san lorenzo basilica the first of these additions came in the form of the medical family tombs though he had never finished the facade for san lorenzo he was able to design and build the tombs in the metro chapel during this assignment he was tasked with building the tomb for his old mentor and guardian lorenzo medici the second of the additions was that of the law wrench in library a vast library that held the personal manuscript and books belonging to the.

michelangelo pope julius pope leo pope cardinal giulio domenici michael angelo leo pope clement clemett san lorenzo metro chapel pope julius pope adrian san lorenzo basilica lorenzo medici three years two years
"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"S for twenty dollars off your first seatgeek purchase now let's get back to the story tortured as he was by the sistine chapel michelangelo continued to work he finished the painting in fifteen twelve and expected to unveil it to the public of rome but what he didn't expect was that word had spread around italy about how magnificent the first half of the painting was and that people from all across the country would come to see the unveiling if people were amazed by the first half seeing the fully completed mural left every one at a loss for words nothing like this had been seen before after all the years of secrecy michelangelo stood before his mural and showed the world that he was not only a master sculptor but also a master painter needless to say he was a little more than happy to be done with the project pope julius was also rather pleased with the completion of the painting as he proceeded to shower michaelangelo with money and gifts as reward for his hard work all those years of headache in arguing finally paid off for both of them most importantly for michelangelo the completion of the sistine chapel meant that he could finally continue his work on the pope's tomb just as michael angelo's started to work once more on the tomb in fifteen thirteen pope julius the second died and a new pope was to be sworn in giovanni domenici who michelangelo new from childhood was selected to be the new pope giovanni was sworn in under the name pope leo the 10th pope leo looking to make a strong first impression wanted to construct a new facade for the san lorenzo basilica in florence a church constructed by the medici family and adorned the building was statues he thought michelangelo would be perfect for the job he.

sistine chapel michelangelo rome julius sistine chapel michael angelo giovanni domenici san lorenzo basilica michelangelo italy pope twenty dollars
"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Shares in the meantime michelangelo quickly finished the initial design for the tomb and presented it to julius julius were so please that he said michelangelo outright away with two servants and a horse to acquire the marble necessary michelangelo spent eight months procuring all the marble he needed in the end he sent back more than thirty four cartloads of marble to rome once he had all his stone michelangelo began to create the statues for the tomb uh the project at a bit of a snag early on michael aims lowe had requested an audience with the pope to discuss the matter of purchasing more stones the pope however gave michelangelo the cold shoulder and refused to meet with him and sent centene away apparently the pope had changed his mind about the tomb altogether this angered michelangelo to the point of selling all his things and leaving rome in the middle of the night and moving back to flights the pope to say the least was mildly upset at michelangelo's departure he sent michelangelo many threatening letters ordering him to return to rome all of which michelangelo ignored while this was happening pope julius as chief architect denardo bramante convinced him that the tomb shouldn't be finished during his life since it would be bad luck meanwhile michelangelo remained too stubborn to return to rome it wasn't until his friends back in rome begged him to return that he finally listened he returned to rome to continue his work on the tomb but julius had other plans when michelangelo returned and fifteen await the pope tasked him with painting the ceiling of the sistine chapel this idea was introduced to the pope i did not to bramante bramante resented michelangelo for being tasked with building the pope's tomb.

michelangelo rome julius sistine chapel pope julius julius michael lowe chief architect denardo bramante eight months
"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Around fourteen ninety five michelangelo decided it would be best to move back to florence thankfully the medici family happily took him in again the medici is gave him a steady stream of work as first assignment was a statue of cupid when he finished the statue michelangelo's patron told him that he should bury it to make it look like an antique that way he could sell it for more money michelangelo listened he sold the peace to a roman art dealer for 30 ducats while the art dealer eventually resold the cupid statue to cardinal giovanni oh giorgio for a whopping two hundred ducats much more than michaelangelo ever got for the peace the cardinal eventually recognize that the statue was not an antique but in fact a modern florentine recreation he had been ripped off he also recognize that the statue was done by someone with great skill then set out to find the sculptor responsible the cardinal sent an assistant to florence to track down the sculptor the system eventually found michael angelo and explain the situation to him understandably michelangelo was a little bit upset that he had been ripped off by the art dealer if he knew he could have gotten 200 ducats out of the statue he probably wouldn't have made the deal the assistant requested that michelangelo come to rome so that the cardinal could meet him in pay improperly for the statue michelangelo agreed and journey to rome the cardinal paid him a small amount of money for the statue and became michelangelo's newest patron he didn't give him much to do so michelangelo just enjoyed his time in rome eventually word got around about the skilled yang sculptor another cardinal cardinal john francesoir wanted to have a piece of michaelangelo's handiwork and commissioned him to sculpt a statue this statue would be a pieta a fairly common style of statue that depicts the virgin mary holding a dead jesus christ in her arms michelangelo was up to the task and created the sculpture for the cardinal colonel francois and everyone else who saw the sculpture.

florence michelangelo michael angelo john francesoir colonel francois rome
"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"To save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that square space dot com offer code historical and speaking of making your brilliant ideas a reality i'm thrilled to be able to share my new podcast conspiracy theories with our listeners joined my co host molly in die each episode as we search for the truth behind the official versions of the world's most complicated controversial events carter in mali's captivating storytelling and grounded research to shed light on the possible coverups in secret surrounding these complex events you won't want to miss it so after you finish this episode check out conspiracy theories you can listen to episodes on the death of princess diana and area fifty one right now plus new episodes are released every wednesday so there's always something new and exciting to uncover and if you subscribe now you'll never missing episode near sport means everything to us truly so thank you now let's get back to the story michelangelo enjoyed his time with a message he family lorenzo medici had a habit of throwing enormous parties and carnivals for the people of florence to enjoy it would be the time of any teenagers life unfortunately all good things must come to an end in fourteen ninety two columbus sailed the ocean poo not quite michelangelo's patron and frame laurenzo met achieved passed away this was a big loss for michelangelo after lorenzo's passing michelangelo went back to live with his father for a few months after some time he was called back to the medical family estate by lorenzo's eldest son pirro medici pirro had a lot of respect for michelangelo and allowed him to stay with the meditate family for a whole year he even task michelangelo with building a colossal snowman in the courtyard of their state in winter michelangelo's beginning to expand his range of studies it was around this time that he became more or less obsessed with anatomy and the study of the human.

mali michelangelo lorenzo medici florence official carter ten percent
"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Learning under gilan diageo michelangelo's friend francesco took him to see the statue garden of lorenzo medici a member of the powerful medici banking family michelangelo was so enraptured by the sculptures that he ended up skipping class to go back and spend more time studying the statues in the garden it's also said that this was the place where michelangelo first met the young giovanni and giulio medici both future popes of the catholic church around this time in the fourteen 80s lorenzo medici was focused on the task of trying to raise the art of sculpture to the same status as that of painting he approached multiple masters within florence and ask them to send some of their most promising students to study at his newlyfounded school for sculpture since lorenzo was essentially the lord of florence at the time it was kinda hard to say no so master gear land that you're seeing michelangelo's newfound interest in sculpture sent him to study at the medical school in fourteen eighty nine under master berthold od'd yovani decent francesco to truly inseparable i imagine they probably got into a bit of trouble together at school michelangelo spent three years studying at the medici school he studied sculpting of various materials mainly marble supposedly michelangelo gained the favour of lorenzo medici by copying a carving of a marble mask of a fawn upon seeing them ask lorenzo recognised potential for great talent and requested an audience with michael angelo's father in his meeting with michelangelo's father the renzo asked to become the guardian of michelangelo lorenzo woodhouse him feed him and take care of his needs michelangelo's father accepted and michelangelo was taken under the familial wing of lorenzo medici michelangelo was treated like a son sometimes even better than lorenzo's actual sons everything was provided for him so that he could focus entirely on his studies pants study he did the three years he spent.

diageo michelangelo francesco giovanni florence lorenzo michelangelo medici school lorenzo medici michael angelo renzo lorenzo medici michelangelo three years
First Human Voice on the Radio

The Past and the Curious

07:11 min | 2 years ago

First Human Voice on the Radio

Enrico Caruso Fred Gaspart Heine Heine Bros. Milan Ogoni Omni Crusoes Sistine Chapel Jason Lawrence Michelangelo Grand Hotel Marion Anderson Stein Italy Fretted O New York America
"michelangelo" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"michelangelo" Discussed on Love Your Work

"I hear a jeff coins and jeff just wrote this new book real artists don't star which is an amazing title and i think a great message but them always curious a wonder when somebody writes a book yes so much work why this particular book so i am i write books to figure things out and because i'm curious about something and the for me this really started with this story that a friend of mine sent me a bow michelangelo and apparently in two thousand three this art historian by the name of rap hatfield found a bunch of previously unknown an unpublished bank accounts belonging to the rs michelangelo an in those bank accounts were very very large sums of money anz whites professor hatfield discovered was that michelangelo when he died had about fifty million dollars in today's currency to his name making him the richest artist of the renaissance and at that point the richest artist who had ever come along and what michelangelo dead i came to found oz like this is interesting i note this a lot of people i talked to said they did know this they thought he was may be doing ok or starving like a lot of artis that we think you know tenda do an's i kinda chases a little bit further i was able to talk to a an expert on the life of michelangelo by a michelangelo biographers still living today anz um he said what.

jeff coins hatfield bank accounts michelangelo professor fifty million dollars