20 Episode results for "Michel Basquiat"

Filmmaker and actor Sara Driver

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

25:40 min | 1 year ago

Filmmaker and actor Sara Driver

"Bullseye with Jesse thorn is production of maximum fun dot org and is distributed by NPR. It's bullseye. When my guests Sara driver, and I spoke in two thousand eighteen she just directed a new documentary called, boom for real the late teenage years of Sean Michel Basquiat, the movie shows aside of one of the great twentieth, century artists. That is often seen a savvy, young upstart painting on the walls all over Manhattan's Lower East Side. Sarah driver, an artist herself lived, and worked in the same art community that propelled Bosc. Yep. To start. And because of that, boom for real kind of tells two stories, there's boss Kiat and shows up in our Kyle footage, but never speaks and there's New York City before nine eleven before Reagan before the real estate boom. Boom for real strikes a careful balance between nostalgia. Endanger between nuance and hero worship. Let's take a listen to a little bit of the movie in this clip will care from Alexis Adler, photographer. Now an embryologist in the early eighties. She was a good friend of Bosc yachts, together, they'd go to concerts at local clubs in New York. At the time Basquiat was trying to find a place to live. I found this place on twelfth street and was his first stable home, the first place, he added Keith, Sean was about eighteen and I was about twenty two. I never felt that he was my boyfriend, but we did have sex. We enjoy each other's company on a lot of friends. He was discovering his own art form, having this apartment allowed him possibility of working on that, developing it the walls and floor where his campus. Sara driver, welcome to bullseye. It's great to have you on the show. Thank you so much. So I guess the obvious question is why did you want to make a film about Joe Michel Basquiat and particularly why this part of his life. Well, I never really occurred to me to make a film about show, Michelle. But I went over to Alexis Adler house. So we heard in the clip after hurricane sandy, hit New York City in two thousand and twelve and I went over to her house. I think it was early January two thousand thirteen and she had been she is a scientist. She's an embryo gist and she'd been looking through a microscope for thirty years and raised two children and had forgotten about this work that show, Michelle had given her when he moved out of her apartment. And, and she was very afraid that it had gotten flooded, because it was in a Bank vault onto the street level in an area that was in the flood zone and she went with her daughter and looked in found what was in the vault and it was over sixty works, including writings drawings, a notebook, and then she remembered, she had a box of clothes that he had painted, and we all knew that she lived with Shami shell because she had this beautiful mural that he had painted over her bed. Of an olive oil on it and, and her bathroom door was painted by him. And so when I saw everything she had plus one hundred fifty photographs are so that she had taken of him. I thought not only is this a window into him and his development as a young artist. But also, it was really a window into those years in New York that were so particular between nineteen seventy eight nine hundred eighty one where there were a lot of young artists coming from all over the country to live in downtown, New York, which was pretty much bombed out zone. I feel like that is a purely New York in nineteen seventy eight move, like it's the next level from staying in an apartment because you've got rent control. It's staying in an apartment for forty years because you have rent control and also Sean Michel, Basquiat painted some paintings on the walls at one point. Yeah. I mean I have one friend who has a, a large mural in his. Co op apartment, and it's, it's, it's a hallway mural, so he can it's actually owned by the up even though it's inside his apartment is painted by his friends. Were you around this world in the late seventies and early eighties in New York? Yes, I was living in little Italy, and going to school at NYU, and I was working on my master's degree in film, and the school was actually on seventh street between second and third avenue. So it was in the epicenter of the east village. He's friends from time in the film go right at the start trying to set the scene of what New York was like in the late nineteen seventies, and particularly what certain parts of Manhattan were like in the late nineteen. Seventies can you describe for audience who weren't there? What especially the Lower East Side was like, when the story was happening, while the Laurie side you know, they were burning buildings down the landlords because it was much more profitable to get insurance money than to have tenants in buildings. It was it was it looked kind of like a war zone and. I cut my hair very, very short about an inch long and took on the mannerisms of a young man, so that I could walk the streets, very confidently and not be hassled. And it was very dangerous. But it was also kind of exciting because, you know, you had to have this very attuned at antenna to the street into the people around you. So you were observing incredible stories all day long, which, I feel like you know, people are now walking around looking at their screens. They're not looking at what the world is around them. And in a way, it was a great privilege to, to be in such a dangerous place because you saw so, so many interesting exchanges. And, you know, we were all going to the same clubs that we're all, you know, even if we may not know, each other personally, we all knew each other by site. It was sort of this weird society that just developed because of the that nobody else will really. To be in this part of Manhattan, and it was affordable. So you could be an artist you could try all different things. You could try to be a painter, you could try to be musician, and nobody was in it for the money it was, it was about expressing oneself and, and you paid very little in rent, so you could work in Xerox shop or you know, have a part time job and be able to pay your rent, and, and do your art and hang out and go to clubs and you know, it was very, very active. What was the relationship between Jean Michel Basquiat and the graffiti writing scene that was exploding in the late seventies in New York? The kind of hip hop oriented graffiti, writing saying, well, he wasn't really at graffiti artists, which I also talk about in the film, although he keeps being referred to as graffiti artist. He really wasn't one Aldea's who was his partner in. Same was it did come from graffiti culture? And, you know, Sean, he, he was he was. Very provocative. He was he was actually what I also learned doing this film, is that he was a pretty advanced poet, by the time he was eighteen nineteen years old. The words he was writing on pieces of paper and how he was putting them. Maybe only on two lines and then crossing certain words out that he made clear that you could read. I mean it was done in a very deliberate way. And when he wrote things on the wall, he, he wrote very provocative musings, which later are, are, you know, his paintings, also have those kinds of musings and writings in them, which also make them so relevant for today. And, and so, you know, so intriguing is this use of words with his paintings, and it's interesting that as a young artist at sixteen seventeen he was writing these words in the art air in the art district of New York, you know, wasn't other places in New York. It was all in SoHo and you know, which at that time was the art the center of the art world. I wanna play. Clip? Michael Holman is in artists, and was also a member of the band, gray and he's in your film. And he tells the story about playing a show at the Mudd club, which was a social center for this scene that was famous for hosting bands like the b fifty two's, and the talking heads, and so forth. Michael has conceived of this stage, set that's going to be this geodesic dome made of garbage and found materials where every member of the band stands in a different part of the geodesic dome and Jami shell like shows up at soundcheck. He turns red walks right out five minutes later. John return with this shipping pregnant Chinese characters were none. It walks up to the stage tosses, this wooden Q onto the stage John scrunches body of and squeezes his body into this QB pulls. His little wasp synthesizer in with them and has cleared at and looks out at me and smiles, and I realized that in five minutes without knowing what we were doing. He goes out into the streets into the allies around the Mudd club and finds this wooden crate that not only works perfectly with the design, but has made him the center of attention. And I was like you, not. What are the images that I really love in the movie, I can't remember who's talking about? But somebody's talking about. Jomie shell walking around the streets of New York with a boom blocks or I guess, at the time, ghetto blaster and listening to, like industrial noise music. Contrarian. With their things about him that you remembered from being part of this world that you felt like weren't represented or weren't represented well in the mythologised version of him, as, you know, legendary artists with a capital L in the capital a. Well, I just felt like I had a print when I saw what Alexi because he was very transient during those years, you know, you sleeping all all different people's, so foes in on floors and, and Alexis had the foresight, and many people throughout the work that he left it their houses, and Alexis had the foresight, and she also believed from the very beginning that he, he, he was going to be an amazing, you know, an amazing artist and they wasn't an amazing artist even as a teenager. And that's why she saved everything. And she saved it also because it was like a keepsake. He was very dear to her more bullseye still to come stay with us. When we return from a quick break a whole foods opened in Sarah drivers neighborhood a couple of years ago, she'll tell me why. It made her miss the old New York it's bullseye for maximum dot org and NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor squarespace squarespace, is the all in one platform to build an online presence and run your business. Create your company's website, using customizable layouts along with features, including ecommerce, functionality and mobile, editing and squarespace offers built in search engine optimization. Go to squarespace dot com slash NPR for a free trial. When you're ready to launch us, the offer code NPR to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website for domain when you're paying for college on your own. There's a lot to balance help you get through it all NPR's life. Get talked to the real experts students finding a side hustle that works for you works for your schedule is usually Beneficial's signed like it's new guide on how to pay for college in apple podcasts or NPR dot org slash life kit. We're the host of my brother. My brother may and now nearly ten years into our podcast secret can be revealed all the closer in place and the world's greatest treasure hunt can now. Begin embedded in each episode of my brother. My brother and me is a micro food that will lead you to fourteen precious gemstones all around this big beautiful blue world of ours. So start coming through the episodes. Let's say starting at episode one. Oh, one on. Yeah. The early episodes are pretty problematic. So there's no clues in those episodes. No, no. Not at all. The better ones. The good ones clues a whole listen to every episode repeatedly in sequence laugh, if you must but mainly get all the great clues my brother. My brother made it's an advice show kind of, but a treasure hunt mainly anywhere you find podcasts or treasure maps, my brother. My brother made the hunt is on. You're listening to bulls eye. I'm Jesse thorn. My guests Sarah driver is an artist. And filmmaker when we talked in two thousand eighteen she had just directed a new documentary about the artist. Joe Michel Basquiat? It's called boom for real. It can be really difficult to describe what is special about show, Michelle boss cots, art, especially as visual, art. And there are a lot of folks in the movie who. Just kind of say, well, I saw it and I knew it was it. You spent so much time in making this film with the works. What do you think is compelling or moving about these paintings? Well, I think, you know, I just love his use of words in his love of words and, and his painting is so full of the so vibrant and it just it's just full of energy. And I think that's why people are so drawn to it now. And it's so, you know, like so many great artists who almost have a profit, like kind of demeanor in terms of you know what they're what he said thirty years ago is totally relevant now. And it totally as important now as it was thirty years ago, and maybe that's just because things haven't changed that much. Or maybe it's because he was very he was absorbing so much and his output was so great who's incredibly prolific. And. You know, I think I think that I love reading his words, I love reading his absurdist play that he had left it Alexis his house, which is parts of it are read in the in the film. You know, I think that Rene Ricard said it very well in the art form article, when he called him Meridian child because he radiated he had a kind of light that came out of him that was extraordinary. But he was also just this kid that, would, you know, we you'd see everywhere one, a great voice in the movie is leaking Yoenis, who's a probably the most eminent graffiti writer of the first great generation of graffiti writers. And he was he had this relationship with Bosc yacht through, you know, they're kind of parallel careers. And what I love is, is the way that he talks about the completely different perspective that bus Kiat had on the some of the same tech. Sneaks that the graph writers were using, let's take a listen to him talking about that in the movie it was strange to me because it had nothing to do with style. He's like the anti style. And at that time, I would never want my work to drip, and he was like into letting drip, he was into letting our be itself. And that's why his work was very crude and maybe childlike in some ways because, you know when a child is drawing. There's no, there's no holdings. You know, you're not being held back by anything you've just gone by. Spirit of the moment, and that in itself, made for speed Rapids, as we were painting and rapid session because reading wanna get caught, but John was doing it because he felt and probably knew that he only had a limited amount of time. And, and that urging moment in his life. I don't think he knew that he was going to die. But I think the passing of the moment was very frightening. To not have an idea to get created, you know life and art is very fleeting and he was very much freighter. I think that's what kept his wheels turning faster than everybody else. I was really moved by that sentiment leads extrordinary and I love league because he's talking about, you know, John, letting his paintings, drip and Leah's actually sitting in his studio with a painting next to him. That's dripping all over the place. He's an incredible artists -ly. I was so happy to have him in the film. I mean like one of the things about it, right. Is like if you're part of this graffiti culture like demonstrating that you have the most technical skill at the time was essential. I mean that's what he's talking about. Like you have to develop a new style and you have to it has to be tight, right? Like every letters perfect. And it's really wild and whatever you know, it must've blown mines that boss Kiat was saying, like, no, I choose for this to be rough and immediate. And, you know, almost almost fleeting like it's not about the circumstance in the way that it is. You know, you can only see a few words as they go past on a subway train like this is on a wall or this is in on a on a gallery wall. But I. Choose for it to have that kind of intensity and almost morality. Yeah. I mean he I think Marianne Mon Mon four. Tim says it really well, she says, you know, it was something to consider, you know, you'd walk by you'd read it, and then you'd consider it and think about it. And so you were carrying him around all day long. Again, he gets the attention. In some ways the Times Square show is the climax of your film. Can you tell me what the Times Square show was? The Times Square show was a show that was put together by cola. And, but it also included many artists also fashion Moda which was in the South Bronx, and it was downtown artists uptown artist and they took over a building in Times Square. That was that had been a, a whorehouse massage parlor was called, and it was many, many rooms and exhibits were set up in all the rooms, and there was a fashion show and, you know, showing us to would paint the clothes like the models walked by to splash, the paint on them. And, but it you know, an included a lot of artists who then you know that that show was when the actual gallery st- from the galleries in SoHo started to, to, you know, to come up and check things out, and they started actually to get many of these painters in their galleries. From there. It was really the PS one show. Right. After that, to really kind of solidified this all being a legitimate art movement. Were those shows that you went to personally. Yes, yes. Everybody went what did it? What if you like to be there? Oh, it's very exciting. And he would see your friends and the to their work and you know, it was and Times Square was always such a trip to go to used to love to go to the movies and time square. Because everybody would talk to the to the screens, you know, they start screaming at at the, the characters in the film and stuff. They were always very lively. But it was always tricky to him. The subway too late at night coming going back downtown from time square. Did you ever did you grow your hair back out? At some point. Yeah, I did. I you know, things sort of got a little tamer in the mid eighties, or so. Unless interesting. I was just talking to somebody on the show a couple of weeks ago about the moment when you realize. That, you know, you, you are walking around with someone in the city, and they don't have their, you know, they don't have their head up in their antenna out the same way that you do. And you have this thought, like I'll come on quit being such a weakling like you're gonna get, you know, you're going to get got, you know, like somebody's going to somebody's gonna roll up on you or something. Bad is going to happen because you're, you're being a wuss, and you're not paying attention in your acting like you own the place. And then, and then you realize like, oh, maybe that isn't something that's wrong with them. Maybe that's something that's wrong with you. Like, oh, maybe it's okay not to be on alert all the time. Yeah. But there's some gifts that you get are all, you know, it's funny we had whole foods open about two blocks away from us, and I was over the to Robert Frank, the photographers house. And, and Robert, he's was about ninety at the time. And, and I said, Robert so great, we have whole foods is like two blocks away. I used to have to walk fifteen blocks for food and actually his wife was a wonderful artist June leaf. She and I went to the opening of whole foods. We were so excited. And then Robert said to me goes put Sarah think of all those things you would have seen in those fifteen blocks. You know, you don't have the same city experience anymore. How would you say the vibe at the whole foods opening compared with the Times Square show? Totally different vibe when I'm very interested in food, as I am art. So maybe better macaroni and cheese at the whole foods opening. Yeah. For sure I think we ate at the Ukrainian national home that was our big treat and need. Get lamb chops and apple sauce and potato for three dollars and ninety five cents or something that was like our big meal. But I think you know, I think. You know, now you don't you don't get this kind of gets anymore, the way you did, because it's become so rich and didn't there's it's not as varied as it once was Sarah driver. Thank you so much for talking to me on bulls eye. It was so nice to get to see your film men to get to meet you. Thank you so much, Jesse. Sarah, Dr boom for real the late teenage years of Joe Michel Basquiat is available now for streaming. You can also check out Sarah in Jim Jarmusch movie, the dead. Don't die. She's out now until active theaters. That's the end of another episode of bullseye, we record the show at maximum fun dot org. World headquarters. Overlooking beautiful MacArthur park in Los Angeles, California, where our producer review saw three police cars parked under a canopy of trees for hours, our best gas. And right now, this is just a guess this is not news. Reporting, our best guess is that they were playing hide and seek with some other police officers who were in helicopters. The show is produced by speaking into microphones. Our producer is Kevin Ferguson. He's on leave recoupment of all in filled in for in this week. Hey, Seuss Ambrosio is our associate producer. We get help from Casey O'Brien. Our production fellow is Jordan cowling. Our music is by DJ w everything except our theme. That is, Dan Wally is his government. Thanks as always to Dan. For sharing it with us. Our theme song is called huddle formation. It's by the go team. Thanks to them and to Memphis industries their label for letting us use. That super nice about that great band before you go. I've been making this show for a long time. There are a lot of interviews, like, for example, last week, we had John waters on the show. Do you think that was the first time John wires is on been on the show? No, he's been on the show whole bunch of times. Why don't you listen to them in a row? And see if he keeps his story straight. We've got tons of stuff on our website. We're also on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube if you want to hear either of these interviews. Again, YouTube is a great place to find and share them. You can follow us on Twitter at bullseye, and we're at bullseye with Jesse thorn on Facebook, and that's about it just remember, all great radio hosts have a signature sign on. Bullseye with Jesse thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by NPR.

New York City Jesse thorn Joe Michel Basquiat Sarah driver NPR John Michelle Times Square Sean Michel Basquiat Lower East Side Mudd club Bosc yachts Manhattan Jean Michel Basquiat Sean Michael Holman Alexis Adler house Alexis Adler SoHo Sean Michel
Luther Hughes reads "Tenor"

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Luther Hughes reads "Tenor"

"This is the poacher magazine podcast for the week of December third twenty eighteen I Don share editor of poetry magazine. And I'm Lindsay garbage associate editor for the magazine on the poetry magazine podcast, we listened to a poem or two in the current issue. Luther Hughes is the author of touched a collection of poems that came out this year. Hughes's also, the founder of the shade journal executive editor for the offing and a columnist for frontier poetry his palm in the December issue tenor draws from a painting of the same name by Jean Michel Basquiat Hughes told us that in college. He saw documentary about boss Gat, and the artists became one of his muses. He was so free of kind of societal norms of how black artists should come a live at present themselves. I'm also he was poor. So it was like interesting to me how that never stopped him. The painting from nineteen eighty-five two picks four. Bird heads circling around a monstrously oversized around. I love crows. I really have an obsession with CROs and being from Seattle and living back in Seattle. There are so many crows here. So when I saw this painting. I was like, oh, my gosh has painting with CROs after seeing an image of the painting for the first time Hughes told us that he started looking around his apartment, and I had these paintings in my living room that had a bird in it that had a picture of a boy in it. I saw a mirror, and so everything is seemed to collapse into each other. And I remember one day seeing our rats in a crow's beak walking home from the bus stop. And I was like, wow. This is kind of perfect. How do I reckon with all of this perfection? How I reckon with them us telling me Luther Lou sit down write this poem. Write it. Here's Luther Hughes. Leading tenor after Joe Michel Basquiat. Crows and more crows one crow with a rat hanging from its beak sloppy and beautiful. Another crow with its wings plucked empty. I wanted so much of today to be peaceful, but the empty crow untethered something in me, a federal yearning for love or love that is so full of power of tenderness. The words fall to their knees baking for mercy like tulips in wind. I don't wear the crown for the times power has tainted my body, but I can tell the difference between giving up and giving in. If you can't ask the crow that watches me through the window, laughing as I drink my third bottle of wine. Ask the sound. The tree makes when the crow has grown disgusted with my whining after years of repression. I can come clean. I was a boy with a whole other boys stuff themselves into I have wanted nothing to do with blackness or laughter or my life. But about love who owns the rights really who owns the crow who loves fresh meats or the crow who loves the vibration of its own throat. Everything around me is black. I own good. I suppose the widow the picture of the boy crying on the wall the mirror with it's taunting the crows that belong to their scripture. Can you imagine being so tied to? Blackness that even your wings cannot help you escape about my life every needle a small prayer every pill a funeral him. I wanted the end several times, but thought who owns this body really God dirt the silly insects that will feast on my decay is it the boy who entered I or the boy who wanted everything to last. There's so much about this poem that I love I think it would be easy to read this poem without knowing about the John Michel Basquiat painting, but it adds such a beautiful layer onto what this poem is talking about. Specifically, the one mention I don't wear the crown for the times power has tainted my body because boss out was well known for putting crowns in his paintings as a way of honoring somebody that he cared about. And also in his own self portrait to kind of offer his own body and his own talent. And I love how this one mention of the crown in Hughes's poem both pays attention to honoring his own body. But also to talk about power in the way power can turn us into both like a Saint and martyr the same time. And so that crown sort of echoes out throughout the poem for me because the word crow is also within the word crown, and so is the word own which is also repeated. Throughout the poem. And so I love how all these different themes are tied together. And that way the way of Bosque painting does similar theme tying together, visually and textually. Ya Anne on the page the Palmerston stepped lines, and I suppose we'll remind readers of William Carlos Williams is accept that. This is like the perfect fulfillment of Williams American way of laying outlines and steps because it doesn't just have that kind of crow like movement through the poem, the stepped lines and not just the breath that Williams talked about. But it has those other internal sounds and rhymes that. You were describing that I think Williams ever quite got in or didn't want to. And so to me, this is grateful film. And it's a great American poem for this reason. And then, of course, another crow poem or book of pumps comes to mind from another poet named Hughes. I always like it when a poet and opponent come. Along and kind of displaced as what we think we know about a subject and so for most people upon about crows gonna call up something about Ted Hughes. And then for for me like you say, this poem absorbs all these influences, but it actually flies well above them too. I really like that. It's like now, we have a new brilliant poem that takes on a way of thinking about in visualizing crows. And also, it creates a landscape that to me is very intriguing because it's kind of like when you think of crow you don't always think of a crow is being in flight because actually a lot of their time is spent kind of calculating in moving and looking at things and doing things the very busy, and they're very clever and ingenious, and of course, they're very striking as well. I mean, it looks like crows yearning for something. They're working on things there. They have a kind of power using the figure of crow for kind of. Power Eknath thirty is really compelling in the poem. It's something that allows the poet to really think about how to live in a different way to realize, for instance, the poem says after years of repression, I can come clean, it's really creating kind of iconography for poetry and love about love who owns the rights really who owns the crow who loves fresh meats or the crow who loves the vibration of its own throat. I love that section where it says the crow who loves the vibration of its own throat because it's a sort of harkening back to the title of the poem tenor. Which is, you know, both like a sort of melody or pitch of a man's voice. But it can also be related to metaphor. It's object. That's being described in a metaphor. And I love what you were saying about crows too. Because the part in the palm where the speaker says if you can't. Ask the crow that watches me through the window laughing as I drink my third bottle of wine ask the sound. The tree makes when the crow has grown disgusted with my whining. Crows always seem like so observational to me like they're really watching you and really aware of your movements, and some people say that crows have a really excellent memory that they do remember people when they see them. And so the idea of the crow sort of being conscious or god-like figure in this speakers life of being like, I see you see what you're doing. And I see how you're failing. And I'm pushing you to do better is such a beautiful moment in this poem. And I love how it expands outward to be everything that's surrounding the speaker. So the widow the picture of the boy crying on the wall the mirror with it's taunting that this whole scene becomes involved in the speaker understanding themselves and understanding their own life a little bit better, and there's real power and liberation in that too it's very moving when the poem says canoe. Agean being so tied to blackness that even your wings cannot help you escape these questions that arise especially towards the end of the poem, which Hinz on a question really have kind of muscular movement to them, which I think allows us to imagine asking questions about things about our lives and about our bodies, and sort of almost become more muscular in our response to the questions to become strengthened by asking them by having tasks them who owns this body, really God dirt the silly insects that will feast on my decay is it the boy who entered I or the boy who wanted everything to last. You can read tender after show. Michelle basket by Luther Hughes and the December twenty eight teen issue of poetry magazine or online at poaching magazine dot org. We'll have another episode for you next week or you can get all December episodes all at once in the full length podcast on soundcloud. Let us know what you thought of this program. Email us at podcast at poetry foundation dot org, and please linked to the podcast and social media. The poetry magazine podcast is recorded by Ed Herman. And this episode was produced by Curtis FOX and Rachel James. The theme music for this program comes from the Claudia Quinta. I'm Don share, and I'm Lindsay it. Thanks for listening.

Luther Hughes Jean Michel Basquiat Hughes poetry magazine William Carlos Williams Seattle poacher magazine Joe Michel Basquiat Ted Hughes associate editor John Michel Basquiat Gat Luther Lou editor Don share executive editor Claudia Quinta shade journal founder Ed Herman
#162 8 Success Hacks That Will Level Up Your Life | Impact Theory

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

40:31 min | 9 months ago

#162 8 Success Hacks That Will Level Up Your Life | Impact Theory

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You'll hear from on today's Episode Leadership Expert Robin Sharma triple threat. Actress Meghan Good bestselling author mark. Manson media mogul Dame Dash cultural phenomenon. Rachel Hollis widely popular keynote speaker. How elrod personal finance expert Roommates City and World Renown neuroscientist Sam Harris? So get ready for the secret weapons of success to be unleashed with our first guest. The One and only Robin Sharma one thing that I wanNA talk about. Is that level of energy and enthusiasm and you talk about that being something. That's common among high achievers. How do we cultivate that well? First of all congratulations and all your success with the show. And all the people that you're influencing so one of the lines for right out of the five. Am Club is one of the DNA's of legendary is longevity. So if look at the Picasso's Jean-michel Basquiat you look at the great sports champions. You Look Great History. Makers they were much better at energy management than time management. And so we're in a war against distraction right now and what we really have to do is optimize our energy. How do I do well I get to the morning routine? Which which the whole book is based on. But it's really quite powerful because if you start your day which sweaty exercise you're actually going to activate a pharmacy of mastery that exists in every human brain. I know you love the neuroscience. You're going to release be the NF which is brain. Derived neurotrophic factor. That's GonNa actually accelerate your processing. It's actually the repair brain cells that have been damaged by stress. You're going to release the neurotransmitter dopamine. Which is the fire neuro transmitter? Which we all need as entrepreneurs and business builders and and servants of Humanity Cortisol. The fear hormone is highest in the morning so exercising. First thing in the morning is going to reduce that. I'm getting into my twenty twenty twenty formula but I mentioned it because it is a way to maximize your energy. So talk to us about the twenty twenty twenty. I'm you sort of Started there with this exercise. But what's the rest of that formula which is pretty powerful? Sure so the new book is all about rising and five. Am and that's because you look at the great creatives and the great saints and the Great Humanitarian and the Titans of industry many of them got up at five. Am even right now. You've got Tim Cook. And you've got Howard Schultz and it goes on and on before the Sun. Rises is the time of lease distraction before the sun rises. Were you can build intimacy and fluency with what you want to stand for in your day. Before the Sun rises the luxury in tranquility of the early morning hours. You can do that deepen or work that will allow you to go out in the world and play at your best. What the twenty twenty twenty formula is is simply this? There's three pockets. The first pocket is move five to five twenty and you get into the sweaty exercise. Because like I mentioned it releases. Neuro transmitters reduces the cores all increase your metabolic rate which gives you more energy so now and sort. Serotonin as well which gives you joy so now. It's five twenty fundamentally feel different. You have energy. Your state is strong. He's got a fire in your belly. Accelerated your focus. Five twenty five forty is the second pocket of the twenty twenty two thousand formula which is reflect. We live in a world where a lot of people are busy being busy. But what's the point being busy around climbing the wrong Mount Everest so clarity is one of the DNA of mastery? You know if you talk to the Titans of industry and you talk to the people really getting traction around the Ram Bishen these are people Monta maniacal focus on the few things matter. They haven't obsession bordering on possession around the few priorities. They want to build their life around and so five twenty two to five forty the second pocket. You're writing a journal. You Meditate you. Visualize you do what I call him? The book a blueprint for a Beautiful Day or you. Just sit in solitude. And you'd think and you ponder and you reflect and then the final pocket is five forty to six o'clock and this is the victory our the final pocketing is grow. But if you look at the greatest billionaires coach many billionaires over the last twenty years if you look at the greatest producers on the planet. These people have one thing in common. They are ridiculously curious. And no matter how much money they make no matter how much impact they have. They maintain a white belt mentality. One of the keys to epic performance is a relentless commitment to daily growth. So that's the twenty twenty two thousand formula that the five a method is built around and the premise is basically this as you begin your day. So you handcraft the rest of your day and if you have consistently great days you're gonNA have consistently great weeks quarter I year and a lifetime. So your days are life in miniature. And you gotta get those mornings calibrated if you really want to win. So Adore gets slammed in your face. And sometimes it's gotta suck really real level. How do you process through that and get moving again for me in the beginning? It was like very devastating in frustrating. And then I just fixed my mind to just say like what's for me as for me. No one can take it for me. And what's for someone else's from someone else for someone else and I can't take it from them and that's how I taught myself very early to not compete with other women and just you know I want to see them. Win belongs to them. I can't take it and vice versa in some In of the grief of you know the frustration of certain things not working out or not being fair just fixed my mind to say okay so sometimes these things aren't fair and choice. I can be mad. I can be upset. I can be hurt I could be Chilton. Have a chip on my shoulder or I can choose to say. Let me just do what I can do to change things for the little girl behind me? Let me continue to push forward and be very thankful and happy for the things that I do get a chance to do because I could be doing something else you know. I could be working somewhere where I'm not happy and not doing the things that are really in my heart and not following my passions but I get to follow my passion every day so to be grateful to be humble and to have my perspective really be about. I am thankful to do this. You know this is exciting and To not get upset if it was mine I would have it. You know and so I just changed my mind about how I look at it and how we think about and of course there's roles you go in for your like. I really wanted that but I just choose to say you know what I'm GonNa get really excited for. Who did get it? You know and get excited for the thing that's mine that's coming so I love that you say that's a choice that you choose to be excited for the other person. I think that's really strong. Your attitude and the way that you carry yourself and all that and make you a hero to a lot of a lot of people first of all and then a lot of young women. Especially you've said that your mom is your hero. Why she's amazing. Sorry and cry. She's just you know she's done so much. She was married when she was nineteen. And my older brother He stopped breathing when he was a baby. And he got brain damage and she raised him by herself and then she got remarried to my sister. Nice father and they were together for ten years and then my dad was lapd for twenty six years. He was constantly working so she raised meal. Amaya by herself. So it was me and my older brother Coburg and then she adopted my younger sister and she raised all of us by herself and there were times where we had this three bedroom house. We had one extra room built on the back and I look up in eighteen. People were living with us because my mother would literally take everybody and literally care for everybody and she really gave me that heart But she is just an incredible person. She's a lover. She's a giver she's given every lasting that she can to my sister and I to my sisters and I my brother and She's just my hero. I just love her and appreciate her and no. I wouldn't be here without her and when I was a kid. I asked her me and my sister. Do you think you could quit your job. And maybe manager. So we could do this full-time issue did the thing that I found. Most interesting is the talk about values and like how much values begin to inform your identity. Basically your values are essentially. Who are yes. Take us into that. What does it mean? And then how much malleability is there in values? Sure so my my focus in my work has always been value focused I feel like in the self help and self development world. There's so much focus on success. You know getting ahead in your career starting a business making more money having better relationships but nobody's actually standing back and defining what success is like is our definition of success valuable or not And I think especially today's crazy Internet world where were exposed to everything deciding what we're choosing find. Success is is a more important question than ever before. So that's kind of what got me started on the whole value question in general and then when I started investigating it and doing a lot of research and writing about it I started to discover that like basically you know if you think of how how you define a person in general As humans we tend to find people by their choices by their actions. But then what motivates their actions will often. It's how they feel. And in. What what motivates how they feel about certain things in it's their perception of what's valuable and what's not and so that's kind of how. I drilled down to to this idea that essentially what we are is just an aggregation of what we choose the value in this world. If I value money more than anything else that will come to define me through my actions. My behaviors what I invest my time and attention into if I value family that will define who I am because everything else will flow from that the thing that I find interesting about values people often act as if they are empirical. Truce like money is valuable. Family is valuable and they don't realize that it was a choice often handed to them. By the way the grow up their parents with their parents instilled in them. And so stepping back and recognizing that all of this is a choice. That you can consciously decide what you're going to value and I'd love to hear your thoughts on how the process works deciding to value something so somebody finds themselves in a place where they feel totally fucked up. They don't like they are and they buy into this notion that okay. A lot of this is being driven by values. How do they actually change that? Yeah it's funny because I'm not a huge fan of a lot of like kind of the typical self-help trump's but the answer to this question. I think is kind of classic neutralization. But it's not the visualization that we usually hear about. So what I talk about in the book is that you like. Let's say let's say I'm just really superficial and I value money more than anything like I've got like fleet and it's all I care about you know and then something happens in my life and I realized that that's pretty superficial. I should grow up a bit and value something else and it's not as simple as just deciding like we've all had that experience in our lives where we wish we cared about something that we don't or vice versa. We wish we didn't care about something that we do. And you can't just stop and so the process that I describe in the book is that essentially before you can commit to value you kind of have to like try them on like going to a store and trying on a bunch of pairs of clothes and the way you try on a new value. Is You need to sit down and visualize and you can even write it out if you want. But it's like let's say all I care about is my fleet of boats and And I want to try on a new value like charity or something. I have to sit down and start asking myself. What would it mean for my life? What would it mean for me as a person if I didn't value those boats anymore And that's a very hard question it really. It messes us up because we realized that a lot of our relationships would probably fall apart. A lot of our business commitments would probably fall apart. A lot of our understanding of ourselves would be shaken up or or questioned. And it's a very difficult thing to ask. And so you know most of the times when you see visualization taught in the self help industry. It's like they take a guy who wants a fleet of boats and they say visualize a fleet of boats. Now go get it. And it's like no no. No what you need to do is take a guy wants a fleet of boats in say visualized not wanting to flee boats. What would that say about you? Who would you be if that thing you always desired was not your desire anymore? What DOES UP ACTIVISTS HOPE? You guys are enjoying this episode. Wanted to give a quick shout out to our sponsors and then we'll get right back to it remember. Our sponsors are all hand chosen. We love these guys and they have something incredibly valuable to offer so. Be sure to give a listen. A lot of these guys are doing special offers just for you. I'm credibly excited to tell you guys about our sponsors at skill share because as you know I am all about constant self improvement having a growth mindset any relentless focus on progress and skill acquisition. And no matter what I accomplished I always know. My future is going to be bigger than my past. And the way that I guarantee that is by making sure that I'm constantly acquiring new skills. And the best way to explore new skills deepen existing passions and just get lost and creativity is with skill. 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Helixsleep is offering to two hundred dollars off all mattress orders for our listeners at helixsleep dot com slash impact. They have a ten year warranty. And you get to try it out for a hundred nights risk free. That's helixsleep H. E. L. I. S. L. E. E. P. dot com slash impact for up to two hundred dollars off my guys take care and be legendary One of the things. You talked about a lot that I think is insanely powerful as perspective and those to me go hand in hand so talking about perspective you said that I know every perspective from the Smart Perspective to the dump perspective one. Why is that so important in to? How do you do that? Okay so what am able to do if I want something I go into the future and my brain which is powerful and visualize exactly what I want. So I'm there I mean my future and then I think about every single thing I need to do to make that happen and every single thing that could stop that from happening or what I need to avoid then I go right back. You understand what I'm saying like I was just in the future thinking about watching myself on my television network so because I do that that means I have to think what would be the worst case scenario and then think what would be the best case scenario and then. I laminate every single thing that I think could happen which I call art detecting and then I put everything and every single attitude in person around me and my vision is going to make me get to what I want and also I try to get the people around me to think about the same exact vision so you can inspire people and all the energy is focused on one thing that visualize in their head then it becomes a tangible reality. And I know that because it's happened. It's a fact for me so. I continue to do that and know that anything I can imagine I can make happen so I am really careful about how small my thoughts are. Because I don't feel like wasting time in a twenty four hour day making this much and I could spend the same amount of time with the same amount of energy for art detective right at this much and with this much. I can help so many more people that I love what? I'm so that's how I look at all perspective. It's the only way to prepare yourself. It's like when you when you buy a tape. So you see where that person punches that's one perspective and look at it from another might WanNa fight from from right might wanNA fight from softball. You know it's just studying in the more you're prepared the easier. Your time is what I tell my staff and everyone that works with me is the more you care. The more you prepare period and thanking is a part of that. You'd be surprised how many people are scared to think most of my arguments. Don't come from me pushing somebody physically. It's from me pushing them to think how about God. Damn you don't want to think like that doesn't eat it. It's harder to run up fucking mild into thinks. So why is it less scary to work out than to just think and it doesn't take any physical effort? It's about a perspective. Why are people so scared of the unknown? Just because you don't know an answer like Google was so foreign to me up to a couple of years ago surprising as that may seem but Rocco's white fee for life. He remembers the moment that I was like Holy Shit. I can find out everything all this time you know at all I would've had to do was look and I would have seen out easy but because it was unknown in the moment I thought it was complicated. How many times do you get a remote control three million things? But just because you don't know how you can't figure it out you're like fuck all those other things even though if you look at it it will make life a bit easy. So how did you go from being paralyzed by Your mother-in-law's expectations? Or what your eighth grade friend. Who's GonNa think to to really owning that? Well I think first of all it was over a decade. I never went sort of an nowadays. We see social media. Were always kind of looking for the magic bullet and I if you want business advice for life I mean I can tell you what worked for me but none of it's fast and I think that the things that are lasting are ever quickly accomplished so for me a couple of things I had really pivotal moment and at some point. I'll stop quoting him. But a huge fan of Tony Robbins going to. Up W changed my life. That's not an ad and I don't actually know him really was a huge deal for me But I was at that conference years and years ago and He they do this thing where it's a question he asks everybody like a witch parent. Did you crave love from most? And if you've seen a documentary he. He does the same thing in the documentary. Not who did you love most? Who did you crave love from most and for me it was my dad and he said No. Who did you have to be for him? In order to get his love and for me I I knew the answer. This is nothing new. I'd done a ton of therapy so I'm like I swim an achiever like I had to perform well in my family. Nobody paid attention to. Unless you're doing something good so if you got an A. On the test if you scored a goal in the soccer game then we all clap for you and we love you and the second that achievement is done. We're back over here doing our thing and what that teaches a child. Is that in order to get love. You better keep achieving now. I don't regret that because Gosh it's manifested in something really powerful as an adult but so we asked that question. Who Do you have to be? And then he says. And who else did you have to be? And I had never consciously had this thought and it fell out of my mouth small so my dad was a little girl. Little girl you know what you're talking about little girl this little girl and he wanted you to be bigger than life when other people were watching but he also believe that children should be seen and not heard you little girl. You better shut your mouth. So how do you carry that? How do you carry be as big and achieving as you can possibly be and then shut up because nobody wants to hear what you have to say and I found myself as a grown woman sitting there realizing that this had become my career so I had a in the dark like behind the scenes in a way that it wouldn't bother anybody? I'm building and dreaming and an entrepreneur and super proud of what I'm doing but if you had asked me what do you do I'd be like? Oh I have this little blog and it was at the time like by myself. It's over six figures. I was really proud of what I would but I never said that family parties Rachel she has a little blogger. She's a little diy. But I. I wouldn't claim what I was doing because I just thought I've got to be big and I've also got to be small so for me. It was a understanding why. That's why I think. Therapy is so freaking powerful. It's not that time that you sit in the chair with someone and cry about all the things. It's that moment where you're like. Oh my gosh. That's why if you know why you can learn how to navigate around something but I think if you don't know the core of the problem you can't move past it so understanding why. I felt that way and also making the decision as a people pleaser that I would no longer seek love from others in negative ways and the only way I know how to do that is. I'm going to be so filled with love myself. I'm going to be so filled with love for my inlaws for my parents for for everybody else that it doesn't matter if you love me back. I'm GonNa love you so hard. It doesn't matter if you love me back because if I've got enough love for both of us then I don't need to try and shake myself into someone new in order for you to approve of me about fear like it. I have a from an emotional standpoint. I I will put myself in the almost emotionally invulnerable opposition like I've I've spent an inordinate amount of time on that but I would have to process through some real fear even if it was just okay. Now what happens to my wife? What happens to my family. So how did you deal with that? Here's an important piece of this is when it comes to accepting things that you can't change. Death is one of those things so I made peace with death along time ago and I think death is a big fear for all of us and to me have gotten to the point where I realize. It doesn't even make sense that it'd be a fear for for anything that's inevitable or that you can't change right. There's no point in in resisting and wishing weren't going to happen and in the way that I look at death is it's the other side of birth and we don't fear birth right but birth and death are both as inevitable and there are two sides of the same coin. There's life but how man I it's that's the one thing I've heard you say whereas I and I'll say why birth gives death takes or such as my perception right now and maybe you're about to give me a break through and I'm so fucking open to that you can imagine but like the thing that that I really want to understand like how you've dealt with it internally is that data and maybe I'm packing wrong when I say it out loud but that sense of I want something so badly and thusly I am terrified to lose it and the the wanting is so powerful and so important and so beautiful that I know I don't want to give that up but yet it creates the fear it is. The old Buddhist notion of life is suffering. Because you want things because you want things and you may not get them because you want things you may lose them like love for child. I Imagine I'm not a parent I imagine is transformative profound. But it fucking sucks. Un Dude and it gets you to the point where now like right now. I'm not afraid to die except for my wife blitz for myself whatever like I. I won't say that I'm not bothered. But it's like not a grand fear of mine even though I talk a lot about living forever. That's me moving towards something I don't. I'm not moving away from death. I'm moving towards the things I would be able to do if I could live forever but dude the thought of having kids or the thought of leaving my wife mind. That shit makes me emotional and so I really want to know like. How did you process through that? Because in there somewhere is a breakthrough for me. If nobody else yeah so. That was the hardest thing like I said because I've made peace with death. I was mentioning my wife and my kids. Losing me especially my kids like the the the most important thing in my world in my life is that I can influence my children in a positive way to set them up for a great life right and so that that that I might not have that opportunity was the hardest thing deal with. I think that part of it is. I didn't spend a lot of time on thinking about that right. So that's the thing is people that have a lot of fear. You're thinking about the things that you're afraid of. You don't have the fear of if you're not thinking right if you're not thinking the finger afraid of but as soon as you think about the fear comes up so for me I use affirmations a lot too. That's one of the miracle morning practices affirmations and affirmations any kind of a bad rap. Stuart Smalley I'm good enough. I'm smart enough and people like me and they're taught by like a lot of self-help pioneers lie to yourself. It's going to be a millionaire. Just say I am a millionaire over and over and over until you believe it right but we're we know the truth. You're like I'm a millionaire. You know your brains. No you're not you're like shut up. I'm doing my information's right. Like the point is the way that I view affirmations is they simply direct your focus on wherever you want your focus directed so you can literally like a computer program you can okay? What are the beliefs that I want to focus on so they expand inside of me even the thoughts that I want to focus on? What are my values? What are the behaviors that I need to embody right? So so you read these affirmations every day and your programming yourself to live in alignment with that program that you've designed so let's talk about the job stuff because I talk about jobs. It's a little unusual. I think it's become very popular online to say like screw jobs and be an entrepreneur and I think entrepreneurship is great but I also think most people have a job and you can create amazing value by working with the team and I have employees and they do an incredible job. So I've had jobs so I think that When it comes to a job there is a totally counter. Intuitive way to approach it routinely show people had negotiate ten twenty five thousand dollar raises all the time. And if you're like crazy there's no way etc etc excuse us. Here's the different approach. The first way that most people think is like if I'm going to negotiate for a raise which like all they might just like fire me that's problem number one. That's that's the wrong way to look at it. If you go in and ask for a raise you're not devaluing yourself. You're actually increasing your value because what type of person would go in and ask for raise a top performer. So the second thing is they believe that they have to kick down the door of their boss and say like Gimme money. Well if you do that of course they're going to kick you out. That's a very impolite way to a third way is much more effective. So I'll just give you like the quickly of the land if you want to get a raise for anybody watching. This is how you do it. You send you an email to your boss. You say you know what I would love to meet with you and I would love to discuss what it takes to be an absolute top performer in this world to make your life easier. Could we set up some time in the next week or two? Of course one hundred percent of bosses are going to say yes. I'd love to see you so you go in there and say hey boss really appreciate you taking the time. I've enjoyed my role. I just want to tell you that I don't WanNa just do a fine job. I WANNA be a top performer. Here and I would love to know exactly what it takes for me to be a top performer. Okay so let me just pause right here. If I'm the employees in your boss how do you feel right now with me walking in asking this so fucking good? This is the greatest advice of all time. The because we're creating value right and I'm not coming. GimMe Money. I'm like please advise me. You're the boss. I want to learn from you. So the bosses say they're going to give you some generic answer because they weren't prepared for this. Oh you need to show up and Blah Blah Blah Blah. Whatever you say. I really appreciate that. I'd love to get really specific. In fact I did a little bit of research before I came in here are three things I think would be looking at it. We're going to face because bosses don't hear this most of their employees. Just show up do what's expected and then they're like how come. I'm not getting ten thousand dollars. Braised Meat said because you don't deserve ten thousand dollars unless you go above and beyond so hey boss. I know that I'm currently working on the sales project. And were slated to have a three percent improvement. I really think we can do six. Would that be part of top performing? Roll here yes. What about this? So you have a little discussion and you say okay. Am I reading this right? These three things would help me really outperformance this role yes okay. I'll tell you what I'd like to get to work on this. I'M GONNA commit to send you an update every week or every two weeks and at the end of six months. I'd like to come back and show you what college if I do it. I'd like to discuss a salary adjustment at that time. But let's not even worry about that right now. Let's have me focus on this. What do you say one of the things I struggled with with meditation was it felt decidedly feminine. And in a way that as somebody who I felt I felt that certainly growing up that I was far more on the feminine end of being a Guy than anything else and so for me my journey certainly to being an entrepreneur one of toughening up and so anything that that made me feel that old school sort of gentle way. I would push back on. Its widened meditate for a long time. But I see you're doing Brazilian Jujitsu. You're somebody who obviously cares about martial arts and being able to fight and defend yourself. I've heard you talk very eloquently about violence and clearly in your professional life. You've just even just what you've done in the writing let alone the lecturing you've already achieved such massive success refuse to believe that there wasn't a just massive amount of energy behind that. So how do you think about meditation in that context? Is this like going to war. With your mind and your. I'm going to come out the other side having faced demons and having won some sort of victory that allows me to perform at a higher level or am I totally missing all of this and it needs to be a letting go a more peaceful relaxed sort of transient experience. And I. It's a very common association. I totally understand. And it's presented in many ways. Where yeah you under that framing you can just feel the testosterone and leaving your body? You know So yeah that's not. My orientation is a lot like. Jujitsu for the mind and it's and it's a lot like I it. It was so beautiful about Jiu. Jitsu in particular is that you can have this massive effect in the domain violence while being relaxed. It is what a Kito off advertises itself to be. But it's a much more you know. At least in my estimation a much more effective version of that same underlying ethic where you can like you can control someone And use as little violence as as necessary and basically just use a superior knowledge of physics and leverage and position against them. So it's very it can be incredibly relaxed and yet Given wh- what the circumstances it can be a very high testosterone in experience you know is not Kinda quintessentially Masculine thing to be doing. But you can internalize the same sort of structure. And that's largely what meditation is because basically the the default state is one of being attacked an ambushed all the time by your thoughts and by your reactivity and by You are being taken in by assumptions and illusions and not not just you just. You're in a fog and not you personally but you know one is and You know even when you learn to meditate urine this fog. Most of the time. You're so the practice is one of continually breaking the spell. Everybody I hope you enjoyed that episode as much as we enjoyed putting together. I think some of the advice that was laid out is some of the most extraordinary advice that you will hear anywhere and I promise if you put it to consistent use in your life it will change for the better forever right until next time. My friends be legendary. Take care everybody. Thank you so much for listening. And if this content is delivering value to you please go to itunes. Go to stitcher rate and review us. That helps us build this community and that is what we're all about right now building community as big as we can to help as many people as we can deliver as much value as possible and you guys rating and reviewing really helps with that all right guys. Thank you again so much and until next time I friends legendary take care.

Rachel Hollis helixsleep Helixsleep Robin Sharma Lisa Jean-michel Basquiat testosterone Meghan Good Howard Schultz Sam Harris Tim Cook Mount Everest Manson twenty twenty twenty elrod Jujitsu
Sep. 21, 2018: Over the moon, dead cops, all hail Abe, least popular city and Japan Yesterday.

Japan This Week

18:55 min | 2 years ago

Sep. 21, 2018: Over the moon, dead cops, all hail Abe, least popular city and Japan Yesterday.

"Fly me to the moon has become a reality and Japanese billionaire is about to be the first private citizen to take that journey will tell you as plans to play amongst the stars. In our first story. Now back here on earth. Japan is known as a pretty safe country statistically speaking, but not it seems if you're a police officer these days, another cop was killed at his local station. Last week details coming up. Prime minister obeys set to become Japan's longest-serving prime minister, but can he do it political punditry on his tasks ahead in just a few minutes. In two thousand eighteen. Japan is near the top of major popular tourist destinations, but a poll of its residents about eight major cities. One in particular came in dead last in the appeal factor, which one do you think it is? Well, we'll tell you later in the show. And in another addition of Japan yesterday, we'll tell you about that time US president and civil war general. Ulysses s grant visited emperor Meiji way before the days of presidential tweets and bromance is. Hi and welcome to Japan this week. A quick recap of stories. We're following on the Japan today website for the week ending, September twenty. First two thousand eighteen. I'm Jeff Richards. It's good to have you back again and now let's get right to this week stories. Well, we're shooting for the moon in our first story. What we always like to do Japanese billionaire Yusaku Meisel has been chosen to take the first ever private commercial trip around the moon. And he said he will invite six to eight artists architects designers or other creative people on the week, long journey with him. The SpaceX big falcon rocket is scheduled to make the trip in twenty twenty three said company, founder, Ilan, musk, Miza, who is forty? Two is the founder of Japan's largest clothing retail website called zone town, and coincidentally, he's Japan's eighth richest person according to Forbes magazine, musk said that my ZOA will pay a lot of money for the trip, but he declined to disclose the exact amount. It's probably pretty hefty. I don't think that SpaceX is a budget carrier miso approached SpaceX with the idea for the group flight. I did not want to have such a fantastic exp. -perienced by myself. He said he also said he often thought about what artists like Jean Michel Basquiat, or Andy Warhol might have come up with if they've traveled into space. I wish to create amazing works of art for humankind. He said the mission, if you were thinking it will not involve a lunar landing, it will just be going around the moon well, who'd like to go on that. I mean, I know I would, but who else out there wants to go to pan today reader, good luck to you for one, I'm an artist and actually free that week. So if he needs someone to tag along. Okay. Open ended question Tigers Tokyo dome's. He's the trip as a good opportunity for something else. The guy is so rich. How do you know he's not planning to become the first ever in the thousand mile high club? He hasn't disclosed his companions. Right? A pretty hot date offer that could not be refused. Well, I guess that depends on your personality. And also, I mean, do we really know what happened and all the lunar capsules and other flights on the space shuttle up there? I guess you'll never know what what happens in space, station space, something like that. Well, coming back down to earth here in domestic news. You've heard of Cobo on kkob our police boxes, and they're very common site in communities across Japan. Usually, they're man by two to four police officers who are always accessible to the public for all kinds of inquiries. People can report crimes, like robbery, they can report lost items have disputes and even ask for directions from the police officers. In fact, this actually seems to be a lot of what they do at the co bonds, but there have been three incidents at on this year in which police officers have been killed in Shiga in April in Toyama in June. And again, just this week in Sendai in meow GI prefecture in the latest case, Thirty-three-year-old police officer, Hugh to- Ocoee say no was stabbed to death in the Koban by twenty one year old university student, Utah, ISO at four AM. Last Thursday ISO had shown up at the co Bon saying he wanted to hand in lost cash. This is something that also happens a lot at coburns while say no and police sergeant were on duty. After the sergeant went to a different room. He heard shouting and fighting. And when he came back into see what was going on, he saw his colleague bleeding from a stab, wound collapsed on the floor with his attacker is Allah who was wielding a knife and what turned out to be a model gun stood up and sergeant ordered him to stand still and to drop his weapons. Instead is our approach the sergeant who fired three shots at him, say no Anizah unfortunately were taking a hospital where they both were pronounced dead. So we really don't know a lot of what the motivation was for this attack. Why did he do it? I don't think we'll ever know. But Japan today readers, of course, they have their own ideas, Mikey likes. It suggests suicide by cop, the guy used hand. Ding in money as a pretext to get into the police box and earned trust. Then he attacked and predictably fell in a hail of bullets. It's a quick dopamine fueled way to go. This is the best explanation. I can fathom given the details. We know, interesting point. I'm not sure suicide by cop is a thing here either are hail of bullets. But yeah, we'll add that one to the suggestion box hero ads. I seriously recommend. They have a metal detector for visitors when going inside a police station or at least a security check any nutjob can just walk in with all kinds of hidden weapons. Good point. I think they should be checking that I have to say. I thought I thought he had written mental detector at first. When I I was reading this and you know, metal detector mentally Tekere. I think they're both good ideas to have at these community police boxes. What do you think? Why didn't you visit us at Japan today dot com and give us your too. Cents. Well, the world of Japanese politics and politics in general can be a little murky, especially if you don't live in the country where those politics are happening. But for this next story, let me try to bring it a little bit more into focus because this one is about a very big milestone. For one particular politician, prime minister Shinzo Ave won a ruling party leadership vote on Thursday, and that puts him on track to become Japan's longest-serving prime minister ever. So that's what this story is about. Ave turned sixty four last Friday. Now if he manages to stay in office through November of two thousand nineteen, he will exceed the record two thousand eight hundred eighty six days that was marked by Tato Katsura in the early twentieth century, he's the last longest serving prime minister, but he has a lot of stuff to do before he reaches this milestone. I, he has this immediate. Challenge of a summit with US President, Donald Trump happening next week there. He's going to face pressure to cut Japan's sixty nine billion dollar trade surplus with its key ally. And nearly two thirds of that are from auto exports after as political win Trump, even tweeted him a message, I guess trying to butter him up for this conference. Congratulations to my good friend. Prime minister Shinzo Ave on his huge election victory. I'm looking forward to many more years of working together. See you in New York next week a now. He's referring to their meeting next week at the upcoming annual gathering of world leaders at the United Nations. General assembly. I didn't realize that prime minister was a big tweeter, but I learned something new from Donald Trump. Everyday abaya has some other big challenges ahead of him and he's going to need to accomplish these. Before he reaches said milestone. There's dealing with Japan's huge public debt and rising social welfare costs. It's there's rebooting the economy. Let's see. Invest in infrastructure to cope with natural disasters. There's this little matter of hiking the sales tax to ten percent from eight percent in October of two thousand nineteen. And there's that little bit about revising the postwar constitutions pacifist article. Mine that part renounces the use of military force and clarifies the military's somewhat ambiguous status here in Japan. Golly, that's a, that's a lot to do. That's that's plenty to do before lunch has my dad would say, and he's going to have some major opposition to this from his cabinet and from the public in general, Japan today readers well, they, of course weighed in Klaus door rights and aging society governed or controlled by an aging, or is it over aged government. They should all sit back, relax, play, Shoghi go to an onset or do whatever, but please. No, more politics. Yes, I know politics, they're boring. It's choppy says my producer, but, hey, it's important and a couple of other things. Shoghi is a super popular game here in Japan. It's also called game of generals and it's a board game lot like chess and on San. If you don't know what that word is. Our hot springs hot spring baths. Really kind of like a spa where you go, sit, soak, relax, get some steam, you know, it's also kind of saying that they're old. And they should cut it out. Gumbiner Japan, gushes prime minister. Obey the fighter from Yamaguchi will make history to become the longest serving prime minister in history. I am drinking sparkling soccer right now to celebrate. Okay. I'm gonna drink some sparkling soccer right now to celebrate the most repetitive comment in the history of repetitive comments right there. But I think what Gumbo Japan really did right there is give us obeys, new nickname old, sparkling sake hashtag, sparkling socket. He worded here I while Telera doco response to that comment with a question is from Yamaguchi or a member of the Gucci. A couple of things Yamaguchi is both a prefecture or province here in Japan, and it's the name of the largest yakuza or mafia group in the country known as the Yamaguchi Gumi. Well, let's take a nonscientific poll. How do you feel about obeys lengthy leadership, visit us on Japan today dot com, and let us know your thoughts. Okay. You've made it this far in the podcast. Thank you so much and lucky you. It's time to talk about something boring. If I asked you what is Japan's least appealing major city, what would be the first place to pop into your head or would any do any of the locations that you know and like in Japan actually register as least appealing? Well, if one did and you were to say Nagoya you'd be right at least according to an internet survey of eight cities gathered from over three thousand participants. Nagoya was chosen by about a third of the respondents followed by Fukuoka Asaka, Tokyo Sapporo, Kobe, Yokohama, and kill. The survey asked participants, which of Japan's eight largest cities is the most appealing and which is the least now respondents range in age from twenty. To sixty four and all of them had lived in one of the city's for at least five years. But what made Nagoya so unpopular? Well, nothing in particular. But unfortunately, nothing in particular sort of applies to the image of Nagoya as whole when asked Pacific what they found most appealing about Nagoya. The most common response given by about a third of the respondents was Nagoya castle. The second most common answer was and here it is. I can't really think of anything by the way the most appealing city in this survey was Sapporo followed by Tokyo Kyoto and Yokohama. And if you'd like to know all of the boring statistics from that story, we have the link to it in the show notes below. What did Japan today readers think stranger land says, I lived in Nagoya and this is spot on. I actually enjoy visiting the city because I know the places I want to eat and have friends to visit and sky is pretty cool. Cool as well as central park. But that said there is nothing particularly striking about the city and the quote above really hits home as to why it's at the bottom. Every other city on the list has something attractive about it, which is missing from Nagoya, don't hold back strange land and from speed. One thing that I think makes it ranked the least appealing of these eight cities is that a lot of times you need a car to get around the other cities have more convenient public transportation. It's also a flat sprawled out city. So it's not as picturesque as the other. Seven. Good point. Speed telling name transportation is pretty darn important. And yes, all of the other cities have very, very good transportation, but the trains and the subways and stuff like that. I personally have friends who live in go right now and they rave about it. But part of me thinks that maybe we're all just junkies high on this piper, Connecticut metropolis style of life here in Japan's major urban centers. What do you think. Linked to the stories in the show notes below. Why don't you weigh in with your facts and figures? If you have some. Well, we in this week's podcast with another story from author, Patrick par and his series Japan yesterday, which chronicles visits to Japan by famous people out of the pages of history this week, Patrick takes us way back to end civil war general and eighteen seventies US president. Ulysses s grant visited Japan in eighteen seventy nine. Wow. This is like our oldest Japan yesterday. Yet in this one, we learn how grant became like a mentor to Japanese emperor Meiji as the country was going through a turbulent transition toward an imperial led government. This was replacing the centuries old samurai led shoganate two years after leaving. The presidency grant arrived in Nagasaki is part of an Asian trip to help improve America's credibility as valuable nation of commerce. I think it has some relevance to modern history happening right now grant didn't match the image of the common western. Stereotype of arrogant disrespectful and crude. My how things have changed. One Japanese woman who saw him up close remarked. He looked more like an oriental man than an American gentlemen because the generals appearance fit our ideal. Our sense of respect for him increased on his part grant marveled at how far to had come in such a short time despite facing treaty restrictions and internal divisions during his trip grant had many meetings with the emperor enjoyed lavish banquets, including a fifty course meal planted trees and several cities watched annot play amongst many other things. Long after grant's death in eighteen eighty five emperor Meiji would continue to refer to him when making big decisions on various issues facing the country at the time. Next month, Patrick will look at author and humanitarian, Helen Keller's, three visits to pre and post wards pan linked to that trip through history is in the show notes. Below, as well as links to all of those other Japan yesterday series where you can meet Marilyn Monroe, Jody, Maggio, Albert Einstein, and some other people. And that was a quick recap of the news from Japan this week. Thanks to the Japan today editors for curing the stories. Thanks to comic con for his production assistance from faraway. Thanks as always to you. All of our listeners readers and commenters out there. You can find links to all of the news mentioned in this podcast in the show notes below. And since the news from Japan never stops, follow us on Twitter at Japan today, and you can get all the breaking stories you can also tweet meet erected at at Jeff w Richards. You can join our Facebook page. Ford slash Japan today for more news and comments. Of course you can and you should visit the Japan today website at anytime at Japan today dot com. If you have a question or comment about the show or the website, we're always happy to hear from you, get in touch with us by Email, won't you? You can reach us at podcast at Japan today dot com, and we'll. Always try to answer whatever questions you have. You can get Japan this week at whatever podcast store you shop at. And if you find it informative or at least entertaining, please leave us a rating or review on apple or Google podcasts from the Japan today. Newsroom g plus media in Tokyo. I'm Jeff Richards and join us again next week for a quick recap of Japan's biggest and smallest stories sign our folks.

Japan Prime minister prime minister Nagoya Japan US president Jeff w Richards Ulysses officer Nagoya castle SpaceX Yusaku Meisel Yokohama Tigers Patrick par soccer annot Jean Michel Basquiat
Claire Danes

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

1:04:52 hr | 2 months ago

Claire Danes

"You know I just liked playing some buddy, a woman who was so muscular and unapologetically commanding and brazen because we never get to be that way, and I just suddenly had like full license. This is designed matters with Debbie. For Sixteen years has been talking with creative people about what they do. I've got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working. On this episode, Claire Danes Talks about her long career and what she learned about spires from playing. A lot of times, spies, Mary spies, right for obvious reasons. Same reason actress Mary Actors. Here's Debbie I of a couple of messages. Then her interview with Claire Dates. I'm a native New Yorker but since the beginning of the pandemic I've been living in Los Angeles I missed my hometown but I love having more space more sun and a big garden and almost nothing makes me happier than tending to the tomatoes and the Fox club and wildflowers by listening to powers of music. sonus move is the premium portable smart speaker and IT companies me wherever I go indoors outdoors and even in my car. With an eleven hour battery, I can spend the entire day pulling weeds, planting seeds and streaming tunes free and easy from Sonos radio through the APP the designers world class and this sound is breathtaking. So not only works with experts and sticks in engineering, and then collaborates with Oscar and Grammy Wing Producers Mixers and artists to ensure an unprecedented state of the art listening experience. If you want to know more about the best beautiful sound system in the entire world, please go to Sonos DOT COM to learn more. And finally a little personal ask from me I love making design matters and I'm always trying to make it better. One Way to do that is to hear a little bit about a you. If. You have a few minutes I'd be so grateful if you took a short survey about how you feel about the show at survey nerds, dot com slash design matters that survey nerds, dot com slash design matters. Thank you so much. There's just something about Claire. Danes. That makes her hard not to watch and we've been watching for a long time. A teenager in the nineteen ninety, she played Angela Chase in the much loved. But short-lived television show my so called life after many film and theatre roles she starred in the much loved long running series homeland which won her a few emmy awards for outstanding lead actress homeland just wrapped up after its eighth and final season and you can't help but wonder what this actor will do next to compel us to watch her again Claire Danes Welcome to design matters. Thank you so much I'm thrilled to be here. Thank you, Claire I understand for a time you owned a hula-hoop made by artist Jean Michel Basquiat. Did you come to have that. I've. been looking forward to this question Yeah. That is true. Hot Pink with white stripes all around it. My parents owned actually still own with another couple a loft on crosby street and Basquiat was a renter I was about four years old at the time. And I do remember seeing him in the elevator and he was very charming. And some grownups really register with kids. You know they're like on the plane and I recognize that he was one of those people and yeah he eventually moved out and left a few objects hot pink hula-hoop being one of them. So you grow up in your parents artist's loft obviously in this same building with John Michel Basquiat, Yup your debt studied engineering and biology at Brown University, and then transferred to the Rhode Island School of design in the nineteen sixties where he met your mother did they were generally WanNa be designers? Yeah. So my mom was a textile designer. She studied textiles at wristy and was one for ten years might one of my first memories was watching her paint an endless series of flowers while watching or more listening to all my children. And and my dad was a photographer and he had built a darkroom in our loft. And that's what they did at the start of their their young lives They went to the bowery I after graduating from his D. and. Then eventually moved to so but yeah, and then they did other things My I have a older brother Asia seven years older, and then when I came around I, think it was time to make some more money really, and my dad was a contractor became contractor a business called overall construction good name and where the ever is degraded. Definitely he is Pun stor. And my mom ran a toddler school and Daycare Center, I saw two different names for your mom's toddler school, the Crosby street toddlers group and the crayons street toddlers tribe. So I think I should clarify for the record which was the actual may was much much easier to say and more literate of it was crosby kids. Because it. Yeah and Yeah there were six kids in the morning and six kids in the afternoon and she started that when I was about four years old, she taught one and two year olds and she ended when I became this like actor teenager person. But yeah, it was a funny way to live. Is it? You trampoline a trapeze installed over the kitchen table in his swing suspended from the living room ceiling in the apartment? Yes. That's all true. But that was all pre nursery school. Life, in the in the Danes households. The great things about a love is that you have this you know uninterrupted flat plane. Just expanse of of wood floors. So it was an ideal roller rink and guess my parents really believed in fun and then I had to share that space with other little humans, which was what was it like for you to share your home with a classroom full of toddlers in the morning and in the afternoon. You know. It was tough I've I guess, I, struggled with feelings of jealousy. For sure but I adapted and they were amusing and you know I encountered them every. So often now as fellow middle aged people and it's always a little startling, I understand that Lena Dunham was actually rejected. When she To be part of the toddlers. And my mom. My mom was amazing. She was really excellent what she did and There was a long list of people who were eager to send their kids there and and Yeah Lena when I met Lena years ago and that was like the first thing she told me was that her mother was still a little annoyed. I it was not personal I. Know that to be true I know I. Do I mean I do know a lot of nursery rhymes now? Just helpful having your own young boys? Yes that's right. I understand that you discovered the joy of dissimulation when you were three years old when not wanting to actually taken up you pretended that you were sleeping by mimicking some of your mother's twitches and body movements while she was sleeping, how did you figure out how to do that with your own body and to pretend that sort of seamlessly I think it's just a natural human impulse and instinct to to mimic to observe and to imitate I. Don't know why that's the case I'm sure it's served US evolution in evolutionary terms but look I mean kids are taking in so much I I'm just shocked by. How perceptive and sensitive might now toddler Rohan is, for example, but Cyrus was the same way. It's almost like the younger they are the more tuned in they are to every detail. I do remember that experience. It really was like I think the first time I. Stumbled upon something like acting and I. Was Delighted by the experience of it and the challenge of and it still at the root of what I do now. It seems like you are rather headstrong from the very beginning of your life and at five years old while singing and dancing on your parents bed you sell Madonna on television and suddenly realized that performing could be a job. What can be the sense that Madonna was actually working that it was her job. That was another epiphany this moment where I connected an action to a vocation. Even at that age, even at five people will ask you like, what do you WanNa be when you grow up you know I guess. I knew that was something to consider and. I don't know I just saw stars. I was just so inspired. I do remember like I couldn't contain the excitement and I had to release it by jumping on the bed but yeah, no Madonna was a major force and. Influence and aspirational figure it was. She knew that have you ever told her? I've met her. The Courage to actually admit that to her I was probably playing it. Cool. But I was charmed by her when I met her I was she has a great sense of humor and She's kind of salty and she didn't disappoint. She liked delivered full Madonna when when my wife met her, she interviewed her for I think Harper's bazaar and you went over to her brownstone and Madonna, offered her what she called summer lemonade or something like something really funny and it was Rosa. Some water that was it similar water Like some some water and it was. And I just thought that was super finding. To Steal. Yeah, some water. When, when you were six years old, you started taking dance classes with Robert at the dance theater workshop, which you continue to take for ten years and Ellen that you were a risk taker and improvised full blast from the start and in thinking about your childhood, where did that fearlessness come from? It seems like just from the moment you popped out you were really certain about what you wanted to do and how you wanted to do it. Yeah I. Guess. So I guess I was that way I mean there's like there's a family story about how I would camp in this little plot of Land Massachusetts every year and pick blueberries, and of course, I insisted on carrying the bucket of blueberries down the hill and I spilled the mall inevitably maybe I insisted on doing it again I spelled them again. So yeah. I was a very determined person I can't account for that I I mean I'm just so grateful that. Parents who were patient and encouraging and didn't Swat that passion or. Enthusiasm away they not only let me be whoever I was, but encouraged my curiosity about. and. Then ultimately, performance art I think just the zeal was huge and irrepressible I although I say that and I'm sure there was a way to repress it and they didn't at six years old you started therapy which I believe you still continue to this day and. I understand that. I've been in therapy for thirty years with the same therapist and you've said that you think it's a helpful tool and a luxury to self reflect and get some insight what motivated you to start. So young I didn't start until. I was in my twenties unfortunately. Yeah. I went through a difficult time at six. I saw ghosts and other creatures. Or do you think you were? It I don't I think I was very confused at the time the typically there was a Garg oil. WHO QUOTE UNQUOTE? On, the pipes of our loft and would make me do things and. I think it was more like maybe burgeoning OCD or something. But I have to assume that I had a really. Unruly imagination and maybe I was confused about how to harness it. I- densify it just kind of. Coexist with it. Once I went to therapy my parents therapist I finally realized that I had a problem and just that that acknowledgement was sufficient to puncture the neuroses and they naturally dissipated I mean I remember getting said, can you anticipate when you're going to see these creatures I, guess I had to admit that I I had anticipated them and he said well, then you can also make them go away. But yeah, I mean I was dogged by that that anxiety like well into my twenties I was really Afraid of the dark. I'm not anymore really proud of that when that shift happened, but I was going to ask you about that. Actually have that happened I remember in College I. Called my boyfriend in the middle of the night so that he could escort meet to the. Dorm bathroom. So I didn't have to go alone like they was still had a grip on me. How did you get over it? How did you get over that? Fear the iphone flashlight maybe Technology the mini uses. I don't know think look I still have a lot of questions about what lurks in the ether and I'm really really endlessly fascinated by the subconscious. And what happens when our brains go dark at night? So my big my big phobias. Are Go sir rats and cockroaches and I realized they're all nocturnal. They're all numerous like if you see one, you know there are countless other early. It's that kind of deep stuff that defines and motivates us that we can't know fully right but I also love that yeah, I'm fascinated by it as well. What happens when we're not thinking you know what happens when we're not saying. Yeah I it's. It's like the ocean. I. Mean there's so much of it and so little we understand about it. When you were eight years old, you were bothered by a male classmate and became worried when you considered the possibility that he could your mind and discover your revenge fantasies and ask your mom if it was possible for people to read your thoughts, she replied your imagination is your own. You can do whatever you lake with it. And they're right. There is evidence of good parenting. This. Isn't a wonderful thing an absolutely. To say, yes, I I'm getting goosebumps as you say that it's true. Was So. Relieved. Really. Because the vision I had was pretty A. Busy. What were you GonNa? Do I did I envision dislikes circle of people he was in the center of it and I guess people just went in and like beat them up. Like. Remember back in the circle in another prison went in and. I don't think I would ever allow myself to go there even like now as an adult but I'm it wasn't release at the time. Yeah. I think that's a similar. That's similar stuff I was wrestling with I mean I think that was what? That was related to this business of the ghosts and why is a a fleeting thought and what's real and How do I negotiate all of that and water my boundaries and? Where do I start and end and how do I engage with the objective world you know but that's also a lot about acting to. Of course that is that's a lot about acting and you know there has to be a porous nece there between what is conceived what is imagined? And what is actual and you have to kind of float in and out of those two states of being I guess I've always been really consumed with thinking about that. Well, it's interesting because it was also at that point in your life, you decided you wanted to be an actress. Thought was so interesting that you were worried about not being able to make enough money and you decide that you're going to become a therapist for your day job and teach acting workshops on the weekends and I'm wondering we worried about not making enough money or were you worried about not being successful? That's a really good question. I mean it's really calcified over time as my being nervous about being uncomfortable physically not having enough money to support myself, which also had to do with a feeling of freedom I wanted to. Be Independent and have a sense of expansiveness in my life I. Think it was more about pat but yeah, maybe there was the fear of doing away that. Wouldn't connect with people or you know. Successful. Yeah Mate. That might have been part of it I. Love the fact that at ten years old, you formally announce that money or no money you have to be true to your art. There was no plan B. You were going to take the risk and become an actress. You decided this at ten years old I believe you announced this at the dinner table You went out and found ages. Ago. Independence. How did you find an agent? Did you up in the phone book? I mean. My best friend Arielle mom is a woman called Tamar Rogoff. WHO's a choreographer? So Arielle had done a student film and that same director was was doing his next student film and loose asking for a reference and. Tamar suggested me. So tomorrow was kind of my first agent and then you know that was my first experience working on a set. In front of a camera but I guess before that I had I guess I. Move that I make made was to take classes to acting classes at least Strasbourg at ten and. Totally. Loved it and and then I. There was a performance junior high school called p. p. a. s., which is still around in its first year of its existence and I met other kids who were working professionally and I I had this student film under my belt and and I guess some other student films to like. I was in that world. Yeah and then it was at that school through those other kids where I learned what agent was and what a headshot was and we had this dark room in our loft and woman who is renting. It took my head shop photos and we've printed them right there on site. And and we sent them out and people answered agents answered, and then they saw little film that I had done and I guess that was arresting enough to have them hire me but it was really funny because I I would just I would rollerblade from audition to audition arriving a sweaty mess but the stakes were so low like I had a day job of being a kid and going to school and it I mean of course, I didn't feel like it was extracurricular because it was so clearly my life's calling. But not a whole lot was riding on it and I was just grateful to have a chance to do it. I. Just loved it so much like I didn't have to get the job I was reading sides with the casting director and that was another another turn. So. So I don't think I had any smell of desperation you know could being rejected at all upset you or did you were you aware of it? Yes and the closer you got to getting a job the more painful. The rejection was unquestionably sounds auditioned in like six times and then you'd get flown out to California and you'd be put up in a hotel and then there would be a screen test and you know when it was down to you and to other people and you didn't get it you felt that in your bones or I did. Yeah brutal many many tears were shed over lost gigs but. You know when you were twelve, you were offered a part in the soap opera one life to live and I believe you mentioned was that the soap opera that your mother watched while she was making textile she was an all my children person. But yes but you turned down you turned it down because you were worried that taking the part would mean selling out at twelve. That's really felt. Yeah, I really did I mean I knew that I was still learning a whole lot that I was uninformed as an actor and? I I didn't want to develop bad habits which I might do on us soap opera so I did take. God said I. Guess so I remember going go I mean I got close to doing it and are Like yeah. They wanted me to color my hair. I don't know I just didn't feel it didn't feel right. I know I had I had a lot of integrity when I was younger I. Lost It. And we Say That's the moment. The I got confused. In my late teens early twenties I, guess right after Romeo and Juliet when I suddenly. SURFACED IN A. Major Way and and was getting offered a lot and. that. was like a whole other skillset. The that I had to develop an I just didn't have it yet and I may have had insight into acting at a very young age but I didn't have any insight into movie stardom. I didn't I. Didn't have any point of reference. And I think I was just making a lot of mistakes about what that meant. And I, got a little lost but it's also at that time that I stopped working for a while I definitely want to talk about that when you went to. Yale. But but before that, you won the part of Angela Chase in the now beloved television show my so called life which not only brought you to national prominence. You also were nominated for an Emmy Award you want Golden Globe award you with thirteen years old when you shot the pilot, you were fourteen. When you shop the series, your cast mate was jared Lido who played the heartthrob Gordon Catalano. I was already in my twenties when the show was aired but I truly thought that Jordan Catalano was the most beautiful man I'd ever seen I mean it was he was just glorious. You were fourteen and he was twenty one in real life. What was it like kissing him? Yeah I. So there was a scene like our I make out scene. There was a stage direction at the Angela kisses Jordan's face. That was very confused by and. I Yeah I guess I asked the director what that meant and but he wasn't your Jarrett's he wasn't my first kiss. No but I was not. Very practiced in the art of making out at that point. Yeah. So jared. Interjected. Explained what that might mean and I don't know. It was weird I. Mean my mom was. A village watching all of this I was I was just so tiny that it I think I couldn't even appreciate the awkwardness exactly I just. Like pinched my nose and like jumped in. It's a show that I think really provided a lot of palpable feelings especially for those of us in our twenties that were watching it and. The show ends in a cliffhanger. You don't know ever if Angela is going to go with Brian, AKA brain or sword. Which I love that that I still do that I still make that spelling stake in every single I do think the show. Who Do you think Angela ended up with. Oh brain. Brain. Yeah What's brain doing now he's probably running the world. You Kinda, wanted her have both both experiences I don't think she would have ended up with either of them. That's true. That's true. I don't know I'm still really good friends with so many people from the show. And a Winnie is like my fairy godmother? No, it's. It's still a very vital connection to her and into to that experience, and it was just miraculously to get that piece of material. And I was really unhappy acutely unhappy in junior high 'cause DA. And you know but I, I think I struggled even more than a lot and to just have this brilliant author right my diary entries for me and give me a chance to release of this. Angst. was just a mercy and it was such a healthy little culture on that said, and it was my my initial entry into this business and. They was foundational. I believed that world to be a safe end nourishing one. You know. So I'm just very, very lucky. The show ran for one season it ran it aired nineteen episodes. It was cancelled I didn't even realize it was canceled at the time I remember talking to a friend who worked in the television business at that time who told me that no one expected you to do more than one season of the show because you were destined for much bigger things in the movie business we you disappointed when the show ended. I was but the show didn't get picked up initially after we shot this. Perfect pilot and I went to high school and my heart was so broken then and then it did get picked up halfway through my first year high school. I was already quite jerked around by it. And as we talked about, I'd already experienced quite a lot of rejection just being a working actor it's. It's such a defining part of what we do does it ever get easier. No, thanks so much. Easier. Does it With something else will come along. It was 'cause we we weren't able to ended consciously or say goodbye but that it had this incredibly robust afterlife unit got picked up its online different networks and it's still in circulation. Somehow, by Nineteen Ninety Nine, you had filmed thirteen films in five years you've worked with the likes of Oliver Stone, Francis Ford Coppola Buzz, Lerman Matt, Damon Mickey Rourke Liam, Neeson, Numa Thurman, Leonardo Di Caprio. You were also offered the role that Kate winslet. Titanic with Leonardo. You turned it down. Did you just have a sense of? Just too much. Yeah. I think it was definitely part of that. I had literally just finished filming. Romeo and Juliet with will in Mexico where the titanic was going to be filmed. Another epic romantic drama. It did feel. A. Little repetitive I mean obviously. It's different than a lot of ways but Yeah. I, think I had some wonder lost and I think there was. Part of me that anticipated that that might lead to a different level of stardom that I wasn't braced for I was pretty clear about that. I didn't. Yeah I've risen. Separates none yet? No. I wasn't conflicted in any way and I remain. So it was not. Mine to take it just didn't feel like mine to take. You decided to put your film career on hold and attended Yale misstated and you mentioned even just now that you've felt lost at the time I read that you stated that you had played so many roles but didn't really know who you were going to yell help that so much so much I needed to just stop and give myself a chance to see who I was and I didn't go to high school really I was technically enrolled at a school in. La. But was primarily tutored on set which was a very lonely way to go about. Go about such a thing and I'm I don't know I was starting to feel a little strange I mean, I was I guess always mature precocious or something but that just became relief etched when I was strictly surrounded by adults and I didn't know how to like hang out I didn't have friends independent of the industry who were my age I really needed to make some and I also. Wanted to give myself a chance to explore different ways of thinking and different subjects had decided that I wanted to be an actor when I was very young person and I just wanted to. To make that choice as more of a realized. GROWNUP human. Of Things did you study it? Yeah I had A. Great Time, and in fact, my favorite class that I took was a graphic design class. No. Yes. Really mom you got some graphic design Chaffetz. I yeah. So my you know my parents obviously were artists and so I grew up drawing and we had so many mean it was like a wonderland officers the trap in the swing but there was also a light box and you know cutting board and my bed this incredible rubber stamp collection we had just so a surplus of materials I still do. My craft section in the basements. Berry serious. So I used to draw a line and then in junior high when I was a miserable misanthropic kind of pecked. Person I would just kinda retreated into drawing. So I became pretty proficient and so I took a lifetime class and it was so humbling because I I had I stopped drawing didn't kind of put it together didn't realize that I had stopped doing that because acting had become so consuming and suddenly it was like I was drawing with my left hand and I I was really I was just shocked. And mortified anyway so I took this life finally got that muscle working again, which was great and my mom suggested I take a graphic design class. She said, you know clear your your work is quite stylized. You might like graphic design it was like, oh Really Stung a new that was code for you know anyway. But but she was so right the first lesson we had as one of the best lessons I've ever had ever and she gave all the students, the same sheet of paper, the same ruler and the same pencil, and we all had to draw lines from the top to the bottom using the ruler and the Pencil, and then we tacked all of our drawings on the board and they were so different. It really has always stayed with me you know. Just. Do what you do as well as you possibly can don't try to be interesting just do you really mindfully Yeah so interesting to see the perspectives that people have when given the assignment there was no room for Creativity Blake. Just draws out of lines and. Even men your self is expressed. It's amazing. After two years at Yale you return to acting one of your first roles was a part in the hours which was based on Michael Cunningham's Pulitzer Prize, winning novel and acted alongside Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore, and one of the scenes of your scenes was a rather heartbreaking conversation with an elderly Julianne. Moore and. I got the sense that you were the only really kind interaction. She'd had with anyone in a long long time. Do you remember that that particular scene and what you were experiencing because I thought it was one of the most beautiful scenes in the movie. Oh that's so nice that you say that I, you know I loved making that movie I mean obviously was such a special one and it was my first time meeting and getting to work with Merrill and it was such an effortless seen between the two of you. You're so comfortable lying on the bed and talking as mother and daughter was it was a really beautifully new on scene? Yeah. I I mean Gosh it was. Just so thrilling to be that close to the genius who I had you know admired and studied for so long I mean when I saw Sophie's choice at nine I knew I needed to do this thing I mean Madonna? Yes. But then, merrill? Mind no that. He's been referred to in your early years of acting as a young Meryl Streep you. You Must I came that you must know. Yet. But there are a lot of other young actresses who have also been called but she's like you know it's just she's the bar you know she's the example of. Of of greatness and now she's you know Mamie. Her daughter is one of my best friends. So I now, she's like maimings mom. So that's funny but and Michael is now a dear dear, friend did another movie that he wrote called evening where I met Hugh, and he married us and were in a ulysses book club with him now I mean. Yes. That's what we're doing during our pandemic as some. as. We are reading might do a visual interpretation of that book really Someday Yeah Yeah. So you've gotten through it I took a class on ulysses in college and fell in love with it, and there's a line from the book. The longest round is the shortest way home which I've decided like the motto of my life. I'm having I'm having it carved into steps to my house so that It's sort of just there as part of my life. Well, that's a good tattoo. Anyway. So it was it was it was a wonderful re entry into acting again excellent material with excellent actors and Stephen Daldry who's Another very inspired person. You return to the small screen in two thousand and nine when you played the role of an autistic and brilliant woman in the Hbo Film Temple. Grandin. You follow this role with playing Carrie. Mathison the brilliant woman struggling with bipolar condition on Showtime's homeland. How has playing these extraordinary women impacted your own brain or your own brainwaves district? INTO THIS I really was so thrilled to play. Women who were autonomous and defining and driving their own lives and the story animal. It's like a little sad that they. Need. To be. Extra. In order to warrant pat but yeah I I mean I was very privileged to get to consider temple in a deep way because she is an actual hero and I've always been really really interested obviously in how people work but especially, really interesting people. And she saw things differently from most of us and she was able to make the world better because of it you know and she suffered enormously and kept advancing her self and her interests in her work despite all of that. So, yeah. I guess I just felt very privileged to have a chance to illustrate that and hopefully engender empathy and and people and audience members who might not have understood how somebody like that thinks is an exists. Another thing these parts had in common was how many awards e one playing them, which included three Emmy Awards, a slew of Golden. Globes screen actors, Guild Awards, critics, choice awards, people's choice awards and more, and yet you said this about winning, it was a period when I won all the things for Temple and then I won a lot of things for homeland. So it was like Oh my God this again, which was very nice. But the gift of that is that you learn at it doesn't really matter. Clare tell me more about that. Why doesn't it really matter? It seems like this is like another benchmark that an actor. Sir. ALPA. Chino, in the Green Room at some awards show and he was up for something and he was Kinda Green, he just looked miserable and he said. Out Loud he said. These things are dreadful. You dread losing them you dread winning them you know and. So I couldn't have. said it better myself I mean there's so. Nerve racking and and they feel something outside of the actual experience of making thing. It's a whole other industry like at this point and yes, it is. It's hugely validating and but the can't define you, I mean nobody does this so that they can accept an award at the end of it. You know and I think we can get confused about that are interesting in can be important markers about what we value in our society at any given moment and what we recognized to be excellent work but it's also a little arbitrary and you know those standards are set by. A group of people and. It's not always selective of what is really deserving of attention. You know I don't know I think it's also dangerous to be critical of them in anyway like don't want to be seen as. An grateful or on the outside or sounds like Al Pacino's comment is pretty accurate. Yeah right like yes. Got It. So right, I just will always take his line. Homeland debuted in two thousand eleven and had show finale earlier this year. You played the role of Carrie, mathison a counter terrorism operative for the CIA and I read the writing team. Had you in mind for the role from the beginning in fact, their first six drafts of the pilot they call the character Clare at the time you were also up for Rolling Clint Eastwood's movie about J. Edgar. Hoover what made you decide to choose homeland You had no idea that it was going to become what it became. When. I i. read that script it was of course, wanted to read the next one. It's their incredible writers, Alex Howard and boy do they know how to craft a cliffhanger but I just thought? No, that's way too much. I mean I understood what the commitment of television show would be and she was under such duress and she would be forevermore. You know I just didn't want to invite that level of suffering into my life but it Once I realized that. I was just flinching from the level of the challenge I realized I I had to do it, and it was really scary. It was really scary but you know it's not very often that you get well one to play character that is as dynamic and robust as Carrie Mathison is and I had incredible team I mean Alex surrounded himself by other exquisitely talented writers it he had the courage to do that. Every single person on that writing team had been show runners themselves. So just they were all really really skillful and Mandy Patinkin was my partner and. You know it's like it's much harder to do technically easy seen. That is poorly written than a really exacting seeing that is excellently written. And so I just got an. Endless stream of. Excellently. Britain very exempting. Scenes. I just was so amazed that I never got bored I. Mean that was like ten years of my life and there was. Always. A new facet of the character to unearth and the writers were always very good about doing that I mean they also didn't want to right themselves into ruts and it was almost like an anthologies. Series in that there was a reset, every year and. We would be based on a new location and we would focus on a new theme. So yeah, it was it was very stimulating and I got to learn a lot about the bipolar condition and about the clandestine services. was doing amazing going to spy Cam these do exist. I WANNA meet. So here. In the dark corners I'm to the show eight. Season One I actually. Watched the show by accident I was watching. So my family at the time we were all hooked on Dexter and we were all getting together to watch the season finale of Dexter. Ended and somehow we just left the television on and all of a sudden. It was the season finale of season one of homeland and I and my brothers were out and about and doing things and I was like holy. Shit. What is this? On the lawn screaming in front of. Demon Lewis Brody's house in his family and I it. I was hooked I ended up watching the entire first season in a ben and then for the rest of the rest of every season since and watched how Kerry changes and you stated that the experience was your first time aging with a character and experiencing her develop and change. What do you think was the biggest thing you learned about carry over the ten years you played her? Well, just that wonderful tension between her vulnerability enter her super strength. Right was endlessly enjoyable to play with and that she was her reason for being was always so unwavering and so clear, which was to protect your country and I thought I mean her being bipolar was really relevant to that because she's obviously Cassandra figure but you know for somebody who is struggling with with that experience i. mean they know that their minds can go boom right that they're they're. They're world. Can Be in disrepair all of a sudden without any warning. So they just are not ever comfortable. They have to be hyper vigilant, and so I think it was a natural extension for her to imagine the world as a place that needed her constant attention. So yeah, I thought that was that was interesting and you know when she had so little to lose I mean she wasn't. Ever really going to partner with somebody in a conventional way and have a nuclear family. It's not something she could do and it's not something she was that interested in doing. which allowed her to have all of these kind of outrageous. Adventures. I just liked playing some buddy, a woman who was so muscular and unapologetically commanding and brazen because we never get to be that way and I just suddenly had like full license and we've seen what she can do. So you know like nobody dared challenge her it was just a given after a certain point that when she walked into a room, you fucking listened you know I was just like awesome. So that was. That was a great gift. The first few seasons of homeland are centered around relationship with Damien Lewis's character Brodie, and then you also have an intense but very different kind of relationship with Rupert. Friends. Character Peter Quinn who by the way I was just devastated when he was killed off the show just had a mad crush on him. With the mentor slash father figure relationship, you have, with Mandy, Patinkin character Saul Berenson is the one that I just found. So endlessly fascinating after ten years of working together. You stated that you knew each other's rhythm. So intimately, it became cellular. How does that actually happen? How does that momentum bill that mutuality grow? Well just lots of practice I. Mean we just put in so many hours together and I really liked the propulsion of nature of television I like. How much material you have to produce in a very confined amount of time. So I couldn't indulge my neuroses or get at anything like precious about the work just had to. Keep forging on and yeah I mean you live your character's backstory In our eight season. The catalog of experience that I shared with Mandy on and off the set was just huge. There was just so much material to draw from I. Don't know it feels like you're cheating almost but It's not something you have to imagine it's been lived. Yeah, and he's in. Amazing. Partner he's he's just so good and he's so deft and tuned in and Flinch Sing and you can't believe it's the same person, right? Yeah Yeah. No, that's right. That's right. But he's he you know he's just truly playful and anything I would offer. He would receive an you know make something magical out of and he's obviously very musical his rhythm as Saul with. So wonderfully opposite to my rhythm, carry it kind of worked and it worked from the very beginning like in that I, read through in the pilot as soon as we started. Kind of flu. So yeah, there were two scenes with the characters Saul Berenson that I wanted to ask you about the first is at the end of season seven after you released from a Russian prison after nearly a year where your medication was withheld for bipolar disorder and when you released during full psychosis. You sort of see Saul Berenson we think that you do but it looks and it looks like you're running towards him because he's air to receive you from this present but you run right past him and that's the end of the season and we're all left with like holy shit where she running to. Was that improvised or was that in the script that's my question that was that was in the script. Yeah and he grabbed her and she doesn't recognize I just thought that was beautiful writing God's so wrenching i. mean we know that this is Really, her most vital human connection and. She's so far gone that she she can't identify him. No, it makes me cry thinking about it. Yeah you know and we shot a lot of material that was used in flashback in the final season and that was a little frustrating to you know have that I'll be for naught I mean obviously it wasn't but but it was much more powerful to just imagine what she had been through and it was very suggestive. But yeah, they really do know how to write an ending even in the pilot that was clear. I think that I was almost most struck by the potency of the ending the night that I was anything else and the ending of that season or the ending of the show in totality the pilot when I I I I, read it. You know I just thought. I wanted to read the next one I imagined other people would feel similarly. The second scene is the scene where you nearly kill him to try and find out information about one of his informants. Do you think that carry ever could have actually killed solve aaronson. Well, it's interesting because obviously, there was a lot of discussion about how we would and our show and we always went straight to the crux of it and to the center of the conflict and this was inevitable right but yeah, Kerry is massively transgressive and even corrupt in some ways. But only for the right reasons I think. But we could never forgive for that I mean she can't kill saw and remain a hero and that was like it was an interesting practice right or meditation like what? What are the requirements for heroism in a piece of fiction and? It's that basically so And that's what she so frustrated with Saul because he can't kill this woman you know because of his personal connection but actually in moral terms, he's at fault there carries right it's not commensurate. You know one life does not equal hundreds of thousands but yes so it's interesting I mean we are not rational creatures. Yeah. What was it like when Saul Beckons for you and he's like? Dead. Or nearly about to die and he beckons view and you think he's finally going to tell you who the informant is to save his own life and you come close to him in your face to face and he whispers with all his might fuck you. Well. I mean that was a part of our dynamic throughout the series. So, yeah, I. Think I told him also at one point like fuck you. Maybe it was the beginning of the third season I distinctly remember that. In a hospital drugged up. So yes, we were exchanged many many fuck you. But yeah, that was the that was the ultimate one. But but yeah. So much of the show to is about. The loneliness of being a spy right and that's kind of the the sacrifice that they make. They can't really in joy the pleasures of. Domestic life for intimate connection you know it was so so interesting talking to actual people on the business a lot of times, spies, Mary spies, right for obvious reasons. Same reason actors Mary Actors. But. But so so they work together. They have to have their fights in the shower or out at sea, and often the relationships would fall apart when they were done with an assignment or opposed, and they'd come back home and they didn't have the Adrenalin to keep them connected or afloat. So I just thought all of those particulars about what might actually be like were were really interesting. And it's not a natural. Fiction. There's some really great fan fiction. God. ANGELIKI GROWS UP TO CARRIE mathison Gideon. Jason Gideon grows up to be Saul Berenson. It's so incredible I had much. In, that can only imagine I can only imagine they carry ends up in Russia living with I. I don't know if the term is right or a Russian operative she ends up the sort of Edward snowden character. But in the very very end, she begins to send Saul Information and so for my own personal fan fiction from the character yourself do you imagine that they're able to have any kind of friendship again, I can't help but hope so that they can. That was pretty inspired again, all credit to to Alex and company. Yeah. I mean, as I say it's so much about there being alone in the world and the cost and the pain of that but her connection to saw. Everything like. The way I understood it she she couldn't attempt these risks or these. daredevil moves if she didn't feel supported and known. kind of held by him. So yeah, I I love that idea that that line was not severed right and I mean and they're kind of mean for all of this leading US, they're pretty monastic like they're so devoted to this ideal this cause which is very abstract. Yeah. I need for them to be united sort of eternal infinite. No I. Don't know maybe maybe not I don't know but it almost doesn't matter. You know that they're still communing. Somehow spiritually yes. In the dark. Last thing I want to talk to you about is your experience in the theater. You may your Broadway debut in the two thousand, seven roundabout theater production pygmalion, and then stored in the world premiere of Sarah Burgess Dry powder helmed by Hamilton director and very, very dear friend of the show of Design Matters Tummy cal which I saw him was wonderful. Any future stage plans assuming we can ever get back into the theater. Yeah I. Don't know I mean sure. I'm not really like a stage beneath now. My husband Hugh is an amazing performer on stage and he really came into being through the theater and I love the theater as well. But I think I really fell in love with film and discovered myself as an actor. In the world of film that said, it is also true that my first professional experience was as a dancer at ps one, twenty two when an old. Yes. and. Then, I did I did a solo dance peace with my besties mom WHO's an amazing artist? Tamar Rogoff but yes, I did I did a solo with her again at ps one, twenty two, which was beautiful. My early twenties s just leery one or on the PS one twenty, two lifetime achievement award, right? I guess I did I did that was very special that was one of the most meaningful awards I've ever gotten and so actually working in the public felt really familiar in a way that working on Broadway didn't a again I would love to do more of all of it because I love every version of this acting thing. In every context and every medium. I, I'll read a book on tape all. Human I are always wrestling for the books reading to Cyrus and row in. You know we're just we're just like total hams but yeah, I, Love I love those intimate spaces I do a lot of work with performance space and I can tell you without a doubt without having desk anybody else there. We'd love to have you back and he died yeah. Yeah. No no no I would. I was really exciting to do a play that had never been done before and obviously Sarah's. A legend she's such a bad ass but yeah to get to make your mark and not have the shadow of previous generations of it. Yeah. And Tommy is like a total dream right I mean yeah. The whole thing the whole thing was great and and you know seven minute walk from my house highly recommend that my original question for you was going to be are you still afraid of the dark but we've learned that you're not and so we can. Forego that question. But I still I am still afraid of. BRATS so. As. Clear I just WanNa say thank you so much. So, much late in the world and making such beautiful characters complex really interesting characters come to wearing and thank you for joining today. Oh. Thank you I really I love you and your show so much I am really unlike Ed Diehard Avid Fan so he was just like such a treat an honor. So thank you for having me for the time being you can see clear Danes on Showtime in Homeland and on Hbo Grandjean and. Wonderful. Hopefully infinite reruns of myself called life. This is the sixteen year we've been podcasting design matters like to thank you for listening and remember we can talk about making a difference. We could make a difference or we can do. I'm Debbie moment and. Talking to you again soon. Matters is produced by Curtis Fox productions. The show is recorded non pandemic times at the School of Visual Arts Masters and branding program and New York City, the first and longest running branding program in the world. The editor and chief of design matters. Media is Zachary petted and the art director is Emily Weiland.

Madonna Angela Chase Emmy Awards Saul Berenson director Alex Howard Debbie I Saul Tamar Rogoff US Claire Danes Mandy Patinkin Mary spies Mary Actors partner Showtime Jean Michel Basquiat Claire Cyrus Hugh
The Evolution of an Artist | Cey Adams

Good Life Project

1:15:17 hr | 10 months ago

The Evolution of an Artist | Cey Adams

"My guest today say Adams. He grew up in New York City. During the mazing time when graffiti rule the subway is hip hop and new wave. What kind of changing the face of music and converging with the downtown punk and like Studio Art Meets Street Art Scene And as a lover of music and artists from young age safe found himself at the center of it all making a name I as a graffiti artist around the city and then becoming a part of that legendary downtown art scene that included people like Jean Michel Basquiat. Andy Warhol Keith. Haring and so many others and along the way. He ended up becoming fast friends. With the members of beastie boys started creating all of their designs for their merge their promos and eventually even there I- conic graffiti logo and that launched say into the world of hip hop where he became creative director of Def Jam's in House Design Department and help design the visual identities of so many of hip hops biggest names over the years since leaving that world. He has embraced a blend of commercial work designing for many of the world's most iconic brands and also really deepening into the fine art world with his work now in private collections galleries institutions museums including places like this Smithsonian Moma Brooklyn Museum and so many others his also co authored definition the art and design of hip hop designed Def jam recordings. I twenty five years of the last great record label so excited to share say's as infectious energy and passion and just his powerful pop art style and so many of the behind the scene stories that have defined his truly remarkable and incredible career and life. I'm Jonathan fields and this is good life project. Goulet FROGGATT is supported by signature hardware. So if you're looking for the perfect item to take your kitchen bathroom or house up a notch head over to signature hardware dot com slash. Good life they offer an incredibly wide variety of pieces for every room in Your House with more than twenty years experience supplying Vanity sinks to hardware plus all the classics latest styles and they're in sync with all the trending colors and design. Touches may also have amazing customer service to help guide you through the process. So you'll never feel lost or intimidated. God Love Company. That really stands behind what they offer. Stephanie and I actually picked out a collection of eight furnishings. That we love their unique and our one hundred percent are style. Maybe like them too. And you can see for yourself at signature. Hardware DOT com slash. Good life you'll be amazed at the variety and the quality so visit signature hardware dot com slash. Good life to find your style today that signature hardware dot com slash. Good life or just click. The link in the show notes now realize is not always perfect but with signature hardware. It is beautiful so much fun for me to be able to sit down with you because there are so many different moments. I want to touch down and it's like you've lived so many different. It's all part of the same story the but there are some there are a whole bunch of really big subplots live just saying that because I'm certainly a at a point now where I can see it and for so often of Soda. Just doing whatever I was doing and not really you know really taking stock of it and now Amanda Point where I can sort of while. I'm still working. I can look at it and go. Oh Wow I didn't know that was going to happen. Oh Man Lookit so-and-so and the feel like you've had a connection to that and to some degree you can take a little bit of ownership because you know you helped to shape the direction that you know some of these people's work when and so yeah I mean that's got to be a bit on the one hand really cool and the other hand a bit European weird. Yeah but it sort of the only life. I know what they're definitely moments where I sorta wake up and I look at how far certain people have come and could use. Ll Cool J. As an example and think man I'm really proud of that guy because the Guy I knew is a sixteen year. Old Kid was a different guy. I mean same amount of energy. But you know when everybody's at the starting gate you sort of can't even imagine how far you can go because nobody's done anything yet especially at the starting gate has an and we'll circle back to this. We'll fill a whole bunch of stuff but the starting gate when it's not just that individual starting gate but it's like an entire genre of music or or the whole thing wasn't even defined at that moment it's the person's identity and their directory but it's also there is no path to follow yet. You're starting it. I I think about that very often. That there is no blueprint and part of it. Feels like it's really great to be a New Yorker and to come from New York and you think about all of these amazing bands that started here. Whether it's you know blondie talking heads. Madonna had to come here to make it run. Dmc beastie boys. Ll Cool J. Public Enemy APN. The Day Lasso I it's just it's really unimaginable and it was before scenes started bubbling and other cities. So you couldn't go. Oh something hottest happened in Seattle hadn't happened yet. All look what's going on on the west coast hadn't happened yet but New York is one of those places that it was kind of magical wits tickets will back and then we're going to jump into that little bit more Originally from Queens Correct Jamaica Queens. Mom was a nurse Data Butcher was but it seems like your were you exposed to art really young or was it just any there was something in you that kind of like which gravitated towards it. I have been an artist as long as I can remember. I honestly don't have a memory before I could make stuff but an actual interest in art. I would say I got what everybody else got. When they went to a museum in school it wasn't like some light bulb went off. It was just you know it's like when people are gifted talented musicians. It's just there and you know one day know you start making something in all of a sudden you're like oh you're a little bit better than you know. Johnny or you know Katie and then all of a sudden you look up and your representative for your school and and then somebody complimentary and you start to get a little bit of support and then all of a sudden you think okay maybe there really is something here and I. I knew that from the time I was. You know. Seven eight years old was it Curious about the people who compliment or the people who sometimes touchdown especially when people really young and in a way validate like there something here like keep with it. Well you know it's funny. I got that at the grade school level and okay and then by the time I got to junior high school and high school it disappeared. So that's a fourth grade teacher giving you reassurance that you can do something your folks might look at But they're not. Nobody's GonNa tell somebody that young that can be an artist. It's the last thing people want to you. Especially growing up in the seventy in New York New York now. And they're like oh great say the seventies in New York. Not a good time now. Nobody wanted that for their kid. You know of any background like being an artist like you you might as well just go straight to the soup line. By the time I get to junior high school all of that sort of went away and I didn't go to an art school. I didn't go to an art high school. I WENT TO JAMAICA HIVES regular high school. Where did you get the same amount of encouragement? Is everybody else doing everything else? And I I really remember at the time. Some of the kids in my school they wanted to start dabbling with being rappers and DJ's and all of it. And I remember one of the Dean saying. Oh you're interested in that that talking you know musical thing. I don't think that's such a good idea. And so hearing that person shooting down my friends. I knew wasn't going to get in the encouragement if I wanted to be an artist and this really predates you'll graffiti and all of it. It was just adults just didn't offer much support at all. I mean 'cause when we think about graffiti right you're gonNA know this a lot better than I am. I mean I know like a decent man really history history of hip hop and how so much of it really truly did come from New York late from the Bronx down from Hollis in defeated graffiti has always seemed to me like it was largely in your base thing also certainly starting with like Taki and Fab Five Freddy Late. Sixties even early Seventies. I've been told that it started in Philadelphia and I'm not in a position to debate it but I will say that even if it started in Philadelphia it exploded in New York. And it's just one of those things where I wasn't interested in learning about the history of it even when I was a teenager. I SORTA JUS- It was describing it to a friend like it's like seeing like seeing somebody taking tag to me in watching the ink sorta dripping that it was like you know looking at a cool kid with a leather jacket on and a tee shirt rolled up smoking. Cigarettes is like wow that guys cool and you just want to be part of that. Not that I ever felt like I got that rush when I did that. But that was sort of my mind what it looked like. When I tried to articulate somebody else it was like you know. Fonzie undeniably cool. That's funny I mean it's interesting because that was that was also a time. I mean like now that people look at it. And they're like oh it's street art and everyone's calling it something different and it's sort of like an oddly gentrified in different terms for but. Y- back in the day in the seventies especially. This was a lot of people now. This is vandalism and it still is. And that's the the the sad thing about what graffiti has had to. You know burden is that it is high art and it is still vandalism because for every person that evolves and becomes a fine artist and is selling museums in showing museums and selling in galleries. This some kid that is fifteen and once that same rush that I had when I was a kid and that is not you know fine art. And and that's the misconception that people have about graffiti is at. It's that and it's that it's not just one of them and a lot of people can't make distinction because you know maybe they only are exposed to the vandalism aspect of it couple of years ago. We had a Chris. Ellis yeah goes by days who I guess was kind of your temperature. We came up together. Yeah I remember him telling me. Yeah because I was asking him like what was it for you? Because he's one of Lake you. Yeah he's one of the few guys who actually broke out and ended up you know. He's now in galleries museums and he's on the fine art side and I was like wanted in the early days like and what was it about. I mean it was it. Was it the expression side of it was and he had a really interesting answer. I'm curious like what what comes up for you and he was like you know. Yeah it was all that he's like but it was like he's like we were in this one part of the city and because we were all we were writing on trains. It was almost like a form of communication. It's like we've put a message on on on a subway car and we'd like we'd send it out to queens and it was like this way that the boroughs could communicate with each other. Now I mean for me it was always a means to an and it was about wanting to be seen in wanting to be heard and I mean that literally. We wanted people to devalue what we were doing. We were artists. Have you talked to most of the people that were graffiti artists from the generation that I come from when they were in grade school? They were an artist before they knew anything about graffiti. So you know. Graffiti becomes your identity. But the reality is if you have the ability to paint. That doesn't come from graffiti. If you can do portraiture that doesn't come from graffiti. You might learn things along the way but the reality is if you are an artist. That's in you before you introduced to graffiti. Also curious about your. There's there's the artist side of it okay. So so effectively. Trains walls places all over the city. Become your momentary canvas like this is just the place that you express things and at the same time for at least a window of time it. It also seems like a real. This is sort of like our way to express anger to express our stance about authority and to to make a bigger statement. Also what I was a teenager. I don't know that I had the ability to articulate that magic marker but I do know that I wanted people to recognize that what I did had value and by the time I started making paintings on canvas. I was able to do that but when I was painting subway trains. It was just painting subway trains. And you know bigger is better. You know. Look Mom. There's my name you know. Look at this my name. You know that sort of thing. It's it's just wanting people to know that you exist in that you are the small person in you can do this giant thing and I think that that's something that a lot of graffiti artists share and I think that now if you look at the street art movement that's why people are painting these murals bigger and bigger and bigger because the availability. Is there the the people that own? The buildings understand that these people are capital a and they have the ability to do it. And there's a platform to show the work. Now you have this global network of people that are all like minded but to me. It's the same thing as a young kid painting graffiti on the train. And then you know they go from painting under the windows doing a top to bottom to doing a whole car to multiple cars or painting a full handball court. I think it's all connected. Yeah whose crew that. It was like there was a legendary painted ten cars. All at once was at five and kindle exactly as Lee and the fabulous five and that was sort of the thing. Is that actor wild? Yeah you just have to continue to one up your contemporaries because no one. Is that many people doing the same thing. You really just trying to like. Stand out you know in the crowd you mentioned. You're like look mom looked at. Did you folks have any idea what was going on? I'm sure you know I should have brought a a room with my two brothers Th You know and if you've ever smelled the smell spray painted easy to hide you can't you can't fool anybody and that was back when the paint was much much stronger but you know you saw the pretend that it. It's just limited to your bedroom. You're not doing anything out in the street. But they got hip to a pretty quickly. Yeah so you're doing this and that kind of takes you in ties school. Also at some point I mean it sounds like you you also. There's interesting stuff happening in the city around. That time also writes years is really coming out your eighteen ash You make a decision somewhere around there also like let me actually see what would happen if I did some formal education but you know while I understood the value of it. I didn't think think that it was just sort of KD. Either GonNa do that. You'RE GONNA get a job and I. I didn't think that making art was going to be something that I was going to be able to do right away but I did have this crazy idea in the back of my mind that I was going to be an artist even though I didn't know what that look like I just knew that it was something that I wanted to do but it wasn't until I came downtown and I started hanging out in the the West village and East village with other people that like minded beyond the people that I wrote graffiti with because while they were great and a lot of fun to hang out with. When I came down town I met musicians and I met you know will say traditional artists for the you know purpose of distinction and that was when I realized that I was a part of a really unique club of a misfits. Because you know. They're all rebels whether they would musicians or they they tended bar they. They didn't want to wear a suit and tie to earn a living. And was the way that you made. The distinction between who you are as an individual and corporate types for example that time was so fascinating all specially downtown lower side. Because you had you had hip hop coming down from the Bronx. You had punk happening on the lower east side and it seemed like downtown. Was this one place. Where all the cultures in your from music art or kind of coming together and people weren't duke out fast and all this amazing collaboration. Well well the other thing that that happens is compared to where I lived in Jamaica Queens though the the West village downtown Greenwich Village. All of that was a million miles away the same way. If you live in the suburbs in Times Square it's different and that was one of those things that I understood immediately. But when you're that young and you're that impressionable you just want to be near the action and that was like electricity. Even if we were eating pizza and philosophy polls and hot dogs a steady diet but just wanted to be around it and one side went down to a never. WanNa go back to Queens. I would stay out for days and my folks literally just you know wonder if you know I was dead until I I called the house and you know hoping that one of my brothers sisters will pick up and I just said you know they heard from me but I definitely wouldn't want my folks to get on the phone because then it was like. Yeah if you're not dead be dead when you get home but that also speaks in part to what else was going on in that part of the city is in the eighties which is like that was the height of the crack epidemic and and that area especially East village alphabet city was sir sort of like ground. Zero four in the middle of this amazing music and art was also the Super Intense. Drug saying well. I remember it a little differently. Like you know coming from Queens. I remembered everybody that I knew and loved was hooked on on drugs in some sort way and not that I'm patting myself on the back but I I honestly believed that. I don't know what it was about who I was. That saved me from getting trapped in you know like that wave or drugs and alcohol or even you know like a life of crime like whatever it is. I've just always been an artist and that's all I ever cared about. But at that point so many of my friends had it gotten hooked in it was just you know they will zombies. I mean literally zombies. And no when you're young you. Sorta don't understand the larger picture and in all you see is the devastation but it ripped through so many households myself included like you know I had brothers and sisters that would like you know got caught up in and thank God. They found their way out without. You know getting to beat up but it really took some people completely out. Yeah it was. It was like the classic line. I was the best of times. It was time to seem like that. Embodied everything good life project is supported by human so part of living a good life is taking care of yourself and have an incredibly full schedule. No matter where I am I also do my best to stay active and it takes a lot of energy to sort of get through a really full active alive day. That is why I am super excited to tell you about a new part of my daily routine. That helps you stay on my game. Super Grapes soft. Choose from human. That's human with two ends at the end. The delicious way to give you an energizing boost each to is packed. With heart-healthy grape seed extract that protects against oxidative stress promotes normal blood pressure and energy efficiency by supporting blood flow. So there's no jittery field know crashes just energy the way nature intended with anti oxidants derived from non GMO concentrated and clinically studied. Grape seed extract. 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It's interesting herring to me because I remember like there was people. Think of him as this incredible pop artist. There was a time where you could walk in New York City subway and there'd be like a torn up piece of black fell paper marked up with something really cool and you couple years down the road now. He wishes doing that all the shore. Yeah you know. It's like anything else you know to this day when I see one of his subway chalk drawings in a museum or in a gallery it makes me cringe because I know Keith. Never wanted that stuff. To be considered is his fine art. That was stuff that he did for the public. The same way people take a tag on building outside if you ripped that brick wall out and you put it in museum i. It changes the meaning behind because the intention lives with the artists and that that was the city at that time it was just it was really raw and everybody was trying to figure out who they were in trying to create opportunities for themselves and it was so much fun and and you know looking back we we all needed so much less so when I think about even myself like the Diet that I was on like I said it. Was You know? Basically a diet of fast food united crashed. Somebody's couch somebody's floor. Like whatever it took that you know you didn't place a lot of value on those things. It was all about being in close proximity to with the action was and the clubs and the art scene. Yeah I mean there are also. It seems like that everything was about the the scene to me. It was about the art and it was about the scene. It I mean all the other characters who weren't near the artist there but they were the host and the hostess and The people who brought people to the fun gallery you know and Patti Astor and like all these people that were if you're like what was your job and you're like creating the container to earn. The job was to make something happen last week. I was in Miami for our Basel and I saw Arthur Baker the producer. I hadn't seen Arthur Baker explained who while Arthur Baker was a producer a and he was responsible for he worked with Africa. Bombarda more recently. He worked with new order but he worked with everybody and to some degree. He you know he worked rick. Rubin and the Beastie boys as well and he was a fixture the scene at that time but he was arguably you know a more contemporary version of Phil Spector. Arthur Baker was a really well respected producer. And this is you know. Before Rick Really Establishes himself meaning Rick Rubin as a a a massive producer Arthur Baker. Was that guy at the time. And so we're at this gallery. It was actually the opening of the new graffiti museum in Miami and I designed the logo for the museum. And so I was there lending my support and you know Nancy Arthur Bacon. He looks exactly the way he did. Then only just an older version and we just have the best time talking. Not just about the good old days but you know what we're doing now but he was one of those people that knew everybody was in the mix and was doing really interesting work. But you know people didn't take themselves quite as seriously back then because everybody was just doing what they enjoy doing. And also the way you know partying and hanging out and just really absorbing the energy of being young in downtown where you could do anything you wanted because there was nobody there to say that you know. It wasn't possible death when you're in that place surrounded by all this these people on this amazing experiences. If you could bring yourself back there do you recall having a sense for just wanting to really get the most out of every day or having a sense for like. There's something out there that I'm working towards always You know for me. First and foremost it was always. Who am I going to meet this? GonNa help push my agenda forward. You always thought. Oh it's GonNa be some rich patron or club promoter because or you know somebody that you know runs a major business. That's GonNa come on board and finance a project because that's how things happened. You know if you look at what happened with studio fifty four. That was sort of the idea. You needed somebody to help support what you're doing and while there was a lot of competition amongst my peers. We will all sort of a dysfunctional family because we all came from some other place to be in this place and we all had the same goal in mind. We wanted to make work whether you are a musician or producer or rapper or DJ or a break dancer or an artist. It was just about trying to figure out how you GonNa get to where you're going. Yeah and it seemed like there was this moment. Also where all of those people were mingling in the same rooms with people who would have a decade earlier been patrons of coat fine art and all of a sudden. I mean mutual serving sandwiches fun gallery that kind of like started that whole trend because it feels like there are a bunch of graffiti slash street art galleries at started to pop up around the city. But that was the one where you would see. You know you'd have guys who are out the night before tagging around the city and then socialites showing up all in the same place and just jamming together. Well well you know. That's one of the things that hip hop urban culture and even to some degree maybe a little less punk. Because I don't really remember you know. People from High Society sorta mingling on the PUNK scene. That was so contrary to Punk Research. But they were definitely on hip hop scene and certainly they were around graffiti artists. I I think a lot of it. Was You know to them? It was interesting and it was a lot of fun to us. It was survival but to them. This was you know recreation. This was an interesting way to hang out with the cool kids and to some degree you know. If they bought work off they supported. You know an artist or to you know good for them because at the end of the day you know. My parents weren't buying paintings and I'm sure a lot of my friends folks didn't really understand the value of what they were doing. Either and so a Patriot as patron every everyone wins at the end of that day at some point. Sounds like you never lose your focus on that has always been the through line for everything but there things get added to that for serious chunks and one of them is music a deep dive into the the sweet spot between music and art. Tell me if I'm wrong but it sounds like you meeting and then becoming fast friends with 'em Horwitz. Who would eventually who is one of the Beastie boys back then was one of those really catalytic moments. I certainly I knew. For the Beastie boys were before started hanging out with them and it was hanging out with them and then working with them but you know before it had a name. I was listening to college radio back in Queens and so I was familiar with alternative. Music will like that was the name but before it even you had the term new wave so you know bands like the talking heads and Smiths Depeche Mode and the cure and all of it before. Those bands really broke big. You would hear them on alternative radio at the end of the WWL right right and so I you know I would listen to stations like l. a. r. and that's how I would learn about these bands and the place that those bands played were places like dance terrier. Max's Kansas City Legendary. All the MUDD club and so that informed a lot of you know how. I got my musical education. I mean aside from no jazz and traditional rock and roll and all of it but that's where those people hung out and so I had this natural love for the music and it. Sorta just informed a lot of other things that I learned about when I was downtown but meeting Adam and the rest of the guys in the BC's it was very similar to the way I met graffiti artists on the street. You run into people. You have a conversation you about the same age so so you already have that in common. You are interested in rebel cultured. Because you're there and none of these things had names at the time you know this. Even predates hip hop having a name. But you realize that you share that common value for loving you know an art form. Whatever it is whether it's graffiti you know or making music and you just click and that's what happened with Adam in the guys we clicked and we were together every day because we love doing the same things love making music. I love making art. And we'd love hanging out. Has it go from just becoming fast friends and hanging out and making order being easy to care to to making that transition to there's business between US Kazakh can get funky for a lot of people. Yeah I you know. I think the thing that that helps a lot is that we didn't think of it as business It was my friends are in the band. My friends have a baseball cap that needs graphics on it. Oh I can do that because there was nobody else. There that was doing that I did it. And so that was sort of in my mind how it happened. Oh we have to do a photo shoot. Oh let me do. A piece of the band's name behind you it was really organic and you know those early years before there's real money exchanging hands. It's Oh we need to cans of paint it. It's not know the way things are now where you'd have to involve a whole army. People get something done it. Was you know a bunch of kids sorta banding together the way you know the little rascals did and you're just sort of having a good time and you have each other's backs they do a show get a couple of bucks we go to White Castle? Everybody's GONNA eat. The money goes to Burgers and gas done right. It's almost Into collective pool so we can all just keep doing what we wanted. Yeah yeah part of that early. Collaboration though is you. I mean creating pretty much everything. They need from t shirts hats to fliers but also their logo which is because that that has become one of the most iconic logos John. I'm I'm very fortunate. In that regard that I've worked with so many people that had a unique vision. I never really thought about it before. All of these people that come from New York City that have this crazy dream that they're going to make it big and then they make it big and then all of those things you did to assist them become equally important and that was something that I still marvel at that. Because I I didn't see any of that coming you sorta just you do these things and you put them to the side or they go out there. And they live on their own and they start to breathe and then their fans get a hold of it and they start to embrace a lot of these these graphics and logo designs and things and it's almost like it. It has a life independent of you around this same time so you're starting to do a lot more with them. This is also you mentioned earlier. Recruitment who now legend in the space he and Russell Simmons ended up CO founding. Def Jam Records Roy right around the same time right. Yeah Yeah I mean it all happened at the same time because we will all together granted. I'd New Russell before rick. And the Beastie boys when he had a management company before they formed rough jam and I was designing things for artists that he managed and and again. It's the same thing it's tore backdrops t shirts posters flyers anything that had a a logo or needed a name or some sort of branding. I did all of that but it was always because there was nobody else. They're interested in doing it and it was. I didn't have any competition you know making art was just you know it might as well have been a foreign language to them. You're also it's like you're stepping you start out as a kid. You Love Art. You left comic books you get involved in graffiti. Then you move into the downtown scene where you're hanging out with the whole crew. People that really kind of bridging the gap between progressive conceptual abstract and street art. And then you moving into music. It's like you're bringing all of that there but you're also adding this element of graphic design. Yeah which is a whole different. Well well the thing that I understood immediately was that graphic design was A studied skill. Graphic design was a trade and while I didn't really understand that part of what I did understand was that I had a graphic sensibility in the graffiti. Work that I did and I realized that I could take that and apply that to something a little bit more practical granted I did have to learn how to do technical Traditional pay stop with the exact knife and ruler and rubies in all of it in blue lines but once I learned that you could apply that to anything. You could work for magazine. You could do book design. You could really go on to have a real career especially of you. Didn't care about the type of design that you did you know. The door was wide open but for me making albums. I didn't know how albums made like you know the way you hear people talk about. How film was done is like magic and and you saw take a lot of these things for granted as a kid and then when you learn these skills you realize that you can communicate with these professionals where some of your peers weren't able to do and I just knew that this was going to be a thing that was gonna take me in another direction. Because a lot of my friends that were writing graffiti and then made the transition to fine art. Some of them got picked up by galleries and some of them went off to Europe. And then some of them stopped altogether because without drive and determination and support a lot of people. Just you know. They couldn't weather the storm during those those lean years and by meeting Russell and and Rick in those guys it gave me a whole nother avenue so I could leave all that behind and embrace this new career. You know like with both feet and really focus is interesting is as you're saying that unlike that makes so much sense and had you come from sort of more of a traditional art background no doubt people would have been like. Oh man like he's selling out what's so fascinating because you came from this place where people were giving to the public. You get guys like Warhol who you are hanging out with a bit where he didn't hide the fat. He's like hell. Yes off Mike. I'm going completely commercial and a lot of money doing and it's like it almost like this green light. Well we came from making. It was making it. They'll selling out is a is a mentality that was manufactured by people that were you know like the people that came with the term keeping it real like that doesn't mean anything and back then if you could find a way to take your talent and turn it into something that you could physically hold in your hand whether it was you know cash or a contract or something that could help sustain you. That was not a bad thing and I say this very often that you know when people talk about how similar hip hop and punk car. They are very similar in their rebellious nature. But if you've ever seen a you know a kid sitting on the sidewalk with the sign and a dog. You never seen anybody in hip-hop doing that because Papas aspirational. They're trying to change their circumstances. And you know that's what it's all about. How take this thing that I've you know like stumbled upon master it and perfected and put it out there in the world so I can you know earn a living and change my circumstances and maybe even you know do something for my family so a little over year ago? We launched the sparky type. Assessment introduced the world to a set of ten universal imprint. For work that makes you come alive since then. More than three hundred and fifty thousand people have completed the assessment and discovered there archetypes. And we've also been really excited to share them with teams in some of the biggest organizations in the world. The feedback has just been stunning. The stories that we have heard have opened our hearts and our minds and Just so incredibly exciting to even be part of this along the way we started hearing from helping professionals people a coach's career counselors hr talent officers and team leaders within organizations and they were all asking the same thing. Show us how to better understand where the concept came from. How design what they tell us how to work with them. In the context of individual client work group work even organizations who are just looking for more purpose expression performance engagement and from leaders in those organizations saying. How do we tap the spark attempts to be better leaders? So we went back to our instructional design lab to create the first professional level. Training the Certified Sparkle Type Advisor Program for coaches. Hr and other helping professionals and leaders enrollment for that is now open and spots are feeling for the May program. So if you're interested in learning more and becoming a certified sparky type advisor will just click the link in the show notes now and you can check out all the details and see if becoming a C. Essay is right for you really excited to be able to share this and let the spark type ripple expand out through more and more people again if it sounds interesting. Just click the link in the show notes now and see if it feels right for you so you find yourself. In relatively short order the basically heading up designed for DEF JAM and working with all of these artists and like we were talking about earlier. Some of them had started to break pretty big but then you have guys like L. J. who's kind of like the very very early age but the I mean the people that you had the opportunity to sit there and be a part of the creative vision with. I mean like begging their early days of public enemy when they're in the early days just the list of people so curious for you because you show up and you have a certain creative sensibility right and you have a vision. What they as the musicians in the creators they have their own vision sensibility. How how was that sort of like you coming together and trying to bring those into alignment. No sometimes. It was easy if they didn't have a strong opinion about the visual side of what they were doing. And then you know for the most part was always like trying to take a bad idea and presented in the best possible light and you always got lucky if they didn't have any ideas well you know like if if if they didn't have any idea at all about what the visual aspect was beyond. Okay I know that I wanNA photograph myself on the cover. My job was always to help them articulate what they were trying to say. You know individual perspective but it wasn't always easy because sometimes they were really stubborn about what they wanted and you know there was no. How put this in a way? That sort of Okay it was just sometimes the ideas of just plain bad. But they're really passionate about it and so I can think of so many things but the artists aren't famous so you know. Sorta doesn't you know lend itself to great storytelling if you listeners. Don't know the artist but the the goal was always to help them realize what you know the visual side of what they were doing look alike but certainly there were moments where you're working with public enemy or LL COOL J. And they have much clear vision and it made it much easier because not only did you have to execute the idea. You had to sell it to everybody else at the company and while when you talk to a lot of record executives they will pretend that they were on board with every amazing visual idea but the reality is that very often people had very lean in narrow approaches to you know commercial art because everything was about marketing and sales and so in order to sell the wreckage you have to have the image of the artists on the front cover. No you don't and they never really wanted to take a page out of the rock and roll book. Because they saw the thought of that is something completely different than what they were doing. And for me. I always knew that it was very similar. And my idea was I wanted to elevate what we were doing because I didn't want it to look like traditional R&B just because it was black music. I wanted to do something that rival. These amazing album covers that all of these rock band's doing but that was a difficult sell because it always starts with something. Conceptual Wall you. I mean this also. 'cause DEF jam nearly days was they were distributed through one or two Columbia right the so. You're you not only need to get sign off from the artis from Def Jam Richer. Younger more progressive more edgy. They understand more what the music is about. But then you've got to go to Columbus and stayed helix structure and the people who are making decisions and and also already probably pretty freaked out about music. That's the thing that that changed. Their minds was when the record started to sell and it was really difficult in the early days because while they wanted to reap the benefits of what came along with being associated with you know a label like Def Jam. They didn't want the negative things that came along with Adam well and it's really tricky because I had to go up to fifty second street in New York to where Columbia was distributed and really work with their creative department and very often. It was difficult but because Def jam had so much power more times than not they sorta just had to go along with whatever we were doing but they would assist us because they had resources up at the major label that we didn't have downtown at a small offices. I mean you you kinda simultaneous with this. You're creative director of this but you're also sort of co running like an sounds like a mini creative agency drawing board which is wrapping not just Def Jam's artists. But you're also late. You're out there with all sorts of other artists. We were lucky in the sense that you know I I think of it as though nobody really cared what we were doing. The recording artists later would've been totally different. Sure the recording artists were making money for the label. Everything else cost money so what we were doing. Nobody was paying attention. They were like okay. Just do whatever you guys are doing. And we thought having you know some sort of autonomy gave us the freedom to work with you. Know other labels like Sean combs as bad boy label. But what we saw didn't realize is that you know in perfect world is sort of a conflict of interest because DEF JAM bad boy alike rivals on the charts. But here we are working for both of them. But you know in their Defense Russell Simmons and Leo Cohen and Sean Combs and Andre Harrell and all of them all good friends and so wild. There was this creative rivalry out in you know in the Neil the so called like you know real world behind the scenes they were all really tight and they shared information and so I felt like in a Lotta ways muse. Sort of doing the same thing unless I mean but that was also the time we're like right around like the east coast. West Coast thing started. Yeah Yeah that is true but you know it would have been impossible to do that during today's You know way of Doing Business. Because ideally people think that a either. You're giving all the good stuff to one company versus another but also people just don't WanNA share information in the same way so you're doing this. I mean interesting. Backdrop and those sorta like the world of graffiti at the same time also because the cities changing at one point we had a new mayor decides that the big thing that has to change is it creates his quality of life crimes phrase. And then you've got like these forces that are going out now and making it the number one priority to strip graffiti off of every inch of New York City and making it illegal to buy spray paying. It seems like from the. I'm curious whether you like you were already sort of largely out of that part of it but it seemed like from the outside looking in. That was a moment where that world kind ground to a halt. Oh yes sure. I mean a lot of what happened is we all sort of moved in another direction so to some degree I was completely out of it but being a native New Yorker and and you know somewhat of a rebel. I'm a more ways sort of anti establishment in that way and it was a bit of a drag to see them cracking down on people that could potentially become artists but you know with the MTA and and you know the city never really had an ally and the strange thing is even to this very day the MTA will not do anything with any artists that has any relationship to graffiti in any way shape or form. And it's it's it's unfortunate because people are should be allowed to grow in transition and change but an happened that yeah I remember I guess it was probably right around that time. Also because while it was getting pulled off trains and walls around the city there was one place long island city Point yeah which became the Makah sake all of a sudden you have this big old warehouse building and inside of it back back then. It was cheap artists loss. The whole outside of the building like living breathing plays where the the best writers and the mystery arson the world would and with an international following. I it became famous. And then you look up and you sort of have the you know. Get an appointment to paint on the building and I just remember thinking that it was a great sense of community and it was the place that a lot of people went to see the friends. And you look and see what you know folks done and you know you're going to take pictures and whatnot but the thing that I loved. The most is when they did the old timers day because that was when all the cats that were you know writing and coming up. When I was a kid I would get to meet them in person. And you know and now everybody's an adult and you know the not hiding in the shadows but I just remember really getting a chance to meet and say thank you to some of the people that I I'd lies as a kid when you just sorta see their name but you don't know them and you don't know anybody that knows them and the only connection you have to this person. This constantly looking at his writing all around the city are her writing. And that was the thing to me. That was really great about five points as it had this beautiful sense of community and in all actuality when we look at. You know what what's happened. Since it's been gone it would have been the perfect place to put a newseum because it already had a built in audience. Yeah I mean to put a bow on that story when you said when it was gone. It was kind of devastated. This was a place where people who travel from all over the world to see some of the most stunning stuff and it was. There were walls that were getting put up new all the time it was owned by somebody. There was a dispute and literally spell five six years ago now. Everyone woke up one day and overnight the the The owner of the building whether you agree with what was done or not basically hired a crew to come in and whitewash named Hart building like everyone on the Knicks. Yeah wow it's over. What was a drag to me? Was that the building owner capitalized on all of this work. That a whole community of people did first and foremost and the thing. That was really horrible as that. They also named the building after the movement and they had nothing to do with that. And you think that they would have at least thought of a way to keep the energy of art in the neighborhood and they didn't even think about that and you know it's unfortunate and even with ps one being right there. Ps One never sort of embraced the movement. Neither and you just think between the two of those Things they had the this. You know this ball of electric energy right in the palm of their hands and they just did not see it for that. Missed Opportunity Yeah so as all. This is happening You also reach a point where I lead your time comes to an end at at Def Jam and you also wrap at the same time. You're like so our agency league just kind of like my time in this work. Feels like it's it's it's done. I'm curious what led you to make that call. I just had gotten told point where I felt like. I dedicated quite a bit of my time to running design firm designing records and also when Def jam moved uptown to midtown it just changed. The energy was different. It became a corporate record label and everybody started cashed in chips. Rick had already gone off to California. Russell was doing multiple things and they you know they'd sold a portion of the company and the Energy has gone off the wall. I just saw thought you know. What am I hanging onto like you know? I'm hanging onto a legacy. That that is SORTA CHANGED. And all of the band's had you know broken out and became major successes and everybody that was there now was knew that in remember the old regime. I didn't have people that there that remember the overseen and it just never wanted to be somebody that was working for money and I just felt like I'd done as much as I could do. It was time to move on even if I didn't know what that meant. And that's my other big curiosity like when 'cause there's two things that happen one is like okay. It's time the other thing is like having a sense of what's coming next. How did you get because you in relatively short order? You know like you start you. Start exploring fine art again. You start working on large scale commercial brand work and stuff like this and it seems like it seemed like it happened really quickly but I'm curious whether from the inside you've lived it. Did it feel that way too? You know none of it ever felt fast. That has sure but what I did understand was that it was time to do something different. And my partner. The Time Steve. Kerr had gone off the Hollywood and he started making movies and it just looked like everybody was having fun and I was managing this team of people. That didn't remember the old days and I just wanted out mostly for that and it wasn't like anybody pushed me out. I could've stayed there and been a creative director. Probably until today and it probably would have been fine. You know. There's always a new. You know like hot artists on the horizon but it just it just didn't have the edge that I thought that it had back in the day and so I just decided I wanted to do something different and the thing that I recognize instantly the this is at a time when the you know the is and girls from beautiful losers start bubbling. An in the street art movement was being born. And you had all these little indie artists that was thought into you know make work and starting to get a foothold in the gallery scene and I just thought you know we helped to birth this movement and I wanna be a part of this and in order to do that I have to jump in with both feet and really focus and that was the moment when I decided I wanted to just be an artist not be thought of as a graphic designer and not be thought of as a graffiti artist but just a capital a artist and that meant dedicating myself to doing that but what I sort of also had to contend with. Was these major brands wanting to collaborate because of my relationship to Hip Hop an in-depth jam. And so you know is somebody who never really wants to leave money on the table. You you take those gigs and the thing that we were talking about earlier. There's no shame in doing that. And to some degree I felt like if anything I was old that because I remember when the sea signed with Adidas and I had an opportunity to work with them and and collaborate but I was so young that they didn't think that I could fully design a clothing line by myself so I was sort of like ghosting another designer and fast forward all know these years later. Adidas comes to me and they're gonNa give me a signature collection of my own with my name on it and pay me and distributed and I thought yeah I deserve this Steffi's right. Yeah it's interesting. Also that that this all coincides with like you said this this moment in time where what couple of decades before outside of a fringe group of people who saw this as art now come full circle and now sorta like the world is seeing this as capital a art and and you have installations and galleries and representation and museum shows and people are are wanting this and wanting to support it in a way where it seemed like it was. It was a really good time for you to step back into that. World also is one of my curiosities to was when you had spent so much so much time by by the time you made that call largely waking up in the morning and yes tapping your own creative juices and coming up with the stuff that was really created for you but in the name of in no small part creating other people's identities and telling other people's Stories. Was it hard at all for you to step back into you being the capital artists telling your own story and having all of your own swirling visual identity put onto the world and saying this is not on behalf of anyone else like do. Did you have any any struggle at all? Sort of saying okay. So at this moment in time whom I what do I have to say. No I think if anything what I realized was I had been teaching Brooklyn Academy of Music and and you know some other Universities and and and working with some great schools as well and I and I just realize it you know I had a lot to say the people that were so young. They didn't remember the movement. Anytime you walk into a room and somebody doesn't know run DMC. Is You know you got a little bit of work to do. But I just thought that I could be. You know I could use my my. I time and knowledge by educating young people about the history of the culture because very few my peers have a An interest in teaching and being spokes persons for the culture. And you know now. It's more common than it. Was You know? Even you know five ten years ago. Everybody's sort of stepping up to tell their story but I just felt like it was a part of my experience that I wanted to share with people because I've been on a very unique journey and I felt very fortunate that I could have an opportunity like that even if I created a lot of it myself but it was just something that you know. I didn't aspire to want to do public speaking or or educate young people or even morph into you know somewhat of a historian but it just happened naturally and I felt that it was a natural progression. Considering how hip hop started. It started out of nothing so here I go. You know some people say might be the third leg my career and I'm going to now start telling the story of who we are and where we come from some other work that you've done on the way over the last decade or so. You mentioned a lot more education a lot more storytelling a lot more and also big going back to big and collaborative. Niro's and outdoor project with juilliard project with in Nebraska. Blanking on the name of the the the center The beam asylum or create that love Euro when it's and it seems like that that's a lot of not a lot but a strong element were going back to. You is the teaching side and also these collaborative really large scale public art things that have a message in. And there's this nineteen sixties really clean lines pop style that I see in your work which which I personally just love. I mean you walk in here today. Pieces hanging up the if it feels like there's almost a coming home in some of this work offshore. The thing about what I do is it's always rooted in in in childhood memories number one. You know I was born in the sixties and so things like you know the Beatles and the rolling stones and Motown all those things inform Hawaii m people that younger disordered stop at Hip Hop stuff. Which was okay. They don't know what they don't know but all of those things inform the work that I do and having a graphic sensibility before I even knew what it was and then using that in my graffiti work and then later finding that as a way of sort of connecting with my graphic design were. My style has always been bold. It's always been bright. I like to make people feel good and so my color. Palette is always going to be warm and friendly you know that said it definitely is sort of like a homecoming because now I can incorporate all of these things into one body of work so when you look at my collage work. It has a lot in the stall. Joe Built into the work that I do With the trusted brands series is about celebrating the past and a lot of ways. And for me. I just think that if there's a way to connect all of those things but not have feel forced than ultimately. That's the goal and I think of the educational component as the same thing Temple University is giving me an opportunity to teach there and I've been working with them for the last five years maybe and a travel around the country and I lecture at universities and other creative institutions and cultural institutions and I. I feel fortunate that people want to hear the stories because I'm somebody that primarily work behind the curtain but I was working with Charlie Parker and dizzy. Gillespie and Miles Davis and Ella Fitzgerald of you know the this generation and I think that that's the thing that's so important and if I find my myself in that conversation or you know of FAB Five Freddy or crash or some other visual person as well I. I think that we deserve to be in that. That same group just because we didn't have a microphone in hand doesn't mean that the work we were doing wasn't equally as valid. And that's the thing that I'm experiencing right now. Is that we all standing on the line together. It's not like those people are in front and we're behind them the love that and it's funny the people that you just rattled off like so many of those people that think and many of them actually stepped out long before you to. Sorta like say like I'm I'm gonNA claim my name and my sort of stake in my voice here but it feels like we're at this moment where a lot of people diverged and now a lot of lakes really. The original class is coming back together and everyone's taking their seat and being seen and recognize. Well the other thing too. Is that if you dedicate thirty or forty years to doing something and you master it you hope. Eventually people take stock and recognize it. I mean if you look at and we shall find the Martha Cooper or Janette Beckman. Any of those folks. They've been making work for a good portion of time and it's only right that people start to recognize them in the same sentence as the subjects and love. That you brought Martha Cooper also I. I didn't I didn't know about working till recently and I saw an hour's just mesmerized. Yes she's been documenting. What I've done since I was a kid I love it. She's for those who don't know that name. Also check it out your photographer. Who's has some just incredible body of work? Something Janette Beckman. She's been photographing hip hop artist. Since the very beginning and now she's working with Levi's Dior and all of these major brands but like myself she's been out there on the front line making work consistently for you know forty some odd years. It's funny for it. Feels like you're at a. You're in a moment. You're in a season where you're putting together things where there's just a lot of fun half in it now because. I think we've weathered the storm we been on the journey and the reality is. I think if you've been around long enough and you understand that life is about peaks and valleys. They're going to be great days and then they're gonNA be leaned days and ultimately if you're making work for a living and you can sustain yourself and people appreciate what you do. There really is nothing more than that. Feels like a good place for us to come full circle too so hanging out here in this container. Good Life Project. If I offer up the phrase to live a good life what comes up well for me. It's just doing what I love and having people appreciate it and still feeling good in my body. I think that's the thing that I love. The most is being well past somebody. That's in my twenties but still having that feeling of what it was like when I was a twenty something running around in the streets of New York and I knew where I was going. I just didn't know how I was going to get there. Thank you thank you for having me thank you so much listening and thanks also to our fantastic sponsors who helped make this show possible. You can check them out in the links we have included in today's show notes and while you're added if you've ever asked yourself what should I do with my life? We have created a really cool online assessments. That will help you discover the source code for the work that you're here to do. You can find it at sparky type DOT com. That's S. P. A. R. K. E. T. Y. P. E. DOT COM or. Just click the link in the shadows. And of course if you haven't already done so be sure to click on the subscribe button in your listening app so you never miss an episode and then sharer share the love. If there's something that you've heard in this episode that you would love to turn into a conversation. Share it with people and have that conversation because when ideas become conversations that lead to action. That's when real change takes hold see you next time

New York City Andy Warhol Keith Queens vandalism Stephanie Russell Simmons Bronx director Jean Michel Basquiat Arthur Baker Seattle Adam HIVES Smithsonian Moma Brooklyn Muse Your House Haring Goulet FROGGATT Amanda Point Adams
New art, monthly, via Mueral

Talking Tech

08:41 min | 1 year ago

New art, monthly, via Mueral

"Talking Tech is brought to you by WICKS DOT COM creatine published a stunning website all from one powerful platform go to wicks dot com to create your very own professional website. Today that's W.. I. X DOT COM in stay tuned after the show to hear you can take advantage of Wick special offer for talking tech listeners art is expensive and put it up on our wall. It's GonNa stay there for a long time. What if we could switch it out digitally the subscription while there's a company with it I would like to do that for you? It's called mural. I've got Vladimir here from Mural Vladimir wanted just jump in and tell everybody how it works sure will neural is basically like the ipod for art. It's a beautiful digital canvas. It looks and feels like a painting you buy it. <hes> you put it on your wall and connected to your Wifi and then all of a sudden you have access to tens of thousands of artworks from around the world we work with museums galleries with independent artists and for five ninety five a month <hes> so six dollars a month you have access to tens of thousands <hes> probably billions of dollars worth of art through through our product. Let's tell people about some of the art I on your website. I saw a photograph of Marilyn Monroe in a in a painting of the Mona Lisa. When Elsa got that's right yeah we have everything from classical Greco Roman are through to the renaissance era of Davinci and and Michelangelo through to impressionist Mango Monet <hes> and we're starting to add contemporary art as well so we launch keep hearing <hes> Jean Michel Basquiat <hes> brain new contemporary digital artists that are creating art for the president like just for us? We're commissioning the artwork and then also classical photography so we have national geographic photography. We have magnum art photography so Magnum is probably what you saw the they they have a very. Very cool images of of Mohammed Ali <hes> kind of contemporary artists can vary artists like any warhol so I if we have pretty much everything that you might WanNa put on your wall available through the mural platform so the frame correct me if I'm wrong but it's twenty seven inch. That's right so that the display itself is twenty seven inches but the frame itself is a little bit larger about to buy three 'cause it has a beautiful Matt Finish to it has would <hes> <hes> citing it so it looks and feels like an art frame <hes> even though it's a it's a piece of technology you by the frame for how much is it. The frame is five ninety five also for six hundred dollars <hes> and <hes> that means that that initial hardware and then the subscription is by many five zero five dollars dollars ninety five ten months so we kind of stuck with with the kind of flack catchy price point all right and so you basically digital art. Does it look like the old digital photo frames now so we we actually we look at those we looked at the digital photo frames rings. We looked at the special displays that photographers use for looking at at high end photography. We looked at some other technologies and when we set up shop we murals been around for about four and a half years we were incubated out of an artist co op so we were <hes> taking feedback from artists while we were building our product and so we we we ended up developing a new technology cold true our technology that combines uh-huh and L._C._d.. Display with a few sensors and then specialized software that runs on top of that so we we created software that says you know this is a Bango primary colored blue secondary colored green display in A. Certain way or this is a black and white photograph showed in a different way so this combination of hardware and software is what makes it look different than those traditional traditional digital picture frames the idea of doing this yeah so before this I had another company. It was a company called rocket hub and it was a crowdfunding classroom kinda similar to kick starter and he gogo and <hes> we were helping artists raise money and what I saw was that music film television <hes> they all had their digital platforms for music the ipod for writing you have kindle or for television you have all these smart t._v.'s and platforms now but provisional art there was nothing really into digital realm. You had posters on the low end you had expensive are on the high end but there was no kind of middle market and I I want something for myself so we set out to develop like I said the ipod for art and <hes> once we created at first prototype artists were saying Holy Moly. This looks really really good. We we knew we were onto something so we wanted to create a whole new whole new category early and how you doing six hundred dollars is a big expense and a subscription is another bay expense are people sending up. They are yeah we have tens of thousands of users units sold at this point <hes> we <hes> we were independent start up <hes> for about four years and then we were acquired by next year the <hes> home connectivity company and so now we are part of a larger entity so we're getting a lot of resources to grow it to expand it and to grow really across the world and yeah it's kind of dollars isn't real expense but if you WANNA go to a frame shop and frame something you know no reasonable size. It's already a few hundred dollars and to do that. You only have one image on your wall whereas with six hundred dollars plus six dollars a month you have almost an Internet amount of capacity and capability to put something on your. WHOA also now if you frame it like that? I think it's a most of our customers think it's a pretty pretty good deal most people do they have a different picture. Everyday an average people change about <hes> three to four times a week so <hes> what we find that people put some you know they look through a few maybe five six seven is they stumble upon something that they really like and then they keep that up for day or two and then they do that over and over again and we have a platform through our mobile APP that introduces traduces Newark on a consistent basis so people can discover art through our at if they like it they just send it to their wall instantly and then <hes> really enjoyed for carver London. They want great so if people WANNA know more we're back mural. Tell them how to find you sure the easiest ways mural dot com so m. e. u.. R. A. L. DOT COM is the best way to find us and through there you can learn more about the ardently have available and also purchase <hes> the canvas and and the platform does this description all right well Vladimir want you tell everybody your last name because I was about to try pronouncing. It and I didn't even want to go there so go do it so it's a it's a good old Serbian last name all right. We'll Vladimir. aww thank you so much for being on talking tech. I'm Jefferson Graham with U._S._A.. If you have any questions for me you can find me on twitter at Jefferson Grammy and once again these everybody subscribed to show wherever you listen to on my Nadia I'll be back tomorrow with another quick it in the world that these days businesses of all sizes need an online presence whether you're an established name a brand a new startup or something in between you WanNa make sure people know where to find you at wicks dot com. You'll find all the tools you need to create a stunning professional website. You'll get access to hundreds of design elements and features that can help you grow your brand online email marketing tools and accustomed domain to name a few Wicks is creation without limits choose from one of their five hundred templates or start from scratch. You have the freedom to build your site anyway. You want plus. Everything is optimized for any device.

WICKS DOT COM Vladimir Mural Vladimir Magnum Wicks Marilyn Monroe Jean Michel Basquiat Jefferson Graham Mohammed Ali Michelangelo Mona Lisa Elsa warhol president Greco Roman London Newark R. A. L.
The Drawing Board  Episode 102

PodcastDetroit.com

52:04 min | Last week

The Drawing Board Episode 102

"You're listening to the podcast detroit visit. Www dot pastor troy dot com before information. great evening. Everyone this is. Andre ibra the founder and one of the host of the drawing more packets that a little bit of feedback there and listen. I'm excited tonight. Because tonight is the second opportunity to welcome one of our new host to the show. He's no stranger to the world. In fact the world knows exactly who he is a stem. Call him the applets smith. The third his wife probably caused him bay. Poor honey His children call him dead and father his friends. Call him you know. They're homeboy their brother Course his mother and his father called him son and to the world. He is known as fresh laundry. Welcome to the show again. My brother if you think you're doing hillary one man brother out. I wanna say man before. We really jump into it. When i tell you. I am grateful to god for the collaboration of that we've had here. I'm seems like the last month we've really been kicking it up but yeah before the last year man it has been a blessing to have. Had you come to the drawing board experience which are inaugural conference so think of like this video at the inaugural conference. I was able to now in fresh laundry in my home from our very first conference to that is able that i'll remember forever and then from that point deal We have gone on unite the drawing board nation fresh laundry to merchandise that very piece of artwork man. Listen when when. I tell you the owls super about it. I mean super stoked about it because What we were able to do in that moment. I've never done anything like that. So i'd has. Shirts live had but to embark upon something new to literally like reimagine the possibilities right. And of course you know for me. I don't do anything and you don't do anything without a foundational scripture backing just at emphasis of how faith influences all that we do as may when i thought about. And i'll ask you. I don't know if you can rebuild it. But i have a artists interpretive. So when i look at that picture why did you choose. The five tally marks in gold on his head. Man represents the bigger scheme of things depending on your perspective. It represented his crown So one thing some some situations could be could be looking damn or Discouraging or to the point where it's like it's no good it's no value But if you change your perspective or they look at it for positive perspective. You see the best in something in so turn. Those tally marks were a traditional where site is just. A bad memory is a bad situation. One thing after another is happening why could not be something. That's powerful that that enhances us in the future. So those tally marks represented being the crown. Yeah missile listen. I was all i said. Okay i can tell that it's a crown right and then of course you know i. I got all spirituality. With so. I said there are five. Tally marks in his crown which means he has a crown of grace. You know out in when some people look at the artwork. They may think sometimes that he looking down but what he is. He's contemplative with his pen in his hand and he's create his next move so this is a message to somebody right now although some people are looking at you and they're perceiving as you're looking down what they don't understand is that you're contemplating your next smooth with pen in hand. You're ready as we always say. What will you create on your wrong board. Yes yes you and i. We collaborated and we were able to Contact us crooks. Which is the founder of the balloon project in anna. We were able to bless a young king over the weekend. He got all of You know goodies in items But we were able to bless him with three hundred dollars of you know the projected proceeds from our The shirts that we're launching that launches. Tomorrow tonight listen. Swelled william am. Theo i gotta let a cat out the bag again. There are only thirty six of these shirts that will ever be printed rudas major major. Listen a short sleeves long sleeves crew necks but thea washes tell me why i've had preordained for six already. Wow so so so listen you at twelve midnight tonight. Twelve a m. You'd better go to the drawing. Board nation dot com. And make sure you get. The cert is the drawing board nation fresh laundry collaboration and so with that being said the old man. I see that beautiful piece of artwork behind your laundry hanging behind you. And i just want listen. I wanna All true drawing-board nation fashion. I want everybody now. Put your hands together for the internationally. Acclaimed the artist that comes in look personifies creativity. The that comes in some way embodies what you've can feel. His technique is so profound. Tell you about how signs his name you'll have to talk about. It is not just watching a artist. Work it is literally an experience so the drawing board nation welcome our family another host. The is in your hands. My brother thank you. I appreciate appreciate it. Mass so Once more sort introduction my name is theon. Smith go by fresh laundry. I'm a husband. I'm a father. I'm a homey i'm that guy and i'm just down to earth serving a guide I enjoy people. I enjoy life in a guys wide kinda differently to just be able to create as art artists. I've been invited to since the age of three empowered to really do a cessation thirteenth professionally in. I've kind of started a journey where says like one thing after the next everytime crates designed west going happen after that. What's next what's next and so tonight. I'm actually wanted to kind of get involved with just saying what is culture. What is art about from from perspective as a young man So i i'm going to give you a small definition kinda paraphrasing the depredation of culture culture the meaning of culture is arts or in other ways the manifestation of human intellectual to some people maybe social institutions of achievements of particular nations. So for example you know how we get together in may say We have started creeds and colors batas sometimes african-americans may do one thing non-stereotypical kind of you. Like hey americans are. Don't do this over doing this. Native american or into our indigenous people are not one thing or the way they cook or the way they dressed also in art. It's a certain culture to a certain culture certain audience for each artists until their own story. My free is able to parallel with that. What is art and culture has to do with your life. Kinda crazy like why. Why does our heads doing with me. I'm not an artist. I'm going to have my body. And i wish i can do half the things that you do No you don't be may be individually. And i'm glad i can share this perspective tonight so art in life. I'm gonna cut beggar story about me and my art technique so with me Growing up from st louis. Missouri had the privilege of being able to see all of life and art in art museums in in in belgium arc and i would be fascinated by this now see cartoons on tv Setup try to mimic draw something. I felt good in your neck of related. bess worrying. I kept practicing over time. Until i gets to the point where i found my own style voice around rhythm within art dana. Got so point where i just fell off in. I didn't i couldn't do it anymore. Just i didn't. I didn't have a desire. I didn't know how it worked from a life in. Why did do it. Best word support myself in my art and i find my identity in a who i am. Why became through art and wine becoming to heart so with art. Any subjects that you do you do something that you can relate to worst serve intellect value or something that you feel our social institution of achievement that you try to embody to a subject on the subject is of course whatever you're going to be painting or drawing or coloring. In of course art has voice so with me is like that's the way i believe. I'm a quiet Will person but with my art. I speak by i. Rural ice cream across the nation But when i'm choosing to subject. I'm choosing something aren't being something that identifies to me. What works to me. But before i get started though always like to make us either pre sketch of it or make the framework for Indulging in making a whole painting on one setting our know what what would does as far as making them articulate with hit looks like the structure of a hand or face or play certainly motion or colour in what i do is i pre- sketch have a framework. So it's not like building a house if you'd build a housing for they may have blueprint. They may have something where they have the structure of it or you may see two when when you like for me. If you're on a wooden structure in a wooden structure you see the potential of what could be something. That's great if the passporting once you get done with structure you decide to figure out what goes here. What goes next or what should go in. This place are created. Or if they're you gathered those The substance of it from your experience wife for example i. There's no way. I could build a house with a pill right vows. A take a hammer and nails it. Excuse me no hammer. If i just use a nail in the pill. I'm going to have the right to build this house Same thing is our in life the rights who was the bill which you're gonna Which you want and what you expected so with this. I will go on this journey figuring out what tools. Oh when he was throwing paint won't use acrylic use clay. Don't wanna do something that Knows ever used before or something as a technique. Airbrush got some people as they. They probably got shoes. In in switzerland everything under the sun that airbus with our have have ever close. Step out for the evening with. But i like to make sure that i have the right technique in a right tools for my job so going from a frame in a structure Some people you know they they may study this little too. So you have a blueprint. People that studied anatomy or to study subjects with me. Separatism propose doing a face. I'm going to study in the face inside out only look at the depths of the shadows the light source everything else. Create a bigger pitcher. He were bigger picture. But i wanna make sure that. I have the right tools for the job in the end. I to embody Something that no one else created in. Sometimes it actually shocks yourself when you create so as an artist. Once i get to the point where i'm scheduled something you see just the peaks and valleys of potential. It looks like you see the framework. The adults who was maybe Might say graphite or whatever medium it is it and be able to apply it and if you see the picture you see the potential pitcher you play around with allied to make it a day and it's like i'll color pitch with with pictures and paintings so you may see light sources of yellows and blues alive lou. The macy's demar was shady or dark ribs or any kind of like this combinations. Like why did he do. But what's more for a bigger picture if they once get that technique down to play with over and over again. I get their work on the face. Get to work the subject of the the body torso the details of the hands in down to the veins and what that looks like for me is. I'm i'm having fun. Because i understand who i am my rhythm when i can't do and i'm starting to see the big picture. Just let you know. We're talking about lifelong to. We're going to get to that shortly. it it. In this i get a chance to play with the background in the forefront. Make sure that you see stuff off. In the distance and something that you can relate to in the forefront where you see that is the appeal of the is a look into the soul abyss this this actual piece where actually you could relate to it. It may be a certain emotion that you'd qatar to it. In those at even collect are they mostly do it because they could relate to subject or they see their potential based off. A painting study shows so with this. I like to make sure that I'm only do it from expression and whoever's interprets it that's how they receive it and it applies to their life is so just about this. I former us to create something on a nothing is a blessing in the thing is you have to have is in the mindset of god to create your own. You can't make this up and just throw something together so fascinating once. I get the piece that i like. You know shake just right. It may take some time in may be frustrating. May not get the light source. I have to play with it for a while. May it may take a week. it may take a month. Makes a couple of days may take a couple of seconds to fill in my ambition based off my experience once more again. we're talking about life runs. Wish that in a second. But once i get this painting or this pitcher done it is to my likeness perfected and you step back and look at it. You know that today in your own strength is so wild factor. Like sometimes i'll do paintings cycle off or so for the those that are viewers out behind me right now for me to sit down and just articulate an abstract trading it could be heart tricky and i can never create this again physically. I can never create each breastroke again. I can't read with eighty. I don't have the energy or the time or that. Experience are be practice but for now. I can't see myself doing this. But that's something to decree valuable kind piece. That's that's the western but once again now to talk about this thing so just like life for me actually found myself in my art. I found myself at a point where i didn't have identity I didn't know what i want to do in life. I was like i was just existing like what is my purpose. Why am i here. Why do i exist in. I found myself in a load of dirty clothes. This is a aside prequel to call fresh laundry. I found myself in a load of dirty clothes where i was frustrated with life in. Everyone's flying past the in their their sewing. No jealousy ball but more so why am here. Why is everyone else finding their that. Their niche their potential their their achievements. In why am. I here sitting silent. It didn't know why. So i find myself getting my rhythm and i found it in my paintings and so i was in a load of dirty clothes now cry and that sort revelation that you should be doing art hanging in so with them. I decide to just make the most of it. So i would go on his journey ralph about night after night and just create painting the painting after painting and i would Just creates i guess a point where it's like. Wow this is where potential. This is where i see myself in years to come see myself in the long run it starts from me just clearly. Dry too fast forward. This is about life now guys. What is your blueprint. what is your subject. What is your framework that you've been working on that thing that you put off that you feel like he should be doing like i don't have time to do it. I know it's necessary for my next destination. Sometimes things are unlocked in the future bed software. What you do now in so with me. Depending on how something they'd be like in areas positive your life good but what about those dark times in those dark shaded areas that she feel like. Why am i here. It doesn't matter to anything but guess what there's a bigger picture. I'm just here to remind you that in so within that you'll go on this journey of life where bow football where you may see lightning's having positive things have been these negative. Things may jump in place. He may feel like this this this painting. This bigger pitchers david work the journey. But don't forget us a bigger picture in. Its purpose that you're doing it with article chairman. It goes hand in hand because people can relate to your story. People could relate guess. What your canvas. Your work of art in the beginning i created created you in the same token your campus work. Who you are as a canvas. You will have his own. Shaded areas grey areas. If you will and then you have those those bright bright days and she'd been long before. But it chris. A bigger picture guest guests. Would it helps you to see who you are but allows others to see their potential where they can be. It would people invest in the people that they can see. They see the best in you. My goodness it's like what can't you do for me. Every time they not create peace just today. I created a piece downtown for wayne and out of the public and people they were loving and this one guy said i studied you. I have studied your art work. I i'll be right. I'll be right back. He wants to his car. Grab a kim. this is was about half the size. A him he was about. He was not too big but he was. He was a nice nice. short level. guy crosses piece where it was tons of color in wyatt balancing says it the oh i want what you know that your story. I honor that in which you do as artists. I had to set you because guess what it helped me become free. That is the biggest compliment of life where someone has watch your why it may the certain based off of what you've done like do not have major days how how don't over creation of sense you are that you'd be able to someone look at your piece in. You'll work of art and be able to make their mix based off of what you've done. We're here to help each other. So why not do life like art is hand-in-hand with life in everything that you create is bigger pitcher. So man journey where. I was a single young man when when it was frustrating to life and then once i find piece to the puzzle. The biggest unlock in time. I would draw away to situations. But guess what. Ma artwork. My fiscal our work with mimic my life. And i said. I will make bold strokes in this area. I'm gonna finances aren't gonna work on being a better person or i'm going to work doing the best in the best version. I can't myself if my best forward do you start to happen in my life. I started to think definitely feel more Have so love for myself. Bus pass up awareness of others caring about others and then all of that though but for other people other people came in my life as well to for example my wife my wife came up the clear blue. I've been on my wife actually most of my most of my life. I guess this is my teenage years. I've been on my wife. Who wasn't they. Who was in sweethearts or anything like that. But being able to unlock my brain with the help guide. I was able to Just ray freedom today and it was like more and more people were around. More people have been bigger pitcher. What happen so. I say to you that everything that you do is linked to a bigger pitcher leaves a bigger source linked to a bigger project in your natural this once more with his definition. I love his part. Says social institution or achievements of peculiar nations. Who else is creating like you. You find those those those increments with the being that you like beings at your your adulting in and things that will create you. See the you see the state making them so with it. That's how i grew. I mean just like running to andre like my wife. Audrey but i did out the clear blue me creating what i can do what you know. My potential is you come across like ryder people. And so that's paying with the war nation. It was like just ain't people like mine. Where they went to see the best people they value they create doping secret. Craig dot content agree. Craig dote alex and how culture you crazy year. Old culture you shaping your forging your own way of express yourself what god is giving. You is so i'm around. Great people that are doing great things in so as we continue to journey. What are you gonna do at the end of the day macho tonight. What are you going to do with your campus. Who are you as a person who isn as individual where you're going to create those the dope this view of you. So just how articulate with a paintbrush yet to do two things first leg up got allow you to create something new but then also to guess what he gives you the ability to create that. So what kind of life are you're a great for yourself and guess what no one can stop you but you get frustrated because i can draw certain figures i could ears at one time mccain draw hands or anything i would get so frustrated like my body. Look like nubs you know. Why is this figure like this not to to the anatomy that i it should be to a certain degree to practice it. So guess what everything that you do is not going to happen. Overnight argue journey. Are you up to see the bigger picture. Are you up to see the best version of you starting now even with this count as blueprint so it's a look at your blueprint. It takes to make things work for you and guess what bothered it and guess what for those who have children while while for those who have children your kids are privileged to see your blueprint but also guess what your campus daler they see how you it they make your restaurants they they make your patterns in your your wife miss and guess what they're miniature versions of you. There are many canvases and all of your dark areas. All of your light bright days. Guess what they're able to see that the ought to them to see the best painting of you. Also guess what barilla's painting of you little to but make sure that council a bigger picture everything that you do. Everything that i do is to a bigger picture. Saddam is echo so best. What i leave with you today Also with with culture two man guess what it is it does hit the nation it will take issue Last time samia was actually working in a wall mayo in it was a big the biggest while we've done in the city in fort way in by myself. Yes but it took a long time but basically it was me three other artist to see this fake richer. What we did was we got together. We created a blueprint that says. Hey the suicide. This is what is going to do for this corner. Every either sees it is going to be empowered by it with this. I had to hers point scores perspective of where they are in their culture to make bigger culture bigger bigger bigger bigger board for all the so one of this things or just like i did just my individuals itself where ukraine framework for ukraine's outlook of house to house. Feel house for sale to saint. People will draw people to you. Will you know make things bigger with other people being alive by. Guess what it did continue to do that. So even in the process of that we had to come together as artists and figure out. Hey should we do this. Should we not do that. So we put more this color network. What will work for this westwood. Which should wall bureau say And we had to go through this for week. We went back and forth. What she looks like should feel like it being before people it was like. Wow what can i do now. So guess what you've got four like minded people. It was on the same page and we want to do this project now. What happens next would not get out. Now we've got an apartment a blueprint for putting to work now. We have to work so with. Everyone's everyone had strong. Susan some know weaknesses strength weeks. It's just like any other circle in. We would call each other in a respectful manner where we understood each other So just like as a musician you know. They may play the bass guitar. Drums keyboards in each one has their positional with notation. Take higher lower house still. They're playing or how fast are slowly. Planner tempo rhythm same thing balloon artists. Who's like okay. You do pretty good with the shading. Let's get you over here do this. You work fast over this way the best work and potentially this way. This switch okay. I'm gonna fall back. I'm to learn how to do this. So you have to be open enough to know that who can do what your life as well to events already One of the older jim because it was different. Kind of kind of generational gaps if you will when the outage said hey. We should do this way in this. We should do this. And it's gonna be a traditional way in me. I'm kind of fast pace. And i'm like okay. We've got rocket. Now who do some time. Man who got stuff to do is go home to and everything else is so he took each me when i was saying so when you find all the people that are doing which you enjoy doing. We're on your journey the same as you. You'll find shortcuts in life that that these faster versus going through the motion to get you to a point where you just want to give up so for example. He wanted to do things where he wants to make a great got blueprint in. We have this big wall. He wants to make things in a grid pattern. Find great we don't have time for that because you've got bigger things to do. I see potential. I see great things so we did was we sketched it on some swapping took a pitch in project. The wall we did be the grid way it would. It took us two days to probably be on the wall. What i did could time where i was able to do. In our forty five minutes to be able to paint just on the wall to get degrade the blueprint on the wall. Yes what he told everybody off france who said hey bill you doing great things i've got everybody's doing warned based off your experiences will be inspired and guess what they will take it and run with also tell others will to his. Guess what we're gonna help each other in the bigger picture after that we decide to late paintings and okay got the blueprint got it up. Excited was pump. We're our our refinements into it next day rocket out okay. This is what we're going to do now. When lesnar colours down or base colors first and then we had a brick wall this is a brick wall in mind you if you have ever painted a great wall it is the most tiresome crazed this cringing experience. You've ever do because guess what you go into the paint. And it's going to be some eric is. You're not going to be able to hit until like little things. And so it's hard to to get him that you don't want to do that. So the solution again. Hey let's give us a spray paint sprayer not Colored we out here in no time lay down pace coat. colors once more experience experiences key. Don't withhold your experiences from the bigger picture is your pitcher and your experiences are are needed. Your technique is needed. Your your way of getting out served things in life like how you battled things mining in how you go where things would it be. Relationships are finance or How how you how you saw god research situation. Your experiences are necessary and so with that you will see that in the actual detail of your bigger picture whether it be fiscal painting or life in so we would go through. This were knocked out cold by color by color. Flew past time. So this this big wall here who got it done in about a week in half great we get their based off experience and taking the time to understand what we can't we can't do it also hopefully trust in others to help us with this Because guess what you cannot make your big picture by yourself. We cannot make your pitch by yourself. Why not glad you asked because you make yourself your life experiences of major. So whether it be your parents guardians of your teachers your bootleg or whatever else you to call it. You'll honey whomever you did not make your own self and guess what you cannot do greatness by yourself I had the privilege of now. Just have this one experience with islam niro because guess what also propel too big great things. I'm like what can i do now. I'm ready take down the whole city. I'm ready to take down half. I'm ready to go to the mid west region. Detroit olympic him up. There is a wall but once you get that experience having experience is key. Exposures to exposure helps you with saying a bigger picture exposure. Helps you create your destination so for me. It has done any repeatedly over and over every time. Not finding the rhythm new habit on alad allows me to be free to do greater things Art artists are able to create. Because sometimes we don't know what we're going to create to be able to go into the unknown of creating something out of nothing or transcending its blessing is a bit is a one of a kind experience that only artists can do in articulate to give out to the people so they're kind of kind of kind of taking back this awhile factor that. I enjoy doing this. Hopefully this has been making sense it now. Listen you have been doing an excellent job. Or the i have been dropping notes in the chat. And you're something you didn't know that i was going to do okay but i got a screaming on. Let's on to your website. Fresh laundry dot com. And i have just ordered a sixteen by twenty watercolour. Print all optimistic. While and what i would like to do at this time to the first person the says comments experience and exposure. There's a bigger picture experienced an exposure. There's a bigger picture. Take a selfie. Put it in a chat. Whoever does that as soon as i get it. I will make sure that it gets to you. What is the chart. The very first person that puts in their experience and exposure. There's a bigger picture. You have a sixteen by twenty people fresh laundry that you will get today but you it'll. You'll be able to claim it. Today i listen. I don't see anybody in chat yet. But you gotta get it in there. You better let people know. This is a once in a lifetime. Opportunity make sure what you to see. The drawing board nation and fresh laundry collaborate a. You'll get a piece of that wrestler if you put in the chat experience and exposure. There's a bigger picture and take a selfie justin smiley. he's put experience exposure. We need to come up with the. Let's go let's wake racist. Let's tell you something about art as well while we're doing this and you just you just opened up. When held on for gay with art as well to it holds value it holds weight it holds time experience exposure. It holds everything. What do you think this. You see like jean michel basquiat for selling over over millions of dollars. Why are you seeing people. Invest in artwork. They do it because of the value behind it of the thomas and put in the experience. has had over the years in just for example like with our work. I'm i'm privileged to say that A lot of people have mara work in. It's a blessing and guess what it take away time. It's time away from my family. It's a conway rock potentially be doing in the future. Because i needed to create in guess way those paintings he just bought it has a value now but guess what that value increases as well to the thing is that everyone can have their painting everyone can have an original when is signed sealed and delivered it you own it. The rice to man it has value it holds weight so just like a household name where people know. If you have a pair of jordan's you get a pair of jordan's and you got them up. You feel like you say ended the world. Why as right judgement. So it has value has wait. Why does it have Have this because of a name attached to base off of his experience and exposure in his his his time energy into something so is it is art in so thankfully. I'm to be able to have you know names behind me that you know have been have been exposed. Smart working to collect artwork You know people don't care about me and spike lee network spiky as mara working work with portion starbucks. These different names that whole weight value. Guess what everything that has ever been created was based off the experience. That's good you know so. Every not just physical. Our work with everything has been recreated so even with his drawing board experience this has been created of the necessity of experience and exposure and knowing that guess what i cannot hold this to myself. You know as a bill. Do you know the drawing or is based upon a one of the worst times in my life. It was two thousand eleven. I lost my job at lost my cars at lost my home. I had been on my own out seventeen but now my family we had to move in with my laws because literally. I lost everything so when you see the word the drawing board you hear me on here saying the drawing board nation like no. There's a huge back story. So the everything he made. Creating is based upon inexperienced. The i was home in fort wayne over the weekend and had drove my son around. And i've done it before. But it was. Just he. And i and i drove him to every house that we lived in when i grew up and up to one of the homes would very first homes that we live the end when my mom and i moved back from north carolina and this was what they call a shotgun house. Spring me small. I wasn't in the best condition. And when i showed him the home. S it looks drastically different from where you live. Doesn't and i told him the every privileges based upon sacrifice just like everything that we create is based opponent experience. So when you see the drawing board or when you see a andrea ebron you see napoli smith fresh laundry. There is a host of sacrifice in experience. That shows up on the canvas of our lives that you have no idea about so while you appreciate the beauty of it in the heat of it in the clash in the collision of different colors in howard in something in you within there is both pain and suffering and there's joy and jubilation when you do that you you you and that's how we have to get each other's life although we may understand it appreciate it because you don't know the back story right and so i may not fully agree with everything you do but i'm gonna find the beauty in your life and appreciate what you present that i can identify with unless agree that i don't. I cannot judge what you do. I don't understand why you do correct. In the thing is we have to do a better job of looking for the beauty and others as well too. We always so quick to figure out what's wrong this person exactly. What's wrong with this person. In how they come across in. I'm sure what time for them gonna cut him off and everything else. And we may best of blessing based off of now looking for the beauty. Our windows gotti kim. Yes sir is beauty everything. You just have to look forward. that's it. They expected see potential. And what i find is that If i long enough out see something about myself within u s and what we really looking for in other people and we don't openly say it is. We're really looking for ourselves in them. Yes what happens a lot of times. These people that we fiercely reject represent park about like that. We're not prepared to embrace. And so my rejection of you has nothing to do with you but my rejection of you has to deal with that part of our lives that we haven't had the courage to confront so i'll blame it on The way that you look. I'll blame it on your race. Your ethnicity our blame it on your gender on. But i reject in you what. I'm not willing to confront you meet right right. So here's my challenge. Everybody like it increased. Especially we're in the midst of crisis so what we have to do is look to create new experiences like don't try to recapture the past the fastest. The past gone. Don't try to say. I can't wait to recapture what was the. Let's be real four second. What was wasn't all that. Great throw me and i'm gonna tell you like this year alone. Okay so of course this has been a pandemic and it's been a time where the world has been either just is shifting. It's a it's a time where it's like. What is going on when we got this. In the same token these are the times where higher was high but the beginning of the year when they looking like. This is twenty twenty. No you gotta look for the potential. The goodness in this beauty came out of this so for myself alone. I literally the ground on my okay. Twenty twenty. I don't know what's going to happen but we are here. I will have a background in financing our go to work working. I would be frustrated. And i was like okay one here. I don't wanna be here rather be doing art anyway and kept even when she create with your mouth as a side note every day i would say why am i here. What am i doing this. Go through the motions and you know i could i painting and i could make them whole check in in a week in a couple weeks in. Why am i here. You said enough where it's like. Okay if you feel like you can do better be better but guess what. I didn't say he today. So got completely out there. So may twenty. Fourth became a miss smith. We are cutting your position along retreat to other people. Here's seven package. have a good life. Any other person would be like. why why. Why is this going through the mixed after that. The pandemic said hey we should have on the world. I as an opportunity. I woke up with joy. I woke up every day. Like oh i'm about the crushing about to get it because guess what i have lived a blueprint. I have lived the structure. I have lived the framework of how this thing plays out now. Tom affiliate with with the substance to philippine with those mediums of my experience in my exposure. In how would attack this thing called life. Guess what. I have done art every since we get into this year as time job. No what his ever. And i have a family i would. We're house. we have cars. We got kids and guess what got has not allow us to. He is show health so every every job. I took him as far as art related. Guess what. I'm sonal back in the people and guess what the way life in to me both The same so wherever your gift is. Guess what it would not only help you. Guess what make room for others as well too so be careful what you put into you. Whatever your your substances aware of you trying to do a lapidary trying to accomplish this year. What years not overweight. Whatever you're trying to do right now don't your exposure guichard go dropping your at your experience your intellect your culture get out because guess what no what to do but you. If you don't do it you cut yourself short. You will cut your experience short. You cut your exposure short it if you don't do it today tonight. This is guess what you don't need another wakeup call do it today. As good yoyo as good listen man You said something today and believe it or not man. We're getting close to the closure of this You know this segment of this edition. But you said something that i thought was so powerful and it's totally in alignment with scripture. You said your story should create freedom for us and man listen. It reminded me of description. Says we overcome him by the blood of the lamb by the word of our testimony are right and so you said your story i immediately. Of course you know. I'm in the merchandising. Mind right now. So i'm like oh that's horrible so i say we gotta definitely put that down deal You know how they have those shirts. I'm just speaking to your brother brother. They just happened to iraq Shirt where they have like rosa parks Like exit attorneys. Say your story. She create freedom for others period and the fresh laundry at the bottom. Right when i tell you. That's a whole narrative right there right like it's white experience and exposure those two things transform People's lives. I was talking last week before greg came more. And i'll send you. We've been talking a lot about dreams and goals aspirations and ambitions. I said one of the things that we hit about a lot and we generally talk about it as a path of discovery when we talk about our purpose right so scripture that the purpose of sure so guys purpose alive standard. Sure it doesn't it. It hasn't changed because of You know i'm not gonna go on my king james language but that hasn't changed because of the conditions i can hear myself arrow but has your purpose doesn't change but your dreams will change based upon what you're exposed to anchor. Greens will chain based upon your maturity. Your goals will change as you accomplish. I'll tell you theo at. I'll be thirty eight in a couple of days and my goals as a thirty eight year. Old are very different than my girls. They were as a twenty five year. Old i grow mature exposed to experience. Different things my goals change. And then you know we say we sat goes up crushing. This is just what we do you know. And so as your goals will change. Your ambitions will change says as your character changes because what happens. A lotta times is We come into the world so ambitious and we'd violate principles of character which we will find ourselves meet find find ourselves at the drawing board again right so our ambitions changes are character develops and then the bumi get to our purpose after you perjure bishen at the you. Expo been exposed to some things experienced things after. You've had the test trial of actually setting something up in accomplishing it. Then you come to this place purpose. Some people call nor destination but literally purposes. What fuels your life like. A guy actually in my conversation with him Throwing some thoughts around. Like you know if i had some same thing i was like. I have some time to really work on this business. If i had some time to really get some things going and so then what would you do if i gave you the time. So then the pandemic hits boom. He said well you got the time now. Let's see what you do you come. Here comes the sketch collection which launches tomorrow on the drawing Hey listen the dry diskettes collection is dropping tomorrow. Several different items beyond blue with the drawing board nation blue crew neck and along. Sleep the here. I am Crew neck which is based upon first samuel chapter three verse four guy called out the samuel and before samuel randy lie. He responds here. I am all right and then of course you know our piece. The drawing board nation fresh laundry reliable the drawing a that. Listen these exclusive pieces. Only thirty six will ever be made and six of them are already gone. So the question as you. Your statement says your story should create freedom for causing works What are your closing words. May my close worries. That's one thing just just to piggyback off of that again. Just whatever you do now. It will echo to the whole nation. Whatever you do now and guess who had. No one else can do your purpose but you. I'll say this to you. Know how a microwave has one purpose is to heat up food. He can't go swimming. it can't make things cold. It does is purpose and guess what only you can do your purpose. And you're only designed to do your purpose. No one else can take that from you. So whatever your purposes to god if you don't know your purpose hey i'm gonna need of it. Need the right people. I mean the need of the right exposure i'm in the neater of right Intellect in have desire. You have to wake up one eight. How bad you want it. Because it hurts worst. Remain the same. Yes sir so theo. I want to announce the winner. I don't see his. I don't see the southeastern here. But i'm sure when i go to look at it. It'll be in there but the first person to comment experienced exposure. There's a bigger picture. The winner is justin smile. Also about this deal. He's a young man to my church and yet so is going to be able to give that to him and we are creating experiences man you know. The the mission of the drawing board nation is to create an experience that will transform the world and so the world is full of institutions. The world is full of organizations. And all of those institutions and organizations are run by systems so whenever we impact. Somebody's life we are literally transforming the world. Will we get right here tonight. Joe is creating as you said at an echo in the world that will forever be remembered. It's because never we create with our mouth it goes into perpetuity out. Believe that firmly because we know the power of life and death is in the town and they love. It shall eat the fruit. There are up so yeah Looks like we're going to be good fruit brother so no won't let's go reclosed tonight Again theo i just appreciate. They can definitely look forward to seeing you every third tuesday of the mom coming in. Yes sir coming into going into twenty twenty one and These shirts will probably be sold out by black friday yet. You know is yes. Yes sir so to the drawing board nation into the fresh laundry. What do you call your followed. Actually i have with yet. But i just i just welcome everybody to the laundromat. So all of those that have come to the laundromat. Remember your future is not behind you. It is not before you. It is within you. And i'm andrea ebron and this is my homeboy fresh laundry. And guess what you'll be able to catch us again next thursday tuesday of december. God bless you up piece.

Andre ibra three hundred dollars fort way demar bess forty five minutes Craig ukraine st louis hillary smith detroit macy anna belgium justin smiley qatar jean michel basquiat samia barilla
BPR Full Show 10/22/20: Small 'D' Democracy & Capital 'A' Anxiety

Boston Public Radio Podcast

2:46:01 hr | Last month

BPR Full Show 10/22/20: Small 'D' Democracy & Capital 'A' Anxiety

"Support for Boston. Public radio comes from CIC health providing routine COVID, nineteen testing solutions that help make work school and life safer. You can visit CIC DASH HEALTH DOT COM to learn more and PNC. PNC Bank has made a home in the heart of Greater Boston investing time talent and resources in Massachusetts communities helping to improve the places we call home PNC bank National Association member FDIC. I had both in public radio millions of ballots have already been cast recent counties but the number of undecided voters at a measly five percent of the electorate. So what's the point of tonight's debate between President Trump's Joe Biden. Trump showing in the polls though might one last primetime debate give him a push across the finish line expresses Chuck Todd joins US and just a couple minutes to preview the final presidential debate on Jared Bowen in for Marjorie Eagles, grand jury tasked with looking into the killing it Brianna Taylor stirred protests after no officers charged directly with her death. And anonymous JER is now revealing. They weren't even given the option to indict the officers for murder. Meanwhile, one of the officers involved says the protests simply unwarranted to break down the latest. Andrea. Cabrera joins US ahead on Boston public radio. On the Boston Public Ready. I'm Jim Brady Margery EAGAN. Is. Yet again, sitting in yet again is executive arts editor Gbh jarred bone good morning. Good Jim. So for four years, Barack Obama's frustrated as supporters with the reluctance to denounce Donald Trump that he make up for it yesterday with his scathing unsparing critique of trump's presidency hitting the campaign trail for Biden in Pennsylvania Obama held a rally held around table took to the streets of Philly. My hometown masking up an amplifying is call for voter turnout with bullhorn. With that bullhorn might also given trump and idea of how to circumvent the mute button. It tonight's final presidential debate moderated by a colleague of our guest joining us lunch on this and other headlines is Chuck Todd Chuck's the moderator of meet the press. You can catch on Sunday mornings at ten thirty and NBC Boston Channel Ten among providers also, the host of meet the press daily and MSNBC and the Political Director for NBC News Hello Chuck Todd. Well other major there. So let's go back to President Obama appearing in Philadelphia yesterday lot lots of horns honking, which is took. Applause for a Democratic Rally anyway where their social SOCI- distance gathering. We keep hearing so much that little can do. There's little that can be done to change the tenor of people's decisions anyway, and perhaps even participation. So many people have voted. So what does it do to have Barack Obama now out on the stump for Joe Biden? Well. I mean look where they sent him. This is still healthy a place that they want to. you know they they don't WanNa come up forty thousand short in Pennsylvania again and so and. This is this to me was was was about get out the vote efforts. This is about. firing up that last remaining. You know maybe it's somebody WHO's not tired of about but does like the President I mean I think he's a pretty good a pretty good surrogate the have out there for him and I think frankly I've thought about this you know. four years ago I think one of the reasons he. He wasn't as effective for Hillary. Clinton. Is is voters that that you know Clinton where rivals? I think he's more effective for Joe. Biden because. That's that that the public views them as partners. So I think he's more credible surrogate for for for Joe. Biden in a way that that he never was for Hillary Clinton. And don't think they didn't run against each other. You don't think it's the danger of the outshine. Well, they did against each other but a long time ago. Yeah. Because they serve together eight years it. It does change things right and and they're not appearing together. So I don't think you know what you mean about the only but they're not a parent they're not together. You know because for me you know during the so actually don't think you have to worry about that at all I think there's no. Where we all know that this is the that that Joe Biden Barack Obama that's been Joe Biden also donald trump that's sort of the point right? That's sort of the strength of this candidacy. Yeah. I think the guy who doesn't like weed every second of the day or does it read diarrhea of the mouth every second you know? One last thing on this lily, Tomlin's great line was no matter how cynical I get? I. Just can't keep up and I sort of feel like I'm in the same boat I'm watching this hastily called press conference last night on Iran and Iran Russian interference with the director of national intelligence you know sort of a trump sycophant and and the head of the FBI and can't stop thinking. Did they have this on such short notice because the president told them to help deflect attention away from all the attention Obama was getting is that unfairly cynical? I. Here's what I. I don't think it's unfairly cynical. You are cynical. Yes. View. I but I understand the reason. I say fair and I've thought about this too the reason there's so much skepticism about anything that Radcliffe says. Is. Not. Because the news media invented it it's because you know this is what Donald Trump has done. He's he's burned. You know he's burned the credibility of of so many entities and that. You know my concern is that this is a legitimate warning that the F. B. I wanted to make, and because of Radcliffe presence because of the president's rhetoric, the public doesn't take it as seriously as they should, and that is a concern I had I think the president has so. damage the intelligence community so damaged the credibility, FBI. So damage the credibility that Justice Department. Then I think everybody takes these announcements with a grain of salt. I. You Know I. It it is. It is You know the RATCLIFFE. that. It did seem odd that he decided to characterize what Iran was doing when he didn't do that before and it didn't really sort of comport but obviously had an audience of one that he wanted to please so. It. My point is is I. Don't think you'd be I. Don't think it's unfair. I think they've earned your cynicism I think the president has been four years making you cynical. And that's why I don't think it's unfair. They he create he made this. And now he's to live in it. Speaking of sending messages, the Senate, Judiciary Committee, Republicans, side of it anyway just approved or confirm judge amy conybeare it to proceed for the full vote Democrats were absence. What happens coming out of this with with the Democrats have done. Not much, I, mean, they just didn't they WANNA give less legitimacy to this and I and I you know I guess that's what they decided to do. You know there were some that said they should have boycotted the entire hearing process not just this vote but. You know I think I actually they. They use the hearings about as well as they could under the circumstances to move message particularly in healthcare but no, she's going to the Supreme Court. and you know I think what the Democrats did today is not just largely symbolic. It was about and I don't you know doesn't really. have. Much of an impact by. This is less than really bitter feeling and if Democrats keep control of the Senate. I do think Filibusters Gone I. Don't think they're gonNA. The first thing they're going to tackle as the courts and it's GonNa. Be Interesting I had somebody theorized to me that. That the that That covert really might end up being the trigger for killing the filibuster that that the first time Mitch McConnell tries to stop. That the Democrats want to be able to kill the filibuster for a reason that doesn't feel partisan. And so keep an eye on covert released in mid-january if Democrats get control and the trigger for that, and then you know then we're talking DC statehood which I think the biggest that's the biggest game changer, and all of that should be DC stated because you get to New Democratic senator. Chuck, I don't want to get myself to aggravated. So early in the show, some do this as briefly as possible. My take away from this whole process I totally agree with you that most of the Democrats use their time. Incredibly. Well as best as one can however, the ultimate proof to me of the old adage Republicans know how to fight particularly Mitch McConnell and the Democrats don't. namely. Dianne Feinstein. This hug of Lindsey Graham at the end of this. Sham process in the wake of garlanded Cetera and this quote whatever it was that she allegedly said to Senator Graham the best set of hearings I've participated. I. Know this speculation as to whether or not show get dumped at assuming the Democrats take control the Senate. It they really it is the gang that couldn't shoot straight was that is that, how do they? How do they allow that? Luck. Because you do have an older Kabbalah. Democratic senators. WHO. Missed the good old days whatever you think the good old days were okay for Dianne Feinstein. I guess she thinks that's the nineties. but you know because she got elected in ninety two but you know there's this older group of senators. Patrick Layhee, I'd be Joe. Biden. was part of this. Right. which is why he's uncomfortable with the court packing that you know. There's this you know the Senate senators that have been there longer than term believe they're better than every other politician right? The the there's this mindset that no, no, no. No, we're not like the idiots in the house We're not like the partisans in the White House. We're the cooling saucer. We we know how to come together. We know how to compromise. Factors. That's not the United States Senate that had been the United States Senate. Arguably in this century, we haven't seen that version of the US. Senate right. We we've seen a Senate that has been much more like acting like the House of Representatives. So back to you know we haven't seen the Senate the Senate that people talk about honestly since the eighties now much ninety. So it doesn't exist but I do think what I would say is this Feinstein's comments are a reminder she she's not alone. She's just one of the few that accidentally spoke publicly and there is a small group, but they're older Democratic senators who? Art Don't want to be the ones responsible. For for for. Creating creating this new Senate again and and you know look I think there are more. I think now more senators are sort of in line with you jim on this sort of like, Hey, let's deal with the reality that we have not the reality that wish we had and so I, think that's where we're headed but. But I would say this is. Probably speaks for more senators than you might sick. Not as crazy Graham. But in just wishing that we had the old ways back. So Chuck I'm wondering what the level of Jim Brady and Lily Tomlin cynicism is going to be after tonight's debate. I mean, I think we all know what we're anticipating tonight. What what could unfold tonight I'm trying to read into the all the time that Joe Biden is spending this week and in debate prep. All to wonder how critical this is at the end of the day anyway. Well you know this is one of those you can't loose. So it's critical by doesn't need a win this debate, but he can't lose the demand right and and he just needs to he just needs to hold his own. it's you know but this is such A. This is such a weird thing that have to talk about. I. Mean We all know what the issue is. Is the prison United States going to behave himself if he does then maybe we learned from this debate if he doesn't, it's another debacle. And what you know, what good does it do? I look I I think the president's been behaving. He bathes the radically lot. I think he behaved to radically more since he left the hospital, you can draw whatever conclusions from that but. I mean, let's be realistic here he's behavior has. been really odd. Compared to other people that had to go into the hospital for the virus. And you know I. I have no idea what to expect from him tonight. But I think we've learned assume more manic. And more mannequin aggressive version of him. Has, your colleague who he thinks is. And unfair and owned by the Democrats doing with What is it? Eleven ten hours ago. And she's She's Easily. The most prepared person on that stage tonight. I promise you. Them both candidates I I just you know I I have I have enormous coughing in her and she's not she's been through his before he's tried to bully her before she doesn't rattle. She stubbornly fair. She just you know she knows this isn't about her and she doesn't she's not gonNA. Make that mistake anyway she's just she's ready. She's ready look but the issue is not her the issues Donald. Trump. He. He he you know just like it wasn't Chris, Wallace? His fault it was Donald Trump. Now. And at the end of the day, what is he going to do is he going to behave like a normal? Human being you know that would I mean that was what was so I in sometimes where we in the media sometimes we gotTA. Say. What it is like he didn't. He didn't behave like a normal human being to. Forget whether he'd be like a normal presidential candidate. And I think we just not sometimes we just don't sometimes. Say What we Mean there is none of us would have tolerated anybody we know behaving. We'd have all been crunched whether at a P meeting. or or pregnancy. Well this makes me wonder how much of this is just stunt performance you set a radic and coming out of the hospital but but this guy who knows programming he knows how he knows how to get people talking being in front of the cameras I I kept thinking in the back of my mind over the last few weeks. When is he going to walk out of an interview and then sure enough he did that with Leslie Stahl which just felt like something that was intentional and not necessarily organic everything. Yeah. I don't disagree it. All feels it's like somebody sent me a stat from last night that the reporter noted which was at at. Donald Trump's rally. He had four hundred mess mentions but not one amy Barrett mention. I mean, he doesn't even know how to run for reelection. He doesn't know how to talk about things that you would say a normal candidate would talk about these things. You know I. It's interesting. How much of this is performance art? I will say this. It does feel like Donald Trump's desperately trying to recreate oct twenty sixteen, Right. So instead of Hillary. Clinton emails and James Call Me Letters. He's looking for Christopher wray letters and honor by email. Right? He does there is he's brought Corey Lewandowski back on the trail with them. It's like. He's trying to. You know all else failed well, maybe I can recreate twenty sixteen. So. I just you know whether that's pure performance art whether it's a Mac version of them. It it some form of that and and I, think you know I I assume tonight, he try so hard to to to push the hundred story that it just sort of. It gets in his own way. Yeah I have to say. My take on. This is more what you I I don't think trump changes anything I think you're lying whatever it was biden doesn't need to win. He just can't lose I think that he's got to make it through ninety minutes intact but you know before you go only minute left here I. You probably are aware that margin I always on edge and I'm always planning ahead and tell me some day that the jobs no longer mind kind of thing. So I assume that's Rudy Giuliani is doing he's hedging his bets basically saying if Donald Trump isn't reelected, I can go in acting I can go into film. Do you think that's what the Borat thing was all about choctaw I have to say the. You. Know the biggest loser twenty, twenty, it's been Giuliani has anybody damaged his own I mean talk about an obituary that has has to be massively rid. If you've written that. Times you two term mayor originally passed away tonight. It up right and now look what he's done to himself. I, mean he is. He's become I don't know what to I, but he's just become just a a caricature of himself. A caricature of what others I mean you know how easy of a bark was Rudy Detach Baron Cohen could do. Think about fat think about how easy it was, for Sasa. Successor Baron. Cohen can infiltrate Rudy Giuliani's world. Then I think the Russians have to. Move. On that note, pleasure to talk to you Chuck Todd enjoy the debate with your colleague. Next week take you. Got It. Thank you so much chuck todd joins US every week he's the moderator of meet the press which you can catch. Sunday. Mornings at ten thirty on NBC Boston. That's channel. Ten. On most providers, he's also the host of meet the press daily on on MSNBC and the Political Director for NBC, News Up. Next open up the lines and ask you about President Barack. Obama will his rebuke of Donald Trump's presidency helped biden or hurt him keep your dial on eighty nine seven Gbh Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston public radio jared bones sitting in for Marguerite Jim Brady what inspired Donald trump to run for president in two thousand, sixteen small group reporters and political analysts. It had everything to do with that two thousand eleven White House correspondents. Association dinner. Remember it. WE'RE DONALD TRUMP was recurring punchline from Obama making fun of celebrity, apprentice lampooning trunks trump's fixation with his birth certificate in two thousand sixteen. Here's what the New York Times. Maggie Haberman Alex. Burns wrote about the mortification trump experience quote that evening of Public Abasement rather than sending Mr trump away, accelerated his ferocious efforts to gain stature in the political world. If that's what Obama taking swipes at trump did in two thousand eleven. What effect will Obama's latest rebuke of trump have on the election we let. We know that he continues to do business with China because he's got a secret Chinese bank account. How is that possible of the TAXES DONALD TRUMP? He may be sending more to foreign governments. Then he pays in the United States, he hasn't shown any interest in doing the work. Or helping anybody but himself and his friends we're treating the president's Like, a reality show that he can use to get attention and by the way even then as TV ratings are down. So you know that upsets. So, Obama gave yesterday a scathing critique of president trump's. At chosen and trump at a campaign rally in Philly while he probably articulated how lot of never-trumpers are feeling but let's for years attacking trump that way do anything to win over the voters who Biden needs most eight, seven, seven, three, zero, eighty, nine, seventy you think Obama's return to politics will help Biden or possibly hurt him in while you're at it by the way if you WanNa comment on what your expectations are for tonight's debate the final debate with twelve days to go give us a vase at eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy. Chuck before I ask talk about the help or hurt and he said, you know Biden wasn't on the stage with them. So there's not that kind of comparison that was one issue would sort of like. A. Obama, such a huge personal presence and we haven't seen him like that and so I thought it might hurt. Biden. But I hadn't. Thought. About what I just said, which is that What's the value of attacking trump like that or is there a value when all of the converted Biden voters are already there? Does it get the fence sitters and they're still a few and obviously Pennsylvania's only decided by what forty five thousand votes I think in the last election does that help or does it push people away? What was your reaction I thought by the way I thought he was brilliant and it was a brilliant speech and I love the honking car horns like you mentioned before. But do you think it helped actually I? Don't think it has anything to do with what you're talking about I, think it all has to do with polling and I think the Democrats are probably scared that the the people who will think okay. We've got this in the bag now I don't necessarily have to expend all of this effort to get my ballot male. Dan Although it's probably too late at this point or or have to worry about standing in line because it seems like this is if I'm a Democrat this is seems like it's going to go the way I want your. I think we know that the Bronco is not going to pull any trump supporters over I think we all he can really hope to do. We know that there are so few cents fence sitters at this point. The only thing he can do is make the case. That this is by no means in the bag and they absolutely have to fire up the base and remind the base of why it's important for everybody to get out human humanly possible. I think that's so get out the vote exercise yesterday essentially what actually that's probably a better analysis than either a mind and the second thing before we get to the calls at eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy, as I said the chuck I I don't think there's anything that trump is going to do tonight even if he act to use his words from years ago, you won't believe how presidential I'm going to be once I'm sworn in. Even. If he control himself I don't think it gets them anything if he loses it again which I assume he will. I don't think it loses him any anymore I think the first thing chuck said is huge. Doesn't item paraphrasing chuck out I don't think a matters if Joe Biden wins this, what matters is if he loses it. There still are some doubts and you hear a lot of people saying. I'm not really voting for Joe Biden vote for Joe Biden I'm voting against Donald Trump and I think Biden's gotTa give a competent performance tonight. To allay fears, people, I'm not suggesting are bed abandoned Pieta, crappy performance but on the margins in light of the fact, a lot of experts say don't believe these ten point spreads. This is going to tighten as we go through the final twelve days I think the issue is Biden's performance tonight not really Donald Trump's I, agree I think his biggest Achilles heel right now is his age and people are GonNa be really paying attention to how he answers and and how competent he seems I hate to say that but that has been a lot of the conversation because he because of his age so whereas the president might have to make some argument tonight that he's presidential. Joe Biden has to demonstrate his continued competence. and. You'll have more opportunity to do that with the mics being cut and having more opportunity to answer whereas you allowed himself to a great measure we run over by Donald Trump. Last time you know by the way and we'll get to the calls and set the notion that anybody thinks that they're six SEC. Sections of the debate for people have been playing a paying close attention. You know this whole muting the Mike thing is not when the other guy is speaking it's only when the other guy is speaking in making his first statement is two minutes statements on each of the six topics. Once you get through that first four minutes, two minutes in two minutes, the remainder of. The time they can all go nuts but if anybody thinks he's even GonNa, make it through the first two minutes. He being Donald Trump without making some snide comment that you sort of hear in the background. I. Think you're crazy. Don't you? You just made the point so we have a little insight and TV here we know how it works. So what we're hearing at Home is going to be what the audio engineers want us to hear by cutting the Mike. If you're in the hall and you don't have an earpiece, you don't know that your voice is being cut off. So we could hear if Donald Trump continues to interrupt he thinks he's interrupting, but we will just here this sort of disembodied voice being picked up from Joe Biden's. Mike, which will make it even more awkward and strange. So any case that's tonight at nine o'clock will be carrying it here can't be in front of a television set. But what do you think about the Obama thing yesterday and is that a net plus jared case which I think is a pretty compelling one wasn't about convincing anybody about convincing them they'll show up and vote. Get out the vote kind of thing I worried because he was so. Obama and so he was a terrific speech to like the guy who know it was just a terrific speech and boy was having fun. You can tell he missed audience really having fun this thing but does it is it a net benefit for the guy? He's supporting his former vice president eight, seven, seven, three, zero one, eighty, nine, seventy. Let's start in watertown with Mattie hi, Manny. Hi Jared Hi, Jim? How are you? Good. So I agree with jared I agree with everything you've both said. It certainly can't hurt Joe Biden as I said to the girl who answered the phone it was such a like it was so nice to hear call her sentences. That meant something. You Know Joe Biden is a good speaker, but you know when Obama speaks it's like, oh, boy, he's so and I miss that. So I miss Yeah and I. Chuck Todd said something interesting about how? trump's mental state is a little more unbalanced since his covid test positive test. And it is concerning especially there's something going on in Russia's some fifty year arms. We've been discussing for four years when from the day that Marjorie used the term unhinged before people were saying those kinds of things about candidate trump about his mental state and the unwillingness of people who have the power members of Congress cabinet to take some responsibility for making assessments about it because he's got a lot of power, he being the president. So Chuck has been pretty honest about it and I'm with you I think it's a serious concern that most people aren't willing to touch, and by the way Mattie it's not just most politicians. It's most press people all of whom with whom I've spoken are thinking it and very few have the courage to talk about many. Thanks for the call. Appreciate. I feel like I'm bringing a little bit of arts background bear here but I feel like, I, you can really can to some degree write the script. Donald. Donald Trump I said this with Chuck Todd, just a moment ago to. Somebody. WHO's used to being in front of the camera? He knows what it takes to get people talking. He knows he knows how he can. He can create drama and these little moments I, truly was expecting this the what's the what's one of the few things he has left but to barge out of an interview I mean who does that especially when you know that Donald trump loves interviews, he loves that combative back and forth he loves to be in control and thinks he's won them. So it makes no sense. that. He would storm out and I I truly believe that this is something he had planned to do. Yeah. I. Hear Ya and it makes sense on in one part but the other side is the only likes more than whatever you described as he likes winning the only thing he likes less than that is a being humiliated. He's on the verge. If these numbers are right about a of a crushing loss I, know it could change in twelve days it may. But if the election were today, which is which it's not. No sane person would think his behavior at the first debate helps them no sane person by the way it's one of the few things were Republicans have publicly said Hey Mr President maybe should change the strategy. Nobody cares about Hunter Biden they care about staying alive during coronavirus than they care about getting their jobs back as soon as possible. So they can pay their bills and feed their family I. Think the guy is totally gone off the deep end it may be the drugs may be the the the after effect of having a corona virus. It may because he's panicked about what seems to be a crushing loss that is imminent but I don't see any of this stuff works there's advantage. Fool's errand on my part, but if you try to understand but if you try to trace the behavior, even if he loses even if he loses by an epic margin I, think he's somebody who's going to be able to justify it in his head he he will explain it away in the way that he's explained else that he's just got this confidence in the way he thinks maybe, which is also what I've heard from. You know at least one or two conversations I've had over last decade of people who worked with him is that they were just struck by his confidence and so Roy, Cohn thing. Even when you have it, you just keep plowing ahead and do the positive warrior and Paxton you're in Boston Public Radio Lori. Hi Jim. This is my second time this week I got through we're going to have your what's up. I have three points. The first one is I. Didn't think that Biden should have gone through with to this debate I didn't think it was necessary. The only way I think it is is if it's on regular local channels instead of cable, so that all the people that watch Fox only and never see the CNN debates will actually see a measured candidate talking about facts and they might learn something. The second thing is I think Obama I'm glad that he spoke out. I'm just disappointed that he hasn't before today but I think it will help. And then the third thing is I hope that Biden because he did decide to do the debate to uses this time as free advertising to remind. Voters that when Obama was president that John Boehner and Mitch McConnell blocked and obstructed almost everything they try to do for eight years and unless we take back the Senate and get those Senate votes in Michigan and Georgia and elsewhere, it'll be more of the same. So I hope Biden campaign is listening and he urged voters to vote for Democratic senators. Then, Morinho, tonight, can we go back to your second point? You think Obama helped abide help Biden as jared described in getting out the vote that already support or expanding his base. maybe expanding the base with Democrats who are still on the fan to aren't really voters really. They definitely didn't for Hillary. Donau. Because is in Pennsylvania I'm hoping he has urged some people to come out to vote who normally don't. We shall see Laurie thanks for the call I. Think did Obama knocked out of Pennsylvania for Hillary Clinton? At the end. Yeah. Well, this is sort of the end to you know I mean we're do you believe I say the Margaret Twelve days I was gonNA say twelve days they'll over is not even close to over on November. Third in all likelihood but twelve days until at least the voting stops. Let's go to Brooklyn Lawrence here in Boston public radio welcome hi. Lawrence I lawrence. Try Third. Lawrence. You there. Let's put Lawrence on hold eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy, Lawrence. We'll get back to you in a second where we going next friends in Brighton. Where we go next, we'RE GOING TO BILL IN CHUMSFORD I bill. Mind Jim Jared. How are we read this morning? We are excellent. Thank you. We are too and I think. I have a little twist on this. I think Obama's speech was aimed right at president trump and I think this is why because if you think about it, everybody's saying the same thing which I disagree with but they think that this whole thing, this last debate trump is off the wheel off the road and off the rails but I think that's been him from the beginning but his thing his inside people for the last two weeks been saying we've got to get this guy to be more focused and stay on track and NOCCO crazy. We'll yesterday Obama just set him off he. He. Really was a thriftily back trump's gonNA react to it tomorrow night when Biden brings it up in trump's gonna go off the rails again like he does in one last thing for the Frisk three years, people have been afraid to say the trump was lying. But now we have to say that he is mentally got some issues. We don't want to say but it's a fact just like wanting for three years I think gets some real mental inches bill. That's a really interesting analysis of the Obama thing I mean, that is a really the timing the night before the debate. That's. A real interesting analysis. Thank you for your call. We appreciate you buy that jared I by both counts actually I absolutely I think that's a great theory that he was bathing him and I also think that having watched that debate I didn't think that that Donald trump lost his badly as everybody said, he did because he was the person his base wants to be out there and he's he's fulfilling a role to go back to God either I mean you don't have to be a political genius to know that if Donald, trump just wins his base he's coming in second he's got. To expand a little bit. So in light of the fact to quote the man himself, I could shoot somebody on fifth avenue not lose a voter you're not gonNA lose those voters no matter what you do. They are totally loyal the goal of a sane or semi sane politician is you got expand a little bit if you want to go home the winner on election, I? Do think he picked up one vote that he didn't have in the first debate. Well, I don't think it's well, I think it's possible because he also go to Joe Biden saying some things come on all. We did shut up to set. Presidential and that's something that Donald Trump very effectively did and I think that's why Joe Biden has taken himself off the campaign trail and why he has spent so much time preparing for the debate this week, how'd you like to be Kristen Welker it not only are? Do you have to control the President United States in what is the final debate in a race where he's losing number two he's not very good with women. Particularly not very comfortable with black women. This. Well, IT'S A. Family Rooney when I came into the office the next morning, we're socially distance in the office but I said. Lesson number one here. Don't ever accept that job to the debate moderator because there is no winning ever. Well I'll tell you. She's I. I haven't I. Don't know if she's ever done a debate I think she's pretty competent reporter, but obviously, it's a different skill. She's quite competent reporter, very different skill when you're doing this with the most powerful person in the world and the guy who wants to be the most powerful person in the world. But I am really really looking forward to this Lawrence you're in Brooklyn will try again. Hey there. Hey Listen. I Jim. I don't think that he's capable of expanding is base. And I think that. When he speaks his base, you know. The did up. And the same thing can be said for us when Obama. Speaks? Because to hear him speak as like a previous speaker Matty said. Just, to hear someone that has such a grip on the vocabulary and singlish language is viewed. It's beautiful. It really is we miss it we hunger for that. And I think that it's going to be a and for sure and I would just like to think that matter what Obama has said he has spoken for all of us. The way that the former president has spoken his base, those the people that would like to say all those things to someone in their life, but they don't have the stones to do it. And Obama has spoken for a lot of us. That do have the stones and do have the vocabulary to speak it, but we don't have the. The crowd and we don't get the volume and I think that Obama date yesterday and I hope he does it again before the Election Lauren Sang's we're glad you held on. I don't know jared scheduled to do anything else I should know this I don't know I know he did a bunch of things in Philly or at least in Pennsylvania I'm not sure all in Philadelphia. I don't know if he's doing more I, mean there are the three, Wisconsin Twenty three thousand votes lies Time Michigan I. Hope I get these three right was ten thousand votes last time obviously all for trump and Pennsylvania I think was forty, five or forty, six thousand. So you can understand how important they are in all three states I believe the polling shows pretty significant leads for. Joe Biden. So eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seven, we have two things on the table. One is what your reaction to the comments from President Obama were yesterday where they're a help or not to his candidate Joe Biden and what's your expectation for night? What are you looking for what you nervous about in terms of tonight Let's go to Kira. I here. Hi Hi. How Tim and jared how you? Thanks. Thanks for taking my phone call to you I I just want to say that I really think that. With this with the pivotal times that we're living in right now. And this is just GONNA be You know I'm really hoping that the wonderful You know I think is only going to help things I'm hoping Because he's kind of a voice of reason, and you know he's steady on you know and. Then, also, tonight. With respect to the debate I really think the moderator is I just? I revere that way because it, you almost have to neutralize the. All the all the antics onsite coming from the one. You know, and then you know unfairness I really hope that things can go a little more smoothly. We'll SORTA WHY and so do we all I. Have to say cure as someone who's moderated a few debates obviously not at that level a couple of weeks ago we did a a Senate debate Marjorie and I. It is really nerve wracking whether you're doing a city council debate whether you're doing a Senate debate. I can't even imagine waking up here. Thanks for your call on a morning like today knowing that what hundred million people in the United States are going to be all over the world they're all wondering if you will lose control like Chris Wallace point that does that seem like a century ago Like a Chris Wallace does and you know I have to say with wind no a little bit about Kristen Welker work most people probably never heard of her before just know that she's a reporter NBC. This is her stamp you know and it's sort of like I was never a big Savannah Guthrie Fan. I thought Savannah Guthrie was nothing short of brilliant at. That town hall the other night she was so prepared and so strong, and so good as compared to how pathetic Chris Wallace performance was that I'm GonNa Meyer of Chris Wallace has worked to just didn't have it that night boy talk about all eyes on you would you not be like a puddle of Goo today in anticipation of this, I lose probably thirteen pounds. Just in. The today, I mean the responsibility that you have is just absolutely tremendous. How about your rep for responsibility screw the Abbot Reputation? How does Chris Wallace go out of the house? He's doing an interview the next day with the New York. Times and again, a lot of people think it wasn't his fault there's nothing you can do I don't agree with that too. I don't I think he acquitted himself well, actually that's one. It's hard. We're talking about Barack Obama's return to politics. We're asking you is he helping vice president on his way to the presidency or hurting him this eighty nine seven Gbh Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston Public Radio Jim Brady engineered bone sitting from artery. We're talking about, Barack Obama yesterday in Pennsylvania asking you hit helping his candidate Joe Biden or hurting him by returning the spotlight with his damning assessment of trump's presidency, which is very unusual not just for this former president but for any former president and we are now just how many hours away nine hours and fifteen minutes away from the final debate what are your expectations of the two candidates? tonight eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, hundred, seventy just one unrelated note. But I, think it's important because it's something talked about a lot Julie Brown is the brilliant reporter I think for the Miami Herald who did essentially the Epstein reporting Early on says in a four hundred, this is breaking new. She says an hour ago in a four hundred plus page deposition taken in two thousand sixteen accused sex trafficker is lane that your surname Maxwell Colleen repeatedly going whatever is then is knowing any underage girls wherever present with Epstein, the documents are heavily redacted get this names blacked out include Prince Andrew, and Bill Clinton. Eight seven seven again I. Don't know what? Context Eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one. Boy, given seen him out on the stump for. A for Joe Benigno. Also, you haven't seen that on the stump for his wife Hillary Clinton the last nominee of this party if we have either the Clintons been out there anywhere for Baden I'm not suggesting they were willing to I'm sure bill particular would love to. But I guess they are not who Joe Biden, his campaign or looking for. Does immediately come to mind man north reading. Hi How you doing we're good. Thank you for taking my call. First off, we all know why? We on the White Bill Clinton's in that. In that four hundred pages while we don't know exactly that he had a relationship team but that's Why? Come on okay and I think Obama's hurting you show when the Biden's weekend can't close the deal on himself bringing up uncorroborated evidence about China bank accounts and. Didn't, and then Chris talk talking about his mental capacity after get a little but he's shuts down any conversation about Biden's mental capacity. I, mean I don't think shutdown. Show? By the way, the China can if I may met, the China Bank account is reporting from his returns. It's not wild speculation. You can say it's totally innocent and it's fine but apparently paid one, hundred, Eighty, eight, thousand dollars in taxes the China. Put that in context paying seven, hundred, fifty to the US even though he said at the debate, he paid millions and millions and millions. So where's the uncorroborated part? called. It a secret bag down not secret if actor not secret. Matt Matt Matt. He's the first presidential candidate in recent American history who refused to disclose his tax returns. The reason we know it is because in your times reporting not because of transparency by Donald trump it was kept secret by Donald Trump. I just believe of. Obama's making them making five. Look. Really. Week. Okay by the way I think that I don't know if he's making them look really week I. think the comparison is striking in Matt thank you for the call I mean, it was very interesting with Chuck Todd said, they weren't on the stage together which I think was a conscious thing I mean Obama not only looks young but is so full of life and. Vibrancy I mean people unlikely say this but I mean Joe Biden is seventy eight years old and when you are about to be on by the time, he would be sworn in where to become president and you look at video of him like any person who ages just like Donald Trump and he is not the Joe Biden of ten years ago when he was with Obama or at the Anita Hill hearings or before I mean, that is a fact it's not a condemnation. Of the man the one thing I'd say I have to agree with that I, think the Democrats. The voices, the punditry term I hate the punditry. Loses credibility when they're not willing to say like after that first debate I mean, you watch CNN and all the the Biden supports was brilliant performance. He just showed he allayed any fears people thought is just not true. Simply. That was not true. He is a he looks like a really capable guy who is seventy eight years old and about to start at seventy eight, the single hardest job on the planet. That's. It. Is, naive. It's not biased. It's naive. Listen Attleboro your next. Hi. Hi Good Morning I just want to share I developed bipolar disorder at age forty two, which is very unusual usually get new teens or twenties and for me it was because I was given try does apprentice, zone. And induced by bipolar and I can't help. But wonder if pats when the president has been undergoing might induce bipolar enhanced because he's really displayed a lot of the symptoms such as mania grandiosity you know and instead of and so that's my to fit. Well, thank you I don't I don't think. I don't know I haven't heard people suggest a bipolar diagnosis, but a lot of people have not suggested but said the side effects of that steroid use taking decks and methods is that I think that's I'm maybe gotten a Rumba whatever it is third was has very serious side effects and some of the side effects not all cases are very dramatic mood swings rage. That's sort of thing and he took it. So it's all speculation not that he took it but what the impact was and you heard Chuck I decide his thank you for your call eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, hundred, seventy are you excited about tonight? Even said, are you into this or? Of course, I'll watch. But I, know I'm not excited because why we're just not because look at we're seeing in our country and in the future of leadership in this country, it's just such a scary and precarious thing I think to to to to look at how a presidential debate unfolded the last time and anticipate that this may happen again, we were tuning in because we wanNA see presidential leaders and to see Donald Trump. Not, essentially, be presidential and to see him get Joe Biden not be present presidential and some of the comments that he made. It's very unnerving. We want leadership right now this is kind of crisis by the way. Let me just clarify what I said to you before though I think you you see what you might get it which I think is the value of these whether you like one likes it or not. Marjorie always accuses me of doing false equivalency stuff. So I want to make sure I don't hear I didn't like when Biden said shut up to the president had states I didn't like it at all but for anybody to suggest I, don't know if you were that the the behavior of Joe Biden when it was not stellar came even close to the grotesque childish behavior of the United States is is unfair. Trump was totally out of control totally childish totally disrespectful totally unpresidential couple of times. Joe Biden said an acted in ways that I wish he had not but I think it's totally apples and oranges disagree with them. Well, I'm looking at it in its totality no, I don't. Agree I wasn't suggesting that we didn't see anything that was at a Presidential Joe Biden I'm not saying that at all but I I hate to I hate to see him basically get in the muck with with Donald. Trump. and. Again to because he's he's supposed to be I think he's taken himself off so that he can be fortified this time. So that might not necessarily happen again but I mean we've all we've all experienced generations in decades of presidential debates now and I think it was pretty it was it was sad to see what we saw time and time again where everybody's stressed out who's anxious everybody's looking for some glimmer of optimism and we didn't see A. Blast time. Well, I'm a cup nine tenths empty come. God but I'm hopeful tonight will be better. So I don't know why let's check in at eleven one. Let's not actually I. Hope. I, pronounce. Is it oh deed in Western mass that I get it right In Western, dead, I'm so sorry dead my apologies. Thanks for calling. Appreciate. Not No problem. Thank you I was I'm watching trump and he's not looking for any more votes. And he's not looking to solidify his base. What he's doing is setting up a rage. Now situation. So that as of November fourth, he can say look I've been I've been chipped election is rigged and you can do all sorts of illegal things in response you can have marshalls show up and take boxes of ballots that haven't been counted for all I know have been countered he can have things he can have results counted you can look to state legislatures to select boards electors that are not in a not consistent with the popular vote voted right. Right you know he can. He can declare if he's ahead. I don't know what they'll. Let's see. If he decides, he's the head at eight PM Eastern time on On Tuesday November thirty can say look at one you know. We talk about that. A second by the way, the Peace Bark Kelman was with us from the Atlantic couple of weeks ago about road a brilliant piece about exactly what you're talking about. Oh, dead but I I want to do with John. King. Urges to do regularly and talk about that night of November, third in what is being called the Red Mirage. The notion is that unless this is a landslide victory for Joe, Biden since many more of trump's voters will vote in person their ballots will be counted faster, which means it is not impossible donald trump could lead on the night of November third yet. When all votes including undercounted in the days after that, lose the election thus the Red Mirage dead I? Think you focused on a point people after be prepared that when Donald? Trump. If Donald Trump declares victory on November third, he may be the victor, but we won't know in all likelihood because so many millions of ballots will not yet be counted. So, thanks for bringing up the point and by the way he's not just waiting till November four th. He's Andrew Cabrera in about ten minutes is going to talk to us about voter suppression efforts that are ongoing as we speak in state after state around the country. So stay tuned to death I. Think she'll be singing your tune as as well. All right. Well, coming up, and then there were nine what the confirmation of Amy. Conybeare to the Supreme Court could mean for voting rights and the presidential election as Jim just mentioned Andrea Cabral is here to talk about that and a lot more keep your dial on eighty nine seven Gbh Boston public radio. Head on Boston public or after six months of closed doors. The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston reopened to the public with a comprehensive look at Artemisia Michelle. And the HIP. Hop Generation the museum hasn't been dorms time just a couple minutes director Matthew Teitelbaum joins us to detail the MFA ever keep the arts in pulsing vibrant and relic during the Vanden. I'm Jared Bowen in for Marjorie, the Boston school committee has voted unanimously to drop admissions tests for the city's prestigious exam schools for one year because of pandemic, instead the schools will make decisions of eligibility and acceptance based on grades, mcat scores, and zip codes in just a few minutes Paul rebel will join us to discuss the controversial proposal and what happens next. Our number two Boston Public Radio Marti Regan is offered bone executive arts. Editor GBH is sitting in hello there jared again, Jim you're just an update I. didn't hear the first minute of the NPR news. So my apologies everybody if they mentioned this, you know the Joe Biden was under pressure to say what he thought about court expansion number of Democrats including Ed Markey of said if they slammed through the barren nomination, we should do that Biden originally said he wasn't going to answer till after the election was a distraction than he told. George Stephanopoulos last week. Of course, he'd tell people what is position was before the election well, it turns out in an interview that is going to be on sixty minutes with Nora Donald, Sunday nights the same interview that trump walked out on i. don't think Biden walked out on his he said that what he will do is he will pick a bipartisan commission of scholars to study the issue about possible court overhaul and a whole variety of issues give them one hundred and eighty days to report back with recommendations. So he's sort of I guess. Trying to get around that issue with twelve days to go by the appointment of a commission in any case, joining us in line for another edition of lawn. Author is Andrew Cabrera Andrews former South County Sheriff Former Secretary of Public Safety for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and now the CEO of ascend Andrew Corral. Well, hello. Well Hello. Start that is really not a good start. GAITO Andrea. Well, enough to to read a lot into that hello. Andrea. Let me just start by I. Know that Jimmy Maher Marjorie excuse me earlier this week hegemony Cobb a great. Me I need some water from. The New Yorker on for the piece that she did for frontline our colleagues frontline looking it's called whose vote counts looking at voter suppression around the country and continues working its way into the courts right up until this very moment can you give us a roundup of what you're seeing? On the Anti Voter Suppression Front at this point. On the anti voter suppression. We'll? Of course fighting voter voter suppression. Well. I think. A lot of it is the is a ground game I think people have a pretty good idea of all of the ways in which voter suppression is the Republicans are attempting to enforce voter suppression and and people should really take note of this and entire political party is trying to stand in the way of people voting because they can't win. If people vote, they can't win on policy they can't win on you know any any sort of Legitimate ground. So they're standing in the way. So part of the strategy is to overwhelm you know vote in overwhelming numbers and to make sure that the turnout in every single state. Is So spectacular that you you you put yourself a little bit ahead of the game in terms of beating back some of this oppression and we've already seen in early voting in a lot of states. The early voting has far far exceeded early voting in other years in some cases they just said in a place like North Carolina more people have voted in early voting north. Carolina. Then the total number of people who voted for Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen. So, we're talking you know over three million votes already in early voting, but there's also a ground game around. The Biden campaign and other a lot a number of other independent organizations and legal organizations to be right on the spot in all of these jurisdictions when there is active voter interference or voter intimidation at the polls or questions around the acceptance or rejection of votes. There are lawyers on the ground in very from what I can see a very well organized and well coordinated. Effort being led really by former Attorney General Eric holder to make sure that We're getting in the courts quickly on issues that are worthy of court intervention or that we're taking up issues at the state and local level where they need to be with things need to be challenged. So I think there are a number of ways that that this is going to be approached that said I mean you know we're talking about I'm talking about this a calm tone of voice as though this is normally the way an election should precede. This is the most abnormal abberant thing. I certainly experienced in my life where there's a fight over the ability of people to cast a vote, which is one of the most fundamental rights that every. Citizen in this country has and it's just astonishing that this is playing out this active voter suppression intimidation effort just playing out right in front of us and obstacles are being thrown every obstacle conceivable including foreign election, hijacking, and interference. to keep the vote for the elections from being fair and free, and which is essential to democracy. It's just. And we get I was talking to a friend of mine this morning about some of these state. Supreme Court decisions, and what he said to me and I'm in the spirit of full disclosure. He's a big time anti-trumpers. He's not crazy about Biden, but he's voting for him. He can't stand trump is he said, you know last few days there's been victories for people believe in Small d democracy in New Hampshire were as we know the attorney general. ruled. In favor of students who reside there better in school remotely, they can vote New Hampshire Pennsylvania, the supreme. Court with Roberts joining the Liberals for to four. Ruling stand that allowed to count ballots for an additional number of days even if the postmark is not clear that it was cast, by election, day North Carolina and Appellate Court. Did a similar sort of thing bad news out of Alabama which we'll talk about a minute and he said, well, in three of the four cases, the good guys won, and you're my response was when the good guys lose any of them then there's injustice and people have their votes tonight and while people had a lot of hope. this is pre Barrett we'll talk about Barrett's ascension, which is going to happen next Monday apparently in a minute but on the current court forty four with Roberts voting with liberals allow cases that have good results the stand he was not with the Liberals on this Alabama case and. It is incredible to me. That They allowed this voter suppression tactic to stand by a five to three vote. Could you describe the? The thing that is so common sense to me and so fair that the Supreme Court allowed to be struck down in Alabama. Okay. So You're you're not you you're talking about small democracy. and. The Pennsylvania though you want to go to the well, those were Alabama vote for. New Hampshire North Carolina last thirty six hours were in my opinion pro. The right of people to vote Alabama is not even close to that and it's a Supreme Court Without County Barrett on it. So I thought it was worth talking about that one case again, Pre Barrett and what it may bode for the weeks ahead. Yeah I. Mean we should start with the idea that anything. Any terrible vote that you get Barrett is going to be far worse post Barrett. If that issue comes up again before the court and the other thing that's sort of unusual in these a lot of these decisions like the Alabama decision in the Pennsylvania decision, the justices that are dissenting. Are Not. In in Pennsylvania the justices dissented didn't have an explanation in the majority vote on the Alabama case again, no explanation as to why they're doing it. So this is essentially a ban on. so-called curbside voting right because They basically ruled that violate the Americans with Disabilities Act and that you can't have a policy that requires counties to curb side voting even though the argument obvious is that that would be a reasonable accommodation underlaw. So there's a pandemic. there are people who are disabled and disabled an immuno compromise, and so what what this county in Alabama had come up with was that there could be. Voters could be allowed to vote from their cars at the curb side of the polling place, and it simply hand their ballots to a poll worker. Mind you people are putting ballots in two official ballot boxes. So the idea that you have to sort of you know do something more impersonal put it in a an actual mailbox already gotten sort of beyond that and so you know what is it felt vulnerable in in coming into polling places or voting in some other way wanted to vote. In person wouldn't have to wait outside in a crowd of people who many of whom I think especially maybe in Alabama are not wearing masks of course, the Secretary of state in Alabama is a Republican the he that's the person who essentially banned it it to prevent the accommodation and the Supreme Court sided with the Secretary of state, and of course, the did centers where Sonia Sotomayor Steven Briar, and Elena Kagan. Who are just about to be the minority on the court? And your As we've said, repeatedly for those who object when someone like you or me or Marjorie of jared has yet said, the president was incredibly open about why he wanted Barrett confirmed before the election he said publicly like he's you know whoever said a couple of weeks ago the guy's never had an unarmored thought which I think is a fair statement. He said the reason I need on the court is because the courts to decide the election and so in all likelihood a five to three majority or even afford a four tie becomes a five to four six to three vote. and it's not unreasonable in light of the fact that the. Four conservatives if you exclude Roberts have stuck together on all these cases. that at minimum she provides a five to four majority for voter suppression and so what do about that Andrew Cabal in light of the fact that she will be confirmed on a straight party vote I think it's Monday that the full Senate. Is Voting and she'll be on the Supreme Court in Plenty of time, not just for the affordable Care Act hearing on November tenth but on any hearings, should they get their on? people's. Voting in this election. Well, I mean, there isn't seem to be much that Democrats can do to keep her from being on the court. The issue will be how long she sits and how many cases come before the court, and there are some that are coming right up before there's any attempt made to expand the court and and put some balance on the court I mean you know. I don't know how many people are really pay much much attention to this kind of stuff as I do. But what the GOP Senate has done to force this unqualified nominee, she would be an unqualified nominee notwithstanding some of some of you know. her positions on things in her absolute refusal to acknowledge. you know provable positions that she's held on a number of different issues. If she even if she if she had gone through a confirmation, hearing had been fully transparent, she would still be unqualified to be on the Supreme Court of the United States. People should people recognize that she has been on the Court of Appeals for three years. Merrick Garland was on the Court of Appeals for decades and was the chief justice for at. Three of those years and historically we have sought to put people on the Supreme Court of the United States whose length of time on the bench and whose depth and breadth of experience are worthy of that court. It is just so obvious why this unqualified reliable conservative vote is being placed on the court in circumstances lay waste to all of the Senate's procedures, all of its rules. and lay bare a level of naked hypocrisy on this issue given the blocking of over one hundred of Obama's nominees for the lower courts and merit. Garland's the blocking of Merrick garland nomination for the for the Scotus just lay bare a level of naked hypocrisy. This is this is the enforcement of minority rule in my view, it is as clear as apartheid. That this is the enforcement of minority rule because even the polling on on a variety of issues that will come before the Scotus says that Amy colley Barrett is out of step with what the people in the United States of America want when you add all of this to voter suppression. You have. A bloodless coup of government. Being affected by one party and a number of money who stand to benefit from that. So Andrew Kerala, scary Hendry said at the top of the rape for introduced you. The Joe Biden had finally sort of answered. The question about expansion of the quarter court packing is critics to. Call it. By, putting off the decision saying. Bipartisan Group of scholars the report back to him after hearing what your analysis of what? Has Happened. What short of expanding the size of the court? Can a Democratic President Joe Biden a Democratic Senate. If that's what happens do to restore what you'd consider be fair and equitable balance of the court be other than expanding the size of the court. Well. The certainly, Congress can pass legislation I. Mean that you can. You can address a number of issues by passing legislation actually. Oh. You certainly stuff that you can do on voter intimidation. Of Issues. You can yes as long and you just have to be very careful. To make sure that the legislation is is properly worded and can withstand challenge if it does get up to the Scotus but again. But again, you have three separate and coequal branches of government and there and and and you have the action you'll end up having the actions of two of those branches. Trying to trying to enforce a justice on behalf of the people of the United States in anticipation of the injustice of the Third Brash and to some degree. That's exactly what we've been seeing even in the in the current configuration with Republican rule. But I think, yes, they can congress can certainly get legislation through that will fix a number of these things you know by law. I won't stop won't stop a court that you think has bias in its genes from no matter how tightly some do that? You support. That's my question. You support expansion of the court. I'll absolutely you do so do you think Joe Biden? Do you think Joe Biden has an obligation maybe not strategically but I don't know if the word ethics can be applied to politics ethically to be more candid with the American people I. Mean I think it's fair to say that this one hundred and eighty day commission is an attempt to not have to answer the question. Before November third is that not a fair statement but but here's what let me ask you this I get it and I'm Gonna I'm GonNa ask you a question I don't know why we're spending all of this time talking about whether or not Joe Biden does something to expand the court that has been packed by the Republicans for the last at least the last eight years. I don't know I don't understand that why why we're spending time on that is why I wanted to talk about the Pennsylvania thing because people thought that the Pennsylvania ruling was a good ruling, it's actually not a good ruling. Justices. No I mean I listen. My opinion is that the court should be expanded immediately I'm not the president of the United States I'm not. You know I haven't promised to represent all of the people in the United States. So I think he's taking a thoughtful approach to it, but I would I would expand it immediately because I just see that injustice there. But for people who think that there have been small gains for for small democracy in a vote like the Pennsylvania votes not true. So the Pennsylvania the Pennsylvania Supreme Court had ruled that S-. Ballots that were mail in ballots but had been, but we're postmarked by election day could be counted. Pennsylvania Republicans challenged that and they made to absolutely ridiculous Well, what? That is that is clearly ridiculous. The second argument. At least persuaded the The four four dissenting of the three dissenting justices. But the the first argument they made is that you you you can't count ballots that are postmarked by third because the federal a federal law establishes a National Election Day. Which is insane to make that argument because it doesn't say that the votes have to be counted by the third it says they have to be cast but the second. Argument they made was that the Pennsylvania's Surpreme Court was usurping The authority of the legislature which does have the constitutional right to prescribe the manner of elections by saying that ballots could be even if they were received after they'll postmarked by the third even they could be counted after the third. And again, what you have are these dissenting justices to of home. Were on Bush v Gore. Two of whom with warlords, on Bushby Gore and if Amy Coney Barrett Skoda, she will be the third lawyer who represented the GOP Bushby Gore, who is sitting on the Supreme Court. So you've got a Leo, Cavenaugh, got Gorsuch, and Thomas. Dissenting without without any real explanation as to why they're dissenting. But there signaling that if this comes back, this issue comes back before them this issue of state steak. State Supreme Courts saying making rulings on the counting of ballots past election day. They've made it clear that if that comes back up post-election. There's a Bush v Gore in the offing. Right, they're inclined to vote along those lines to make it possible for a legislators Republican run legislatures in swing states to you know elect elect doors that will hand the vote to Donald Trump. So it's not really a victory. It's a short term victory much as Pennsylvania will be allowed to count ballots that our postmarked by November third, but it is it. Is Very potentially a long-term major loss for free and fair elections and democracy and courts historically have stood in the space where voter intimidation voter suppression lie to to issue rulings especially state courts to issue rulings preventing that, and what these four dissenting justices are saying is we're going to take away that protection from the American people and let highly partisan legislatures decide. Who's vote counts and who's doesn't, and that is incredibly dangerous. What's the word used to describe yourself in this conversation ten minutes ago, com Yeah I'm I feel in all seriousness? Break. I'm serious. How are you how I mean? I don't think you're factual retelling of where things are can really be disputed. Some people may say it's great that they're going to. Essentially, decide the election they may disagree with you on that but I don't think they can disagree with your facts. What's is doing to you? Oh the fact that I'm not running amok in the street like you know, Kinda just waving a meat cleaver and banging on people's car windows is astonishing to me. That I haven't reached that point yet I mean I know it really is anxiety making it really you know I just you know. I. Genuinely encouraged by the number of people that are voting early and strengthen those numbers of volume but I hope people understand this is the last shot. Did another shot doesn't come after this? Not With Amy Barrett on on the Supreme Court and not if Donald Trump wins a second term, you know democracy as people have known it, their entire lives will cease to exist and that's not an understatement. It's just true. It's already part of the way they're it's already wounded. but it has the wounds you can live with. You can recover from if if things you know Joe Biden elected and if there's a way to sort of bring balance to the Supreme Court. But all the things that people think they want, you know for people who are saying, this is great like put her on the court and this is great. You know trump should win. History of the world that the very people that share on autocracy authoritarianism. They don't get it until it comes for them, but it always comes for them. So. We we just have a tiny little bit of time left I don't want to. Ask You a question that's going to send you racing for the meat cleaver but. I'm so sorry I do. But I do want to quickly ask you because I think a lot of us are trying to reconcile what we're understanding about the grand jury in the and the Briana Taylor case, and when we heard from this anonymous grand jury Earlier this week who by the way had to appeal the fact that they even speak out publicly who said, you know what we weren't even given the task of indicting any of these officers so I guess my question to you is this is this normal and how? I guess it is normal because grand juries are given a task and they they did their job here. But the fact that we're not finding out about this until now. It's actually pretty extraordinary in any other day. You know just to just to make jim lap and he has a day. This would be the segment was completely sending me over the edge. So thank you for adding it onto the. The But even the judge characterized the allowing this this grand jury to speak publicly and is actually to to render that want us to be publicly about it He even he acknowledged use the word that this is extraordinarily extraordinarily relief for an extraordinary situation and what makes it extraordinary is that the Attorney General Daniel Cameron. Essentially lied. To. The public and hid behind the grand jury. And said they, they basically said they chose not to return an indictment and what this anonymous juror is saying we will never give is that we were never given an opportunity to return indictments. You didn't even see charges against these officers other than the ones. which we returned indictments and those with a reckless endangerment ones for the single officer who fired into someone elses home. and the judge is not standing for this. You know sort of brazen misrepresentation lie to the public that you know one cameras got his dirty work done. He basically went out and laid it at the feet of grand jurors is though they were unable to process you know evidence or they consciously chose to ignore evidence that he put before them and that's not true and this juror filed a motion. I have never heard of this in in in sixteen years a prosecuting I've never heard a juror filing emotion to be allowed to speak publicly. About an injustice like this. So it is extraordinary and it forced Cameron's hand. Remember the judge ordered him to turn over the grand jury transcripts and he tried to delay it. He got a delay of a week. but ultimately, you know to to make them public but he fought it tooth and nail once it became clear that his deception was going to was going to be exposed, and now the grand juries are being allowed to talk about what was presented to them and what wasn't present it to them. I think he's in a lot of trouble. but it is one of the worst manipulations of the grand jury process which already a nurse to the benefit of a prosecutor and not not you know unjustly. So it is the prosecution bringing the charges but this is one of the most naked manipulations of graduate process I've ever heard of in my entire life. I've never see I've never heard seen anything like this in my entire life. At lucky for us since we don't want you to become a so cleaver ready or whatever. You said a couple of minutes ago run on time. So we cannot discuss today how the sackler bought themselves out of another. Corner I would argue despite the size of the settlement we'll do that next week Andrea. I was GONNA save. Pleasure, to talk to you it was good to talk to you and we'll talk more. Thank you so much yourself. Great to be with you Andrew Carroll joins US every week for law and order sees the former Suffolk County Sheriff Secretary of Public Safety She's now the CEO of send well coming up the Museum of Fine Arts goes the physical distance reopening amid pandemic with an ambitious large-scale Bosque show the conversation continues on eighty nine seven. GBH Boston public. Radio. Welcome back to Boston public radio. I'm Jim Brady Jerk bonus sitting in for Marjorie when it comes to adapting to the pandemic museums might have an advantage after all they've been in the practice of keeping museum goers physically distance from masterpieces for decades keeping museum goers distance from one another as a different challenge altogether together, a challenge at the Museum of Fine Arts is now addressing. Reopen last month now has a new attraction, the long-awaited exhibit writing the future basket and the hip hop generation join us along talk about what the museum experiences like in Corona virus times and the changes that are happening at the MFA is Matthew Teitelbaum. He's the end and Graham Gun director of Museum of Fine Arts. Match, Tom It's great to have you thanks for calling in. Thanks for having me. I Matthew. So you've now been open for a little while you open partially with the art of the Americas and those galleries in that wing and I know that you'll expand next month hopefully open more and i. wonder what it's like to be open right now especially, when we see numbers rising around I, wonder how that all computes into how the museums operating? Well so to to. It's great to be opened a museum exist to serve our public, engage our public to create convening and give a community sense itself. It is great to be open. It was really tough for a whole range of reasons to be closed. Opening up is our purpose and. The pleasure that people are expressing is is really really rewarding. we're keeping very close tabs on public health issues our biggest from the very beginning, which create a safe space wanted a safe space for our staff. We want our base for our visitors. We're keeping very close tabs. We've had no incident of any health flare ups any concern. People, are being brought into the museum with care thoughtfulness. it's it's quite actually quite a good time to crtv because it's not very crowded purposely. So purposely so and we're in touch with public health officials. There's nothing that suggests we have to check protocols are. Always been conservative and You know we did one of those things that. We need one of those things where you know the ask people as their. Experiences like one of those word clouds where you actually see what word to people who the most and the three words that people use to describe their experience. was people felt safe. There were other words they were like open good distancing engaging. But that Word Seitz was the biggest word in the word cloud at not reading to I'll tell you. We'd never risk taking a word cloud on this radio show. Let me tell you right now. So How? I know you had to let some staff go and I was actually thinking of a conversation I had last week with Keith Lockhart and freelance musician with POPs in the BSO on television where they talk not just about the pain that these workers were suffering during financial pain and other during the pandemic. But also that there fear that these dedicated long-term players in your case workers would be lost to. The orchestra in your case, the museum are you worried about that? Your staff I have to say I just have anecdotal experience but this is so terrific and welcoming and knowledgeable. You worried about the long term impact of this on staffing the. Short answer is yes. I'm concerned about the sector as a whole We all exist on our revenues trapping people give come share their experiences advocate for us and without that the whole structure becomes a bit my word wobbly My biggest concern is for the individual You know none of us went to director school to learn how do they offer and reductions in force properly. You know we did it with compassion. We admitted benefits. We tried our very, very best, but none of us a took the jobs that we did. To. Oversee reduction force you want to grow. You want to be more important and impassable. You want more people involved including the staff level. But the sector is undergoing up very big shift and we're not sure what's going to happen. One thing that's happened but very positive positive is our move to digital. We you know their institutions across Austin across America starts to really she knew to in some cases augmented in some cases, really good digital program, and that's creating new audiences and it's creating audiences from beyond Boston. are very exciting but how that gets blended. With. The traditional museum physical site. Exhibitions Galleries painted at the question we're all working through and I might say and I don't mean to. Be. Unduly. OPTIMA. Optimistic. But as we move into digital and as we move into new ways to present content, there will be new job opportunities so it won't be a static environment, but I think you're absolutely right to say. Is there a worry cast the question? Is there a worry about the way sector shifting and the? Because none of us really know. What about the experiences that we museum visitors have every arts leader I've spoken through to during this pandemic has talked about the fact that their organization is going to be very different on the other side of this. There has been such tremendous loss in resources and staffing and revenue especially in museums definitely in theater, which we don't even know in that will come back that it won't be the same to you do have a an understanding yet of what you're not going to be able to do in the future that you had been able to, and maybe even take for granted or realize you would take him for granted not knowing that we could be. Confronted with such a thing as a pandemic. I don't WanNa get too technical and crashes, but let me say that haven't yet heard. Museum or art leaner say that mission of their institutions going to change. What we're all talking about is within the mission in our case bring. Together to create meaningful experiences with art that in that eliminate our society. Within that mission. we will come up with different strategies and those different strategies will be dependent on our ability to find the resources, they create the structure to deliver our promise. So having out to your question. The things I think you're going to see is in an environment in which international travelers curtailed in which insurance rates are going all over the place. In which the whole ability to move things and to collaborate is taking on a different Ceiling you're GONNA see fewer large international exhibitions and greater reliance on our collection. In order to tell the stories of art now. What I think is also happening and. Slow to come a good development is that we're questioning our histories and most institutions are whether it's racial recommending whether it's gender equity whether it's issues around social justice there are issues that. That by the way are Geek in our collections that are coming to the surface. So what does that mean I think you're gonNA start seeing us with more and leaders in our community whether it's academics, artists, other cultural workers to bring their voices into the institution because need to rely on those close to us to create experiences. That I think is a good thing that I think a very good thing. We want to talk about those artists, Matthew Teitelbaum Director of the MFA in a second but since you brought up racial reckoning. I was GonNa say it's going on in the world outside the museum but of course, whether it's going on as a debatable question, there's an attempt at had going on outside the museum. You're in a unique situation where it's going on inside the museum I think most listeners remember in mid two, thousand, nineteen when the kids from I think it was called the Henry White Helen y Davis Leadership Academy. There were allegations of racism row, racial profiling a year. Later you reaching agreement with the Attorney General, there's now a director of belonging and inclusion. You have an African American President I think for the first time of the board but apparently, that's not all that will come out of this incident from. A year plus ago. What else is on the agenda as part of this arrangement with the Attorney General Matthew Well, you know the attorney, General and they. Came through historic agreement that allowed us to. Deepen our commitment to things. We already doing it didn't imply that we would put resources behind it. Happy to do so. Do, so and it has to do a whole range of things whether it staff diversity whether it's board representation whether it's protocols on the way in which we engage school groups ironic that without having. Them but these are all things that started to shift I would say many of them were shifting before they were routed in our strategic plan. The notion of a museum that belong to all of Boston was core was core to the way in which we developed. Two thousand seventeen and we have many many initiatives. Including the way we hire. Reward. dwayne. Wish we look for greater diversity at A. Board leadership and these we'll continue I think that the hiring of our new senior director of inclusion is something by the way which was not asked for the museum in. Understanding general but something we committed to because it was consistent with. Change believe it necessary and that's specific position. Is. tied to the notion of. How do we. Train. And prepare staff and volunteers. Museum. To engage with our audiences around issues like belonging inclusion. So we have a very. Simple way of saying that he can't be externally what you are internally. So we don't have a way of relating to each other way in which we relate to our visitors by expressing the values that we have institution we won't say that proper invitation so. we're old she's been with us now for For just six weeks we'll be in fat to help us understand how create. Language. And procedures do engage with our audiences truly welcoming way and there were already started terry exciting. So Matthew Teitelbaum Director of the MFA. This leads into a debate that's raging in the art world right now Looking at the issues of racial reckoning of understanding who gets to tell what story there's an exhibition that was to open and be shared by four different museums including the Museum of Fine Arts of Philip Guston and it has been put put on hold because of For people don't legendary artists of the Twentieth Century for images that he rendered of the Ku Klux Klan, not of course endorsing them but his own comment commentary on racism in America there's a huge debate as I mentioned within the art world with a lot of artists especially artists of color pushing back saying there is no way that this show shouldn't go forward. It's clear what his commentary was. What is your take as one of the museums? This show about whether or not they should go forward and why it shouldn't happen right now. Well, you know his wife forward Interesting. This moment is we were we were accused of cancelling of censoring and I mean, we were very clear from the beginning that we were pausing So I think it's really important to say this is not an issue around civil custom. You know he's a great artist is images were deeply deeply critical of additional power structures and embedded racism in American society that which is 'cause he took this on. so one might say why? Not to show these images, well, you know what? museums I believe haven't done the work to create the to use the word hospitality the way in which we create the proper and fair conversation imagery, what imagery and frankly. I. Again. Just alone I made it reminded museum colleagues and in dialogue with the NSA staff. My feeling was that this wasn't the time. Without more preparation to actually engage a way of understanding what it meant for this artist to make these images fifty years ago but to present them in this moment. This moment in which the Klu Klux Klan are being a vote again in which they are symbol of a certain set of values and I think that we have to understand. But the pack of the were made with such power conviction empathy serious intent in nineteen, sixty, nine, nine, hundred, seventy doesn't mean they re they are received neutrally. In the museum today and that that's the main issue that I want to talk about other stuff up about it over the course of the next while, which is, what is the response we of the museum to create the space for understanding and how do we assure ourselves that we're creating the right kinds of conversations with the right inputs and I think that we need to do Morrison Institution I think our sector has to do more but I, think the MFA has to do more inviting more. Voices in to create a diverse understanding of how something is looked at from different points of view. But question that's being posed to is that some of these works and I don't know who is lending I I would assume that some of these works are already on view in museums. The catalog has been published and is out there and there are people who say that the work should stand for itself that the values that Guston. That the messages the passion that guston brought to this should standstill. Yeah and I, respect that point of view I i. don't I don't think that it for me to comment on how their institutions contextualized them display of works whether it's passenger other artists whose images create. Response in diverse audiences whatever audience is nothing judgment. What I will say here, we were proud to do the book. It's a really great book. It's got a lot of points of view that many of these issues I just think there's a different by the way people might disagree with me there's a difference between reading a book. Gauging. With. Ideas. And in a physical space. With an institution that has one hundred, fifty year history that's presenting something like these images. Without. Appropriate context that's all and I. Think we can get there and we will get there and we're going to be very, very proud. Do the expedition You Matthew Teitelbaum One more thing just from me on this gusting thing you obviously come. At it from one direction is director of a great museum obviously charities and art critic I am a consumer only. I have to say when I read about this, my attitude was almost exactly the opposite if not now when I assume that you and your fellow museum leaders even before there was George Floyd in everybody's mind were concerned about context and all of the issues we're confronting just not as immediately for the years that you're preparing for this. So I I really don't understand in twenty twenty four right now seems almost like you said, you obviously didn't cancel of just postponed. It seems like an eternity away at a time when this country finely I'm not sure but finally May. Address these issues so Why weren't you ready? Why weren't you three colleagues ready? You know you could ask that question about why the museums create and share the history of they do. Why aren't we ready to question some of the? Embedded. hierarchies and assumptions in elections we hope and the answer is because long hard work and because the questions are still being formulated and because Work in concert with others to achieve it and my own view. Yes. We have to work more closely with our staff around guessing points of view we have work are closely in our community different points of view because I think one thing we've done is too little. About how things are received museums have thought a lot about how to resenting the whole question of how they seed in particular moment. Very important. I, you know by the way I do think twenty twenty wars is you know we're we're moving towards. Doing something earlier than that, and we can meet and earlier moment you know the the are making these judgments in a pandemic. Our institutions are in financial challenging situation and where the notion of collaboration being questioned but you know what I would want you to remember I really want you to remember. That you know we're having this conversation. Exhibitions we've ever organized. Reading the future drama Shell Hippo Generation has just opened by they soda in the next number of weeks and ticket sales are going very well. You know you have to put it in the context of an institution that is reframing some of the. Assumptions that have been embedded within it for hundred fifty years and I believe we will be judged to shouldn't that honors Pat? Things carefully about embedded history. Honors those people look at the Monet. Show. Up in the middle of November all drawn from our collect because leaders in this community us to have a great and extraordinary collection of nineteenth century French art, and we do. I think you're going to look back and you're going to say you know they got it pretty pretty well, they got this notion of honoring the path but questioning some. So I think it's really important that the gust conversation the framed as. How does our audience receive it? What is the context reception in the institution of the whole and one of the context is? If follows the basket exhibition which changes the dialogue and understanding of new. York. Heart a particular involvement with Matthew just and I think you enjoy doing this you stole my thunder because I was going to transition into bosque which I was just talking about it on the radio this morning as well, and which by the way we're featuring open studio on Friday night too. But this is an exhibition that you had in the works even prior to the pandemic and a lot of the social conversations that we're having right now especially around race. And this is groundbreaking show. Tell us about the conversation you're having here that that moves people beyond just Jean Michel Basquiat. The one figure most people do know from the nineteen seventies and eighties in that vibrant New York Scene Art scene. Yep. So I'm a I'm a huge. Fan I just think that he created an extended a language art which is a very rare thing. and I'm very respectful of this shows that have been done in the past I actually. Was Part of the organization at one when I was director in Toronto. Here comes the. Okay. So Laid the groundwork love love the love work that's been done this caller ship. This is the first exhibition. The. I looked John Show basket in the context of his peers. Are just color. Working. Alongside him. Literally and figuratively. To create our interchange a dialogue. So there are. Shifting other artists in the tradition more or less. All of whom worked with him alongside him. They influenced each other and he will see in the mission work they together work. They did in response to one another. Paintings that were influenced by music music that was influenced by poetry and you will see. that. Community for in front of you and that's what I'm excited about with this exhibition because you know I either I believe I believe that museums trick community they were committee and they ended up creating community. So a great artist. In his Milia in conversations that helped shape him. And also shine a light of some of the other artists who frankly some actives and some. Jesse forgotten it's a pretty exciting moment it a re setting of a certain history. You know I lived in New York City. Obviously had a very short life I lived in New York City when He was doing much of his creation. So the good news before you go Matthew Teitelbaum is you've got this exhibit that I think everybody's GonNa WanNa. See The bad news is that you just say it sold out. The next week next to. Its. Name. So. So please briefly is sold out for the next few we which is great. It tells me that there's real interests that we create some profile. You're helping US create profiles notes on. because he is an exhibition that rewards and expand our understanding and you know it's a joyous exhibition to see by Mid-november to start opening up again, you can book today you can book your time and again I need to say word cloud people. Say I mean we've created a way of seeing the exhibition isn't comfortable and reassuring. Matthew Work Cloud Teitelbaum. It's talking to you. Thank you so much for your time. To be with you. Glad to have this moment to share some. Slow you so much Matthew Teitelbaum is the ANAGRAM gun director of the Museum of Fine Arts coming up for opening up the lines and asking you if art the generates controversy should be exempt from censorship or is everything fair game keep your dial on eighty nine seven. Gbh. Boston public radio. Back to Boston Public Radio Jim. Brady jared bone sitting in for Marjorie. If you're just tuning in, we're talking to Matthew Teitelbaum he's director of the MFA about his decision along with other museum directors three others. In fact, postponed a major X. Exhibit of Philip guston's work at issue or paintings that feature cartoonish to collects clan figures doing everyday kinds of things. The Augusta in retrospect was first open I believe in June the National Gallery of art in DC would then move to the MFA in Houston then to the tate modern in London and finally here to the NFL. The directors of the museums released this joint statement. Here's what they said postponing the exhibition until the time at which we think that the powerful message of social and racial justice in Centerville, cousins work can be more clearly interpreted. But now isn't the time as I asked Mr Teitelbaum when our president sympathizing with white supremacists went is the right time to provoke thoughts about racism and white supremacy, a larger issue jars, and we'll take your calls at eight seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy one is it ever right to I know matthew? Wouldn't use this term sensor or in this case the. So that there is quote context whatever that means or should art be published. A should be presented and let people draw their own conclusions numbers eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy, you're the expert. So what's the answer? Censorship is a word that applies in doesn't apply here as I. Know that I know as Matthew Teitelbaum was just saying. They're taking this time and one thing I did hear from him that I am. Informing, my own decision is he like the other museum directors are listening internally to to what people are saying to make this decision but ultimately, the decision, they have made this to take this this career survey of Philip Guston and delay it until twenty, twenty four so that they can, as they argue, take more time to contextualized. Just, a little backstory of Philip Guston. He is somebody who is a major artist of the twentieth century. He was very politically active, very politically engaged i. think you explained this in your introduction but his images of the Ku Klux Klan are cartoonish. He is not supporting. He was not supporting the Ku Klux Klan. This was his commentary on society at the time continuing his political activism that had started his career in New York and continued all throughout his life. A lot of people were very excited about this survey including a lot of artists. A lot of those artists have now turned around and they've been hammering these museum saying, this is not appropriate to not show this work into delay it and I guess my thought is I don't understand you know as we just talked about with Matthew Teitelbaum why it isn't being shown right now I understand that these images can be very very difficult i. say this as a white person. I'm not a black person for whom these could be especially traumatic I think to see images of the clan but I think contextualized in in this survey. It makes more sense and it should be available to the public. I tend to argue in favor of artists who are trying to deliver a message where commenting on ourselves on our society I. Think there is a way to put this in context for our times. I most recently saw the MFA did this with the Gone Sheila and Gustaf clip show a couple of years ago. This was a show that premiered just in the height of the metoo movement. The MFA was very concerned is very concerned in piece. I was doing at the time what it would be to show Sheila who had been convicted of statutory rape to to show this work they immediately responded by putting labels on the wall and suddenly they could have an education around us. I don't know why this would now take until twenty twenty, four trump to do that I'm so glad you and by the way when I said twenty, twenty, four, which ready said, well, it could be. Sooner than that. By the way I'm not against context I want to be clear and I'm not an absolute absolute I. Don't know enough frankly about are to be an absolutist I know my tendency as again as consumers I said to Matthew Teitelbaum is on the side of putting that out there and I. The point I think made at the end, we're going to get to your calls at eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy, and by the way again, it's not. We're not really asking about the Guston thing because a lot of people haven't seen her don't know. About his work we're talking about art in general in these kinds of decisions that are made the context that would be appropriate I. Don't know if it's necessary but appropriate I'm with you would seem to be be the product of a long conference call and then you do the work for a week or whatever the hell it is. I don't think it seems to me and I mean, this is respectfully as possible. I don't know a Matthew Teitelbaum while I'm a huge fan of the. MFA. They worked on this for years as I said to him, it isn't like this was a non racially charged world prior to Memorial Day and the killing of George Floyd. So it sounds to me like it's just the controversy avoidance kind of thing and art should be the last thing that should be I mean you of all people know this should be it should provoked controversy and discussion not causes avoidance. So let's take some calls eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, do it jared pick what you'd like let's go to start with Blake calling from Newport Rhode Island High Blake Hello Blake. I can hear me. Oh. Thanks for raising the topic Jim I agree with you I think the. Question of why isn't now the right time is about question I think we can push back matthew tied up. His Great Work Museum directors worked really hard but I think the question then becomes how do we create the proper context to make the right time and make this conversation something we can't have now. Interestingly, as we also talked about in that interview just now, the catalog that accompanies this exhibition has already been written and it's already been. Point you made I haven't seen it myself at Sebastian smee wrote about it in the Washington Post and it has essays by as he described it to of this country's most celebrated and politically minded black artists. And so that that that work really has been done in the context. I wasn't even aware. I knew about the Cadillac I didn't know that was in there well, that all even further underscores the notion that they're ready to go blake. Thank you so much recall. So what do you think is the even if you don't think they're malevolent intentions, it is controversy avoidance is it not? It's a desire not to offend. People is that I think that's exactly what it is. I. Think we're in a moment where we We know there's a lot of her know you to use the phrase the surface a few years ago there were there are trigger warnings are things that make. That caused a great deal of pain. However, we get through that pain also by having these conversations by talking about it and then moving forward in it we don't get through it by casting it aside, pushing it off to the future and just not having the conversation at all I. Totally Agree Jurors from watertown. Hi. Hi Thank you for taking the call. I go much support the all of this pressure on the museum having this show but I think that there's an element that's not being discussed in the US is the obvious one about any sort of islands that might take place with this current political situation if such show were to be hung and just playing to the public and I just think an element of things. So close to the White House and they're in DC and there's strong -bility maybe the museum wants to you know even though they are concerned about public the public social impact moving forward but they also have to take care of safety of visitors and also Take care of the art and any sort of thought that they're borrowing this from other other collections. It really you know that is their one of their primary roles and showing this is that they do take care of that and then it's not damaged or there isn't that kind of risk. If I may interrupt to do you not agree though your first argument about potentially provoking violence or whatever exactly said that's a pretty slippery slope. Is it not a in this kind of charged environment? You end up with. Bland America I I. Wait. So let me be very clear I'm very well informed. I actually given a lot of talks about diversity and art I am credibly in support of that in general. I feel that even if we if they were to postpone it, even two months I'm hoping that that will be all the all of the waiting process that they need in order to safely hostess I do not agree with you know. So any sort of Banning this sort of discussion or allowing that kind of. Public Forum to take place to discuss this this ongoing issue and in Genoa absolutely support it. I just think in terms of the museum saying right now is not the time I. think that you know knowing what I know I think that there might be a little pressure on the board there to just hitting please not do this at this very moment with the elections coming up and I'm hoping that that by the wins and I'm hoping that this kind of show will be able to be shown shortly and can be done. So an a more safe environment where the the powers to be take the appropriate action to protect all. By the way this is not an attack on us. So I'm sorry if you took immediate it that way at all I think you raise legitimate point it just don't happen to agree with it. They're also working with rob Pro Black Gibbs. So we've talked a lot about here who's celebrates. African American, life and achievement. That provokes a lot of white people. In. So should we hold on Gibbs work temporarily? So that so a whites who don't like to see black celebrated or not provoked I mean it's just. It's a that's the slippery slope that I was talking about I I guess and you know. Part of this issue is that it's been national gallery of art and it is right down the street from the White House. And I think that that is the primary reason that I'm fortunately is nothing brought up here. Okay because. We, gotTa do to thank you very much for your call. We appreciate your thoughts and I think we did hear a little bit of that and with Matthew Teitelbaum said is well with resources. But I think Judith also makes a very valid point is yet, and as you said Jim, this is a this is also an image issue museums which are already confronting a lot and realized that they are being held accountable for A. Lot more probably don't want to take on a significant amount of more more D- outside of Washington. I would argue again that this is the right moment especially for math you just said you can walk into the museums now because of social distancing because so few tickets are sold per hour and feel like you have it to yourself, which means you won't have the crowds. You probably actually have less of a security risk. Because, social distancing museums. Next. Year, we got an asteroid in calling from Gloucester high-acid. I how are you good so I sort of an absolutist in this I don't think that you should ever ever censor art even the art that we find absolutely reprehensible I think that I think Jim you're correct. You can put it in context and there's actually very. Great ways, helpful ways to put it in context but I think this is absolutely the time and I'm a little bit concerned and I don't think Judas meant to come off this way. But to sort of intimate that we have this huge uprising because and these are very very you know. Kind of in your face they're. Already. Very provocative I mean and they are powerful just even looking at you know like in a book or on the screen they are powerful, but there's also no question on. WHAT UNQUOTE? On What concerns me? Is that I think that. What is sort of when we say we have to sort of? You know make some space and bring people along and stuff like that. I don't think that they're really worried about the masses I think that worried about their boards in their funders. That's what I think. They're worried about because you know as much as we like to think that it's you know. Air quotes. Those people would be you know sort of white supremacists. There are a lot of people who have a you know who fund didn't have a lot of money who? These, these would be uncomfortable for them. And I think that we have to understand you know racism is not. An systemic racism, it's an thing that's down on the ground. It really goes all the way up to that ivory tower boardrooms. Good call appreciate it. Thank you so much. For making it you know we all I mean as Chuck Todd said, does we we're talking to him about the fact that this is two weeks ago then it'd be agreed to schedule The townhall directly opposite Biden's and he said something about. The decision and I asked them follow up question and he said, well, we all have bosses so I think that's another. Variation on asteroids. Theme I. Think. We can squeeze one more quick call. Jared. If you'd like. All right let's go to doug calling from. Oxford Hi Doug Hello Doug. I just a quick comment about being you know a lot of calls of commented on this being the right time. I think it's a little bit of a if you'll allow me perverse serendipity, it's the right time. Or the wrong time for the right topic I guess. And it can drive some evoke emotional reactions, which is what every artist I think hopes for, and that kind of leads me to my second point and that is, if feels a little bit like a filter being placed on the aw on the art itself when curator says. I, it's not the right time to display the art. It's not the right way to display the we have to contextualized. We have to change maybe people's perception of what the art is when they walk in to see, and that feels a little bit like a filter on the art to me. That was that was another great call. Thank you Doug. Thank you all for your thoughts. We appreciate at the same time in a lot of museums or removing labels and and thinking of ways to just have people have even more pure interpretations. Is that true with art museums are? Museum. has experimented with that because what they noticed and I think peabody Essex has been doing this too because they've they in have even done neurological studies where you wear these glasses I went through this process actually and they paid attention to where your eyes went. How much. Right reading label versus how much time is spent actually engaging with the art. This is the other interesting thing about the pandemic right now is there a lot of people are taking away while labels because they don't want people congregating around them and I think it does make for more pure experiences really appreciate what curator's WanNa tell me but I want to formulate my thoughts to well I'm glad we had them. Thanks to you by the way in the discussion. Coming up the trump administration takes on big tech Andy. NOCCO joins us to talk more about that and other things on eighty nine seven Gbh Boston public radio. Back to Boston Public Radio Jim Brady and. I was GONNA say. I know you're not marguerite, but I even said that the last time. I'm Murray with. Anne case he is jared bond that I know margins of today join us to go over the latest headlines at the intersection of Tech Policy and commerce I know who he is his andy. NOCCO and he's a tech writer and blogger. You can find his work at not go dot com you can follow him. It is H.. NATO O. Alot India NOCCO. A handy. So we have been hearing all of this conversation about Google and the antitrust laws over the last week and you kind of I think one of those little existential moments you think wow, they really do control everything especially large part of my life. So break this down for us how much they do control and and how much they might not control if the government has its way. well depends on depends on how how anxious Google gets the defend themselves here we in the news couple of weeks ago was a huge huge judiciary judiciary committee report about all the biggest tech companies. This has nothing to do with that, but it really does make statements case that all these workers are too big and maybe need some sort of regular ritory action. This however is more serious on Tuesday Department of Justice actually filed antitrust action against Google. essentially sent a settling on how they handle the the Google search product saying that it's how they operate it is anti anti-competitive to let anybody else in they control the market they point out the that we we even use the Google something as a substitute For Web searches. But this is very, very serious because it's a sixty page document very very clearly laid things out and they're clearly the tournament justice is clearly trying to do the exact same attack that they used against Microsoft to the successfully in two thousand, one on pretty much the same bound. So they're basically running the same playbook and hoping hoping that will pick. Andy I. Often embarrassed when I say what I'm about to say, but I'll say it anyway I sort of feel about this like I feel about. Amazon. which is any sane person knows that it is absurd to suggest that Amazon and Google or not bad for competition I mean you've got to be an idiot to think otherwise what is Amazon control fifty percent of the retail market online or something Google searches I mean you've advertised not advertise promoted duck. Oh, for privacy reasons on the show, what are they up to two percent of the search Margaret or three percent or whatever it is. So the prime trying to make which I should just make is okay really bad for competition but just like Amazon sadly, really good for the consumer Google is amazingly good and efficient and Amazon, has really good prices so. Don't play lawyer I know you're I'm not suggesting your. So what do you do with that? That problem? Yeah that's the department justice. Big Problem. They have to address the pro you have to address the question we asked but what if people are using Google search because it's simply the best tool for the job? Say Thank. You. And and I'm also very concerned about action like this because I do think that all the big tech companies apple facebook Google. Google Amazon. They really are now big enough and they've had enough replay in the in the country and in business too that they should be required to occasionally stand up and defend their actions and explain themselves however even if what they're when these companies doing is anti-competitive or actually actively runs afoul of antitrust law, the question should always be what's in the best interest of the consumers Now the Department of Justice most biggest claim that. They are preventing other search engines like duck duck go from achieving a really really good position in the search search marketplace because Google has sort of eaten up all the different ways that basic user would would want to institute a search. For instance, Apple they pay apple charges for being the default search engine on all I all I thought this is my. Last time it was disclosed the Google pays. Apple Fourteen forty million dollars. They also make deals with handset makers to say that, hey, look if you make us the default search tool on your on your phone, we will we will cut you in on a cut of what we make from from advertising and from what we learn based on using those search results. So and the thing is, and this is this is used as sort of a smoking gun by the DOJ but Google, of course, they had a block post, raise it go on Tuesday as soon as the suit was filed. They were very very offensively pointing out that will go into the supermarket. You notice the reason why the coke and Pepsi are the end caps and at a height and the mister pip and the Moxie kind of look for that's because even the supermarkets they don't give away all the prime placement for free they charge for it. Now, there are a lot of really good arguments the DOJ is making, but that really is the central thing they're going to have to get the the reason why Google has dominance and searches because. They were the first ones to really get into a serious product and they've been developing it for over a decade and they're really really good heavens though that's the sort of things that the DOJ if they're if they're going to be able if they're not gonna be locked into just a very very, you know limited view of what antitrust means that's the hill they're gonNA have to climb. Jorgen NOCCO. So Andy, sure. There are a lot of people like me thinking okay. All is not lost. World might be upside down and everything is getting shaken out. But at least the holidays are coming and we can have some traditions and slide into our some of our comfort zones and now courtesy you I find out it's the Great Pumpkin Charlie, round is not airing which means yes all now is completely lost. What is happening here that this guy network staple has gone away. It is the way the world So Apple. Has. Their Apple TV streaming services they watched last year they locked up sold rights to all of all the Charlie Brown specials They're also producing brand new Charlie Brown specials and series. That's good. But that means that for the first time I think literally ever since these since the traditional specials have been aired, it's not airing on broadcast television if you go to ABC networks webpage for Charlie Brown and thanksgiving excuse me Halloween special you got his. Ominously content not found worse than that. You can't even buy it digitally anymore. I went to go to the Amazon digital store to go to the Google play store even if you go to items to try to buy a digital copy of it that you then sort of own and use whatever you want, they've been removed from those stores so. The only way you can see any of these specials is to go to TV DOT apple, DOT COM or launched the apple TV plus APP on whatever device you have that happen to be able to run it, and that's that's terrible. The only good news is that apple really realizes that taking away Charlie Brown Christmas from us is not a good look. Not GonNa. It's not gonNA. Make US happy. To Good Heavens. The cooperating the what what what kind of ear pods, the grinch wearing. The. Same Way are allowing the basically the day before the day. After each one of these holidays, it's available for free on on Apple TV plus if you again if you whether you're paying the subscription fee or not you can access the website or the APP and watch it for free without paying any money but that's still that it's the what we tend. To forget is up the number of households that don't have decent broadband and don't have like electronic infrastructure for streaming is a lot there. That's a lot more houses than you would imagine. Now those people are totally cut off from what has been a generation after generation tradition and it also points out the This is this is the reason why as I speak. Some Air Samara as I speak. Pile of CD's computer. Like next next to my. I I. Had I had to prove through through their actual noise. Yeah. That's why I if there's an album that I, really like if there's a TV show I, really like our movie that really like I will I will buy it on disk and then rip it and put it onto like my personal my personal media server in my house because that's the only way you can get something and still have access to it all these all these great pieces of content there being sucked up. By individual streaming channels and then used as sort of a hey if you if you wanna see the star wars movies, this is the only place. You can go see it. If you WANNA see this content, this is the only place you can go see it from now on and so it's it's a terrible terrible turn of events because it's like we're being stripped of cultural heritage in a way I think that's beautifully put actually. So not go could you I watched the press conference with John Ratcliffe the director of National Intelligence and and Christopher Ray the head of the FBI last night for those who missed that. Here's a little bit of what Radcliffe had to say. About seven, forty, five last night about foreign election interference. We have confirmed that some voter registration information has been obtained by Iran. Separately by Russia. This data can be used by foreign actors to attempt to communicate false information to registered voters that they hope will cause confusion. So chaos and undermined your confidence in American Democracy Chuck Todd said was this morning? The undermining is not what Radcliffe said. The undermining is of the credibility of the intelligence community courtesy of Donald Trump and people like radcliffe, and so they don't even believe a lot of us don't even believe what Radcliffe as say but putting aside that attitude, could you describe briefly in English exactly what they were describing last night let's assume for purposes of this discussion what they said was accurate and real what exactly are the Iranians and the Russians doing their Andy Well a whole bunch of voters in Alaska Arizona and Florida start getting threatening email purportedly from the proud boys. Threatening Hey, we're a- have actually one of them in front of me we are in possession of information email address telephone everything you're currently registered as a Democrat and we this because we have gained access to the entire voting infrastructure, you will vote for trump on election day or we will come after you and saying, change your party affiliation because we can get we have we have full access to the voter rolls. We can tell who you voted for and we'll. Come after you. Some of them are even have even like we're pending the person's actual home address to emphasize no, no no, we know exactly where you are. We're coming after you. Now this kind of fell apart, very very quickly because it's very, very easy to tell that the return address looks to go to a proud boys sort of your l., but it actually goes to nowhere it goes to an Estonian textbook publisher went to Saudi Insurance Company. The the the way that you hide. With you hide where the source of address comes from. The other thing here is that It's I wasn't quite I wasn't quite so aware of this until I started looking into this last night and this morning but they're of many many states Alaska and Florida included where. You don't have to be a hacker to get access ask just a normal ordinary person to the entire voter registration data I. Think Massachusetts is one of those states too by the way I think everything that they lead only of is that not true well. I T I checked the date I checked the list this morning and Massachusetts like most states where you can get it if you have a reason to have it like if you're a party official if you're a candidate if if if you can't just be just Joe Schmo from Kokomo I, explain why I want this database, just give it to me. So So basically. The FBI hasn't Unveiled y a know that some of this data was being taken by. Iran and Russia they did say that the emails were coming from around State State Intelligence however, this is very, very much in line with what Iran is pretty much known to do when they they're doing this sort of this sort of business, and once again, it doesn't look like they were hacking into any sort of secure infrastructure. They were just help said the cell phones I stomped up step envelope to box three, five, zero, Boston mass. Oh, two, one, three, four, get back in and they basically got the voter lists that way. So it doesn't look like anything was compromised but this is just your basic your basic big head game to try to get people to have. Undermined their faith in the voting system and really disrupt people. So this was an operation to really make the trump administration or the trump campaign. Look really really bad because obviously they didn't they didn't have one set of emails for for. Republican. Voters. Alleging fraud at once different emails for for Democratic voters. So this was manipulation quitting simple. You tell us about these new neuro neural filters. That are coming out. This is this is my favorite game Photoshop had had their big user conference and they released a brand new vote version of Photoshop. Photoshop Twenty, twenty one, and one of the highlights of this new edition is they've added a whole bunch of image editing and manipulation features that are powered by artificial intelligence neural machine learning where the software knows how a human face as opposed to look in to work, and so therefore, it can do things like you're not gonNA believe this. But like my my mom had a problem where no matter how many times we've got one, two, three and click she would always be the one person in the group picture who'd be looking. At one side and so now. Just open up the the open up this group picture click on the neural neuro filters tools and there'll be a flex her slapped her face and there'll be a slider for where do you want her to be looking at it will shift her gaze from one place to another or if you have that relative that. We say okay I onto onto the be sure to smiles here I am smiling you can actually a slider for for the mouth expression. Do you want it to be a big smile or no smile you can add hair you can age or d age, and that's just for like the facial tools. There are the tools coming that will like. A remove eyeglasses The. Oh, I got to tell you about the first thing I had to try though There's another feature that I'm not sure how professionals will use this but what what it sort of like a copy paste for makeup. So if you have like a model that's all made up with a I, make up the lipstick bless everything and you have another picture of someone else that you I really love the makeup of the first person to be on the second person you can basically. Analyze like we're the makeup is going again reapply it to this bear face or even this non face and I thought Oh, the very first thing I have to do since I downloaded yesterday I have a big high resolution of David Bowie as Aladdin Sane the album cover with the lightning bolt on his face, but it doesn't work. It didn't do that. It just gave me like some really interesting colored is shadow and that was it and the funny but I did I did. I did get some information. I did hear from the the, the the head of Photoshop Development Adobe he's like the first thing that I try to. It's still in Beta we're still working on it. So I i. think that if we don't, if we don't have the ability to I, don't successfully test this on a David Bowie's Aladdin sane makeup be. Kiss makeup all four, all four members of kiss and like the joker makeup at least from the very last movie I have to think that I have to as as a legitimate as legitimate journalists. This failure because this is what we want out of this feature, you know A. Day But. Almost all this makes me nervous in these times I mean I. I. Am I remain convinced that That, we're going to get a deep fake. Three days before the election without time for the opposition to respond to it that is going to be damning and troubling to. A disproportionately large number of voters and while this doesn't make me quite as nervous. It does make me nervous not because your mother will finally be looking at the camera even when she isn't but tell me in a minute why shouldn't be nervous about the ability to manipulate these images so simply? You shouldn't because there are there already countermeasures in place that if there is a deep fake out there, it is easily detectable in definitively detectible. We can prove that this is a deep fake whether it's video or whether it's it's an image. The bad news is that just as we were talking about before about the Iranian setting out emails it's. Not, necessarily convincing people that trump's did a triple Lindy high dive during a naked during a pool party it's basically introducing an element of doubt so that you're all, they're all these people are trying to put the answer shake up the jar doesn't matter what the ants do. So long as they're off balanced well, that's the problem. That's the problem. If. Say We're and we're just. GonNa. Have People. It's just that we that part of we we all learn certain street smarts and all kinds of different categories of life in the digital. Wife we're going to have to learn that we see the more extreme. The more me more is the buzz worthy shocking image that we see. We don't immediately doubt that it's real. We are definitely GONNA say, okay there's a possibility that this is a deep fake. So I'm not gonNA immediately re tweet this already we've seen twitter. The twitter platform is already doing things like saying. Recognizing if something is a story is political and being very very widely re tweeted and so if you try to re tweet something that sort of been flagged by twitter as not necessarily dangerous but something that is really really going viral fast, it will simply give you a moment to pause and saying, okay, do you are you sure you want to re tweet this because there's a lot of activity. On this right now is this something you really believe in at usually two seconds three seconds to think that will give you that time to say, yeah, you know what? Maybe maybe Biden did not take away that snickers bar from that poor child on on Halloween I got news for you when I go to bed most nights I. Think the whole day was deep fake. So I guess it's the. Function and. It would be so reassuring. Andy thank you for your time as always we appreciate it. Thank you. Thank you so much. Andy NOCCO joins regularly. He's tech writer and blogger. You can find his work at in not co Dot Com and you can follow him at a NOCCO that's H. an at. Coming up Boston public schools go all remote former secretary of education. Paul rebel joins us for that and more and eighty nine seven Gbh Boston. Public radio. Welcome back to Boston public radio. I'm Jim Brown jared bonus sitting in for Marjorie thought closing schools down was complicated opening. Them is proving to be harder so hard city of Boston. As you know, yesterday decided to go all remote for at least another two weeks. Thanks to a spike in krona virus positively rates join US online talk about this and all the other ways. The pandemic is straining our education system as rebel pulse professor at Harvard. University's graduate. School of Education runs the education design lab his latest Book Co author with. Elaine wise is broader boulder better how schools and communities help students overcome the disadvantages poverty though there Paul rebel. Hello Jim in jared. Either Paul Hey this announcement came yesterday from the Boston, public schools and it was difficult on any number of levels one. Kids learn they wouldn't be going into school on any level to create more uncertainty for parents and students and teachers. They're also the special needs, students who really desperately need to be in school in so many cases who won't be able to so. What's the ramifications and something? Probably a lot of people expected would come to pass anyway given what they're corona virus infection rate seems to be as it climbs in this area. Yeah well, it's an agonizing decision I know for the school system and Equally for parents and students were involved in it it's important to. Keep in mind it. In the Boston case, this is a tiny minority of Boston students overall who were attending in person there were twenty, six, twenty, seven, hundred students, and they'll now be sent home. The overwhelming majority of students in Boston are already add on. So this will have the effect of deepening the learning gaps for those twenty, seven hundred students because at the day to day attention and these were targeted. Targeted students who had special challenges in terms of ups, keeping pace and so forth. So that's a that's particularly disappointing. It's You know it's a function of two things the changing nature of this pandemic and the unpredictability from. One month to the next of what needs to get. And the slowness of our response to this I don't just mean the school district I mean the federal government starts with the federal government, the state government and the system you know to put in place the kinds of conditions in classrooms that would make it possible for young people that go back to school and I you know a colleague Joe Alan it's it was at the School of Public Health at Harvard, but just on a panel with me. This morning talking about really the the risk of keeping kids out of school surpass the risk of bringing kids back to school if and this is important if you can put in place reasonable conditions that would make it safe for kids to come back, which he argues can be done without a great deal of extra cost and are common sense measures like masks and and testing and contact tracing that had been discussed for some time as well as their circulation purification so well. You know. I'm not a public health person, but I'm going to take issue with your colleague in a minute but first I wanNA play just thirty seconds of a multi minute coal. Yesterday we got from Guy Ben and Tony from Worcester, ball who a lot of our listeners may not have heard at this part of the show because it was in the first half hour. And it was really powerful. He's got a special needs kid and we'll just listen to what he had to say. You got a kid with complex disabilities in this environment right now You're in a lot of trouble you're you have to. You have to make a lot of tough decisions about the rest of the family about work. You know suddenly where we're finding ourselves trying to find somebody to help us at home for more hours but there's nobody there's less people than before to come in and help you with your daily care and all that stuff. So we're doing that on top of trying to figure out how to do therapies for our kids. You know and he went on for minutes and every second poll was as powerful as the thirty seconds you heard. So for the Tony's from West the world I want to agree with your public health colleague. But the reason Marty Walsh made this decision yesterday was because of the positivity rate is exploding and if these epidemiologists around the country, not the lunatic Dr Atlas but the real ones are right. And the next six to twelve weeks are going to be the worst period for corona virus. If you're coming from a physically. Challenged. By. Corona virus community. you can't have schools open for people. Can I mean? It's you I obviously agree with that it's not true. No I mean it depends on what you mean by schools opening. Let's let's keep him talking about twenty, seven, hundred students in many of the schools in Boston. There were ten children in whole building. Oh, you mean in a limited way, you mean for high needs kids. Let me finish. Okay. We have a way to open restaurants. We have a way to Oakland public transportation we're allowing for that and in the in the population of students you know the younger students who are least likely to get a carry this disease. You know our tendency is naturally to be overcautious about bringing back. But if you bring them back under, you know reasonable conditions again, we're not talking about bringing back every kid in the Boston public schools simultaneously talking about spreading out ten or fifteen kids building meant to hold three or four hundred kids it can be done it can be done safely given. To you know I'm not talking about you being families and. Focus in Boston you're talking about I don't I spoke to broadly I'm not quarreling with the fact that a limited piece of the population that has greatest need for in person education it might be able to be figured out I'm looking at the bigger picture and it seems to me as this pandemic continues to spread. Beyond limited populations, this is going to be what we're living with for the winter. Is it not? That's what I was trying. You're right I mean I. think these these numbers are going to go up and down the numbers are complicated by what neighborhoods different neighborhoods have different numbers in the city where we we must people all over the place. Then we it's hard to keep track or to ascertain what the average rate is but I think for the foreseeable future, not just school year but next school year we're going to have these disruptions and hopefully, time with allow us to catch up and do a better job online than we've done. But I simply Tony, I'm a parent of a child with complex special needs and navigated her through the school system and I know what that's like under good conditions and long under these conditions and and what he's testimony to is that the learning gaps that the problems of those who are disadvantaged in any way are magnified many full by this kind of crisis and we that's the problem that we've got to figure out how to respond to if we can't serve Tony's child in school what are we going to do to reach out to him? In a way that continues to provide services because his child may not be able to pick up and do things online in the way that other children can't pull one last thing about this. When you say the next school year hoping you mean the spring semester, you don't mean the fall of twenty, twenty, one I'm talking about I get a lot of apprehension from superintendents, school board members around the country right now about you know well, we're going to get a vaccine, but it's not clear when it'll come out or how widely distributed banning the and they're still going to be You know they're still going to be positive tippety rates in some places. People are also thinking ahead about what this looks like in. Twenty, one, twenty, two schooling. Talking to pull rebel former secretary of Education in Massachusetts and Paul yet another consequence of kids not physically being back in school is lack of dental care for so many kids in need I'm sure a lot of people didn't realize I. didn't realize that this was the case how does dental care come into play and how is it provided within public school systems. Well, the out there there are a lot of arrangements with local dental care organizations or hospitals to provide services. Again, this is sort of symbolic of a lot of things that schools wind up doing that they weren't designed to do, and they don't have the full capacity to do I. Mean we're we're more familiar with the way schools provide meals that provide lunches and breakfasts, and in some cases, even dinners for for students but they weren't setup as nutritional organizations mental health big problem before this whole crisis even bigger problem now. But schools don't really have the capacity to address the depth and breadth of mental health problems they're finding. Schools over the years have noticed that some children including fifty percent of the children who get served in Boston, public schools right now have no contact other than what they get in school with a dentist and yet dental problems can have profound effects on a child's health and incapacity to To concentrate even life threatening consequences with long-term infected untreated dental problems. So it the the dental issue is a is a real and present issue, but it's only one of a number of things that we've sort of sloughed onto schools without changing their staffing without changing their funding without changing the number of hours a day they work, and we're asking them to fulfill all those functions and it's unrealistic that he's a broader effort, the community as a whole. Paul revel staying guy returning to Boston for a second there was a I dunno seven eight hour meeting the Boston School Committee that led to a unanimous decision to change the way. Kids are admitted into exam schools. Could you describe the people what was and what will be and then I have a bunch of questions about what was the decision? Well they've been a long-term controversy about admissions, two exam schools exempt schools in. Boston. Not Reflecting the diversity of the student population overall and for a long time, there's been pressure. On the school system to change in recent months. The School Committee established a Special Commission that was headed by community members and and. Others participated on a to come up with an alternative, particularly an alternative in this moment where it was going to be the district was in the process of changing the exam that was to be used as part of the admissions process but it then became apparent that it was going to be very difficult if not impossible to administer an exam and they had to have an admissions process and maybe now is the time to change it. So this committee came out a couple of weeks ago with a plan that said, basically, we're going to do admissions citywide on the basis of grades and and mcat scores and the top. Reserve twenty percent of seats for the top performers in the whole city, and then the rest of the eighty percent will be distributed an algorithm that factored in neighborhoods and gave a greater wait for neighborhoods a low income low-income youngsters and lesser wait for income youngsters and they would do this by neighbor not necessarily by full zipcode but by neighborhood and but you get disproportionality. So Beacon Hill get relatively few of those eighty percents seats and in Roxbury, for example, would get much higher number and so this proposal was brought forward There have been many challenges to it by people who feel that the distribution pattern that it prescribes is unfair in a different direction than the previous formula was and it generated a huge controversy that came before the school committee last night and the School Committee basically decided in the seven zero vote that they would go ahead and endorse this plan for a single year. Now, a lot of people feel this is a foot in the door and there won't be long term permanent changes that look a lot like what's been done here for advocates they see it as A. Victory for equity and in better demographic representation in exam schools than had ever existed before for those who are current subscribers to the exam schools or who had in mind their children going there and had basically felt that the system was fair and they had a line there preparation with that system They feel like many of them feel like they're being squeezed out of the process So it's not going to go away as a controversy I think it was surprising that there was such a strong unanimous vote on this I think you from from sort of. evidentiary standpoint. This is flawed plan but any plan would be flawed in these times in other words, to get a fair calculation of. In the absence of a tool that applies to all students they're gonNA, use them cast a certain degree particularly as a substitute for grades but but to do that in this environment of Corona virus is impossible to do, and so they're settling for the next. It relies on rating and we all know that grade inflation exists that some schools. More than others, and that will tend to advantage those students and so that's a that's a weakness of the system. But on the whole system, very much needed to move in the direction of equity at fair representation and I think this is a step in that direction and I'm assuming the commentary broke down pretty much on racial lines. Is that a fair? Assumption. I wasn't at the meeting. But it looks to me like the more advantage upper income neighborhoods who will see fewer seats on this new plan intend to be more white than other neighborhoods. had the most objections about this plan and neighborhoods that were composed low income and families of caller. saw this as a significant movement. In the right direction you know I started the show with Chuck Todd we started the show three hour two and a half hours ago talking about the cynical side of me. The cynical side of me ear suggests that leaders knew there was a problem and. There was a great disproportionality that needed to be inequity the need to be remedied. They couldn't get it together to deal with it straight up in normal times. So they're using the pandemic as a way to change the system without having to say, we're just changing system because it's an equitable. Now we're changing the system because. Of the pandemic is that too cynical? I don't think it's cynical. I think that's partly human nature I mean it's sometimes only crisis. In, crisis danger and opportunity It's an opportunity because the danger to shift things I think a lot of things may shift public schools. You know as we go forward to as a result of the stress of this moment we're going to see some changes that are going to be permanent lasting that but the people you know in their ordinary day to day nursery, she takes over and. They're not willing to do to have the discomfort of change, but now you gotTa Change Anyway. So what changes can we load in I? Mean a lot of us are feeling this is the time to transform public education as we know it. So Paul reveled just at the same time that we're looking at the exam schools whole different sector of Education Vocational schools come off magazine has this really interesting piece about who is entering vocational schools at this point and way it. It seems like the system is also almost being exploited to the expense of poor and students of color. Yeah. This is an ironic controversy jared because for a long time and in many other states, you know career technical vocational high schools have been viewed as a dumping ground for underachieving students and to get them out of the mainstream schools and into a trade and in Massachusetts are a career. Technical schools are actually among our highest performing schools in the state and This hasn't always been the case Back in nineteen ninety-three. When we were passing the education reform. Act and and the Vocational. Superintendents Association, CAMP BEFORE US and set the standards where to hide their students should be healthy standards and we counter argued and set policy that held US suits, same standards and sure enough the schools adjusted and they have very high. Attendance rates they have high mcat scores they have high college going rates they've done very well as they've gotten more attractive and more appealing. They've been able to draw higher performing students in and the law as previously constituted allowed them to be selective. So there are a little bit like exam schools within their respective regions. They can. They can have admissions criteria for students, and in recent years, those criteria have been going to higher performing students leaving some of the lower performance performing students often students of color and students are low income students out of the vocational schools which were once a refuge for. Them and they're getting organized and complaining to the State. This has been simmering issue for a long time. It's not particularly precipitated by Koga, but it has come to the forefront and to the commissioner's credit. He's been pushing this and pushing these schools to the admissions process and make it fair. So the board had a lot of public testimony on this yesterday and I understand some measure with respect to this is gonna come up at the December board meeting of the State Board of Education, we only have met left Paul Allen. Return. For about thirty seconds to the Boston School Committee. Last couple of minutes that chair Michael Lokondo don't know if that's how you pronounce his name. Resigned after apparently during this hearing I find this. Beyond belief is apparently mocking the names particularly, it appears of Asian, American families or commenters here. You know more about this than the her and global running. He was under a lot of pressure from a lot of city councillors and other. I don't know much more and I gather he's resigned. But he has given good service but I guess he joins Jeffrey Toobin in a live Mike boo-boo support group. Now I don't know if this I don't know if I don't know if making fun of the names of no. is a boo bones and he he it's unacceptable it by any standard I mean he he clearly regrets it but he engaged in the first place and I think it's appropriate that he'd be asked to resign and by the way luckily, rather time Marjorie isn't here. But next week or next time you're on you Margaret. I can debate my. Favorite topic about school committees whether or not they should be elected and this I would argue is a good reason why they should be so you and Marjorie and I can have that the leaking kick that down to Mars you're winning the I know I know Paul a pleasure to talk to you as always thanks for your time. Appreciate. Okay you Jimmy Jared, take care. Much Paul revel is a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education where he also runs the education redesign lab, his latest book Co authored with Lane Weiss's broader boulder better how schools and communities help students overcome the disadvantages of poverty. So we have a little bit time Jim what's coming up on greater boss? Well, I actually have the former CIA director John Brennan with me tonight written this book called undaunted and it's a lot about his life in the, but it is really a scathing indictment of the president of the United States. There's no love lost their. He will join me tonight also preview the debate, deb Ramirez law school professor at Northeastern and her husband was chief justice. Ralph Gansler just died A. Few weeks ago she's not coming on so much. Just the celebrate him to celebrate his work and continue it namely fighting against a fictions in this state it really is a noble cause it a very hard time. She'll be joined by Lou for who runs the masters that's Communities Action Network and Christina. Quinn's got a great thing as part of this covert in the classroom series that we've been doing in our newsroom all night at seven o'clock I'm Jim Bratty jared and. See You tomorrow.

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#118 Robin Sharma on How Following Your Dreams Unlocks Your Inner Genius

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

45:48 min | 1 year ago

#118 Robin Sharma on How Following Your Dreams Unlocks Your Inner Genius

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That's T O M when you check out at butcher box dot com. Go after these guys men get them. They are amazing. I think you guys are gonna love them as much as an ideal. Right. Enjoy and be legendary. You're listening to impact berry impact, the impact their impact theory impact baby everybody, welcome to impact theory, our goal with this show and company is to introduce you to the people and ideas that will help you actually execute on your dreams. I today's guests is an international bestselling author whose books of sold over fifteen million copies across sixty two countries in seventy five languages, he's penned over twenty books several of which have set sales records across the globe. His book the leader with no title was a number one bestseller on Amazon and his mega hit the monk who sold his Ferrari smashed it in the US was a blockbuster in too many countries the count has been in the best seller list in India for more than two years, and is the fifth best selling book of all time in Israel. His success is not new defense he marketing, but rather an obsessive focus on ensuring that what he teaches deliver. Vers an insane amount of usable information, and as such he is widely considered one of the world's top leadership experts and his staggering roster of clients include some of the biggest names on the planet, including Microsoft FedEx, Nike GE NASA. And he is also one of the most sought after speakers in the world. And he's appeared on over one thousand TV and radio shows. Additionally, his social media posts reach a staggering six hundred million plus people a year, and he was ranked as one of the top five leadership experts in the world in a massive independent study of more than twenty two thousand business professionals. So please help me in welcoming the founder of the Robin Sharma foundation for children the best selling author of the five AM club, Robin Sharma. Oh, man. What a great introduction. Thank you so much easy with what you're after what you've accomplished in the time that you've been doing this, which is already pretty extraordinary, and I having seen you an action now can say that you'll be doing this for a very long time. It's it's really pretty extraordinary and one thing that I want to talk about is that level of energy and enthusiasm. And you talk about that being something that's common among high achievers. How do we, cultivate that? Well, first of all, congratulations and all your success with the show and all the people that you're influencing so one of the lines right out of the five AM club is one of the DNA's of legendary is longevity. So if you look at the Picasso's Zhou Machel Basquiat, you look at the great sports champions. You look great history makers they were much better at energy management than time management. And so we're in a war against distraction right now. And what we really have to do is optimize our energy. How do I do it while I mean, I get to the morning routine, which which the whole book is based on? But it's really quite powerful. Because if you start your day which sweaty exercise, you're actually going to activate a pharmacy of mastery that exists in every human brain. I know you love the neuroscience. You're going to release be the NF, which is brain derived neurotrophic factor. That's good. Actually, celebrate your processing. It's actually repair brain cells that have been damaged by stress, you're gonna release the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is the the fire neuro transmitter, which we all need as entrepreneurs and business builders and servants of humanity. Cortisol the fear hormone is highest in the morning so exercising. First thing in the morning is going to reduce that I'm getting into my twenty twenty twenty formula. But I mentioned it because it is a way to maximize your energy. So talk to us about the twenty twenty twenty you sort of started there with the sweaty exercise, but what's the rest of that formula, which is pretty powerful? Sure. So the new book is all about rising and five AM. And that's because you look at the great creatives and the great saints and the great humanitarian and the great titans of industry. Many of them got up at five AM, even right now, you've got Tim cook. And you've got Howard Schultz and that goes on and on. Before the sun rises is the time of lease distraction before the sun rises where you can build intimacy and fluency with what you want to stand for in your day before the sun rises, the luxury and tranquility of the early morning hours. You can do that deepen or work that will allow you to go out in the world and play at your best. So what the twenty twenty twenty formula is is simply there's three pockets. The first pocket is move five to five twenty and you get into the sweaty exercise. Because like I mentioned releases neurotransmitters reduces the cores all increases your metabolic rate, which gives you more energy. So now and sort serotonin as well, which gives you joy. So now, it's five twenty fundamentally feel different. You have energy. Your state is strong. You've got a fire in your belly. Accelerated your focus five twenty two five forty is the second pocket of the twenty twenty. Formula, which is reflect we live in a world where a lot of people are busy being busy. But what's the point being busy around climbing the wrong mount Everest's, and so clarity is one of the DNA of mastery. You know, this if you talk to the titans of industry, and you talk to the people really getting traction around the ram Bishen. These are people who have a mono maniacal, focus on the few things matter. They have an obsession bordering on a possession around the few priorities. They want to build their life around and so five twenty two to five forty the second pocket. You're writing a journal. You meditate? You visualize. You do what I call him the book a blueprint for a beautiful day or you just sit in solitude. And you'd think and you ponder and you reflect on the final pocket is five forty to six o'clock. And this is the victory. Our? The final pocket is grow. But if you look at the greatest billionaires of coach many billions over the last twenty years if you look at the greatest producers on the planet. These people have one thing in come. They are ridiculously curious, and no matter how much money they make no matter how much impact they have. They maintain a white belt mentality. One of the keys to epic performance is a relentless commitment to daily growth. So that's the twenty twenty twenty formula that the five AM method is built around and the premise is basically this as you begin your day. So you handcraft the rest of your day. And if you have consistently great days, you're gonna have consistently great weeks quarters year and a lifetime. So your days are life in miniature. And you gotta get those mornings calibrated if you really wanna win when you were talking about the ABS the obsession that borders on possession, which I like a lot. And I think is the thing that's missing from a lot of people's lives. In fact, I'll say that I don't think people know how to want, and I don't think they know how to turn want into a crushing need. So there's people have this vague sense that they want something. But they don't know how to really, cultivate, that how do you help people with that? How do you help them light themselves on fire and really commit to something? Tom. I actually believe we are built to want the very nature of being a human being is we are built to progress. We know that the human brain craves novelty, and we are most alive we have the most energy we are most intimate with our best selves when we're progressing towards our mighty mission. So I think we all want. I think what's happened on the planet right now is there's been a great seduction and a great brainwashing. When we our kids we want we want to be astronauts. We wanna be billionaires. We wanna be history makers we wanna do all our dreams. And then and we stand in on wonder, and we're full of curiosity and we're loving, and we're passionate we're strong. We're not afraid to be ourselves. But as we leave the perfection of childhood, the hypnosis and the brainwashing begins our well intentioned parents say, oh, you want to be an astronaut you want to start a business. When you grow up you want. A pay like Joe, Michelle bus Kia be reasonable and George Bernard Shaw said a better than I ever could. He said the reasonable man adapts himself to the world. The unreasonable one persists and adopting the world to himself therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man, so that's our nature, but our parents give us limitation based on their limited psychology and their emotional patterns that they learn from their parents, then we'd go to school, and we're talked to live in a box thinking box dress like everyone else. Don't sing too loudly. Don't dream too. Big don't be too passionate. And then our peers do the same thing to us. And then society says oh, geniuses the realm of genetics. Not everyday people which has been dismissed by some very good science. You know, I mean, the ten thousand hour world that we all know from Florida State University, professor Anders Eriksson it just confirmed. So. So I do think we all want. I think what's happened is we've as we've left who we truly are we've contracted. And now it's all about staying safe in the world versus going out there and letting our brilliant, our primal genius shine. And a lot of people just have stuffed that pain of disappointment and their doubt, really deep inside. And they just are dictated to distraction and escapes because they don't want to deal with their potential that they've denied take us back. So you start out as an attorney euro litigator. And you write your first book, you self publish it printed at kinko's that was pretty interesting. How do you then take that leap like obviously, you were beginning to, cultivate, that the traits of the unreasonable manner. Maybe it was a process of learning. But how did you do that? How did you buckle of that? And do something new. Self growth. You know, we live in a world that suggests the doorway to success swings outward, if you build the business if you get the jet, if you get the money if you get the cars, if you get the beautiful spouse, then you're going to be happy. What I believe in. There's a model in the five am club that I think is a very disruptive model, but it's a transformational model, and it's called the four interior empires. And it's not just mindset. It's mindset heart set. Hell sentenced souls it. And we can talk about it. If you like, but I worked on those four interior empires. When I was a very unhappy, litigation where like I'd made money. I was successful. I two law degrees. And yet I wake up every morning time. And I'd go into the bathroom mirror, and I look at myself, and I was a completely empty person. And nothing. Is more expensive than losing, your joy, and your peace of mind. And so what I did was I started working on myself. You know, I worked on my mindset, and I read all the books and went to the courses, but that's only your psychology. And I think that's one of the missing links in our field, which is everyone's talking about mindset. But mindset is just your belief system is just your psychology. It's very important, but that's twenty five percent of the personal mastery equation. I believe the second piece is your heart set, and I worked on that purifying, your heart. That's your emotionality not just your psychology. You're never going to make history dominate your domain handcraft a world class life. If you've got a great psychology that you're carrying the pain and sadness disappointment and trauma the past. So I worked on my heart's. But that's only the second interior empire. The third interior empire. Your health set don't die. If you want to change. The world like dead people. Don't change the world. So health set biohacking there's a whole chapter on recovery in the essential -ness of sleep. So really getting your health set. Right. But there's a fourth interior empire that I worked on that allowed me to go out in the world, and and pursue my my magic, and it's a little dangerous for me to share because many business people follow you an entrepreneurs, but I'm going to share it because it's my truth. So it's not just mindset, and it's not just hurt. And it's not just help set at Seoul, set and soul said has nothing to do with religion sole said is about working on your character. So you react sess your nobility, and your bravery and your authenticity and your decency and you find a cause that's larger than your life. So when glowed in the world every single morning, people might ridicule you because every genius is ridicule. Before they're revered people might throw stones at you. But use them to build monuments of mastery. People might not understand you because any is going to be misunderstood, and even your if you're an army of one Galileo, Steve Jobs or how Phil Knight you continue at all costs. So those four interior empires that I go into detail in the book give you a fiery inner core if warrior ship and leadership that allow you to go out in the world and do amazing things, but it all starts with who you are because you'll never rise any higher than what's going on within you. I we really have to talk about the the sole set in the heart set. I think those are going to be the ones that are least familiar to people. So. In this whole set. Let's just dive into the the most maybe controversial. And but I actually think people are going to resonate with this. The thing that you talked about in the book that that really hit me is this notion of being braver of finding ways to get braver. And I don't know it was one of those where you're kind of like trying to guess what the person who's going to say. And I was so struck by that one. How do we practice getting braver? What does it mean to be braver? And then how does that end up being useful for us? What terrifies you most go directly there because discomfort is simply growth in wolf's clothing. Yeah. I mean, the last chapter is I don't want to give too much away. But it's it's an experience. I live. You know, it's it's Nelson Mandela's prison. So have you been to Robin heaven, but I am beyond obsessed with Nelson Mandela. So I know this story very well. You know, I I encourage you to go because standing in that cell feeling the sensations will transform you at a soul level as well as hard set level. So how do we become more brave while I went over to Nelson Mandela's prison sellin, I stood there. And I was shocked. He didn't even have a bad news in there for eighteen years. Then I went over to the limestone quarry, and I saw where Nelson Mandela spent ten years chipping away at stone to break his spirit because they threw the stones away. And then I saw the showers where this elderly St.. Dates men would shower while the young guard's would laugh at. And then in the book, I talked about a true fact where he was asked on Robben Island to dig a grave, and he he he got in the grave thinking he was going to die in the prison guards urinated on. And my point is simply this when Nelson Mandela was released from prison after twenty seven years of total incarceration, the he invited the prosecutor who was seeking the death penalty to dinner, and he invited the prison guard who kept him in prison for eighteen years on Robben Island to his inauguration as president of South Africa. And he was asked. Why would you do that? He said because if I didn't I'd still be in prison, and my point is to lead and to become a great hero or an everyday hero. The doorway is through embracing are suffering and doing difficult things. I think pleasure has been promoted to much in our society. Like, no, great titan of industry. No, legendary cellist. No, great athlete. You know, the great ones all understand that suffering is the price of greatness. So how would come braver, you you do the difficult things that you don't feel like doing, but, you know, have the payoff heart set, that's a it's really interesting in what I liked about. It was the way that you talk about you know, we all have this accumulation of trauma oftentimes from when we're younger, how do you help people process through that like how you've worked with some really high performers. How have you helped them tap into that? And then more importantly, how do you help them process through that is about reframing the event? What does that look like journaling is profound do journal? I have journal that to say that I do journal would be ally. You're gonna love journaling. I do it almost every day. I had I had a showed this morning, and then I had to set my intentions for you and all your global followers or via. And so I went back to my hotel room. I took a cold shower helper. You know, I've been fasting a lot. So we can get into fast. And because I fasted as I wrote the I five and club, and that helped massively, and then I pulled up my journal and I sat on my terrace. And I literally started writing about my intentions for impact there. And so how do you how do you move through pain? You journal. If you're going through heartbreak. I mean, we've all experienced heartbreak what we do is often we've repressive because we're not giving the tools to process through it. You lose a business people repress, it someone has a divorce or an illness. Oh, mindset reframing psychology. You're swallowing pain. You're swallowing said is you're swallowing anger were built the feel right? So. Writing in a journal just getting it out. There's actually something in the five I'm club called the journaling deconstruction because it's not just processing through pain, but dance your question that trauma of heart set, you write in a journal, you get it at a your system. Guess what? You don't bring passive aggressive into the workplace. You don't bring sadness or low vibe into the workplace. You your full if your true self in terms of your hearts at which is gratitude love appreciation, you know, what that does for business. You know, what that does for human life? So if you're going through painful time right that out almost every day, right? Gratitude that I love great restaurants. And so I'll take the business card and the next morning. Pull up my little glue, stick and glued the business card into my journal and I- relive the experience. Oh, I had dinner with so. And so here's what I learned. I constructive. With better awareness will make better choices better daily choices better daily results. Imagine journaling like this every single day. You're going to have such a cute awareness about when you're at your best. What the great ones do how to live life. What you want to stand for what your core values? Are you walk out in the world? And you just radiating possibility in a world where people are addicted to distraction numbed out. What is up impact? Hope you guys are enjoying this episode wanted to give a quick shout out to our sponsors. And then we'll get right back to it. Remember our sponsors are all hand chosen. We love these guys and think that they have something incredibly valuable to offer. So be sure to give a listen a lot of these guys are doing special offers just for you. What's up impact? Vists? I want to take a second to tell you about our sponsor for this episode skill share dot com. Skill share is an online learning community with more than twenty five thousand classes on subjects like social media marketing mobile, photography, creative writing and even illustration, and if you're serious about improving your value skill share will help you get the skills. You need to make that happen. You guys know my absolute obsession with skill acquisition. And I think he's guys are phenomenal helping with that wisc Gill share. You can go deep into one topic or you can explore their entire catalog to see what interests you there tons of options. And right now skill shares offering a two month subscription absolutely free just for listeners like you. So if you wanna start crushing your goals head over there right now to skill share dot com forward slash impact theory. Join the millions of students already getting a head start and learning from skill share to skill share dot com slash impact. Serey again that skill share dot com slash impact. Eerie and start your two free months right now. I guys enjoy and be legendary. You guys know, I mean, massive believer in ideas in equal ideas out and in the most efficient way for just about anybody to take an idea is by listening on audible with audible, you get access to an unbeatable selection of audio books in every genre. That there is. In fact, audible has the largest selection of audio books on the planet, and now with audible originals, the selection has gotten even bigger when you sign up for audible, you get three titles each month one audiobook and to audible originals that you cannot get anywhere else. They also have an exclusive fitness program to help you get your new year started off on the right foot to start your free trial right now today, it's thirty days when you go to audible dot com slash impact. That's audible dot com slash impact. They have a free book for you there. So be sure to go and check it out. And if at any point you. Side to cancel your subscription, you still own whatever's in your library forever. So you have absolutely nothing to lose head over to audible dot com slash impact right now and get your free trial started to day in joy, and the legendary you brought up distraction before and you talked a lot about it in the book. How do we in this world where it's algorithms are literally being constructed to make sure that they get her attention with as much frequency as possible. How do you talk to people about eliminating that? How do you do in your own life? How do you create that space? How much time do you allocate to that that real 'isolation? Yeah. The brain tattoo and the book is an addiction to distraction is the death of your creative production. Your people's phones are costing them their fortune. So how do I do a one of the rituals and the book is the tight bubble of total focus. It's it's based on Edison's Menlo Park. There's a great documentary on what he did. But essentially him and his band of co geniuses would leave the world go up to this hill to Menlo Park where they could get into flow state to give credit where it's to me high chick sent me high of university of Chicago came up with that term flow when we're at our absolute best doing magical things in our performance. But that only comes when we get away from the world. So you can play with your phone. Or you can be mono maniacally focused on being a history maker and legendary you don't get to do both. And so building periods of time in that tight bubble of total focus where you leave your phone in another room where you train your team. Or if you don't have a team, you just don't have any distractions and you ask yourself. What is the one thing? I could do that would allow me to go out in the world. And and bring my magic to the world the human brain has a phenomenon called transient Hypo. Frontier -ality of Neo cortex says, you know, it's the the seat of thinking, it's our monkey mind. It's all the chattering. It's the stuff that says, Tom, you can't do it, Robin. You can't do it. What would they think? What if I fail? What am I get laughed at? That's all the Neo cortex is the crown jewel of brain development. Not a primitive rain crown jewel. There's no genius in there. And here's what I mean when we get away from distraction, and we find our Menlo Park, or we go work in a quiet place. And we get lost. The Neo cortex actually shuts down. That's why it's called transient typo for Intel for short period of time are thinking shuts down the whole model is in the book. And we actually go from brainwaves at beta. Down to alpha. Down to fada, and maybe even delta, and we stop thinking we go into flow. In other words, the advanced minds of the world the great geniuses Galileo Davinci, Steve Jobs, they weren't in the Neo cortex. They got away from the world for bursts of time which allowed them to access the human capability, we all have to get into flow state and access insights that they went out in the world. And then execute it on with a world class team, which totally changed the game. It's interesting talk to me about impatience. So this is something that I bump against a lot of people on. I I'm not a patient person. I don't invest in patients. I don't think it's useful. Doesn't mean that. I don't play the long game. It doesn't mean that I do things that are dishonest just to get ahead or because it would be faster, I wouldn't. But I definitely, cultivate, impatience. What are your thoughts around patients, and what do you mean by being impatient? Ridiculously impatient. Around. My mighty mission. I'm ridiculously impatient. Tom about serving people and bringing value to people in very patient with my children. I'm very patient with my team. You gotta love to the people around you. I'm very patient with the verse stay in a coffee shop who may be as overwhelmed or her first or his first day on the job and very patient with the taxi driver who may be gets lost. But you know, that's how they're making their livelihood. So with human beings. I've worked very hard, and I'm a work in progress. But I'm very patient with human beings going back to leadership for a second. What would you say are the three if somebody wants to be truly effective leader? What are three traits that they should, cultivate themselves? No yourself. I mean, Jack Welch of General Electric said it really well. Don't lose yourself on the way to the top Warren Buffett said they'll never be a better you than you. So great leaders again. It's those four interior empires. Working on yourself, knowing what what you want to stand for knowing what you want said about you on the last hour for your last day, knowing your core values, your top five core values knowing those knowing your weaknesses, knowing your strengths and a lot of leadership talk isn't about that. But starting with your character and your self identity that is really important for a leader. I'd say the second thing for a leader. Would be well getting big things done. You mentioned it in the interaction is like for Roches a warrior when it comes to execution like great leadership is less, talk and more. Do you know, I it doesn't really matter. What the chatter it's all about execution implementation. And and application, so they get things done and we live in a world where? We pull out the phone people. I'm going to get this done. And I'm going to get that done. We say to people off send you a book. It doesn't get even worse. It's we lose self respect from the promises we make to our selves that we break. That's where it all starts like, it's so, you know, this it's so important, your your income your impact your relationship with creativity productivity in the world. Oh comes down relationship with yourself. So that would be the second thing about leadership's like execution don't break promises. And the third thing I'd say, you know, be crazy. The great leaders are insane. And I say that they're insane to the majority. The great ones are all misfits. And they're all weird. I mean, the very nature of being a disrupter in a leader means you're not a follower. And if you're not a follower. Then you're not buying the Kool. That society, sells you if you're not a follower. You're not like this all the time looking for likes. If you're not a follower. You dress? The way you want to dress. If people criticize you criticize all the great ones. Critics are nothing more than dreamers who got scared and never got off their chairs and got back in the game. So you've got to be willing to to five AM weird. Who does that why not? Sleep. Leaders have to be willing not to be followers. All said, what drives you so hard to keep doing this after you've had the kind of success you've had to keep coming back to this and keep pushing and the touring and just like going after it be Tom because we live on a tiny planet in the galaxy with trillions of other planets so on our little planet where we're actually it's a core philosophy might we're we're brothers and sisters on a little planet. Person that homeless person was someone's dreams at a time the person in the restaurant or the hotel who it's very easy for numbed out not awake. I'm not someone's father or mother. And when I look most people on the planet. It's no judgement. I just I see people who are there in scarcity versus generosity. I see so many people saying, you know, when I was a kid, I had all this creativity. I don't know where it happened. You see it every day. You have all these people. I want to build a business all I all I guess I see it's psychology of can't versus mentality of possibility. I see people in pain. I see people playing victim. I mean, when you agree most people on the planet at some foreign former another whether it's their creativity or the prosperity or the personalized they're they're stuck in victimhood. And I know I know mindsets. I know rituals and routines I have systems, and it's not just go out there and live your dream and be happy happy happy. I mean, the book shivers. Most of a lot of my methodology the twin cycles of elite performance the ninety ninety. Eight one rule the second wind workout the to massage protocol the twenty like these have worked for my clients for years. So I have the information to serve. You have the information to serve. How can we see people stuck when they have such glory? Nobility indecency decency inside of them. How can we allow that to happen? We have a responsibility. We all have a responsibility. What is up impact? Hope you guys are enjoying this episode wanted to give a quick shout out to our sponsors. And then we'll get right back to it. Remember our sponsors are all hand chosen. We love these guys and that they have something incredibly valuable to offer. So be sure to give a listen a lot of these guys are doing special offers just for you. What's up impact of this? I just want to take a minute to share with you about a new company called fund rise fundraise is the future of real estate investing their crowd sourcing investing platform, where you can invest according to your goals in a portfolio filled with dozens of real estate projects each one handpicked and proactively developed with the goal of growing your net worth. And I love the fact that these guys are a portfolio strategy, which I think is four wiser than just rolling the dice. On one project. Fundraise gives you access to quality private market real estate projects from projects like high-rises in DC to multifamily apartments in L A each real estate project is vetted an actively managed by fundraisers team. How is fun rise changing real estate investing the platform focuses on an investor I model by eliminating bloated costs and middlemen that have traditionally weighed down real estate investing Mets going to save investors time and money. Also fund rise provides gun parallel transparency and realtime reporting showing how the development of specific properties impact your overall portfolio. So you can stay in the know today with a very special offer for you guys. You're going to get your first three months of fees completely wave just go to fund rise dot com forward slash impact. That's F U N D R. I S E dot com forward slash impact. And you can get started to day. All right guys as always. Invest responsibly. But enjoy and be legendary you said that everybody should have core values. What is what are some of your most deeply cherished Corelli's? Service above self in other words contribution impact service member to family. I mean, if I could be a tenth of the human being my two children are I'd be I'd be I'd be amazing family. You know? I I've worked very hard. But I've really worked hard on my family to even trying to be a great, son. Great brother, all those things because we all know to get to the last day for last of your life and say I made a lot of money, and I got a lot of likes that. I saw a lot of books and impact a lot of people and your own family. Never got to know you. That's heartbreak third value. I'm an that the French word lover of beauty. You know? That's why you know. That's why I love Los Angeles that we were coming over here. And it's like there's flowers. It's whatever time of the year is the flowers everywhere now. So I love beauty in art and food and people in sunsets. And that's why I love Rome so much now that fourth value would be vitality. You know, I really do believe that the one of the keys to legendary is longevity. I mean, I wanna live till one hundred seventy seven I wanna you know, Brad. I mean, I'm biohacking and I'm resting and I'm doing the to massage protocol and everything possible. So I can be rocking my craft and serving as many people as possible when I'm into you know, I mean, one of the things I'd say you never wanna let an old person anywhere near the inside of your body. Right because we could get into epigenetics, and the fact that we have a chronological age in a biological age. But vitales important, and then I think the final core value is lifestyle we can serve the world, and that's very important. I notify us, but I want it's life is ultimately a really short ride. And so I want to really be around only people. I mean, I'm focused island want people in my orbit that bring me joy of feel my joy. I only want to do the pursuits in my business and career and life that bring me joy. And I only go to places where I feel joy. That all makes a lot of sense. So you've brought up a couple of times. Now, the biohacking part so going into the health set. Let's talk about that. What are you doing you fasting? You've got the obviously the exercise you've got sounds like the massage to massage protocol. Walk us through what you do to care for yourself to make sure that you hit that one seventy seven number which I like, it's very far and it's specific. So so yeah, fasting a lot of writing the book I was in fasted state, and for me the way it looked doing intermittent fasting. Yes. But I want to get to thirty six hours. And then I want to go beyond that because a lot of the great creatives and mystics. So for me, it's my last meal might be at nine o'clock, but I won't eat until four o'clock. Let's say the next day when I was writing a lot of the book was written in Rome. I get up at two cups of coffee because coffee is a health drink awesome antioxidant magnificient cognitive enhancer, and plus I'm in Italy, drink coffee, and then I just, you know, I'm at a hotel that allowed me to have a tight bubble of total focus so zero distraction. And then I go into that flow state, and I would just work on the manuscript in fasted state. And I. Saved a lot on grocery and food bills. Just imagine it. How much time how much time we spend even eating and I'd actually so and then it'd be like three or four o'clock I've been flow. I didn't even know where the time went, and then I had asked, you know, call the hotel front desk and clean my room. I'd go out to the streets. And I'd read ground and have something to eat. So basically, it would be at least eighteen hours without food. And then I'd have the window of eating where I'd eat healthily on Mediterranean, Keough genyk diet. And that's how I do the fasting and nutrition. I just I know by my energy level. And by my mental focus when I'm in Kito sus. Rest. They're like I said there's old chapter in the book on the essential -ness of sleep. And the key piece is this a lot of business builders a lot of creative performers a lot of great f a lot of athletes think that it's work harder to achieve more. Well, that's been debunked by science. We all know that we are at our best creatively productively, and in terms of our performance when we experienced intense bursts of elite performance, and then we make the time to recover. I had a person at one of my events recently. He worked with you saying bolt and he said you seen bolt told him. I sleep fifty percent of the time. Wow. To allow the training to take effect. So. I run these cycles of intense, creativity and productivity and have learned to really rest. I take naps. I've done it since I was eighteen. And recovery is very important in terms of meditation visualization whenever I I could keep going with you. But we have to get you out of here. So before asked my last question tell these guys where they can find you online. Sure anyone is interested in the five AM club book, it's on in the book stores Amazon. It's an audible anyone also can't find it. It's at the five AM club dot com. And I think it's important to say a lot of books. They don't have a support system, and I really wanted to serve people and really help. So at the end of the book, there's actually a sixty six day because that's the amount of time. According to University College of London to install a new habit. There's a sixty six day online. Digital course for free where I meant or people by videos to lock in the five AM club habit. And it's also important every very important to me because every the royalties from the book percentage goes to helping me fight leprosy. Wow. Yeah. A lot of people don't know about leprosy, and I'm ferociously committed to helping reduce it as well. And then I'm on Instagram out, Robin, Sharma dot com. Youtube Robin Sharma dot com. Yeah. So perfect. All right. Cool. Ask question. What's the impact? You want to have on the world. I want to remind people food they truly are. And when they see Nelson Mandela, or Oprah Winfrey, they say, they did it, but legendary is simply a testimony to ordinary people who thought differently felt differently and did different things. And there by became who they were. And if they can do it, I can do it. If I go all in I want to get that that message out even more of guys if you wanna go all in let me tell you dive into this man's world. Like, I said he's written twenty plus books. It is absolutely extraordinary. The way that he's able to weave information into narrative, he's been at this very long time touching high achievers figuring out how to make them even better. And he's able to distill that information package it up and make it usable to everybody else. I think that he's really one of the most. Notable minds in this space. You will not regret diving in and seeing how much of that information you can extract and put to use in your own life. It will change you. If you let it all right? If you haven't already be sure to subscribe. And until next time my friends be legendary take care everybody. Thank you so much for listening. And if this content is delivering value to you, please go to itunes Stitcher rate and review us that helps us build this community. And that is what we're all about right now building community as big as we can to help as many people as we can deliver as much value as possible, and you guys rating and reviewing really helps with that. All right, guys. Thank you again so much and until next time, my friends, you legendary take care.

Tom Nelson Mandela wicks Robin Sharma Amazon United States Steve Jobs Robin Menlo Park Robben Island Zhou Machel Basquiat Leeson Microsoft Howard Schultz Tim cook mount Everest founder
New Music Friday: May 10

All Songs Considered

24:54 min | 1 year ago

New Music Friday: May 10

"This message comes from NPR sponsor, indeed if you're hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast. Happy Friday, everyone from NPR music and all songs considered. I'm Robyn Hilton on here this week with Steven Thomson. Hello, Robin and up from Nashville the one and only an powers so happy to be with you in the flesh. And it is just the happiest day of the week in my right because it's new music Friday. And that means we're doing a quick look at the best new albums that are out now on may tenth. We start this week show off with the band Charlie bliss and their new album called young enough. Being. The. There. It's not. Let course sinks clause hooky. This is Charlie bliss the album is young enough the song. We're listening to hard to believe in. This is a band from Brooklyn fronted by Eva Hendricks, and this is a follow up to their twenty seventeen debut, which was called guppy, you know, even Hendrix rights dark songs that sound like they should be performed at a pep rally. And I mean, you listen even that little segment of song that we just heard kissing anything that takes me far away from you, very Charlie bliss line in a song that just couldn't be sunnier. Yeah. I think lyrically and fanatically she goes a little bit deeper on this one than she did on guppy, it kind of feels like she's she's in her mid twenties now, and it feels like she's reached this point in her life that we all reach where you realize that your life doesn't have to be remarkable to be fulfilling. But at the same time, she still feels very restless like there's this fire that's still burning in her to do more or be more. Or want more Charlie bliss, part of sort of that wave of nineties revivalism in a sense. And lately people have been talking about riot girl bikini, kill reuniting and punk feminists bans. But but what I like about this band is they bring me back to the poppy side of that, you know, Ruka salt. Yeah. The breeders the deal sisters Juliana Hatfield. She is forming her thoughts right in front of us and presenting yourself as an imperfect human, but one still worthy of freedom and respect I love that about it. Charlie bliss is the band and the album is young enough. Let's go to something a little stranger from the the artist Holly Herndon, Holly her and just a little strange kill stranger in her new album is called pro. Holly Herndon is the artist who knew album is called proto the song is called eternal. She's just a brilliantly experimental electric composer. And you want to take a stab at what she's doing on this record? Explain everything. She's working with exactly what she's working with the most important artist on this record may not be Herndon in herself. But humanoid named spawn and turned into Veld with the program, or gills applause. They brought together dozens of vocalists and used the input from these vocalists to teach. And I'm making air quotes teach the how to recognize respond to sounds so throughout the album, you'll hear the I vocalise ING, but I love it because I'm fascinated with the space of the humanoid and Holly Herndon is making art out of this experience that we're taking for granted. No matter how weird it actually is. I think it's really important. It's important to pause and contemplate the spawn let's let's listen to a little bit of another the spa. Let's listen to a little bit of another song called frontier, which I thought was interesting because it. Sounds like the origins of life and futuristic at the same time. Frontier. He don't really hear it on this cut. But there was something that I kept thinking about as I listened to this album, and that's two thousand one space odyssey. Yeah. It reminded me so much of that film in so many different ways. I wanna play a little bit of a song called crawler. And you tell me what you think. It has that same strange celestial cosmic dissonance. And I think it's interesting because two thousand one space odyssey is about our quest for knowledge, and how that is sort of our undoing and it feels like this album is a little bit about that as well are how are seeking more and more knowledge power will be are alternate undoing and renders completely obsolete. We'll see I get the two thousand one reference, but I see at a different way two thousand one is also about interactions with an AI. Of course, how the the the lethal a on the spaceship and Holly Herndon his presenting interactions with artificial intelligence as a potentially healing thing almost positive thing and something that can connect us to our most human and even traditional cultural expressions for example, track displayed, Robin it's based partly and sacred harp. Singing the. Which of course, is the religious tradition of the most human kind of singing. So really her stated mission is to find a place where artifice intelligence can exist in proximity to an interaction with human beauty human love. I find this very very beautiful place to dwell. You know, all Holly heartedness, the artists are called proto. We could talk for the full half hour just about that one record. The let's go to the singer Jamila woods and her new album legacy legacy. Days. How? Best every home. On them. Service. Hilton. Sick onto. Is. Bye. You everything Joan. So you. Never. Hugh. Sure is a lot of good music in the world. This one comes from Jamila woods her album legacy legacy, and the song is called Zora. She is a singer poet teacher, and activist and this is sort of a concept album for her. Yes. Every track is named after another hero or hero. Win of hers. All major figures in African American cultural history. Nikki Giovanni Sonia. Sanchez those are writers miles Davis Jean Michel Basquiat, the painter and in some ways so early into Jamila woods career is only our second full length album. This is a summation of her her mission, you know, because her work is very concerned with educating as you said with celebrating and steeping her listeners in the sensuality enjoy and power of this culture. You're the circuits really grand mission statement. And really it is a who I am and known largely as a collaborator chancellor apper chance to wrap. She's on macklemore. And Ryan she she has popped up as a featured guest bunch and has had collaborations go back and forth where people have appeared on hers, and it's a great session important moment right now for reclaiming these legacies. And I think her generation is very aware of the importance of that Jamila woods is the singer her new album is legacy legacy. We still have a few more elba's that we wanna play for this week's new music Friday. But first, let's take a short break, and we'll be right back support for this podcast and the following message come from Tito's handmade vodka born and bred in Austin, Texas, the live music capital of the world eighty proof Tito's handmade vodka fifth generation, inC, distilled and bottled in Austin, Texas. What would you do if you found out story that it shaped your identity was ally? NPR's new podcast white lies investigates. Murder in some Alabama from nineteen sixty five and exposes the conspiracy that kept it unsold. Until now Whitelaw's. Start listening Tuesday. It's new music Friday for Muslims considered. I'm rubbing Hilton. I'm here with an powers and Stephen Thompson. And we're looking at the best new albums out on may tenth. We start the second half of our show off with the band halos and their new album any random kindness. Since you. Still. This is the ban halos spelled H A E in the the year crunched up together. H A E L S pronounced halos. Their new album is any random kindness in the song as our ah banned from London that makes this sort of glossy airy pop that's like massive attack and air, and all those kinds of bands dark disco is what I've this. Yeah. A love there trio, Arthur Delaney Lodhi Ben dough, and I'm going Smith and found interview with them talking about their fashion sense. And it was called all black everything. This is there is there sophomore fooling their second full length, and it sits very comfortably with those bands like Saint Germain, but it's also I if you dig into the lyrics socially conscious record talks a lot about climate change in the FINRA of social media. And what responsibilities we have to one another? It's also a testament this band is also attested meant to producer being able to recognize how to vocalists will complement each other because the producer Dom Smith put these two singers together, but they work so well together almost inseparable their voices, you know, often they're compared to the ex sex. But I feel like it's different five. You know? I I don't there's less air in the mix. Yeah. Yeah. And there's not the kind of teasing sexual tension of the X. There's more of a United warmth. People talk about this halos as a warm band, warm and dark halos is the ban their new album is called any random kindness. Let's go next to Tim Hecker. He's also got an album out on may tenth. It's called on Oyo. Tim Hecker is the artist his new album is called on a yo. And we're hearing a short excerpt from a a song called that world. He is a composer sound designer electronic artists and we've been following him for close to twenty years now this album on a yo is a follow up to an album. He just put out last year in two thousand eighteen called Kodo. Tell us what he's doing on this one on koneohe. He was inspired by Japanese classical music and tried to evoke some of the feel of that in these kind of head filling washes of synthesizers that you I kind of expect from him. This is a companion piece to that record. And really feels together they feel like a fairly cohesive collection of music to get lost in. He's very prolific. And when you think prolific ambient composer. I think you sometimes think like, okay, he's got a stick. Right. He's got a thing. And he's able to. Kind of duplicate it over and over again. But each piece even within this record has a standalone quality to it that I think is really impressive. I thought one thing that was interesting about this is that koneohe the first record means this world here and Otto means over there that world over there koneohe the first one had a lot more tension to it. It was a little darker and had more dissonance in the tone, and this one feels a little calmer in prettier that made me think what I used to think when I lived in Japan for number of years, which is it felt like the happiest place on earth and the US felt like one of the angriest most frustrated races on earth, and I feel like with this his first record with all that tension in. It was like he was making the statement state of this. Here's the state of this world and auto over there, and that other part of the world that that's the state of that world. I just assumed it meant, you know, this life and the next actually like the pure land. It could be sure I could read it that way to Tim Hecker is the musician has album out now is called on a yo. We've got one more release that we wanna play for this week's new music Friday. But first, let's do a quick lightning round of some of the other notable albums out on may tenth starting with the Qatar rock band dead spelled D HD. Their new albums called water. We also had on Tuesday episode radiator hospital the ban radiator hospital has a new album out called scenes music for daydreaming. I'm excited about this new record phantom forest by Ainsworth, she's a Toronto based composer. And her sound is I didn't know maybe it's unfair to say those Kate Bush influence, but I always like anyone who makes me think about Kate Bush and also Sierra arm between has a new album beauty marks. There's a new album called ender nece by the singer, a Bondi who's had this fascinating career on the margins of of music. He was the lead singer of Ben called for Beena kind of post grunge band in the ninety s then he recast himself as a blues singer this kind of playing this kind of haunted blues music his first album in eight years Ennis is out. Now, there's a. I'm from Cleveland called morning. Black star the album is called reckoning. They are this genre. Smashing very politically intense three form band that is tackling issues of police violence gentrification and marginalized people and then finally the get up kids their first album in eight years spiky rock record called problems. There's a song on that record called. The problem is me that I've been listening to over and over again for some reason always get up kids fan when she's not necessarily all those albums out on may tenth along with this last one that we wanna feature it comes from the band Loeland hump. It's called glee. Nic. The keys. In. Dress do. Your. Alone with fifty. Corner. Now. Straw. In. With. Snus has says says what do what do? If you love just sublimely, beautiful two part harmonies. You're not going to do better than the span. Lohan calm, and who doesn't the record is called Glyfada ke- the song Salzburg summer. This is a married couple Daniel, and Lauren guns from Charlottesville, Virginia, man. You know, we've played a lot of dark music on this show, if you wanna detox from the darkness spend, some time with this lovely warm full pop record. This is what our colleague Bob Boylan would call Sunday morning music. I'm reminded a little bit particularly in that Salzburg summer song of another married. Couple folk pop duo of the weepy, and it's so funny because I have a whole list of married. Couple of fans up here on my computer dimension. But you go ahead. I'm finished. Lauren and Daniel goals like to hand out lyric books at their shows to kind of deepen that sense of community and connection with their audience, and you can just hear that in the songs can't you? It's just it's so warm and inviting they sing about life and death in nature in the big picture and small moments in these very approachable, an honest and warm and kind with Daniel Lauren guns have started. What I think is a really great project. It's called support quite music. It's a hashtag they've started support quiet music as a movement the idea is that in this very deeply polarized time. There's a lot of shouting going on and restraint is more important than ever. And that there is there's also I think power in stillness, and, you know, especially when it's surrounded by chaos, if you go to the lowland home website, they have how how can I support quite music? And it's about quite music Spotify playlist of quiet music, and then all these other ways that you can support the quiet music moment. But this whole record. They just capture all of these little moments that in life that are just the stuff of life like drive in the country on a lazy summer day or hanging out with friends with a glass of wine. You know, it's just really beautiful and simple. And I love it Loeland is the band and their record is cliff onic. All right. Thanks, Steven you, and and so lovely to be with you, both as always if you want to hear full versions of the songs we featured and a whole lot of other great new tracks out this week. We've got a new music Friday playlist and both Spotify and apple music, just open one of those absent search for NPR. You can also listen on our website. That's an NPR dot org slash all songs and for NPR music. I'm Robyn Hilton be well have a great weekend and treat yourself to lots of great music.

Holly Herndon NPR Charlie bliss NPR music Tim Hecker Robyn Hilton Jamila woods Daniel Lauren Steven Thomson Robin NPR Arthur Delaney Lodhi Ben dough Kate Bush Holly heartedness Austin Brooklyn Texas Juliana Hatfield Jamila Nashville
Haoui Montaug

Suicide Buddies

1:09:36 hr | 1 year ago

Haoui Montaug

"Hey, folks, this Hampton here. I know that David I tend to joke a lot about suicide and make a lot of lighthearted jokes. But honestly, if you're having any sort of trouble, we would recommend that you call one eight hundred two seven three talk is the national suicide prevention lifeline, and they do amazing work. They they really will talk with you. And so we we just hope that you know, you have fun here at the pod. But if you're ever having truly deep suicidal thoughts that you would call one eight hundred two seven three talk, we love you. We want you to take care of yourself. Thank you for listening. No. Me. You get sick. Please stop putting the microphones directly down your. Up your heinous and up the SAFA Amos. It's one tube. I gotta clog to soften as. Worm? You got one two million. If you come in have you got to Dave's now. It's good. I think the world can handle you your damn right dude to two days. It'd be too funny. He will be laughing so hard they die. Yeah. I hate it when I'm too funny. No, you don't one time to funny in front of a Buckingham Palace garden. He blues fucking brains out because he laughed they do kill themselves. If they get flustered fire that was the joke that made them laugh went you. Like our president. Yeah. Totally who's great. He loves that. Kind of riot bald in your face American style. Politico we bit political humor. You know, what I was thinking about forgive me. But this will be a bid I do have mercy and up. Is it like, and I think this is actually a pretty obvious observation. It's like a thought that we've all probably had at least once, but it had never really sunk in for me until I found out that there's no White House correspondents dinner this year. Oh, yeah. Because Trump said he wouldn't go. That's because they were upset about the about Michelle wolf. And so they did this other show that was just like a panel thing on CNN, right and Jordan temple was telling me this. And I was you know, it's good for him. It's good like multiple commies cut to do it. But I was just telling me that I was thinking about it and like liberals get called cuts, right? But like always the most thin-skinned in the fucking world coward insane. He's a coward all his followers or cowards. It's really funny. Like it just really is sinking. In with me. How like sure I there's a lot of things I'm afraid of and one of them being confrontation. But like those people are like babies little crying fuck in baby. He should little bitch people and roast master general, Jeff Ross, the roast master gender Rostom. Yeah. Isn't that weird? He had the comedy central roast. And the thing is he's kind of a sociopath. Like, you really can't laugh at anything, especially has real trouble laughing at himself. Yeah. So it's like the funny thing is like he could easily just ask for a different comic or done a different thing. Like, yeah. You really is like a lot. I'm not gonna show up which he didn't do didn't. He not show up last time or something. Just Sarah Huckabee. He wasn't a wasn't there. Now, they're just like, let's just cancel it. Checks though. It's like even really sell them that it bugs me about because he is so historically this way. But I guess just like, I don't know. I know it's probably not revelatory. But it feels like a revelation to me it just occurred to me like like sure I'm a liberal and I am softy. I am Gajah. But let in I like truly like this is a liberal. I am I just said the word bitch, and I feel bad. What I mean? You are a little big. Yeah. That's me. Working my aggressive. You know, red state blood, look good character. Yeah. I think you're making my point is like that's how liberal I am even I'm more liberal than even liberals want you to be where I'm like any gendered insult, no one should ever say. And here's the other thing about me. I'll fucking kill you. Do you know what I mean? Like, I'll kill you. Tell you saw sitting. All of those things together. No like, eat me up. And you, and you are also know what I'm saying is like I'll like those are how that's how I feel politically. And I stand by. No, yeah. Any sense? You have empathy is what that is not being soft, and that's actually a sign of strength. I agree should about other people. You know what I mean? And it's and it knows them kind of soft. My point is like, I literally am I get upset easily? You know what? I mean. Like, I am. I just it just never really hit me these guys that are like constantly complaining online and saying they're the strong ones and saying they're tough like I'll kill them. Do you know what I mean? Like, I feel very I feel so much stronger than that. I won't kill anyone. I won't hurt anyone. But I just like heaven turn allies d- that we're the soft ones. And then recently like, no, I feel like I don't take. That kind of shit from people, and I don't also get all like. You disagree with me? And I really think that as liberals we should stand up and be like, no fuck you. I like we're stronger than you will fuck in kill you. That's really feel all bullying behavior is guarantees. Right. Right. Bullies are cowards. That's the opposite. If that is somebody who does have empathy, and yes, you beat yourself up. But that's actually just having empathy for yourself. Sure. Understanding how feelings work and how you know things are maybe not right and you have to fix the situation, and then you feel emboldened to correct that situation. That's actually just being a functional person for the most part. And it's the people who are trying to be, you know, ruin it for other people trying to out early harm other people for no real reason. There's usually some sort of like cowardice they're trying to bluster and back right up. You know, by just hurting other people like I can't think of a more frail individual than Trump. Yeah. He's like he has a. Doctors say say that he's basically superhuman motherfucker. We can look at you like, you're you're obviously lurch across the room like you're out of shape. At least, you know, like you're not Hercules, and it's like you're the president. And you're wearing pants you found? He's like, I'm not a lot. I'm not a liar yet will say like women's cause cancer. This like he's everything is like a defense. It's all defense mechanism. You know, and it sucks because people look at that person. Go what a proud strong guy. But it's like same thing with John Wayne that guy was like the most complete blubbering. Loser. If any director ever said, hey, John that gives you do another take. It wasn't very good. He'd be like, what do you mean? No. I know. That's what my favorite thing about the sopranos is like, we you. The we like their murderers, and the we like they are kind of in our culture, the embodiment of being tough is Tony soprano right nihilistic. But if you watched the show, they are crybabies, they're like, would you say about me? Why does it bother you so much that someone said you eat too much spaghetti or whatever they said, you know? That was racist. And I think that might have been racist. And. A window. And the weird thing is like I I don't know why I was thinking about when Piers Morgan is an example of these guys who think of like JAMES BOND or John Wayne or Tony soprano as like these are all masculine men and Mike they are all fictional care. And James Gandolfini, no matter how tough you looks onscreen. I guarantee you at one point he wanted to go to drama school. You wanna do Shakespeare to do the whole fucking rigmarole? So let's do did. I tell you this that I did it show Carl Heston I wants to show where Michael chiklis was in the crowd, and Michael chiklis is one of these guys who like he's like V tough cop on the shield, you think of him as just like you'll break into your house and he'll kill everybody. And. Family thing to. Yeah. That's what he is. Monster. He actually will kill you and Carl as a joke about being a theater going to feeder school, and we were talking the whole show like a checklist likes my jokes. You know, and. And afterward. I was talking to Carl. Beat me uptick listening. Fucking. Up against the wall suck my dick. Fucking punch sign at the end of that thing that tank when I come back going to be five bucks tags. There's going to be body tags toe toe tens on bondage, or tow tags. Don't make correct. Is. It's so funny. Yes, I'm just talking to Carl after this show and Michael chiklis walks up. Looking all chiklis looks at Carl and goes, I went to feeder school. Chiklis famous out. I know. Yeah. Totally so hysterical. Yeah. I think about like Tony soprano, James Gandolfini and Michael chiklis. You could have done anything really like as an actor. You're kind of open to whatever he could have been like a sci-fi actor James get but at one point people relation body shape. You look good with a gun and a Meatball. Sam I get you. Now, totally minute. John Wayne put on a cowboy hat people. Fuck. Says it's a James Gandolfini while he's auditioning to play curly. Sue, and he's like, oh, okay. Gonna be girly. I win over to roll this seat three. Ellison might joke. Mcgee scum. It added a front CAD piece. Got the big nice fed horn Indem trying to do all the dialogue a Luke AM day in this space is on fire. Gotta get out of the desktop building. Our building. Got. The N Y. No, thank you. Thank you for your time. No. Guys aged skinny better agents folks, by the way, I'm sick welcomed suicide buddies Davor us, I'm having young and sick this week sick. He's sick. And I'm in the middle of depressive episode five. Mentally sick. Last sex. And then you die. That's from NewsRadio. So we often mentioned on this podcast loving NewsRadio. It's the much better show than Seinfeld. And I stand by that. Stephen root never had a high school girlfriend. Well is radio. Yeah. For a lot of reasons actually fully might Seinfeld, folks. I know she was seventeen right folks are going to wanna bring up I've held on YouTube going to look Shoshana is. Pick up Seinfeld, lizard girlfriend. Seventeen year old girlfriend was in fact snake? All women are snakes. Keep my wife and my toilet gonna black forced com. Literally sweating right now is fever. Tried to do an Alex Jones impression. Well, story of your life. You're going to be eighty five years old sweating sick trying to do Jones impression there as long daddy five. You definitely will make eighty five. But no further. That's it. That's the end of the road for old ham. Oh, man. There was something else. That was going to say about that tough guy thing. I liked everything you were saying about bullies in that way. Certainly when you're growing up you never bully who's making my life shed is such a coward. It's weird because I think one one super negative of the internet is that it really helps bullies win. Because like the the people allot of the liberals that are killing it online are the bullies of the liberals like the liberals that are like if you do one thing wrong, you should be dead. Just like we're all like, hey, wait a minute. What? I didn't say I will kill you. But I meant it cosmetically. All like, I won't from. You is what I meant your honor. Metaphysical now, I know I really try and watch myself to not say something that would be way over the line. As far as go kill yourself or whatever because it's so easy. You absolutely want to. Yeah. First of all, I would never say go kill yourself. And I don't mean I didn't mean. Yeah. I guess that's like shaky ground. I was saying I will kill you in the sense of as if I were doing stand up, you know, what I mean? You know what I mean? Like this like the stand ups different you're up there. And everyone's watching you, and there's this context of this kind of extreme I'll get you. And I don't even really mean that I mean, like if what I mean is this I see people being tough online. And even though I am a person who is straight up of frayed of fighting. I see these people being like fuck you and your fucking cook. PCS bullshit. I don't I don't give a shit it should be male and female bathrooms, and if you disagree with that, then you're not an American and I'll kick your ass. My point is like, okay kick my ass, man. Do it. That's my point. I guess I'm just sick of it, dude. I'm like, I don't want to be in a fight. And I will probably cry in that fight if I will. But like fuck you, dude, I'm not your I'm not your whipping, boy, we're not your punching bag, and that's what I mean. Like, I'm not gonna kill you. But I will not fuck you. I'm not gonna take the ship for MU. But what if I get you? You on my twelve month Chritine, shake Rogan experience which rogue. Rogue isn't even this guy. He's not like, listen liberals are garbage. I have all kinds of problems with Joe Rogan. But like, he's not you know, what I mean. It's like town fans. Here's how you do a reverse spinning back. Kick a trouble. Giving you trouble to you and your trouble reverse spitting? Kick has twice the power of a front kick because whipping around using centrifugal force to break the sternum. Strong. More like Mia FC. You know what I mean? Jerk off often, I watch it, dude. I'm so mad at getting called week. Oh, this is what I wanted to say. I totally agree with this. There's this weird thing in like the way that we talk about manhood, America. They're all these diverging ideas that I think are so funny and like like, yeah. One of the things they say is like stand up for yourself. Right. That's a big part of being quote, man. But another thing is like you have to be our idea of a man or will make fun of you. And I just think it's so interesting that those two things exist inside of people saying what manhood is because to me the quote manliness thing. And what I mean when I say, quote, mainly is strongest the strongest thing to do is to be you and be okay with that that's incredibly strong to be surrounded by people being like, you're not one of us. And to be like, yeah. Well, I'm still me. And fuck you that is standing up for yourself. Yeah. But then the bad verse. Standing up for yourself. Stand your ground laws where people anybody who gives me. Trouble will die. Yeah. Exactly. You're not standing up for yourself. You're trying to create an image of yourself. That is this. God this hero figure. Yes. And it's like you'd need to really actually just be comfortable with your weakness. And that's very well said being comfortable with your own weakness in limitations yet. And honestly that is like my goal in life to get there. I am not there yet. But I would I really really strive and want to be someone who's like unabashedly me. And I just it's so funny as much as American manhood says that it's about being strong. It's about being one of the heard it is American men hood is my favorite Seth MacFarlane show. Currently. I hate it American it ruined my life. No. I. I would say gave you a career. Well that to I'm blown. Yeah. It also gave me my current depressive episode. Would you create? Bullshit when you're growing up. Does you think that you are? Yeah. Would it be creative? I would Elliott, dude. I would just be making telling jokes about like pin wheels and Thuc and green grass, man. I'd be making stained glass wheels, more like art wheels. You know what? I mean. I probably have a little that. I sell jewelry in Phoenix literally. You're right, dude. I would be I would be a fucking human resources span. I would I would have nothing. No for sure I mean, all of my I mean, I'm sure I would have liked the creativity. Is it some way on the like nature end of nature versus nurture for me. But yeah, it's mostly situation. Talking sometimes about with comedy, creative also comes out performance. Just like if you have that desire to perform say at a young age. It's like, whoa. Where's that coming from? I wanna tension. Do. I don't I'm sure I'll get into it. I don't really feel like getting into the depression have been dealing with lately. But I will say when. I will say one thing about it. I said in therapy yesterday. That. The stand up is the only when I'm perf- literally while I'm performing stand up is the only time I feel actually safe socially because it's the only time I feel like I'm important to anybody. Wow. I know didn't appreciate oh. It's like, I don't know how to like. It's very real. I mean, that's what I've been dealing with. I like I had a thing happened over the weekend that like it's weird, man. It was very minor. But it triggered me into. Into just thing that I fight off constantly, which is the feeling that I have no one, and and it's been just so bad. And so that's why said that because it's true. It's like, and so like what you were saying about creativity. Like, that's it's funny because there are millions of reasons why I like stand up, it's my favorite thing ever. But. I, but the reason I'm doing it is that it makes me feel wanted. And maybe right. Maybe it's wrong. If you're putting that level of emotion on it. It's maybe not healthy. You know what I mean? Because it's not that. It's not the thing. That defines why people love you. You know what I mean? Like, I and you're my friend, and it has nothing to do. How hard you crushed in front of me or. But I don't know man, because I think that I think that anything you like can be boiled down to dark, emotional reasons. So I don't it doesn't bother me. And I don't think it's bad. I think it would be bad if I needed to crush. But I feel good after stand up. Whether I bomber or kill really dude affect me because I have. Bombing hurts my feelings for sure and it can it can really affect me. But I feel I'm not I'm not kidding. When I walk off stage. Don't matter what I almost every time. And it's because everybody paid attention to me for seven minutes. That's cool. It's crazy. It's it is. It's sad. It's definitely very sad. I'm very like. I'm very like. Yeah. I do. I do take it so hard if it's like, especially when it's new stuff. It's all like m I still finding like it's more like, that's maybe where I'm coming from it. Anyway, stand up is just not a healthy thing to invest ton of emotion into it can't be your main thing. Roese like lawless will. There's there's no rhyme or reason to it. It's just such a fucking anxiety attack of career that it's the more. You can really find happiness outside of it. I do it and do it professionally and treat it like a job. Then you will be happier. Totally. But I see people on. I think that I'm Razi bet. I'm better about that than many comedians. But and that's kind of what I'm saying. I'm certainly at this current moment. I'm not it's really. Very present that reality. But yet it's weird. It's not like an ever-present like I need this. I don't. There are other things in my life. But that's I think like this subconscious motivation for sure. Because I don't know. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe maybe it is that and it is unhealthy. And I shouldn't like, you know, just shut that thought down completely because it's something worth paying attention to. But you're right like actively search for other things in my life and try to like make sure I like maintain friendships and have other things that move me through life. But, but when it comes down to it, at least, a minor level throughout the day all day, I have interactions where I'm link where the entire interaction I'm saying to myself. They don't. They're not trying to get you. This isn't a cruel joke. They don't what you're saying matters. The fact you hear matters. I say these things to myself in my head all day every day. Well, I'm really sorry. This sounds like it's a really awful. Sorry. I'd give you a hug, but I don't want to give you the flu. Flew to. Thank you. I appreciate it, man. We were talking about do seriously. Thank you. I wanna talk more. Oh, well, before and before we get into talking about the suicide this week there two things we talk about real quick one of them is tour dates, but the first is that era statal is not a cat. Huge, news dot a cat human beings human beings. Our producer is a wonderful, man. He's the only good straight men in Hollywood. He's yeah. Dave an IRA monster. He's honestly, the only straight man that I consider to be alive. Cool because it's a spectrum. Being straight as a spectrum being is. Either day or. To talks Basque, you're straight until you're full gay did. Man. Yeah. No someone who's a fan of another podcast Aristotle produces which I didn't know that he produced other podcasts, but not cool. Not all right with me. Cut out your they thought he was a cat because they only talk about him as the as doddle in the corner. I guess which makes me question. How much this other podcasts respects you? It makes me think that we're your number one. We'll get you to say place. Totally. And. Yeah. Tour dates yet, dude. I I like without even meaning to have like kind of a bunch coming up. Now, the one the big one coming up is him. Night are co headlining two shows that theater on may twenty six fucking Portland. Siren theater. Guys. Santa did all the work things up on our websites. Hampton, young dot com. It's not on my website Ross, but you're putting other dates up there. So that's may twenty six Portland the sirens. Jeter to shows day than me what he'll yet. Coming up, man. We've never done this together. No sauce tonight. Doing sauce a local Austin. Five minutes each at each other at each other. Hey. Sorry. Roofer one straight. I was going to be dead before twenty somehow our material just syncs up perfectly Floyd style. So anyway, my girlfriend cat, my cat. Got depression to Britiah encamped album up with Dave Ross Zalba mitts fuck in seamless. Yeah. And then I also. I'm going to be in boulder on June second. And then I have I'm going to be in Santa Cruz and Eureka and San Francisco also in June, go on my website soon and those states will be up on the roster com. Check out those Portland dates at Hampton dot com. We'd love it. If people came out, we know all up there. So people can make all yeah. We're excited, man. I also been to Portland in a minute. And I love Portland, I decided I don't know what you're doing. But I'm going to stay there for like five days. I'm going to hunt down. Fred arm. A'sun zeal live. The show told me he lives thing, they say you understand that show. No, it's insulting Portland. I think it saying that is the only place Harry Brown your dad to that's not even her name. Do you? See fucking bikini kill is touring. Fuck dude. I wanna see Keeney kills so bad. All right. Well, not brands in bikini kill but. I got to see that ever tell you. I got to see lati- GRA at the smell. It's like. Yeah. Man. They opened for brat mobile. Add the smell if you're listening. You don't know these bans, we're not gonna know what I'm talking about. The smell is like a tiny bombed out punk venue in downtown LA. Which is like if you're fan of no age, the governor of no ages first album is just a building with no Asia at on the front. No age weirdo rippers, and that's the front of the smell and originally like when I first moved to LA in two thousand the smell was an illegal venue where people would drink forties in the alley and shit and the toilet was smashed it was fucked up, and and thus awesome because punk rock, but anyway, Latigo is Kathleen Hannah's band after bikini kill or two bands after yet bands after but whatever they over brat mobile and brat mobile is notorious lesbian, punk bands a lesbian rag band. And I was like in the back with my friend, Ted. And we were like cool. We're going to watch brat mobile, and they started playing and all of these gay women took their shirts off and started marching, and then this huge massive lesbian lady walked up to us. And just. Made us leave. We just had to leave. You gotta get out here. Yes. So everyone in the room could be a woman, and we were like got it. All right, and we left, and we got dinner a real ally would ripped his dick. Got it. Totally. And that women who kicked me out was Hillary Rodham. Kicked three out. Kick me out Clinton. Okay to cough a bunch. And let's sit this week. We're talking about how we Montauk. And he literally was a doorman that use a doorman famous doorman, Howie montoc. We'll be back. The new I'm loved it from McDonalds coming in it. Written by busting Timberlake. Plus timberlake. But I'm kind. Up on busting. Hey. Sup-, dude. Common. Did this is? So what'd you do? So good damn. Did we? Dude, I'm straight up common in this soup right now, I'm really really happy about busting Timberlake. I'm very very proud of. I'm proud that. I said bust in Timberlake. I'm proud that. You said I'm coming in. And I'm really proud of this whole thing this podcast. It's come to Portland and see twenty twenty six in Portland of all places where they don't allow humor. Oh my God. Okay. This week. We are talking about how we Montauk. How we do that. How do we do? We do that would up. I'm how do obser-? I'm sorry. I believe. Sorry, guys. I if how we men Dell's name with how we do that. I would watch Steeler no deal. And I would watch America's got talent. That was his failed show. I'm being totally serious was how Mandel before dealer. No, do or whatever. And America's got talent. He did how. No, we didn't guy on. I think really. It didn't go like it was a pilot. That was like, okay, you're you're not fucking. I'm not fucking around pretty positive how I'm pretty positive. I'm not sure it's not is it never really gotten made other than like a pilot. So yeah, this is okay. So Aerostat who Aristotle who is not a cat. Our wonderful producers just brought it up. How do it? Oh, how we do it. How we do that would have been a better name Hammett. How we do. And how we doing? We because how do it? Also sounds stupid. But how we do that sounds like you're crying. We do. Yeah. Guilty. How do that is a rapper is a soundcloud rapper? Okay. So there's more there's multiple how how do you do debts? We do that. Damn five thousand followers. Okay. How we do that. Interior snus though, how do you do? How do you get back to the how how do you do? How how do you do Mr. cavenaugh? How we do that. Remember how are? How I do that. I was drawn. Talk to the people got blackout drunk with. Like, my friends, smell and pickle. Steve talked to the people. I was actively a huge piece of shit with throughout my life. How we do that. I don't do that. Your honor? I don't do. I don't do that. But how we do that? He don't do that. Ladies gentlemen of the jury. If there is neither an ODA of you questioning how do you have to do? What is morally? Right. Give this man the electric chair. We don't know when you do that. We don't even know that he do. So I don't wanna hear the question how we do. Anyway, thank bullet dodge tallymen. I didn't do the show. It was a little dirty and didn't want to touch it. That is funny. And I don't know what you're. Does he doesn't touch anything? Oh, I didn't know that lives in a separate house and his family. Really? Yeah. You won't even touch his kids. What's shaved his head? He's also like no hair on me. Wow. Well, I think it was balding too. I don't wanna shame someone's mental illness. But it's like at least can you take some pills to be a dad. Billboard pay. We've got a feel for your kids, man. Take some pills dad as a son of others. I am maybe being a little cruel. Right. No, dude. You're not being cruel. I think maybe I was shaming someone for having OCD. But also thinking of his kids like like men, I mean when you have kids I mean, how we do that. How? Starting to feel terrible to have sex to have the kids. You gotta have desserts. Good point. Well, yeah. If you're OCD allows you to have sex he goes into convulsions, this is really comfortable for him. So he kind of works around it. You know? I'm just saying did he live in another house man how he does. Did he live in another house? They in her while they were having sex is what I'm saying. Absolutely Email her. Should maybe he did. Maybe like, I don't know. How do you have milked? It was a good Seinfeld that how do oh city people. The dick sturdy the pluses dirty. Okay. This week. We're talking about how we do that. How iman? He is literally famous for being a doorman, and they're like famous people knew him. He was born in nineteen fifty two. But his heyday was in the nineteen seventies. He was a doorman at Harare dance to rea- studio. Fifty four and palladium cool the life huge dance clubs in the seventies in fuck in New York City. That's interesting. Yeah. And so, and he was like the reason he was about sir at all those places as that. He was like the bouncer who would curate your night got hired as bouncer and then pretty quickly. He was like he would decide who would come into the club. That's what about your does ensure so there's people on the list, and he would manage the list, and then you would let hot people in specifically hot women, but he's very much in that studio fifty four like I'm choosing I've seen that. I mean, of course, we're way too old for that. But like I haven't seen that movie. But I'll guarantee you there's a character that play. AM? Yeah. Because then then posing guy, but he is just like very few. He had an artist brain, he was very creative. He was like so important as abound at these clubs that he had assistance. There would be in front with him with the list. Yeah. And there was another another guy named Mark. Who was like similarly popular as about ser, and so they would look at the crowd, and they would be like, okay? You seem like a person who would contribute something interesting to this party. So like people who have quick question for clarification. Actually. So a bouncer a doorman are these the same thing? I mean, like, he's not like active. He doesn't like beat anybody abound. Doorman are not actually the same thing. But and like an interesting wrinkle with this dude was he actually was like really accomplished martial arts. Also fight people got. Yeah. Okay. So all right. He's what he was all. But he was like a party artist guy who you wouldn't think was good at martial arts. So fuck with them. And then he would beat their S, basically. And they would leave cool dude of know, you really is the guy ever. Yeah. And as I was reading about it. I realized like I mean, basically what happened at these clubs over the weekend is that they would never close the party would never stop inside this club. So he was looking for like drifters and weird artists and people like Andy Warhol's hanging out at clubs and wants to meet fucking weirdos to talk to on acid or whatever. Yeah. So people like that. And people who pay and shit like that. And so yeah, that's what he did. Everyone knew who he was. He did this into the nineties. But as a result of being such a known. Doorman? He then got into the creative community. And. Okay. Here's here's a story about him doors, just like. In the. Does basically a big painting in you in your house. It opens when God closes the door. Man. He opens a window manned. Two or man. Defenders tour, man. Would be awesome house shove people's window. Parking lot. He hasn't window at all times heads through like, oh, sorry, guys. I'm done my windows done for the night. I gotta get a new window. I'm done. I'm done, man. That's I'm done, man. I'm done. No. I already did one thing. Wow. That's so funny. So one of the. One of the big figures at studio fifty four back. Then was Mick Jagger, Mick Jagger, Andy Warhol, Jean Michel Basquiat. Like, these are all people that would hang out at these places. They're all the same guy. And that was yeah. You never saw them in the same room. But I was reading about it. I found out that like the star at these clubs in the Jagger family was Bianca mix wife Bianca who I think was a supermodel, I'm not entirely sure everybody loved her and make was kind of in that scene the one tagging along. So I don't know exactly what happened. But at some point Howie, Montauk forced Mick Jagger to pay the six dollar cover to get into. Get into whichever club Palladian physical currency in years. Yeah. It's a sterile totally. And I my guess what happened is he was like acting king shit and how he's like bianca's coming in quickly in Kant, and he's like Jagger, and he was like that'll be six dollars this. It'll be six dollars to be. Wanna go in? Yup. Man. What a tool I would love to constantly tonight. Mick Jagger things. God. Oh, sorry, Jerry. This is the last soda. Always supposed to live. You can't see it. But AMT his dancing MC Jagger Jagger right now, I've got like Jaeger. Hager Maestra there. It is. I moved out of our bomb. Yes. So like by just being a famous scene person. He started doing other things he he's started writing articles in magazines, like popular, New York magazines, like paper and details, and I didn't know this details is now just like, maxim and paper is what paper is we all know it as the thing with the broke the internet photo from that Kim Carter. Yeah. That's why paper toilet paper joke during that whole. Yeah. For should be called shit shit. Tickets should tickets, totally absolutely Sharman Sharman magazine. I did forget that. That was what paper is basically most known for now. Yeah. It was like did become like headache. Get your. Solely. Totally. Can you believe Jessica Alba is wearing this piece of plastic? Curls. Will you if you're great beer pong? Kill them details. Details all women are stupid. And all men are strong details. Yeah. It's garbage. But back then details paper, we're like New York seen what magazines cool as fuck magazines. And so he wrote for details, especially a lot. And I found this blog post if someone who used to go to all these parties, and she dug up a poem that he wrote about being a doorman that was put in details, and the poem is excuse me, excuse me, who's in charge here. I mean who has the guest list? I must be on it. I am personal friends with just about anybody. You have ever heard of a love this. Yes. Great, right. Honestly like was admiring that like he was writing whole scenes on cocaine everyone's partying twenty four seven. You get to a typewriter. What's crazy to is? This guy went to Boston University. I mean smart. Knows kung FU doorman studio fifty four just being like. Jagger to go take a hike and shit. Let's go. Let's go. Totally. He's just like an ape. But no, he's like, yeah. Coolest door guy of all time. Mr. T, Mr. T stars door guy start it up chains that we get left behind at the clubs and you just start putting them on. And that's how true that's literally out started. Wow. Just find that. That's just like that's very similar to me rollin story about how he was like, you know, this story of why he's in black flag just the audition story. But I mean, what more wasn't audition story the story that I heard was like he was like childhood friends of MCI. And then when black flag was in DC like Dez like hurt his fucking throat or something and Henry Rollins jumped on stage and started singing and they were like oh. This guy. Like, oh, this guy's just like, Mr. T. Pitying fool whose left and right. With. People next at the time. Did he work in an ice cream truck? I remember that. Yeah. Yeah. That story up fast, but story, and then I think he just made him come in one more time where they're just ask. So you know, what I mean, like, he basically the funny thing is that was basically punk music was though is the Mike would fall down all the time. If anybody knew the song. Yeah, you could reasonably pick it up and just start screaming into the microphone, right? And all I get green bit. Can you believe he's hitting the notes? Good. Yeah. So then he he also became such a big figure that he ended up being in movies because these like celebrities would hang out here. How do you? How do you? He's. But how do? He was in that movie downtown eighty one that starred literally star John Michel Basquiat. He played a DJ in crush groove. Cool. Movie called cookie that I've never heard of. Yeah. Then in the other thing, he started doing was that he adds. Yeah. Crazy. He became a producer and promoter of his own shows live shows, he. Had a karaoke show that he ran with his DJ called Anita Sarko and back. Then apparently karaoke wasn't a thing. People knew what it was. But it wasn't. You couldn't go to any bar anywhere and do it. Because there weren't these like program machines, yet show totally there had to be a DJ in a band there and someone had to have made the tracks. Yeah. And so that was really popular. But then he had this really popular show called no in days that ended up getting so popular that it toward multiple continents. But he hosted as this fucking weirdo. And he apparently like knowing ten days was one of the first. Like publicly known places where Madonna played he was like friends with Madonna and also the beastie boys. He had a big hand in breaking Madonna and the beastie boys as pop culture mainstream acts trying to make me Jill. So this really cool. Just like, Mr. T. Well, he committed suicide. Really? Shoot a draw on this. It's like he's read in high, dude. Yeah. I mean, the suicide is very sad. Yeah. I'll get to it in a second. But I do want to say real quick if you wanna know more about this guy, Google, Madonna. Everybody knowing ten days because she played her first single ever at the show, knowing where he's hosting and there's a video of it in one thousand nine hundred eighty two awesome. Yeah. And folks going to. Bono who on Noah ten days? Everybody performance CIA black helicopters lizard conspiracy. Definitely usually watch it because these Tim hosting and trying to get the crowd like into it at the beginning. And they're not. And he's basically like, okay, whatever you suck. You're like a shitty fucking crowd. All right. Here's Donna she's incredible. And then she murders and the crowd. Cheers. Yeah. It's it's honestly, I found it in that blog post someone wrote about it. I watched it. And I was like damn this might be the coolest video I've ever watched. This is like the video of the coolest thing I've ever seen in green day at their high school. Totally dude. Yeah. So in the seventies is when he became a door and became famous as doorman, and he continued doing that through the eighties while he was this like New York City pop icon also made it through the seven. Yeah. Hand through the eighties and then in nineteen ninety one he was diagnosed with aids shit. Yes. The sticky. Wow. His very tragic. This is not okay. Yeah. And like. From being to aids HIV now are not a death sentence. But they were then, and I also more than that than not more than that. But but on top of that like, it was a even more homophobic world. And so like, it was just tragic. I don't know I'm not going to be able to if you don't know this -tory aids. I'm not going to be able to tell it to you. But I would recommend anybody like really look into the story of the aids quilts, totally before your movie, the normal heart. It's like sad. It's just you know, but it's good to know. Dude. Also, you know, it's like was really cool watch as far as like gay culture in the eighties nineties as a person who wasn't a part of it. It was a little bit is the is the the assassination of Gianni Versace CI FX series hasn't seen that. It's like you should watch Netflix. Now, it's so good. And I didn't realize how much it was going to be about. Gay culture in the ninety s which was cool for me to watch. But yeah, it was like, I don't know the world was not good to you. If you had aids vampire, and so his so his reaction was very extreme. He was like fuck this. Okay. I want to say something before I tell you. It's I wanna say something real quick. We got an Email from someone awhile ago. And the the subject line of the Email was suicide is not DIY euthanasia. It's from a person who has a chronic or terminal illness. I believe it's they've chronic illness that causes chronic pain. They don't have a terminal illness. And what they basically said in the Email was, and I the reason I'm not reading it as I don't know if you want it doesn't seem like you want me to oh you can. Yeah. You can read my Email on the podcast, but don't use my name. Okay. Well. Spirit of brevity. I'm just going to sort of summarize it can read it later. But. Basically what they say is it I have chronic illness. And it bothers me how you talk about people who have chronic illness and kill themselves because it makes it sound like your saying. Suicide is euthanasia and youth Aneka is a medical treatment for a disease, and she is right. She's right about that. And she was saying that the David Rymer episode, particularly it sounded like the Lang to her it sound like the language. We were using was saying like that you should kill yourself. If you're in pain, because we that's way way out or something that we think is valid and I have been wind to say this for awhile. I don't feel that way. I really don't feel that way. I don't think anything I think that you should stay alive. I think your life is so worth it. No matter how much pain you're in because we all deal with pain and your chronic illness. Like, I see you. You know, what I mean, I stay here with us. The reason that we talk about it this way isn't because I ever think it's good that these people kill themselves grand cents. It's because suicide is such a delicate subject that we have to manage multiple things we have to manage on the one hand. Not letting anyone who listens to our podcast think that we endorse suicide because we don't we like we need you to stay here. Never do it. That's never our message. But at the exact same time, we don't want to invalidate people suicidal thoughts because we're trying to make people feel better and help them. And so it's tough to ride that line when we talk about things like this because we're like trying to at the same time say stay here with us. But also your pain is valid. So if in navigating those waters, we have made it seem like we think suicide make sense for those people. I am deeply sorry. I really really am. Because I don't feel that way. And I'm almost crying as saying this that I could have possibly made someone feel like I think they should die. Like, I don't feel that way. It's just very difficult because. To have a podcast where we're talking about understanding pain. It's stuff to talk about. And I'm sorry. I mean, we're we're clumsy. We're also done and we're not professional a big. So I don't think guilty of any crimes because I'm done. To them. You know, I think I'm not really trying to tell anybody how to feel about it. And usually my kind of take away with all these just to really not put too much judgment on whatever their reasons are exactly it's like, you can't really know. And that's the thing. That's well says that's what I was trying to get to both both stay alive. Please God stay alive. But also, we don't wanna put judgment on how you feel. And so that's why especially we say like we understand where you're coming from. And if saying we understand where you're coming from sounds like you should do it. That's not what we mean. Ever. I promise you also ever tried just chilling. The least helpful. I don't know maybe just take a chill pill. It does sound like us talking about it at all maybe trigger you, and it's a very triggering podcast. So like just please like in hearing talk about these things remember try to remember that we're coming from a place of trying to keep everybody safe in every way. And so we don't want to be any judgment for real was that especially the listeners for real for real for real. We really do like. So that said he got aids, and he was like I wanna die. And I think that's good bomber. To run a podcast. Dave over to my left. You're talking about how we would ever do that. How air style turn it into a cat over on my right? Neither don't think. That's good. Good repeat. I don't think. That's good. Yeah. But that's that's how he reacted. And it's like, and this is kind of what I'm talking about. It's a hard line. Right. It's hard to not to be like, I understand you're paying especially if you're living in a world where everyone's like fuck you if you're gay if you have aids your gay so fuck you twice. Ever straight outta Compton? When they the doctors telling easy has aids, but he doesn't it very well out. Hey. Hey, well, wait ago. Blew it. Yeah. No, one can talk to them. It's just like no one will visit. It's so fucking sad, dude. Yeah. No one people. They're all these scenes in movies. I've seen where it's like. Dallas buyers club. No. All of his friends are like you have aids. Fuck you all loses is entire friend group. Yeah. So this is what he did June seventh. He invited of bunch of people to his house for a party on June, seventh nineteen ninety one it's birthday party. It's your darling. We love you, very very very very very much since this started humming. And it was all out. This is very interesting. And then twenty people came to his suicide party. Holy. Yeah. Wow. So a lot of people who didn't did they know is going to be. Yes, they knew decided Vicky invited a lot more than twenty people and twenty people came and one of the people that attended the party by phone was Madonna. Actually, he invited away less and a lot more show, which is even weirder. A Facebook event the flyer. Free pizza here. I saw this on chuckle monkey. That's a reference. No one will understand maybe not even Hampton ninety than me. But it was the open mic list in the early. Two thousands chuckle monkey dot com. No, I didn't get the before. Alan the beckon comedy bureau. Boy got saved by bureau. Gour? So he's people come and he throws a party there. Like, there's like, dancing, and drinks and food and drugs and everybody gets fucked up, and then he takes five like in front of everybody is like by takes five second all and goes to sleep. And then the rest of the people continue partying kind of goes to, you know. Sleep. Yeah. But yeah, you passes out into slumber and everyone's like shit. Okay. Were partying him into the after. King Burson deep into the night. He fucking wakes up and people are still partying. The five off dead. It's a lethal dose. But it didn't kill right. You wakes up, and he's super fucked up people are partying and they've destroyed his house, and so he wakes up, and he's like fuck you for destroying my house. Why'd you destroy just like bitches everybody out weird. And then takes twenty-second all in dies. That's how this fucking do died. From. Fuck as into just die. Let's like a pelican amount of pills. Yeah. You can't swallow that I want. So it takes several okay. Just keep going from a minute of eating pills. They took all hundred aspirin. I'm like, she's what did they take him four days? So hard to get that build on my throat hard pills to swallow. It's hard to to take pills in order for me. Yeah. How bills did he put him in just put him at the bottom of his bowl? Makes cereal. Committed suicide. Well done. Fucking in saying, yes. Surprised? I mean, here's the thing that it's cool part of me wants to be like, that's cool cool store. But a part of me also like it is I would be really I don't think I could ever not think about how my friend killed himself in front of me. I know even though I'd be like I knew it was gonna die. But I would just be I think, well, let's the weird underlying thing this entire story. Like, we're I'm listing. All these details about this, dude. All we're talking about is how cool it is. 'cause this whole story sounds so cool. But then you take a step back. Like, basically, this guy just did drugs for decades and was famous for that for doing drugs and helping other people do drugs correction by doing drugs that best. Yeah. And so then he killed himself in this really dark fucking disconnected way. Everyone in that room was disconnected from real life to such an extent that they watch their friend. I and kept partying. That's why it's disco dude. It's disconnected from reality. It's just go. It's not disc. It was actually originally called. No, what's I guess. He couldn't. Couldn't get rid of the party culture. Yeah. It's a party knows how to express himself. Yeah. I guess or I guess like twenty I was just I don't wanna put a judgment on it. I just judging on it. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe it was like literally, maybe it's maybe it was like fuck. Maybe they just I wasn't that party. Maybe they were like, maybe there was all this crying, and everyone is constantly and they were like wool. But we and maybe everyone in that room truly felt like he had no other option. I don't know. And then he woke up and started yelling at us that we left a bunch of ships out. And we were like, oh, yeah. He. He must have dead like you. Checking all is like. It's like a tranquilizer. Right. Isn't it? I don't know what it is. I haven't done many tracks. I've only done Vicadin is that the tranquilizer, oh it is sleeping pill. Fuck okay. So we took five you should probably done more. If you're yeah. Totally done this drug culture for so long. Maybe just maybe should I do should I take a little league? I don't wanna overdose. I just wanna die. I'm gonna make cigarettes and we'd. Watch out. I'm gonna mix vodka with a little bit of nutmeg. Nutmeg? Yeah. Wow. Dude. That's crazy. So wait, he invited Madonna and she didn't come and she was like, oh, I have a thing. But I'll call it. I'll Skype I'll Skype into your suicide party, basically Lord. I mean, it was nineteen ninety one. She was pretty busy. Is point. That's why she's fucking vanilla ice. Fuck. Lucidly at the time is busy wrapping with turtles. Man. Yeah. It's weird. Isn't it? These these episodes we do where where it's like. I don't know this just tough where the life is very interesting, and it seems like a lot of fun. And then they go and a crazy way. It's like there's a lot of jokes to be made. And and there's a lot of like interesting story to talk about. But then you come around to like, I mean, it's still tragic. It's just always is like always would have been better if he had stuck around. Yeah. I mean for sure I mean, w if he hadn't got debilitating disease, but it's also like, you know, try and come to some of these stories with just understanding, and you're like, I have empathy for that. Totally. I like hearing that story because it also is very human. You know, sometimes like people do have these very exceptional lives that are kind of like, wow, they're crushing it killing it. And that's not like the takeaway the story. But it's like it's just interesting to. Always see these dimensions of people's lives. And how. Sometimes you can understand it. And sometimes you can't understand it. But you have to come at it with empathy. Human beings. It is very hard to outwardly show empathy for everyone, and like it's actually not difficult for you to do personally, but it's hard to be perceived as that definitely because right? Talking about because I say, I totally empathize with this dude who wanted to kill himself. And then someone else could be like are you saying I should kill myself. I mean, no, no, I'm not. Play the podcast backwards. That is what we do tell you it, syncs up instantly. Dude. Pink Floyd's, the wall, syncs perfectly with pink Floyd's dark side of the movie, you told me that came out later that the wall was about Roger waters girlfriend who dumped him. I'm going to have to go on this is that you. Yeah. I I've been thinking a lot about it recently. God I want that to be true so bad. This like epic thing that everyone who ever went to college is like he's talking about the system and just turns out he was said bring about building a wall between you and your your wife, and then she leaves you. See all the problems now to mean different things just break-up sometimes Walzer about immigrants than sometimes. It's about feelings, dude. Dude, I'm going to build a wall and make my wife pay for it. Being alone. Great again. That's what you got. I'm gonna make being loan. Great again, the new system PS four. I'm playing my new system. I really enjoyed that episode. Thanks so much for bringing. Thank you, man. Yeah. That was good. I hope listening. You got something out of it. You maybe feel a little less alone, a little less sadder or whatever scares who was tied horny less suicide less. A little less full little content. A little less conversation and guys check up patriots episodes that we're putting up lots of fun bonus content up there. Oh, dude kills himself predator. What movie? Risk cutter. The risk cutter. Predator does kill him. So yeah. Let's episode predator. Cool. Yeah. We're we two bonus episodes with both of us for the five dollar patrons each week. It's patriot dot com slash suicide buddies. We're going to that right now the sewed will be about the suicide in predator and. Yeah. I don't know. Just thank you guys for listening alive. Guys, check out tour dates albeit and Seattle may twenty fourth and twenty fifth, and then Dave and together in Portland may twenty six but feel free to check out rotates. I'll put stuff on. On my website. Dave Ross dot com by the end of today. Yeah. And yeah, we wanna come up. All right. Let's do the fuck it. Dude, fun. Thanks bye. Thank you so much for listening to suicide buddies. Remember, these suicide jokes that we tell we do it because we are dark people that joke around about our own pain. And we hope that that'll help you make you laugh, it's not because we think people committing suicide is funny or that we take suicide lightly. So if you're dealing with suicidal thoughts, please please call the national suicide prevention lifeline right away. The number is one eight hundred two seven three talk. They're always there. They will hear you. And they know you've been through so call if you need it or reach out to people in your life, or whoever there are resources feel better stay here with us on earth. Glad you're alive and thanks again. For listening. Podcast network.

Dave Ross Zalba Portland New York City Seinfeld Madonna Michael chiklis Jeff Ross Carl Heston president Hampton America Mick Jagger Montauk David Rymer Politico MC Jagger Jagger James Gandolfini John Wayne producer
Martin Primeau  Partie 1  Trouver son chemin du doctorat  la communication scientifique

Papa Phd Podcast

39:27 min | 7 months ago

Martin Primeau Partie 1 Trouver son chemin du doctorat la communication scientifique

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Stuart Vevers on Creativity

Dream It Real

42:02 min | 1 year ago

Stuart Vevers on Creativity

"Welcome to dream it real a podcast for those who dream brought to you by coach. I'm your host heaven. Got to each week. We're talking to inspiring guests about how they're making their dreams a reality dreams for themselves their communities in the world coach and I have been collaborating on this as a part of their dream, it real initiative, all about supporting the next generation and their dreams for the future. So to discuss creativity who better than someone who literally has creative in their title. That's right. We have coaches very own executive creative director, Stuart Vive on the podcast this week, fashion is about doing something new having a unique point of view. I think it's not about pleasing everyone. It's stunning up for what you believe in. I think there's a real power. So Stewart vivas has been the creative director at coach for five years now bringing a unique spirit to the brand that's been celebrated by both press in customers around the world. So in his work, he's collaborated with a lot of people from the rue Dr tasters to Mickey Mouse to Selena Gomez. I feel like that's a wide cultural spectrum, and I'm very curious to hear more about his influences and how he approaches those collaborations. I'm excited to share the conversation with you all take a listen. Welcome Stewart to dream it real. Thank you very much. So this whole episode is about creativity, and I wanna ask you point blank. How do you define creativity creativity is dreaming? Using your imagination to create something new in your head that then can become reality. But it it's, it's really about dreaming. Yeah. Yes. And allowing yourself to dream. I think it's also you've to allow yourself to dream, you've got to play, you're gonna lay in your mind in your day to day life. I think if you can introduce joy and play to me. That's how I spot creativity. You know, like doing, like, come up with the most crazy ideas, whether the they seem incredibly Embiid or impossible, you know, like that process of just. Throwing things out. It it's when you can just catch something that actually, you can achieve will you can create. But I think you've got a, you've got to go there, I think to, to get those ideas to tap into that creativity. When's the last time you allowed yourself to like play like that? I do every day, every day because I think I really challenged myself when I'm working with my team when I'm working with people. Listen head people's ideas. Don't don't you know? You know, you never know where that next big ideas gonna come from. So encourage it like, don't be too practical. Don't go straight into the. Oh. Well, like just let it, let it happen. You know. Can you think of any examples like that? I see. Yeah. So we have a Moscow coach. Dinosaurs has become the mascot for, for the new coach and people all around the world. Love, I traveled to China to Japan, people talk to me about Rex amazing. But I, I remember the moment when Rex happen, I was working with some of the team, and we were playing we were playing with different images. We, we, we were paying with ideas for sweater. And somehow we landed on the idea of this kind of this, dinosaur this t Rex who was kind of ferocious, but cute. It was one sweater in one fashion show. And since then, like, you know, it's she's become. Phenomenon. And, you know, if we hadn't been playing and open in that moment, Vecsey wouldn't have, you know. Let's put a t Rex on a sweater, and it was very first fashion show. And that's an easy people responded immediately. You're right people. It is a conversational item and it's outrageous, how much I enjoyed the, the dinosaurs. So the job of being creative director of a big brand is, like a huge task, but I wanna get into your background. I I wanna start there and then we're going to work towards what you do at coach. So you grew up in South Yorkshire. Pointing south Doncaster South Yorkshire. It's, it's real. It's really real. And then my parents are from Carlisle come rea- so we, we moved there. So the both in the both cities of England. So how did that influence the way you see the world? It's very different from New York, it's very different from New York. I mean, I grew up in a, an a normal working class, family. I didn't know I didn't know that the fashion industry existed. This was. How did you find out? I found out really from going out clubbing. I was I'm tall. So I could get into nightclubs at a young age, fourteen fifteen I started going out, and it was really the idea of dressing up. It was when I started to look up my Zien ze. And that's when I started to. To learn about designers and that that was was was from clubbing people wearing at that time, I remember one of my favourite looks was an all white. Ooh. Look, putty, white jeans loving white luck. Yeah. I also used to make some pieces. But like my grandmother, she was always a creative working with a sewing, machine making things. I'm she used to help me, make my clubbing outfits. Yeah. Yes. This habit. Yes, she, she was very encouraging. A naughty grandmother. In a good way. The nasi. So at eighteen moved to London to study fashion at the university of Westminister. How did fashion school in the city change your perspective or how did that affect you? What was that? It was so transformative because, you know. Growing up in these smaller cities. Suddenly, there was so much to see in so much to learn new people to me, and it was just it. I mean it was amazing when your you're still young when you're still the age. It's just I mean, I, I tried to initially I just tried to do too much. I was working in a ball, five nights a week kind of support myself, then going out and trying to say. It was the first year I definitely I try to do too much. But yeah, it was just it was it was so exciting. And studying something that, that, you know that I really loved that I had had up until fairly recently, just hadn't been on my radar as something that I could possibly consider doing that was amazing. What is it like to, to study fashion, because I this thing, a lot of people have interest in. Maybe they feel like they need an education to get into it or feel like they can be a little more self taught. Yeah. What was that journey like for you? I, I knew that I needed some structure. I knew I needed I, I wanted to learn. I wanted to learn how to make clothes pattern cutting. I, I wanted that teaching so that's why I chose the college I, I went to was because it had a good balance between. A freedom to, to express your creativity, but, but also enough structure that I felt like I was really learning. Would you recommend that path for someone who's interested in doing? I think everyone has to find their own paw. I think it's, you know, it I have friends who didn't go to college or dropped out of college, and I have friends who you know, went to different colleges. I think it's, it's for me it was right to go to study. But I think it's I think they're the lots of different parts. So after you, graduated, you move straight to New York at three bold moves. What drew you to the city? Did you feel like he just had to be there? There was definitely something really interesting happening in New York at the time I, I was really just seeing it through. Magazines tv. But had become during my final year, kind of my, my ambition was to go to New York. I'd never what so much to the was helmet. Lying had just started showing in New York acting Karan that time it was probably also the time in fashion that was suited to American style. I mean, the, the story of how I ended up in in New York is, is, is interesting because I think that's where miam- Bishen kick tin, because I think creativity is so important as a designer, but it's also you've got to take action. You've got, you know, dreaming and creativity with action remains a dream. And, and actually a friend of mine was interviewing full for Calvin Klein and she, I persuaded heart somehow to tell me whether interview is taking place and I just turned up a knocked on the door. Yeah. And it's one of the reasons she ended up offering me job. And so that's. Since then, you've, I'm going to list, a few the casual brands that you haven't worked with no major brands like Louis Vitton Jiangxi booked Hager. I can never say this to take then. Mulberry. Lou Lou FA. And then that's before you became coaches creative director, five years ago. That's quite that's quite a path. No, I've been very fortunate. I think that definitely has something to do with my background. I always feel I have something to prove and, you know, it's that that feeling has never left me. I think being very open minded to, you know, I've lived in a lot of different countries, the UK, France Spain. It's leeann. And now the US I think I've, I've always. Taking a Cianci's and, and, you know, when I've had these opportunities, I've just I've just I moved my whole life to, to, to, to be able to work with these amazing companies because, you know, this is my passion and I, I have sacrificed to the things to, to from my from my work, totally. What are talk to me, a little bit more about your design style? What is the design principles you live by? How do you think about these things, I think it's always changing is always evolving. But there's a the idea of cool means and what cool has men over the is something that really fascinates me youth culture today and in the past. It's, it's a real fuss nation. And so that's a recurring an inspiration, an I, I say about, you know, when someone has a coach piece when they put a jacket on, I want, and then just instantly feel just a bit cooler. That's kind of one of my the things that inspires me. What was what was cool when you were growing up? I think I mean obviously cool is a word that it's open to. Yeah. To me. It's a certain rebellious nurse. I think it's about not trying too hard, you know, like having an effortlessness in in your style in in, in your behavior. I think that's for me. Will what cool. Yeah. I love that music and counterculture play an important role in what inspires your work in your collection. What is your go-to song to music, and your life? How does how does that play a role in your work? I love pop music. I've always loved pop music. I I love pop music. I love pop culture. It's always changing. But I've been having a real revival of the Smiths. Which, I guess you might not define us pop music. It's popular pop. Pop. That's fine. I feel like fashion is pretty misunderstood world. Probably 'cause there's a million moves about it, and they're all say the same thing also like sex in the city or something like everyone's reference point. Maybe what's something, you think people misunderstand about fashion or something. You've seen in movies, and you're like that's not accurate. I think it's it's often perceived as a very superficial world. My experience of it is very different. You know, I've have very deep friendships with people who I've met through walk, and it can often be very friendly and supportive industry. And I think, yeah, I think it's perceived as most superficial. It's also. It's like this is my passion. It's a lot of people's passion, and it's not only mine, it's, it's the people who I work with who make the clothes or the bags you know, there's a lot of skill and love in, in how things created, and I think sometimes people forget that, you know, like I love going to visit fat trees and work with the people Huns on hooah making product and this is a lot of people's love. It's the passionate the the. The thing they have spent years training to do. And it's yeah, the I do sometimes, especially in the design, like when you're thinking about designers, you may not think about the entire team goes into. Yes. Making every single detail of the piece that you love. No, I feel like that's also true. Podcasting, people forget, there are other people at work, and I certainly I certainly don't do this alone. I work with incredibly talented, people who the interactions that we have the conversations, sometimes the design process is just playing it's like getting together and dreaming of what what's possible, do you ever get overwhelmed by maybe, like, so coach, for example as a seventy six year history, do you, do you get overwhelmed when you're stepping into some like taking on a project where you're stepping into history. I mean this definitely a certain amount of pressure. But I also think that's good. You know it it gives you drive up in the morning. You know. Yeah, but at the end of the day, you know, it's I do what I do. And I, I truly love what I do and I think it's just about doing your best and being collaborative and, and hopefully that's going to come through. So I wanted to talk a little bit about your time at coach specifically over the last five years, you've been celebrated for an American spirit that uniquely bring into the brand. I feel like I I have some reference points for like, Americana, but I want to know what you're thinking, and how you magin those kinds of things. When I when I first joined coach, what excited me most was, I, I was feeling this re this a real shift in, in the fashion world. Like, you know, the way people addressing today was it was changing dramatically much more casual more relaxed. And I thought what an amazing opportunity to be at an authentic. American house with this great heritage and being able to reference those those icons of American style. The white teasha sneaker the Hyundai the denim being able to reference these, these pieces like quintessential American clothing, archetypes from an American house. Just had a lot of it just felt right? Had a lot of appeal to me, you know, coaches a down to earth, real house. You know it's. It's America's house of leda, and the something about that dant worth quality that I really love, I think it really sets coach apart. And I think it means we can be less formal. We can be warmer. We can be friendly. I think that's, that's one of the things that I really love about coach. How do you take a creative vision and apply? It to such a big brand. There's already so much happening here. I've been given a lot of freedom. You know, I've been given you know, when I first arrived at coach, and there was a real desire for change. And that's what really excited me that's what really drew me to the role, and I was given the freedom and support to do that. And you know, we will really bold. We we changed a law and we did a lot of things differently. And I think that's one of the things I love about fashion. It's always changing. It's always moving it. I think at its best it should reflect the times, we'll Evan. Can you tell me more about what you've changed? I mean, the probably the biggest thing I mean, we've changed the aesthetic direction of the house. The we've created a real identity for Guyon goal. But the main way we did that was by introducing clothing. So when I joined we started to show at New York fashion week, which was the first time coach had ever done that. And like it's I mean Supra exciting. I mean, very nerve racking, you know, before presenting that very first collection, which was, you know, eighteen Lux. You know, I I we pulled it. Together in a very short time I didn't know what people are gonna think because I think introducing ready to for the first time, you know, it's a can be a challenge. You know, it's not something has there, isn't something that you'll referencing from the past. It's a brand new idea. But in many ways that blank slate gave me the opportunity to really to dream and to try something totally new. But after that first presentation with it's just eighteen looks like the response was so strong and people just were like great. This looks like coach. This looks like coach clothing. This looks like the coach girl. It gave me it gave me and also the company is self encouragement to, you know, push things further and become student. I've been watching a lot of project. Runway's like I know tiny smidge of what your your day is like, when you're trying to make ready to wear and you have to make eighteen. Eighteen. Yeah. Few that's. A fashion show is, is usually more, like forty to eighty luck. So this was very small in comparison, yet move. Yeah. I knew it from what? I'm curious you brought a lot of collaborations into into how coach creates you've collaborated with everyone from the road. Dr tate. To Mickey Mouse to Selena Gomez. Why is collaboration important to you? How do you how do you pro- those collaborations? I worked with Marc Jacobs that Lou return. And he was, you know, he had created some incredible club rations. And I think that training was definitely you know, it's stuck in my head because I think at its best collaboration does, is it, it really stretch your your you'll boundaries. It pushes your boundaries. It forces you to see things in a different way to see someone else's point of view someone else's aesthetic. And, and I think that's healthy for, you know, it creates it's creating attention. I also think when it works that tension it can be really surprising. You know, some of the club rations you mentioned people weren't expecting them. They didn't see coach the they didn't imagine coach and Rudolf Tate's together coach and Disney and I think coach. And Keith hiring these things that, like, it's, it's surprising. It's you know but, but creatively what I love about it is that I get to learn. I get to try new things. I get to push my own boundaries. I I've learned a lot from the people, I've collaborated with, I know you're working with Michael Jordan, the first ever face of coach, men's, what's that collaboration been like what you when you have a Michael Jordan in your corner, like you can't go wrong? But also, how do you perch that? I think the great thing with Michael is that we've gotten to know each other over a few years. Designing for him. It's amazing. It's, it's he's what's great about Michael. He's got a very strong point of view. But also, he's really using this experience Salah. And like he's asked a lot of questions. He wants to understand the process more. And that's you know, that's that's great to be around. We had him on the podcast. He's a great listener. Yeah. He did ask that question. Michael jordan. So I know through coach. Create your now also inviting customers to collaborate. What's it been like to see customers able to interact with the design process in that way? I feel like that's very rare. Yeah, it's really interesting. I often searched that hashtag. It's, it's about expression writes about choosing a collie. You love fashion is about bringing joy and making people feel good. So if you've been part of the process, and you create something that, that's unique, that's really special to you. I think it, it makes you know, that piece just all the most special more. Yeah, I want to meditate a little on what you think about in terms of creativity where you're getting inspiration. What is it like a typical New York is such a great city to find inspiration. What's like a typical Sunday for you? Where are you pulling from an in your world today? I mean, honestly, the, the most important inspiration for me is the people who I work with the people who I can have those conversations with where we can challenge each other, because that multiple people coming together, whether it's just two of you or small group like. Throwing ideas around it just build like something. Somebody says, you know, you can then jump off that it's working with people to me as biggest inspiration. Yeah. Brainstorm. But in terms of the city, it's like it's I recently moved how. And I have a whole new subway. Wait train, and like, it's the something about that, that something about this city, that's so unique, like just the pace an energy of people like I just love that New York, just people from all over the world here, that is to me, something that makes New York. So special is not it's full of character and personality in individuals. You know, I think that's, that's super inspiring love New York, especially in the spring, New York in the spring up, salute. You feel like things are possible. The winter's over humans weren't meant to live like this of the winter, too, though my love snow day. New York days. We've been asking all of our guests this what some advice, you'd give your younger self. I think an advice, I would give to my younger self ole for a, you know, someone studying fashion, or dreaming about studying fashion. Is you really got to stay true to your instinct fashion, as about doing something new, having a unique point of view. I think it's not about pleasing everyone. It's about having your own unique point of view stunning up for what you believing. I think there's a real power in that beautiful. We have some very audience questions from social media, and they are a little random. Which I love, if you could bring one cultural aspect of the UK to New York City, what would it be from Jonathan JD Bishop? Wow. I mean, I've been working twenty three years now and I've only spent three of those in the UK, so I'm I, I, I have family in the UK, and I visit often, what would the one, I think there's a dry sense of humor. I don't know whether that's a cultural thing. I sometimes miss that. Yeah. It's, it's yeah. It's, it's, it's something that I totally feel you, I feel like my version of this one New York City thing that one American bring to the UK is, I don't care for the way you all say schedule. Chadrel wrong. And I don't like it. So just if everybody in the UK listening to me, you know, just FYI I how I feel about it. Okay. Another question from palm tree with a lot of ease in there. What are some tips and tricks, you use for self encouragement? That's a really good one. Okay. So I have this thing that I've learned over a number of years when I when I'm trying something new, and I get that anxious feeling you know, that feeling kind of inside that you like who is guy yet, you know, gut like I've learned that, that's a signal that you might be creating something new that you that you have to trust that feeling. So I use it as a signal that I might have hit on something new that something. Creatively? I've had a breakthrough an think it's the anxiety of Munis that I think you've gotta like how trimbe like okay. This is good. So it's kind of turning. Yeah, I just run away from that trying to suppress, that's really hard. But you're right. It's definitely a sign, but if you if you turn it into a signal of, like, okay, this, this could be a breakthrough then this, you can kind of accept it more and, and joy and away and enjoy it. I love that. Next question. What's your morning, beauty regime? This is from Benjamin Seidler. It's my husband who may you may know yes, it's very simple. It's very quick. I'd done. Why not? I recently got into linked products. Really good really enjoying them bit of Estee Lauder bit of Clini. But it's really fast really. Simple. I love that as a gay designer. What do you do to support the LGBTQ community from D Bishop? I, I live my life, you know, I let my family. Which I think is really important. I I'm also very conscious that, I'm you know, I work in an industry. That's you know, very tolerant, very supportive of, of me. Also in a city that, that protects me in many ways, and my community. I'm conscious that a lot of people don't have that, you know, they don't have that in their life, you know, I experienced a lot of difficult times growing up. You know, it means that where I have the opportunity to give people a voice to give people a -tunities from my community. I, I really I really welcome. Question from Eliza described the coach, girl or woman in three words within tick American dream. Ooh, thank you so much for talking to us Stewart. I feel like there are a lot of people who may not know all about the fashion world are going to be excited to check out what you are doing. And for a lot of insiders. We're like, ooh, how does he do it? Thank you very much. It's been really fun. Yeah. Thank you. Hey like what you hear? Well discover more about the coach fam- and what the brand is all about at coach dot com. Now, let's get back to the show. Okay. So to keep the conversation going about creativity. This week, we're joined by special guests and siblings. Satchel and jackson-lee. You may know them because their father is the economy director, Spike Lee an earlier this year. They all three of them collaborated on a short film for coach starring Michael Jordan. And the film is called words matter. And it's highlighting the importance of values like courage, and inclusion love that family band. Yes. Like their dad. They have very intentional approach to creativity. They're not just trying to tell an interesting story. But to also create real change in real conversation. So we're very excited to hear them. Talk about creativity in how they work we asked actual and Jackson to interview each other. And I'm very excited for y'all to take a listen. This is what happens when you put a sister and brother in the studio together and turn on the mics. Hi, my name is actually I'm twenty four years old. And I am the creative director of Drome, which is a clear, art, and fashion magazine. I also freelance. Right. And Acton Steve other things. Jackson-lee and twenty two years old. I'm sure designer designed three shoes for pan Jordan, also them director, and we're about to interview each other for the very first time on thing we've ever done this before we got a hatful of questions here random questions, and we're going to pick one in one and go through it Cl I'm gonna pick I write getting know each other. You know, let's get deep what sparks your creativity. I think living New York, there's so much like inspiration. I think it'd be like street is run way. Everyone is their own creative director managing their own brand. The tape very seriously. So I think just going up in New York, from the people the buildings like the culture, everything. And also a lot from the past think to Collado inspiration from like boss, Kiat, war, hull, Gordon parks. Most types of also. A lot of music. And that's a good answer. Would you see yourself in ten years time the good one, I like that one and twenty four? Now, I feel I in ten years. I like this question because I think there are a lot of things here. Right. I think typically, we think about, like money, we think about, like, status, we think about success, but I feel like recently and not necessarily just like recently, but I think that there is like a whole emotional like arc that I'm trying to take where I just really wanna be like in tuned with myself, and who I am, as a person, and the way that I relate to other people, I think that I've done a lot of work to allow myself to be more vulnerable now than I have been before. And I think that comes with just growing up anyway, but I hope in ten years, I just I more fully integrated as a person that, like, I like trust myself. More and that artistically Justin every cent and every sense, I think it's about just like kind of getting to the core. And also like you're thirty nobody cares. I just I wanna be like a, a better version of myself also, like I'm going to grad school. At some point, you know, a little continue to do all of my creative work as wells than yours. Yeah. I think so. I mean probably what year what is two thousand nineteen probably like two thousand twenty next year twenty one. No a little bit together. I we don't need to do the study brothers, and we don't need to do that. All right. Your turn. All right. Don't give me the politician answer on this one, drew name three people who inspire you. And why so first on the list, John Michel Basquiat, I think that he is a person was more free than many, many, many people on this earth. Have achieved a part of freedom is being free to not care like what other people's than other people think what the status quo as but he's a true soul, those first person my neck's people, I think, were are mom and dad, and then firing because on their own. They're two of the most incredible people are mothers, a lawyer author, producer and raised us and didn't amazing job. Our father, obviously an amazing director musing writer, not such an amazing actor but he tries. Has an actor really. Yeah. I don't know. I just can't it's a different type of performance. It's not if you're looking for, like, realistic, like heavy deep, you're not gonna find it, but I think he's charming other stowing, but no, but seeing them this on their own. I think is inspiring. But also sing them to come together. I think is amazing for us. Both to watch shows us like how a marriage should run. All right. You pick a question. What's one of the words describes our brother sister relationship as interesting? I think we're very different. Yeah. I just want everyone to hear this. You know, whenever I'm on a phone call with my sister, and I say, all right bye. Love you. She has never ever ever said love you back to me. Well, you're not alone in that. So I don't think you should take it personally asked one of everyone to hear that just for the record. Okay. Yeah. But that's just like I don't know. That's how I am. But again right talking about growth. This is like the vulnerability thing that I'm actively working on. You know what I mean? So I'm like, okay, whatever. I also try to explain to people like, don't take a perfect, and they're like, Why's your sister's like washy some mean to me, they don't take it further just how she is exactly. Why are you pressed? Lord manner film, he collaborated on with coach encourages inclusion optimism courage, why these values especially important today. Well, I think that they are important because inclusion is important, because I think that we can get very narrow minded, a lot of the time and we can kind of put ourselves in a bubble but you only benefit from having people around you who, like, have different opinions and thoughts and viewpoints. But anyway, optimism, I'm a Sagittarius. So like optimism is like my like bread and butter, basically, like what other choice. Yeah. Do you not feel that from me? Now I'm like the most optimistic person. I know because what else is going to happen. True true. What else what early? Gonna be fine. Don't worry about it. And then courage crew is really hard. I think it's really it takes a lot of work to be courageous. And I think, but here's the thing about just like everything in life will tip you can do anything as long as you practice and practice. You need to you. Need to practice being courageous? It's not easy. It's not something that comes naturally, and I think this is a big another myth that we've heard about life is that all of these things are supposed to come naturally, but that's not true. It takes a lot of work, you know, and it takes experience. So to be courageous, you know, it's not easy, and you might be concerned about what other people think about you. It takes practice. It takes. Just faith in yourself. You know, these are all good words that we should all try to think about. Yeah. Okay. This is the last question for you. What is your dream? Mine Jim is to achieve happiness. I think thought something that people should focus on more is like achieving shoe happiness. But also, my gym is to achieve is the tree, a creative agency in decreed a legacy that will outlast me and also that I will build off of the amazing legacy in grand Rick that our family and antecedents have made frost, like you sought to become amazing family on both sides, so making both of making them proud and building up off of that also, when I die, I want the day named after me on, I mean, like Jackson, loosely day holiday school. Yeah. I, I hear you say that happiness. And I think that's true. But what I will say, too, is that I don't think happiness is a place. It's not like nirvana. And I feel like sometimes we can. Get caught up and just trying to get to that place. Where will eventually be happy like one day. I'll be happy or if this. Yeah. I think that everything is a process. And so there's a lot to enjoy. Just even every everyday that it's a good day. It's good. Enjoy river of Goodson undone a thing. Cool. This is so much fun. I've learned so much about you, and all of your business plans. I plan to roll them ration-. Yeah. Now's was good. We should enter you each other more often. Maybe they'll give us a spinoff and coach in order to cause. Jackson satchel. Thank you for joining us. You both have such interesting perspectives to share. I love your spirit your vibes as children might say. Dream, it real is a collaboration between coach pineapple street media young people across the country and me the show is brought to you by coach as part of their dream, it real initiative, all about supporting the next generation and their dreams for the future. To learn more head to coach dot com slash dream in real. Tell your friends about the show. Tell your mom tell your grandma, make sure to rate and subscribe to dream it real on apple podcasts Spotify, and wherever you get your podcast. See you next week for the final episode of season.

New York director UK Michael Jordan New York Rex Stewart vivas Selena Gomez Jackson Rudolf Tate executive creative director Lou Lou FA Vecsey Moscow New York City England US Stuart Vive
The Pro Version: Listener Questions (with Ayo Edebiri)

Hollywood Handbook

42:43 min | 8 months ago

The Pro Version: Listener Questions (with Ayo Edebiri)

"Hi everyone it's as in Sean. This month we're releasing one. It's just hey is when you're talking when I'm talking it's just Hayes. Yeah when you go your hair. You're doing well. I wasn't at the time at the time I was not. And we've been known to do separately sometimes okay but you let you put your headphones on. You. Pull the Mike towards you to me that you're ready to do. They can't for you not ready. They can't see that Hayes. That's why I'm saying that it's both of us. And now it is but when you started talking wasn't necessarily so we are releasing one full bonus episode every week from our premium bonus series. Hollywood handbook pro version. It's we now and it's and it says please provide a short description that highlights how pro version differs from regular Hollywood. Handbook EPISODES OF WEIRD TOO. Such a like a big question like to even like began on something like how different like. Wow I mean it's different. Oh it's different as hell is shorter than normal weight. Well normally does cost money but in this case it is free. Yup so now is at the same but there's rarely a guest sometimes. Yeah but not very often. No if you WANNA listen to the rest of Hollywood handbook pro version and go to STITCHER PREMIUM DOT COM and sign up with the code handbook. I would say just as description that the Hollywood handbook pro version is a free flowing conversation that occasionally touches on mature subject matter. And how is that different from what we do? On the the main Joe I would say that that is a very stiff stunted conversation that constantly explores nothing but mature subject matter. Can I say you have a Promo Code here? Yes yeah and what's what are they get for using the Promo Singer? Premium DOT COM. Sign up with Code Handbook. I think one month free. Okay doesn't say that you get one month free with using code handbook. You promise this. It's a chef Kevin Guarantee right to Kevin and let him know what you got. When you used it you'll get access to all our bonus episodes and add free listening experience for all your Wolfenstein shows in this draft but you can also listen to the ads version to Kevin should be in here. That's right why because the ads are all screwed up now in the free version. So if you want to listen to the show as it was the basically the Snyder cut of the show is basically what it is and with all the ads in their correct order. You listen to Hollywood handbook. That adds version is different from the pro version. But it is in there and you'll be supporting our show. Tim Thanks for listening. He'll be joined the episode. Remember that stitcher. Premium DOT COM PROMO CODE. Handbook and again. It's the bonus and my name's read Kevin Promise Like walking the ground so like kind of check it out grain ahead of the Fang Man Max right yeah sorry monster. Yeah Max Monster and I We are of course getting ready for the big universal monsters like show that they do every day but unveiling this new monster Max Monster who is so we look at all the other ones and we're like what's the thing that makes these exciting often. It is greenness. Yeah I in the case of two of them I remember. We made that short of like what are the commonalities. We basically mind hunter. And all the monsters and said what are the patterns that we can draw from this What are the similarities? They share so that we can create a monster profile in order to ultimately. Make sure that Max Monster scares the bejesus out of everybody. Yeah and so Green. Miss Having a wife is a big one. Very scary to have a wife. I can attest to that. Hair somewhere Often that is crazy. If in the case of one of the wives and the one that has hair on his even face No we really went to battle with. How do we make Max monsters hair different But still recognizable as hair What we settle on was that it comes straight off the back of his head. Along cone just juts out from directly behind his skull And that is very scary. Because whatever you swing and hits you with it and the green elements We wanted to explain. So he is all of yes. He is a big olive with pointy cone. Hair off the back of his own has the cone blasting off. He has a wife who do not see but he talks about a lot. Here's only lady. Let me check in with the old ball and chain. I actually but he he. They are yes. He's checking in is nice. No that's the thing. Is I think a lot of people. I'm guilty of this. This sort of enjoy pedaling. Off Their responsibility than Let me see if my wife will let me do it and Max monsters no different but really because they care and often they do just WanNa spend some time at home with their wives and it's a convenient excuse. Sometimes it's not always fair to your spouse so we do the show and just like the introduce music is like coming in. And it's like and he sorta tipped over backstage and like just a little like part of actually the Pimento part. You can just see sort of peeking out from from behind the stage wings of stagehands me or like trying to lift him up. We accidentally squeeze the Pimento come showdown went with a little kind of blue cheese filling around it. Yes so sal scary that did and it did not like not suffocate. A mother but it did like sort of briefly She's yeah she was going to experience. Mother's mother this mother's mother's that's what she became is one of this mother's mother's now name like smucker's it's gotTa be good now then must be something as an ad right now. What was because I was in the audience? The juice kind of a secret show very stout behind the Thamento filled. That was like an Ultra Ryan. Electric Brian Yes. So that is what shocked me like an electric in the narrative that we had invented for him that is what is keeping him alive that he has brine was effectively zapped has. Brian was struck by lightning animating him and making him the live scary all of the Today. Max Monster with the big cone of haircut. Tobacco assessed stick Lincoln Electric Prime. Hello Welcome to Hollywood handbook. And today we are having a pro version. Yeah happens from time to time that we do have a pro version. Sam's here Sam talk about what this pro version. You guys have listener questions. You've been working on your frigging radio Voice Man. This guy's frigging frazier. Yeah rain over here. Do you guys remember Niles. He had asked him our. Sim Nothing. Because that's the end dear dear name a similar okay. Nitrites over yeah he has some are more like SIM is. Oh No our guest is here. She's lost what the Fuck Jesus getting years. She doesn't come here. Do you need it? What do you need? What is happening? I thought I love my sunglasses on a tape but I did it so this is just sort of them you know. Obviously I'm like here like look at the lobby anywhere either in the lobby they also could you know. Listen Oh there okay great. They're they're they're my bags live. What's actually doing this right now of fresh out the baggage? You remember leaving them here. This is not credible story. Oh it's not. I'm this guy is very thirsty. It feels like she wanted you to know she has sunglasses. Yeah what is the second smack thirsty. Mike Addict thirsty thirsty. Thirsty as of you know my God. Her attention had s s by Ganz feed the Mike Freak? Why we take question from a listener. I guess I could do that. We can at least one cancel your ride. Cancel it it's done. I cancelled the driver. No show will cover. Whatever THE COST IS CANCELLED. It was like no. There's no fee everyone if you ever have you. Have an uber driver named Michael. He's canceled Dr Michael. You might want to do something that I've seen funny. People do which is like make a joke about like the uber drivers like in a show. Thank you be like. Oh like booby is is here. You know like and the name is like crazy and you've really stuck inside. Say I'm sorry you talk about how they stink. People tried to give my ass a ride. Kay listening to this. Dang World Music Vibe. Yeah yes I can't believe like hog do have fax. You can't believe it. You can't believe I said I said what I said. Pod Goddess. She loves the POD man. Look at her. She's so alive. Our restrained because you you like wilted when you left the room. You had so much energy when you were there. I got physically sick. Yeah that's right. Sam had to give me a pep though. Yeah you got pod Sick Sam. Yeah Kevin solicited questions. We got so many way too. Many stopped sent doing view. Stop being so extra to everyone who says all these questions but now we we have some here that we can read. Yes and now. If you can believe this is really the first time we have done this in like four years possible even five years. Who'd you like me to read you one? Yeah what's the best way to throw a successful family reunion in? That's asked Bhai Giambi. My family don't where you from. Where are you? Where are you from somewhere crazy? Okay just feels like you're like you're my family's so nuts. Yeah that's feels like a different like you deals like you've done three different axes so weird first of all there's mom Yeah mom my. You're all familiar with this honey. Her knee and Don't forget a guy who's is the dad that you see that you dad's thing. Yeah Oh an Auntie Florence around as well. Hey honey jobs little brother Henry. That is silly. Just feels like sorry? Beg Your family can look like anything obviously does feels like you're you. Yeah let's actually. Let's just leave it there maybe along the way. Here's the best way to one man doing. Seven or eight impressions very similar phrase. Let me get this off. So here's the best way to throw a successful family reunion in the trash in the trash and do come see him. Yeah Joe Please see my one man. Show blood type. Hand me. Hazing Sean Voice. We were just just hitting our stride from the Chicago show here. I was wondering Borat from the Chicago show. Okay I remember that. What are you guys? Recent trend of Music bio-pics any lists five of them. And who would you like to see a movie okay? Bohemian rhapsody rocket man. Judy yesterday blinded by light. Whose Judy yesterday. Judy Duda remorse comedy music. But I guess she did do both movie. Okay and who would you guys like to see GAM movie keep up the good work signed? Paul Jacobson? Who would I like to see a movie me? A music bio PIC. Now I like my one man show to be made into a cool movie. Oh blood type. Hbo Special Yeah Blood Type. Hand get special easy eight. Twenty four produce Mike Berbizier judge. I need judd to see my stuff. What's weird is we're entering an era where you could basically do ray again with Jamie Foxx. But he takes his sunglasses off and Jamie Foxx foul and it's a movie about Jamie Fox Games now instead and if you basically just digitally remove the sunglasses call the movie he would be say. It's the same year really good. Yes yes lasker and that was actually him doing on gold digger that yet actually and he did any thought it was gonNA suck. He said that he said that he said I was doing and I was like. I remember that interview. It's going to be good. Who would you like to see? Have Bio pic of like singer Does he say that he just says? What are you guys so well? What do you think unpack this down? What do you think of the recent trend of music bio-pics and who would you guys like to see a movie? Yeah you're right so it's two completely separate ideas right okay. I so okay answering the second question I would like to see Mr Bean. Get a movie his time to shine. What if we did narrow it down to musician's musician? Do you think should get a movie? CHANGE MY ANSWER. Cookie Monster. I guess if I if I music if I'm music if I think Tom Long Something Real I think the industry so fake and full phonies and like I think he's real. He's only guy it's been too long time coming. How do I convince my dad that is? Sports is the real justice for well from Jordan Jordan during his engineer Jordan. Probably upset that you're not using your frigging. Ba and Vogel Performance. It might mean like they might call engineering east sports and if it's not light what if it's Michael Jordan okay? Because he's got like he's like probably got threats. Okay and everything okay. That's right but his dad obviously was murdered. Convince my dad who murdered who spurred eastwards a real job now. This is a challenging question and this has become he. Put it in the proper contact. People have different things that they wished they had been able to communicate with their parents Have you seen frequency if usually in contact even? Yeah if I just got the chance to make my case sports job my dad just sick to my stomach almost twenty years ago because of the other sport that I was doing. That's not really a sport. Almost twenty years ago over twenty years old. If only my old man stuck around long enough to be convinced. That eastport was a real job. So here's a theory that I have that. Yeah go ahead. Spa unintentional michael jordan's later on so my theory has been proven correct. You and Michael Jordan. The Dad we're never on this planet saved dive. Do you guys you questions Do you believe in reincarnation so and actually the version of it that I believe. Yes is you get to just like you. You get murdered. And then you get just like sort of regroup and just like just like chill and heaven for like three years yes and then and like sent down and then you get to be. I well if you're good in heaven you pick and you get then gotten pick a body and if you're bad thank God picks the body for you. Your behavior in heaven exactly excess clearly. A lot of people don't read the Bible and is your theory that Jeffrey or sorry. Jane's Jordan was good or bad that he was bad he was bad so God history was not heaven so the real question Michael Jordan asking is do. I approve of sports. Yes and will I? Will I be at least you think are like? Are you able to be convinced? How can he convince you? Are you making that? I WANNA see dead doe I WANNA I wanna see them benefits. Okay Sports as soon as these words comes with a decent benefactor. Yeah Dan oh I want I want. I want my son to have dental. I want them to be able to have provisions for a spell in in in case they are sick and I want them to have full coverage in case there vaping too hard and they're vape breaks and they have to suck all the steam out Nevada poorest long. Now I think really what you're saying is that you convince your Daddy's forces a real job the same way you convince anyone. Anything has a real job which is secured the bag. I have a question for Bosch. Bosch Does Tony. Know your name. My boss does not know my name. She calls me different similar name and I've worked for her for a year on a rare day. She knows my name. Bosch what should I do? She's very rich. Thank you. Please visit Milwaukee. We have a basketball team. Also I have a professor whose name is Shaun Hayes. Can you believe I think if you every time from Deanna way every time? But she's talking to Bosch I. Yeah so she thinks Bosch everytime time professor and a boss can a school is this this is not. I guess he likes that. Also you are Bosch is boss. No Bosch how did you research? Yeah von has a boss. There's a cat of feral cat named Tony who lives in my backyard. Who Bosch does work for. Okay this we can let him in and I'm listening. I'm apologizing because I messed up on that one. We have a whole mythology we show basically. I read my God Bosh. How's IT GOING DUDE? Uh so good a answer this question. Sure Yeah I believe that Tony does know by name but he thinks by Davis early. Hey you're late to work. I mean that how he talks to my ass now. How can you get them to learn your deb? Same Way I never wanted to learn to funny joke now. You have a that. You've been doing lately that you think is very funny. I haven't heard it. So you know the drake saw going bad. Yeah Yeah So. Do you know this sort of let cars lot. Sog HAS IT. Has It goes well so the WAD part that for a joke for. Would it help if someone else did it? Or if even it were played. Yeah so okay. Yeah maybe play like part of Sam's exactly springing to action so I guess I'll do it. Well maybe we'll have to pay for it you know. I'm from Milwaukee He was salty then. Nobody said that. Right Ricky brewers so is actually meek mill. Oh Yeah but Drake's Awad who's talking about the part that I'm thinking about how far in a little bit happens a couple times okay. Ako Him more slobs Louisville's okay actually believe La la atop the Dome got a state of of chicken nuggets so that got away. Go back to the dog park here. We go so everytime everytime. Drake says ten piece. Bosch likes to turn to. Everyone go of chicken nuggets sick. That's fucking sick. Just Ted Peas Og. I guess I just WANNA quit. What's sick do you mean like the cool one awesome? Does it just a little Ted piece of jagged right if you just get classic jokes triplets breakdown? Why this if you just look at classic joke stroke sure. Jeffrey Dahmer was in Milwaukee. Hey Boys quick question. I'm quickly approaching my twenty eight anniversary on this earth. And I'm kind of freaking out about it but I'm starting to feel slash. Look like a dad. How did you guys do with the decline of your best years thanks? Ps please come back to Portland. I waited too long to buy tickets last time and it sold out. That's just as a whole answer so we had you remind you we have to figure out who this person is the reincarnation of so quickly approaching twenty eight years which means reincarnated thirty one years ago thirty one years ago? Yes exactly and so. That's taking us back to nineteen ninety. One was the reincarnation but then back to nineteen eighty eight So who famously died in? Nineteen Eighty Eight don't thinking Gore Vidal but I really don't think so I'm like feeling but I could be wrong but I feel like I'm right. Okay well we can check. Imdb wasn't actor. There's an Ramsey from throw momma from the train. Oh definitely could be. The reincarnation of an Ramsey carnation have fled. Orbison Roy Orbison Okay Roy so now we're getting a very easy bio-pic to his Michel. Basquiat just barely would have to change the poster for Ray. It's pretty much exactly. Oh yeah that's right. Like brave brave Figo circular sticker. Over the a you're done and just like wherever the movie needs a needs a low. Then you're in. Yes is taxed as a long text. Remember Roy or this guy was blinds route to do so much text on the screen. It was never about respecting him. I am and that is happens to be the T- what's happening of the question. Now what question where we answering? How did you deal with the decline of your best year? They're starting at twenty eight. Do you want me to take this. How we dealt with it. Yeah so I remember what you guys were really starting to like godown like real because I was because I was like so young and I remember watching that and like being like. Oh this is the moment. This is like the moment that has like she is shaping and sort of like my personality and so I say records hats one find ugliosis. It doesn't matter which one it is. But does your pets your pear stick to it. Gets them Healy Celia around everywhere and make sure people know that you're Heliang? He'll lead to work from work. Sketch get a rope. Sketch WITH DAILY. Sue The car kitchen with the Healy's dog. Sean Hayes in the Beatles I'm skipping with the Healy's dog we met a little ten piece women forums two and a half years ago and I've been dating ever sense. Do you think this is dumb? Yeah what the Fuck Love. Sadie and land. Show me the pack. There's a pick for stop at this. Stop telling me this. He's got to go in the other room to click it. Why should we talk? We talk about. We have to talk about so fast. So Sam every time I see it looked like he sort of reveals a new tattoo with his close very selective about what's skin patch. She's GonNa be wearing he whole shirt. Holy Cow Wow wow. They're in love. She's got great makeup she's serving. She's absolutely serving a picture of them. And where's the picture of the proof? This picture is sending me. Stop this giving you life. They have a picture of aiming home. My God what no was cursed their two intersecting interests. Are Joanna newsom okay? So the foreign twenty seventeen so this was long. After I stopped I can imagine the boar. Imagine the arguments over whether they should put on a Hollywood like Try COMECON or peach plum pear when they get in the car pro life to read it one of them. I assume the guy. Yes the guy writes. Also you like Joanna newsom an Hollywood handbook too. Damn my two favorite things have often wondered if anyone else on earth shared these intersecting interests lol. Oh wait no. She wrote that and then he said yeah literally my two fave things to will you marry me and she said TBS ya now. What's that Walker Louisiana's where he is? Where was she? I don't know this is some of the wildest shifts and they were like reacting to it. They were like down a little bit. Sam. I want to see if her locate Martin we have this is. Oh my God so TB. Age Stance for topical botulism honey and yours like y'all's s pretty much But dropped toxin instead of been like. If you don't like needles smear all over you this guy kind of looks. Like the Stud Randy from Real World San Diego's So they're they're like cool like there're clearly like young he'll sort of looks like the. Stud Cam that was working in the animation department when we were at ally. Gregory swing through and was like I think sleeping with this system is on the show. Yes can I say that I think enough time has passed? Wow that is so crazy I love you. I know that. What is that what I'm supposed to say but I've said that to the fan. Yeah you have have to Officiate their wedding. Though because he said that you know that that the opening envelope doing okay. Hey Boys and chef Kevin. I'm a graduate student in sociology if you went back to school. What would you study from Henry? The female brain. Hi Sean Hayes. Have there been episodes where you left the recording knowing that you crushed it. Yeah if so what were they all of them. Best Nora and it's how I would love to be able to say and you know what I'm actually getting that feeling right now but I don't know if we have done enough time until I left the record and at but like dropped it like that I would love to just getting some kind of feeling right now nine rush and it's time to say by but I don't know if we've done enough time. And so Sam but this is me asking you if if you've done enough time contractually yes. I'd say about five more minutes. You gotta you gotTa have that one. Read last or something. Because that's hot way. We find the hottest one rapper ad. Lib like at the top. When the beats still coming in you turn up the mike feel some kind of way. This beat's got some kind of way. Okay so so we'll come back to that one is what are you. You're scrolling. Good one of chicken guys. My girlfriend wants to loosen my hips. How do I do that safely without hurting myself? We have a water bed devon events. Wow thank you my hips. Well I mean like you gotta you gotTa You. GotTa take a wrench. Crunchy gotTa take take a rich guy. Get it in there with the ranch. Listen to you you got to jam the run on the Rowley Board. And say all right. Let's take a look at these hits. You'RE GONNA WANNA lie down on a Hammock. Then you get your buddy to lie down on a couple of skateboards role under you with ranch. A good long look nice long. Look just loosen up. All the gears do yoga Waterbed part really unsettling because it's not ripple you're it's gentlemen. If all that you're wolf employees hosts included had a fight to the death. Who would be the last person standing from Jake Okay do we do this? We probably from turbo start shake from turbo stars. It's sad that I know who all these people are almost. Yeah except for the couple. That's like in love. Yeah because of you guys because they don't interact with us. Barry Munday moving. Have someone sort of the worst thing that can happen to. Our fans is they've find fulfillment and some other area of their life is humiliated honestly. Thank you for skipping the one Sam where someone asks. If I ever dreamed I'd be hosting three or four different PODCASTS. At the same time I am very happy to not be answering questions. I'm thinking about getting its head to what should I get an unsigned? What what's the One? What some of the ones. What would you say Sam is your? What's your best to your. Yeah your most freak carnival. Ooh I have a Cowboy boot. That says spur of the moment. Okay And then a Frankenstein. Yeah holding balloons at say that says pop punk never dies. They all say stuff. Yeah they're all awful I have an idea for one. And it's a little cartoon you get attached you of Lego Waning Crescent and then you and then beneath is attached to of a man like sort of like a Professorial looking man Standing with a younger woman and he's pointing up and he says look honey a full moon. What is a waning crescent and what is pro visceral? Professorial means like the man. Looks like he's like trying to appear intelligent. I Guess Hazel and then he's ways that guy could look just like David Wayne he could look like David Wayne and he saying was Connie a full moon but he's pointing out. What is very clearly? Just a sliver of mood. It's it's it it's it's it okay. Scream it so regionalized. It's not funny wise. It's it's it's it's actual it and it's an it's like what what's your favorite letter with the scarlet. One Okay Birmingham jail. Whatever bring him jail and it is coming out of the letter and splitting it and his face is like ooh nasty and it goes. Let her rip. That's really good. You know my favorite ladder. Let her go by passenger prison for you. Is there and I miss the road when you're coming home and wanted him along in two days going change it totally that ten? Ps Dog of object. It gets I heard. I saw one time I heard on the radio stations. Guy Comes on the radio and he goes. Hey this is seen from passenger so this is a song we wrote kind of about not appreciating what you have until it's gone y get the most only know you'll love her when you let go what's Guy Hecker Dot. That song was about doing molly in the club about. I thought it was about chicken. Baghdad's the thing that for some reason I always will remember from here on the radio is Minnie driver was guest hosting on Kcrw or something and she was talking about some song like Michael. Frontiers spearhead song or something and she goes Dole. This song unreservedly felt okay. Okay interesting question to ask right now. Did you lose it? Is What the question Oh my God. Would you ever consider doing a live show in Vegas? No she did you ask him. You know when Chris gathered says to lose. Well he's not talking about the question. Okay go on Sam. What are you asking me right now? You're supposed to go back to the question of this anything. That question is setting hayes up when I say above. Okay keep going keep going. That's a funny one way. Scroll down this one this one San can you the extremely for number. Are you able to perform that one? I don't know who that is. Okay so this question is extremely for non blondes voice I said. Hey St- what's okay? I'm GONNA try it. Okay what's going Those are both good. I get like a big as he's watch that's how they would perform it. Said he is. He is Sean. How have you found the question yet? Sam It was like. Have you ever been crush search? Crushed control half crashed up right. It was on stones up was up. He shirts up. Oh gentlemen just search crushed area. I read this. Yeah Oh my Gosh. Hi Sean Hayes. Have there been episode. Three left the recording knowing that you crush it if so what were they. This one Best Nora. We read the. Ps PS Sean. I was running. The uncle drew twitter account. When it responded to you thank you. I'm starting to feel Kinda some way in my guts cuts US thirty feel like crushed it right now and it makes me. WanNa say buy yes.

Sam It Hollywood Bosch Kevin Sean Hayes Joe I Dr Michael Michael Jordan Hayes Jeffrey Dahmer Brian Yes Ted Peas Henry Max Monster Kevin Promise Jamie Foxx Judy Duda Snyder Tim smucker
At Eternity's Gate with Julian Schnabel and Lee Daniels (Ep. 172)

The Director's Cut

39:21 min | 2 years ago

At Eternity's Gate with Julian Schnabel and Lee Daniels (Ep. 172)

"Hello, and thanks for tuning in to another episode of the directors Cai. Brought to you by the directors guild of America, featuring today's top director sharing behind the scene stories of the latest films and insights into the craft of directing please take a second to subscribe to our podcasts, and I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. This episode takes us behind the scenes of director Julian Schnabel's new by graphical drama at eternity gate set. During the time Vincent Van Gogh lived in arl- and over. So was France. The film is a journey inside the world and mind of the tortured artist. Who despite skepticism, ridicule and illness created some of the world's most beloved and stunning works. In addition to add turn ities gate, Mr. Schnabel's credits include the feature films Miro before night, falls Bosque and the documentary feature. Berlin, he was nominated for both the DIGI award and the Academy Award for his two thousand eight feature the diving bell and the butterfly following a recent screening of the film at the DJ theater in Los Angeles. Mr. Schnabel's spoke with director Lee Daniels about filming at eternity gate during their conversation. Mr. Schnabel discusses putting the audience in the perspective of Van Gogh working with an editor whose main background. Was an architecture, and why this may be his last film. Everybody. We have matching a patent leather shoes. Tell them why. There was the gala of route the. Lucknow? So and he kept he kept his AT took his tux off in the car here. Ooh, how you. Ju-? The last time we were here together you interview in you interviewed me for the Butler. I think we did that in New York wasn't hunting. So but say movie, Saint people just different state. All right. Thank you. Nice to see everybody. Thank you for coming out. So Julian Schnabel's, my hero. And he's one of the reasons why I do what I do. And I guess I'm going to just start with. I why why this film? Why? Well, I didn't wanna make a movie about Van Gogh because everybody thinks they know everything about him. So it seemed absurd to do it. But. I don't know a whole lot about other things. But I know quite a bit about painting. And that's what I am on the painter. And I think there's a an inevitability about his work and. I think he's still waiting for his audience, but they keep coming anyway. So I think that maybe it was a reason why didn't want to do it in the first place. But are later I think the fact that most people think they have a relationship with the painter. Why? Mus good to try to answer that I think ultimately, I got a chance to say things about painting that I wanted to say and about being an artist in just about making anything it wasn't necessarily about painting. But maybe that was a way to talk about what it's like to be alive. When I when I. I walked away with the feeling of like. Wow, critics, you know, 'cause they dogged him, you know, and. As an artist. You know, you get dot you open yourself up to complete vulnerability. And I what it left me. I ended up leaving this film with the feeling of what defines art who who who is who defines that a critic from the New York Times. Who defines what defines art? And I was just wondering if you had anything to share on that. Listening is that why you did the phone. I think that art is a practice that nobody asked you to make. I don't think people do it for the money. I don't or for the fame when you're young you want agreement from other people, maybe one agreement from other people just for being alive, and you don't really know how to get it. So you do different things to get people's attention. But ultimately, the more you work. I think when Vincent says. To Dr Gachet. I thought that an artist was supposed to teach something about. Life. And then I I stopped thinking that now I just think about my relationship with your turn ity. And. I think the more you do it the more you realize that the process of doing it is really. But the thing is and. The notion that Van Gogh wasn't successful. Is a bit is absurd. I would say since. First of all he. If and I guess there's that moment where Wilma sitting in that vegetable field any pours dirt on his face, and he starts smiling. And I would say that to me it looks like that guy was exactly in the right place at the right time and. I don't know how many people actually feel like that in a lifetime. And the work that he made were was his. His was his companion was his confident, and it was his he had the dialogue with himself. It's a luxury when you can have a dialogue with other people. And I think that that's what he loved so much about Gauguin that he had respect for him. And I love that. I love that you showed that I felt like when I was watching the movie I was watching. Watching Van Gogh paint is how you sort of. Is how you directed. It. I shot who shot it Ben wa Delo shot the movie. I think he did a great job and guess this bunch of directors in this room, and I can say to you that he never said wants to me. I can't do it. And that's extrordinary. And there was no he asked for a lot this one. Well, we devised ways of doing things Louise Coburg is in the audience. She wrote the script was John Claude carryanne, I n and also edited the film. I did it with her. But she did it how you wanna stand up stand up. Louise. So obviously, we all know that editing is writing and. Ben wa Willem Louise, and I all became the same person at some moment and. What was your question? I'm sorry Lee. Where'd you shoot it? Okay. So we were we were in all. And that all in the south of France. And that's where Van Gogh lived from eighteen eighty eight until he moved to over sir walls where he died, and so this was took place more or less than the last two years of his life. Gauguin came down visit him as brother. Paid for Gauguin to go down there. And. Keep them company, but Gauguin wanted to do it and one thing that was, but when we arrived, for example, there was no weet in. The south of France. So we sent Ben wad. Scotland asked him to shoot his feet. Okay. So how much is your budget for this? Budget was ten million dollars. And we probably had to spend two million dollars on lawyer's fees for some ridiculous can reason. I mean, it really was hobbled together in a way, and and at a certain moment. Also, we lost three hundred and fifty thousand dollars from one of the investors. They said, well, can you shoot seven hour days? Yeah. I can. And in fact, every day at about five thirty it was magic our in our will end. So Louise, and I would actually. Keep inventing scenes to shoot. And so many of the things that are in the movie were done spontaneously and Willem was up for it. And so was Oscar so good. He's so good. He's so good in the film. Let me do you. Do you like you shot? Now a couple of movies the country. What's different between those crews and these crews here. Your American supposedly. I mean, my father's from Czechoslovakia. My mother was born in New York, but she's from Romania, and I would say. Well, but I would say about say be honest. Well, I would say I mean, I've felt like a person who's person without a flag really somewhere in mid Atlantic. And after I made the diving bell and the butterfly was within tell you, right. I was with Sean Penn who made a movie about. Go with the Emile Hirsch. Into the one to the wild. And I was sitting there watching Shawn's moving. He's really an American director. I was a real American movie, and I looked at the diving bell and the butterfly and I thought well, that's a French movie. And it was a moment where Jerome said do one in me to make the movie in English. And I well, I can't do that. Don't you think it'd be weird for? French people to be speaking English and people reading French subtitles of a movie about a guy who's runs a magazine in Paris. So no, I don't think it'd be weird at all. I said, well, I can't make that really. And so we made that movie in French, and but this movie. I think we're in a post linguistic kind of moment and. What is often Tissot and? Okay. Those kids it would have been very inauthentic to me for those kids to speak English. And also for the people that were in the bar in the Tambo around to be speaking English. But when you're a foreign are you speak your language with your family at home and in this case? The convention was advan go and his brother, we're gonna speak English. And then I guess you could see how beautifully Oscar Isaac speaks French. But he doesn't really speak French that beautifully of. He did a pretty good job. But French people would have heard that it wasn't that good. Louis Gorell came over to the house, and we recorded Louise voice on iphone, and he did Oscar's voice. And we were able to. Arrange acuity and do the tenor of his voice to where it sounded like Oscar's voice and Louis Carell did in mazing job. He also read Orioles letter and was go Gant's voice in the end. And I'm glad that they let them use the movie place. So you could see the yellow come up because I think that's kind of the really the end of the movie, but we didn't want to have too many endings. So we had to wait a little while to give you the yellow. I loved the I really was surprised in love the tenderness between the brothers came came out of nowhere. A shot of Willem in the bed looking up at his brother not wanting to leave. I felt. It's interesting when you think that an image could speak volumes because what they're saying. Isn't that interesting? But the fact that these two guys are lying in a bed in a suit and his his his brother holds them like that. I thought Rupert was really the repository of all of his grief and all of this love, and and at a certain moment, he said to me, I think maybe just my character. I need to have more agency where I could speak about my brother. I said. If I said if you just do what I ask you to do. I think it'll be fun. And he sure did I mean he was really able to be still and the he had so much affection in him towards Willem. And he was so there was some pretty chaotic moments in some of these scenes, and Rupert was able to be very stoic and still and still still still still the that's that's how I felt too about. Who's that beasts that was in the in the? Mental. Oh, Neal's our droop. He's a beast. He's brilliant. You know, when he said basically told him that he couldn't that. What was this garbage? Was it? What was what was he doing? I mean, he was acting as as what he was wasn't acting. He's not acting. He's just crazy as a bug. Here's a great actor though. But he's not I don't think he was acting. In fact, I wanted him to say because some people don't understand what he's saying. Sometimes maybe some people did or didn't. But didn't feel like we needed to put subtitles under what he was saying. Because of I didn't want anybody to read anything when they were looking at his face, except what was on his face so Neal's. He played in the diving bell and the butterfly also. And he's what was what was he was a guy who had been locked in a basement on had been kidnapped and came to see John Doe, and John Doe is sitting there paralyzed. And he says God why why didn't I call this guy when he got out of being? In after he was kidnapped. And so he was instead of it being a positive thing. He was just mortified that. He is sit there and look at this guy. He never called. Anyway, I wanna kneels to do to play in the scene, and at a certain moment, I said to him you think you could just tell me the words sergeant again. And he said, you know, I am like a leaf that's blowing around in the wind. And I don't know that I could get to that place again and really deliver that line that you're asking me to deliver. And so I said, okay. And then he said it anyway, but we never changed it. And I think that the movie was made like that. I think that Willem was like a leaf blowing around in the wind, and we were like a leaf blowing around in the wind. And there was a lot of wind, and weather and the weather and the landscape. Protagonist in the film. We shot the movie in the asylum, where did you shoot the film for? Was thirty eight days or something like that? But we had two weeks where we was not scheduled and we went down to all. And it's not a cozy place maybe in the summer. But in February when Gauguin told him to go down there. It's brutal and people are not necessarily warm, and they definitely were not nice to Vincent. And it's. So when we went down there, the sunflowers were dead, and it was fantastic. I mean to see though, sunflowers really looked like you were walking through a concentration camp in those and those of flowers each were people and to walk through there and. Really Benoi did an amazing job. And when when he went to Scotland he was wearing van Goghs, shoes and his pants. He even had his hat in case. There was a camera shadow, and when I walk around I look at the floor all the time, and sometimes you look up, but I thought it'd be nice to see feet walking up the screen on. So tell me about that you just tell them what you share with me about that. But shot. About walking through the seasons that way, I mean, basically it starts and you're you're walking around with him. But without it was a way of him walking through who shot it. Oh, well, those particular moments at the beginning when you're not by Ben wa but at another moment, we gave William the camera. So there's moments when William is running and he's holding the camera when Willem is walking home after he's been shot and he walks in front of the liquor. He's shooting his feet. And then he shoots the people that are looking at him with the split Dieter. I mean, basically I walked into. Vintage shop, and I bought some say, well, she is to what is it a vintage shop old clothes store. And I. Bought the sunglasses, and when I walked out I looked to the floor, and I realized they were bifocals. So there was a step in the grass, and I thought. Wow. That's okay. So I took the glasses and gave it to Ben wa and asked him to tach it to his lens. Then the sunglasses were a little small for the lens. So we created a split Diop there. So we could have a dif- different depth of field and thought that that could reflect van Goghs feeling of. Or anxiety or gets more exacerbate in and so and by not attaching it to lens, we could just move it around a little bit felt more human. But it's very interesting. When people say, oh, what's wrong with the bottom of the screen, or why did the blue eyed all of a sudden came black did something wrong with the projection into say, no, no the movie supposed to be like that just some K about research. I mean, like did you do things? I did he have a girlfriend. Did he have a lover? Well, and then how do you how did you go about researching? It's it's a bit ago. How are you? How did you go about your research? Yeah. And did you have a girlfriend or lever? Well, he had a girlfriend in Amsterdam. I mean, she I didn't know her. And I wasn't there. But it's documented that he had a girlfriend who had a child and he couldn't afford to take care of her because his brother was paying his bills. And so he had relationships basically with people that he paid have relationships with. So he didn't have a girlfriend. And. An particularly at this time. Between the winter of the beginning of eight hundred eighty eight until the time he died. He definitely didn't have girlfriend, but he was accused of touching women. Sometimes in our being kind of like a town. That's sort of like how you began it. Well, let's see. I mean that was the goal that letter. Yeah. Okay. I don't know that was going. That'd be an interesting thing for everybody to talk about from it. I'm just for us. 'cause I can tell you what I thought. Okay. Love to hear what I thought that something was going on. And I didn't know where we're going and when you came back to it. I thought that something was wrong. I know you're right. But at the beginning of the movie, you you you're lying in the dark or I lie in the dark in the morning. And I think about things or whatever, and I would like to be one of them. I'd like to sit down and have a drink and asked if they Mike somebody to ask me if I'd like a piece of fruit or I mean, just something and a one would smile at me. And anyway, and so an a very literal way you kind of see what he wants. And then here's a woman standing on the road. But it's not really connected in such a. Literal, way and. I think that there is a big chasm. There's a chasm between art and society. There's a chasm between artists and society, and there's certainly a chasm between or I mean, somebody might be very good at one thing and not so good at other things. I mean, he was very good at painting very bad at relating to people. They did of. There was a petition to keep him from coming back to ARL, man. That's a fact, and so, but we invented situations that would serve the story. I mean, he didn't paint the roots in eighteen eighty eight those kids didn't bother him. I mean, that's not exactly what happened. But it was a good way to get him into the hotel set up the sing. So then his brother could call write a letter to Gauguin to get him to come down there. I mean, I wrote the letter to go GAM, but there worked correspondents that were close to that. And then. Getting Gauguin down there. You could have you can see how how important friendship was. And also somebody that he could communicate with. That's so cool. I mean to. I thought about my friendship with you. When I watched the film to you know, how supportive you've been and how you are a supporter of the arts. You know, you support artists and. Yeah. That's what I thought about that with him and your style, man. I really dig your style. I love how I love the music, and I love your your lack of your lack of sound. We're in. We're in motion. We're hearing things. Oh, we don't hear anything. Didn't you hit me with some music is almost like a cool jazz album? And who did whose Taylor who who did the music Tatyana, Liz off sky thinks this is the. I think I I soundtrack that she ever made her first instrument is the violin. And. The first couple of cords in that I made up, and then she and Paul Cantillon did the rest, but all of the piano music, she played by herself. And then louisan I as we edited the film or saw the film really heard that in his head. Now, the in you, you say louisan you edited the film. How does how does that does that? The editor of the film. Editor of the film. Okay. All right. What happened was it was unintentional of you hire had you edited before Louise, she's an architect. Okay. So how did that work? Gene. You can you. Explain it or are. Okay. Well, John Claude carrier, and I started to write the script. And at a certain moment. I mean, something happened. We were we went to we saw Van Gogh Arto exhibition at the museum Dorsey, and when I was looking at the paintings, I was explaining what I thought how Van Gogh painted them to John Clottey felt like go Van Gogh was talking to him. I didn't know that till a couple months ago. Anyway, I was explaining things about the painting. And then I thought okay, the fifth say fifteen paintings in the room, you have an experience with each one of these things at the end, you have an accumulative feeling about everything you saw. So I thought if the structure of the movie is that and we have fifteen vignettes, and it doesn't have to be nil 'lustration of what's in the painting. But a story that could be a parallel life to whatever that separate image was. So we started thinking or talking about things for example discussions about Christ. Shakespeare, vietnam. At a certain moment of. I was seeing a movie I guess being somebody that may actually makes things three dimensional things. With seeing the movie at a different way than John Claude. He's eighty seven I'm sixty six she's thirty three she's from Sweden. I'm from Brooklyn. He's from Columbia, and we all had a feeling about Van Gogh and saw it in a different way. So at a certain moment of Louise started to organize the vignettes into a place where this narrative was coming that was closer to how I was seeing the film. And then when we went down to ARL, if you see the script, you'll see it says that we've been kind of re wrote it, but it was say he walks in nature. I mean, we had seen those eighteen minutes long him walking in nature. There were a large moments of the film where there's no talking, and then there's some where there's a lot of talking. And so we thought and I think that she saw the movie visually head portrait's horizontality landscape, and I guess also. So we started to. Respond to these seven hour days and also to literally to the physical arduousness of the landscape, and for example. So you started the film without an editor knowing so did, you know, she's going to edit prior to on the journey know what happened. No, not at all what happened was Juliet wealth lane who edited the diving bell and the butterfly was supposed to do this. But she was working on Jacko DR Smoot movie and wasn't going to be free till April. And I love Juliet and trust her and thought, we'd wait, and we got done shooting on December ten, but the thing is that don't you hate that? When that happens. When you're doesn't happen to me all the time because movies all the time. But but you hate that. I hate it when it happens. So. Louise. Learn the avid program in two days because she basically does all of these bills these buildings and all does all the spatial work sketch up and different things in has. Curated different exhibitions. And in fact, there's an exhibition at the museo door state where she built the walls. And so I think thinking spatially has a lot to do an editing and also. Inventing things. I don't think there was one set that we did we didn't change everything around. So someone asked her the other day, did you we editing on on the set? She wasn't editing but recorded everything new all the skeletons were buried in undescended tenth of we just started editing movie, and it was on the laptop. So we went edited in Mexico airplane wherever and by the time, April rolled around. We were so far how long does that? So you got a December tenth to April tenth what does that December? Mark was a four or five months. That's good. We were so far gone that when Juliet of looked at the material and some money, well, we paid her anyway instead of breathing on her neck, we'll let her work on it for a while. But she was going to take out everything that characterize it as what it was. And you've got all fight for whatever. That thing is. I mean, there are a lot of battles to fight when you make movies, but there's. We really preserved what we thought was the film. And so we just were inseparable and basically. Went through that whole process. And she used the editor. We added it together. It's great. None of your films are like and yet they still have the same heartbeat. You know, I can never. Know, they they have the same heartbeat. But just none of them. Feel the same. What were you? What were you going for like when you when you when you with this you going for I wanted somebody to have the feel I didn't want to be about Van Gogh? I want you to feel like you were him. I wanted to put everyone in have the experience. That's how I felt. I felt like I was criticized and I felt like, you know, anything you read if you read a review, the one thing you what you cling to what I cling to is the negative as opposed to the positive. I felt so I felt for him as an artist. Well, he didn't really have the tickets you start the movie with the taking the paintings down from the wall get outta here. Yeah. That's a bit predictable. And that's why we put the girl at the beginning to say, hey, this is not going to be a regular bio. We're going to have some really. Thing out in nature that will be the poetry of this guy's life. And. It was a bit too wrote. The fact is that he actually did those and you asked about the research, those are the paintings that were in a more or less. Those were the paintings that were in the cafeteria. So I guess I knew a lot of art historians and people that have curated and and authenticate Van Gogh's work. So we knew which pictures were in the cafeteria which pictures were painted in the asylum, which pictures would have been at his brother's house of. So for example, the roots were painted in eighteen eighty nine not one thousand nine hundred eighty eight but it was good to paint the roots to have that scene. I mean Van Gogh is never seen a Velasquez painting or Goya painting because Goya paintings weren't at the loop at that time, he did see Delacour Varanasi frowns halls. But I thought it was more interesting to show that if you look at it. Painting. And of Alaska's painting up close you see a bunch of abstract marks. And that's what you see. When you see Van Gogh painting and his work is more in concert with those guys and say Millais or Gustav de Ray somebody that he might have light. So I took the liberty to pick what I wanted. I mean even had Carvalho in there. But the. Who I think is as my favorite. But he did. And it just so happened. They let us shoot in the Loof and neck. How do you mean it just so happened? That's well, I'm just so happen. I guess they know my work, and they would have let me shoot in the Lou probably if you would have paid them. Yeah. I doubt it very nice. And anyway, so we've gotta pass shooting in the room where the Delacour paintings, and you see Garrick halt the rafters in there also. But in the next room is the marriage it kinda by Varanasi, which is the painting that Napoleon stole from the Cini foundation Venice, anyway, we were able to just walk in there. So William guests to walk up to the painting and in the real life, supposedly Van Gogh wrote. Because he didn't think he liked Varanasi. And he was painting potatoes eater. The potato eaters around that time, which was kind of a gray Brown and black painting. But when he saw the marriage at Khanna, he wrote the colors in my painting. Don't come from reality. They come from my palate. Well, the your was in your house recently. And I gotta tell you. I wanted to I wanted to I wanted to take it out of there. The portrait of Willem. And then there's a there's a there's a portrait of Willem. And then there's a portrait another portrait of Willem. Tell me. I would've I would've taken anyone is going to go for some money. I know, but then what isn't gonna go for some money. One was a prop. And I was going to ask if it's a prompt and give it to me. I will I already gave it to William do you gave it to will Andy I did. So what who gets that who gets who gets the money? I hope I get some someday. Anyway, here he goes. Nah. Okay. So what happened is Van Gogh? I'm one of the things we found out and making the movies how we worked, and I don't know if anybody knows us in the room, probably raise your hand, if you know, do you know that the flower paintings, the paintings of sunflowers, he didn't paint all of them from life. There. Fifteen sunflowers in a painting and their fifteen sunflowers in another painting. In some another one there might be twelve sunflower. So what I'm saying is he would make paintings of his own paintings say you couldn't go out that day or whatever he wanted to paint. He would make paintings. So he was kind of like Andy Warhol in that sense because he was sort of the first post modern painter. So that being said if William was going to be Van Gogh I needed to make the painting that he painted himself. Look like willing sees in the movie, so I painted Willem as Van Gogh. And that's what's on the wall and the asylum after I got home, I painted a painting of the painting. So I made a plate painting of the painting of Willem as is going to steal. And that's what he saw the student who said this is going to be your last movie. And I don't believe you. And I hope to not know why why am I really change? Well, you know, I have to really change gears to do that. I mean, everybody here. Probably I mean, if that's what you do you do that that way of mediating the world, I do that by painting. And I really didn't want to do this. But I think it was my mother that was. Had an impulse to educate people or maybe she did that to me. I don't know what it was. But I felt like he was. Mistreated during his life. I think he's been Meese mistreated historically with all of these silly myths, and I think he's missed been mistreated in films that we've seen by directors that we all respect who don't know anything about. I mean, Robert Altman's a great director. He didn't know God damn thing about. I was gonna say Willem Dafoe about Vincent Van Gogh. And I mean, it was beautiful thing. Sean, I always loved the thing about the brothers in them. But the first thing that happens in that movie talks about a painting being sold for thirty six million dollars or whatever who gives us. I mean, that's not what it's about. And so I mean. I mean, MAURICE Piazza's movie. I don't know if anybody likes that movie. But it was a busy in my opinion. I French people like it. But I mean, it could have been about anybody. I mean, you didn't answer my questions. My final question to, you know, don't I hope not? I hope this is not that just some bows. No, no, no. Because I really have to change gears to do that. And this was something that was very very close to my. Of me trying to understand what it's like to be alive. And I think I said what I wanted to say when he says when I'm painting, I stopped thinking. I like to do that. I like to stop thinking. And and I guess when I'm painting. I do stop thinking. And maybe when we're making a movie we've stopped thinking also at the moment, we can stop thinking when we can just let something happen. And I think that what you can see in the movie is how we really depend on. I mean, what William did how we could access that place and do what he did how Oscar mas- Mickelson. I mean, these people. Who knows where it comes from? I mean mas- is a dancer. I mean, Chris walk and is a great friend of mine. I mean guy could read the telephone book, and it's interesting, but but they can do something that I can't do. And when I was a painter. Longtime ago, and I had comments about movies. Nobody listened to me. But being the director of the actors, listen to you. So I started to I and the thing about John Michel Basquiat? I think I probably did it for the same reason. Because. I hated Robert Hughes saying that he was he was you're the Eddie Murphy of the art world and all of this abuse that he took really and I thought okay, oh at the John Michel to give him. The respect. Well on that note. I respect you very much, and I'm really happy that you brought this into the world. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you Lee. And thank you guys are coming. Thanks for listening to another DJ QNA if you'd like to hear more you can find past episodes at the director's cut wherever you listen to podcasts. We'll have a lot more fuel in the coming weeks as Ford season approaches, including QNA's Alphonso Koran David McKenzie and Steve mcqueen's. So be sure to subscribe, saying don't miss Nep sewed. If you're enjoying the podcast, please take a moment to write in review us on. I tunes. We'd love to hear your feedback and you can help Palestinia files. Find the show. Thanks again for listening, and we'll see you next time. This podcast is produced by the directors guild of America music is by Dan, Wally.

Vincent Van Gogh Willem director Willem Louise Gauguin Lee Daniels editor William ARL directors guild of America France Julian Schnabel New York Sean Penn New York Times Lucknow Scotland Academy Award Juliet
THE 27 CLUB

What Really Happened?

43:19 min | 2 years ago

THE 27 CLUB

"Welcome to a new episode of what really happened produced by Dwayne, the rock Johnson, Danny Garcia, Brian, Goertz, and cadence. Thirteen. Now our show is only as good as our listeners. Y'all fact check me provide new insight, give your opinions and to become a contributor, simply go to Jenks pod dot com. Slash contributors or call four one, three, four, seven one, two, nine, seven, five. Thank you for being a listener and voice for the podcast. In the last few years NFL star, Aaron, Hernandez, musician, and rapper freight. Oh, Santana, k, pop star, Kim, Jong young all died at twenty seven years old upon their death. Many publications made a point of saying that they joined a special club a special club. You may ask, well, picture, perhaps somewhere in heaven, six positions, they're at a private club. They're in different parts of the large elegant living room that offers fine dining, a wall of interesting in wide ranging literature and obviously comfortable expensive sofas and shares near the entrance is Amy wine house. She's focused while writing in her notepad which isn't a surprise. If you watch the documentary, Amy, you'll see a scene in which she is inside a studio, writing the lyrics for her back to black album. Unlike many pop stars of her era. Wine-house for this critically acclaimed album co wrote only four of the songs and herself wrote the rest of the album. This led to five Grammies in two thousand and eight tying the record at the time for most wins by a female artist in one night in two thousand one wine-house house died of alcohol poisoning. She was twenty seven years old on the other side of the room is Brian Jones from the Rolling Stones. It's hard to see him because there are a variety of instruments surrounding him. He seems like a mechanic obsessed with his tools, the sitter saxophone, oboe, and a dulcimer a Falk instrument which few know of and apparently dates back to the early nineteenth century where it was used somewhere in the Appalachian mountains. Bill Wyman, bass guitarist, further Rolling Stones. Once said, Brian Jones formed the band. He chose the members. He named the band in nineteen sixty-nine. Brian Jones drowned in a swimming pool at his home while under the influence of. Drugs. He was dead at twenty seven years old quietly working away with a companion in the middle of this lavish room is Jim Morrison. Jim would rather be in a corner or one side of the room like the others, but space is limited. Jim says to his friend, hey, listen, I don't know how to write songs. Got these words in my head and the only way I can remember them is with melodies Jim finds a quieter side room and sings a cappella. A song like crystal ship has a complicated melody, but Jim sings it and his fellow musician says, holy shit, wait a minute, f, sharp. Let's do that. Jim couldn't play a chord on any instrument, but he had this orchestra in his head. Morrison is considered one of the greatest singers in rock recorded six studio albums with his band, the doors and is well known for his poetry Morrison's. Death was likely from congestive heart failure while in a bathtub. Some have disputed this for different reasons, including there is no. Oh, autopsy done and changing stories from those who were around him at the time when he died in nineteen seventy-one Rolling Stones headline didn't mention his music. Instead, it said James Douglas Morrison, poet dead at twenty-seven. Unlike anyone else at this private club, Kirk Cobain has wandered up onto the second floor and discovered. There was an easel that was intended to be highbrow decoration for the prestigious club, but Cobain didn't consider this found it to be a waste of a perfectly usable easel and got to work. His painting is coming together. It will be extraordinary. Kurt was a prolific artist and frontman of nirvana considered one of the greatest bands of all time in nineteen Ninety-four four, he committed suicide. He was twenty seven years old. Janice Joplin is hard to see it. I, she also has found a corner, but there's a group of people as it turns out, mentors surrounding her job. Pleine was self taught listening and studying Billie holiday Otis, Redding and endless others Joplin admired Bessie Smith so much. She paid for tombstone to be erected where Smith is unmarked. Grave had been Joplin has been called the first lady and Queen of rock and roll. Sure means one of the top selling musicians in US history in one thousand nine hundred seventy. She died of a heroin, overdose. She was twenty seven years old. He may be alone and not talking anyone, but Jimi Hendrix is easy to spot with blue velvet pants and a shiny red top with an oversized. Well, perfectly oversized scarf. He isn't surrounded by people like Joplin, but a variety of strings. When Hendrix was about twelve years old. He was with his younger brother, Leon clearing the garage, Leon remembered. There was a ukulele. It had one string, and that's where Jimmy started. He took it one string and when he wanted to. Change notes. He tighten and loosen it, and that's how he started to make music. He said, wow, I get the whole range on one string. It was like Jimmy could just about play anything on one string here music, and he learned it. Music has a spirit and Jimmy felt that spirit. The rock and Roll Hall fame describes Hendrix as arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music Rolling Stone has considered him the greatest artists of all time in one thousand nine hundred seventy sleeping medication caused an accidental overdose. He was twenty seven years old. These are the six musicians in the club all six tragically dead at twenty seven years old. They have become known as the main members of the twenty seven club. In fact, they are part of a larger club of which there is at least fifty members. Fifty musicians who have all died at twenty seven years old author Howard soon. NHS has written by fees on Bob Dylan, Amy wine house, Charles Bukowski and is author of the book twenty-seven a history of the twenty seven club Howard cataloged three thousand four hundred sixty three people between nineteen o eight and two thousand twelve all cheating. Notoriety in popular music. He sorted out at what age each person died. The oldest person was a hundred and five years old and the youngest was fifteen twenty nine individuals died at twenty five years old thirty individuals died at twenty six years old. Suddenly at twenty seven years old fifty died when twenty eight years old. The number of deaths goes back down to thirty two and a twenty nine years old thirty four deaths. That means the average age of death in the two years before twenty seven and after twenty-seven is just over thirty artists, but at twenty seven years. Old. It is nearly twice the number. There have been books and documentaries examining the twenty seven club even studies in academic papers. Many of looked at this and considered the club a curse. There are endless theories. Why? Those at twenty seven years old seemed to die at an unusually high rate. I wanna know what really happened. For years. I thought a lot about this twenty seven club. I pitched a scripted series HBO about eight years ago in a documentary series to a few production companies only a year or so ago. If you go online, you'll see endless articles about it. When this term the twenty seven club actually started is unknown. It seems to have taken off by the media and public at large after Kurt Cobain died. It is reported that his mother said, I told him not to join that stupid club. However, whether she was referring to others who had died at twenty seven or was referring to potential suicides in the family is unknown. Author, Charles r cross said Hendrix Morrison and Joplin all were at least lucky enough to die before the internet entertainment tonight, and people magazine it wasn't until Kirk Cobain took his own life in nineteen Ninety-four that the idea of the twenty seven club arrived in the popular zeitgeist. Cockbain suicide set off a worldwide media onslaught, and Cobain's mother added to the launch of the club concept, much of the coverage of this club focuses on six of the most famous musicians who died at twenty seven. The six. I mentioned earlier here in order of when they died, Brian Jones, Jimi Hendrix, Janice Joplin, Jim Morrison, Kurt cobaine, and Amy wine house when studying all six, there are interesting similarities outside of just their age. One genius in his early days. Jim Morrison was certainly known for his good looks is what many of us imagined when talking about a rockstar, moody, sexy, scandalous noted for taking a piss wherever he wanted as a result. Morrison's brains were sometimes overlooked for my young age. She loved poetry history, philosophy unit. When he graduated high school, he asked his parents if they'd get. him. The works of Nici. A genius is considered somebody with an IQ above. One forty. Morrison is reported to have an IQ level of about one hundred forty nine, Amy wine house was a bookworm at a young age reading literature, ranging from catch twenty two to art Spiegelman's Maus wine house was a spelling bee champion and advanced mathematics. This genius or at very least incredible intellect, and creativity is clear with each member of this club. The second similarity, divorce or traumatic experiences with parents. Amy wine house was nine years old. When her parents split Kirk, Cobain was also nine years old. When his parents divorced. He wrote on his bedroom wall. I hate mom, I hate dad, dad hates mom. Mom hates dad. Kurt was ultimately sent to live with his cousins eventually becoming virtually homeless when Jimi Hendrix was fifteen years old. Old, his mom died behind a bar after collapsing. His dad wouldn't let Jimmy go to the funeral. Jim Morrison's, father, an army guy was always moving. And Jim wrote about wanting to kill his dad and refuse to ever see him in Brian Jones's Lee teens, his parents were so sick of his lifestyle. He came home one night to find his suitcase. In the driveway, said, Pat Andrews girlfriend of Brian's and mother to one of his children. The one thing Brian wanted was first father more so than his mother to say, Brian, I'm proud of you. The third similarity, a family history of mental health issues. This is tough because to this day, people are afraid of talking about their own mental health issues and any history of this in once family still faces the stigma that comes along with it. Family records, oftentimes avoid whatever the reality was according to Howard soons his book about the twenty seven club. There was a history of odd behavior. And violent death and Kirk Cobain's extended family on his mother's side. Kurtz great grandfather died in a mental hospital of a self inflicted stab wound on his father's side. Kurtz great-grandfather, a county sheriff died in bizarre circumstances. Reaching for a cigarette. He dislodged his pistol which fell to the ground went off and shot him dead to of sheriff cobaine sons chose suicide by gunshot Jim Morrison, Janice Joplin, and Jimi Hendrix families all had a history of alcoholism. The fourth similarity, each individual showed signs of severe mental health issues. Several people in Brian Jones's life believed he had bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression. Linda Lawrence, who had a child with Brian said, the parents thought he was just a bad child. He was a sick human being that needed comfort and love. While in highschool aiming wine house was asking her mother who was. A pharmacist why she felt depressed. Wine house began taking medication later in life. She would take the anti anxiety medication. LeBron a drug Janice Joplin used for similar reasons, Joplin herself. Once wrote in a letter, I wanna be happy. So fucking bad at seven years old. Kerr Cockbain was considered hyperactive and put on Ritalin. So a quick break here to talk about ring ring is making a difference for millions of people because they do a really impressive job of making neighborhoods safer. They do this by using smart video, doorbells and cameras in an incredibly simple way ring helps you stay connected to your home anywhere in the world. I'm able which still amazes me to use my phone to see what's going on at all times. If there's a package delivery or surprise visitor, I get an alert and I get it from my phone. I can talk to them yo, what's up, criminal? What are you looking to get my neighbor actually has some pretty good stuff. You can also see the criminal or whomever in HD. So if you're like me and you want to edit a video of them snooping around to put on YouTube, you totally can, but more seriously outside of my incredible jokes ring helps you stay connected to your home anywhere in the world and as a listener, you have. Special offer on a ring starter kit available right now with a video doorbell and motion activated floodlight Cam, the starter kit has everything. You need to start building a ring of security around your home. Just go to ring dot com. Slash w. r. h. that's ring dot com. Slash w. r. h.. The fifth similarity drugs and alcohol. Kerr, Cockbain and Janice Joplin were addicted to heroin Hendrix used LSD cocaine, in a means more. Sin used LSD mescaline amphetamines and many believe died of an accidental heroin, overdose all drank to excess and all smoked a lot of weed. I spoke with Charles r cross author of the New York Times bestselling book, heavier than heaven. The definitive two thousand one biography of Kirk Cobain. He also wrote room full of mirrors a biography on Jimi Hendrix cross is one of the top music journalists in the world. He pointed out that it's important to not get lost in certain narratives and remember the nuance and layers in people's lives not to mention the facts. Many people talk about Jimi Hendrix and they talk about his life as it is the life of a drug addict. I think that's really overstating it because I think his accessibility in the. Availability of any of these drugs, and in fact, is ability to pay for them really only would have even come up in the last year and a half of his life to Charles point. I don't want to make it seem like these musicians lives are somehow exactly the same. We are talking about unique artists, but there is without a doubt, similarities, the six similarity that I want to bring up all six seemed to have felt trapped for significant portions of their lives, and it certainly sucks to be trapped. Imagine that feeling, but being an artist when your entire livelihood centers around expression, Kirk Cobain, chronicle this feeling throughout his childhood in a small town, a hundred miles south west of Seattle Hendrix, felt trapped as his family moved frequently. Also around the Seattle area Joplin hated her high school so much. She go onto say, they laughed me out of class out of town and out of state when Jimmy. Hendrix, finally could leave home. He desperately wanted to play music, but instead felt forced to join the army. He'd send letters to his father, pleading for him to send over his Petar like other musicians when Hendrix did reach fame. He felt audiences trapping him to only performing the songs they had come to love for Jimmy. There was also race, Charles r, cross added. You know, Jimmy just simply could not be accepted in African American radio lack stations in America with not play him, and he felt to some degree betrayed by that at the same time, he was trapped within a worldwide rock culture, and everybody wanted to hear purple haze and here in Sweden on the electric guitar. Jimmy wasn't as interested in that last and most important. All six were extremely talented. I think what was amazing about Jimmy for himself awareness is that music was away for him to. Express themselves emotionally. He wasn't a big talker. He wasn't somebody who sat down and said, hey, I've got a lot going on. Listen to me talk about this. He wasn't very analytical about himself. And yet at the same time, once you put a guitar in his hand, he was able to then use music to kind of create this picture of his emotion. Jimmy said that he saw music colors. I truly think he was a musical genius and like some of the grey classical composers. He was in some ways touched by what he was able to create what he was able to actually do with this instrument. You know he was smarter than people want to remember. There are several other similarities. Each have been reported to have premonitions about their own untimely death. Each had run ins with the law, each rose to fame relatively quickly in some cases extraordinarily quickly and each had complicated relationships with lovers. Why do these similarities matter? We'll get there, but I, it's important to note that in addition to the musicians of the twenty-seven club, there are also world renown artists who have died at twenty-seven. Perhaps the most celebrated artist of his generation was John Michel Basquiat who died at twenty-seven like many others in this club. He died of a drug. Overdose also came from a small town move frequently as a child and showed signs of brilliance at eleven years old. He was fluent in Spanish, French and English, and could read very techs in these respective languages at thirteen years old. His mother committed him to a mental institution at fifteen years old. His father left his son on the streets. His rise to fame was quick at just twenty four years old. He appeared on the cover of the New York Times magazine in a feature titled new, our new money, the marketing of an American artist. There are also those who have died or had several mental health issues that appear to fit a breaking point right around twenty seven years old at twenty-six Britney Spears infamously, went to rehab only to leave a day later and shave her head in front of cameras, and thus the world heath ledger died when he was Twenty-eight. His former wife said for as long as I'd known him, he had bouts with insomnia. He had too much energy. His mind was turning turning turning, always turning. I'm sort of hesitant to talk about the following. But if we're going to do an episode on this twenty-seven club, it doesn't take a lot of searching around or reading different books to see why those who believe in supernatural or mystical forces. Have really latched onto something unexplainable happening at twenty-seven according to certain mystic and Christian theologies. The number twenty seven is known as the death number twenty-seven is a lunar symbol of the divine light. Ancient Greek philosophy in a complex system that used numbers to explain the universe proposed that twenty-seven represented the process of the soul being reabsorbed into its creator in the Bible's book of Genesis. God creates humans in the twenty seventh verse in Buddhist philosophy, twenty seven is the highest level of spiritual taint accounting for leap years and measuring a year as three hundred sixty five and a quarter days. There are thirty one million, five hundred fifty, seven thousand six hundred seconds in a year. The some of those numbers is twenty-seven. But at what point can retake any number and begin to assign some sort of larger meaning to it. I'm not doubting the importance of astrology. Or numerology right now for this portion, I'm going from fact checking to an opinion, but I think there's a massive reach to start drawing correlations between the meanings of twenty-seven. And these people dying at twenty seven years old with the help of Jonathan Harris and others I could now talk forever about twenty-seven. The diameter of the moon is point two, seven, two times that of earth approximately twenty seven percent. The atomic weight of Aluminum's only stable isotope is twenty-seven according to hang sh- way. It's good luck to have twenty-seven identical coins at home in baseball. Each team has twenty-seven outs twenty-seven is a perfect cube three by three by three. The English alphabet contains twenty six characters. In the seventh century, European monks invented the white space character between words and the alphabet. Now contains twenty seven characters. I'm thirty two years old while writing this which means I've lived for two hundred and eighty six thousand five hundred twenty seven hours. If I was reading this in the federated states Micronesia, otherwise, not twenty-seven. The more I studied numbers and understood the thinking behind supernatural or mystical forces the more I found myself thinking, well, twenty-seven is certainly a number with a lot of meetings behind it. Twenty seven is the age. These individuals died, but just simply pointing this out is about all you can do trying to connect. The two feels forced. It is forced. It reminds me of the danger of conspiracy theories. You see different things going on and attempt without facts to connect them. Let's say you're looking at a piece of paper and there are two dots. One dot represents people dying at twenty seven and the other dot represents the meanings of the number twenty seven, but I'm doing right now is trying to create a line that connects these two dots, but that's all I'm doing. Trying opposed to explanations that we've talked about explanations which can cause an early death drugs and alcohol, family history of mental health issue. Use fame depression or lack of support. There is a line connecting those dots and the dots of those who have died at twenty seven years old. If you're interested in exploring this further, there is plenty of reading out there on the meaning behind twenty-seven. And any correlations this may have, but not for me. And with all this information, I took a deep breath and went back to the drawing board. So as many of you know, I'm really proud to have some great sponsors this year for our podcast. And that includes an app which I constantly use like a few times a day use, and that is com- com- has helped me quite a bit. It is the number one app for sleep, meditation and relaxation. It was even named apples 2017 app of the year. If you had to calm dot com slash w. r. h. they'll get twenty five percent off com premium subscription which includes hundreds of hours of premium programming, including guided meditations on issues like anxiety, stress, and focus, including a brand new meditation each day called the daily com. Sleep stories, which are like bedtime stories for Dulce. I have been using them every night. Com has over one hundred of these soothing tales read by well known voices to help people unwind and fall into a deep sleep. For a limited time. What really happened listeners that's all of you can get twenty five percent off Akam premium subscription ADT com dot com. Slash w. r. h. it includes unlimited access to all of coms amazing content get started today at com dot com. Slash w. r. h. that c. a. l. m. dot COM slash w. r. h.. When doing research for each episode, I always try to remind myself and I know mocked me if you think this is cheesy, but I try to remind myself of the George Orwell quote to see what is in front of one's nose needs constant struggle. Maybe this happens in your life when you've been preparing for some big event. And then when the special day comes, you've realized what's the address again, what my wearing? Did I get a gift, an oversight of the most obvious form a few days ago. I was in a cab home from psychiatry point of all things when I thought. All right, are twenty-seven club episode is coming up. Is there anything I missing? One component I began harping on is something that's been on my mind this whole time, and that is the word club in the twenty seven club. I was somewhere in the mid seventies in central park. When I looked up the word to make a long story short, generally speaking club is a good thing to be a part of a sports club, a book club, a dance. Club, there's exceptions like anything, but generally speaking, you wanna be in a club, the twenty seven club sounds like this to at least for me. It doesn't just sound like something special, but something you'd want to be in. And then I thought, well, maybe it's an ode to these great musicians. If you're going to die at a young age, this is an impressive group to be with, but then it kind of hit me in all likelihood, the last thing these six members would ever want to be a part of some sort of club. We're talking about world-class rebels, individual thinkers, these were artists who were the least likely people to ever join any type of club far more seriously and less of me participating is proof that these musicians didn't wanna be a part of this club. We know this because they asked oftentimes pled for help help for their depression, mood swings, drug habits, help from their own family and friends. If there is such a twenty-seven club, they add. Actively were hoping not to be a part of it. If you haven't seen the kademi award winning documentary on any wine house called Amy, I'd highly recommend it. It's directed by Asif Kapadia while researching this episode of the podcast. And after we watching the film and going down the rabbit hole of reading more about us process while working on the movie, I came across the below quote also is talking about one of Amy's most well known songs titled rehab before getting to this quote for those that don't know, Amy song was a smash hit. The catch is part of the song which you could literally hear people singing along to when walking down the street was they tried to make me go to rehab. And I said, no, no, no. I remember exactly where I was. When I first heard this song, Chelsea New York twenty third street. I felt weird like, yeah, I don't know a better word than that feeling weird when listening, maybe it's my own struggles with mental health. But wine houses song quite clearly is about a person saying. They should be getting help, but aren't however, like most, I can't say this stop me from listening to the song instead I did so endlessly director Asif Kapadia in the interview, I read said the following about Amy's thoughts. I don't think she liked the song. It's dark and it's a cry for help. I think she was surprised. It became a hit. The trouble was already there, but that's when it really kicked off that song becomes, I think the thing that she hated people wanted her to sing it and she singing it with a drink. In her hand, it's a cry for help every time she says, no, she saying yes. Oh shit. I thought in retrospect I was or I am part of the problem. I was one of many celebrating a song about a person badly hurting and pleading for help. So I tracked down also on Twitter, asked if he could semi his Email, he was kind enough to respond in. I emailed him. I set up a time and called him for an interview. But off in the kindest way, possible said he wouldn't take part. I'm not quoting him, but he was okay with me, relaying his thoughts from the notes I took while respo- his reason for not wanting to be part of the podcast was simple and left me wondering why I was doing this episode at all. Awesome. Has made it a rule of his not to talk about the quote unquote twenty-seven club. He believes this concept has somehow made it seem like it's cool to be an artist and diet twenty-seven. When in reality, it's obviously horrific. Any reference to the club, even if well, intentioned will further the romanticizing of this fake club that is simply put tragic. I'm not kidding that when he told me this, I was kind of angry myself. I felt terrible. If you do is simple. Google search of the twenty seven club, you'll get photos that don't show the reality of each musician's death at twenty-seven. Instead, you see cartoons. Or paintings of the six musicians hanging out in heaven or talking over a card game or seated as if that the last supper you see photos of them like they're in the Brady bunch smiling smoking or playing music being part of a club incensio celebration. Exactly. Like how I started this episode, she'll music the group hanging out focused on artwork. I now really was part of the problem. I thought of forgetting about this episode and doing something else. I want to take a quick break to thank one of our great partners who really make this podcast possible as many of you know, I spend most of my time working. I don't really like to do much else reading writing recording. Repeat. So what happens when this is the case, you don't really get furniture. I lived two years. This is true. I live two years in an apartment once with only a mattress. No fridge, no rug. No girlfriend anyway, my current place. Well, something wildly unexpected happened now. There's no girlfriend, but I got in touch with the folks at article article has beautifully designed modern furniture and that Scandinavian simplicity, which I happen to be a fan of. I got this new suite high table desk, not too much just tasteful and it's all online. No showrooms, no sales people just savings. An article is offering our listeners fifty dollars off their first. Purchase of one hundred dollars or more to claim visit article dot com. Slash w. r. h. as in what really happened, that's all it takes to article dot com slash w. r. h. and the discount will be automatically applied at checkout. That's article dot com. Slash w. r. h. to get fifty dollars off your first purchase of one hundred dollars or more. I thought of forgetting about this episode and doing something else, but I I wanted to spend a bit more time going through my research. I came across the work of Diana Theodora Kenny. Dr. Kenny has a degree in pretty much everything. She's primarily a psychologist and researcher as well as professor at the university of Sydney. Dr. Kenny is the author of over two hundred publications including seven books. She was curious about this twenty-seven club and did her own study with a few colleagues. Dr Kenny used over two hundred sources and studied over eleven thousand pop musicians from nineteen fifty to twenty fourteen her findings. Well, if anything, perhaps there should be a fifty six club. Eddie rabbit, Tammy Wynette Mimi Farina, Johnny Ramone Chris Ledoux van smokey Hampton and Charles baby Tate. All died at fifty six in terms of that twenty. Seven year old bump according to Dr Kenny study. One point two percent of the over eleven thousand musicians in her study died at twenty six years old. One point four percent died at twenty eight. And one point three percent died at twenty seven. So again, one point, two percent at twenty six years old. One point, four percent at twenty eight years old. And one point, three percent at twenty seven years old different studies on this have had different outcomes. But I do believe that the more focused and the more precise the study, the results are the twenty-seven isn't really all that different. Even Howard soons would go onto explain the limits of his own study so opposed to moving forward. I took another step back and looked at the years. The main six had died, Brian Jones, Jimi Hendrix, Janice Joplin, and Jim Morrison, all died between nineteen sixty nine and nineteen seventy-one. That's four of these six. Members dying over the course of two years. In fact, Hendrix Joplin died within two weeks of each other. So what was happening during that time period? Singers, like Frank Sinatra and Tom Jones were at the peak of their careers during the nineteen sixties and sold millions of records. It was the second half of the decade which saw the emergence of rock music, including psychedelic rock. Michael Hicks, author of sixties rock garage psychedelic, and other satisfactions defines the John Jonah as one which excavates and enhances the mind, altering experiences of psychedelic drugs. Most notably LSD. This music was personal and introspective for one of the first times in pop culture history, the masses were talking about suffering and pain. Musicians were exploring their subconscious more and using drugs to do so us editions and record company saw that the. Doug culture sold people, particularly young people, loved it. It was celebrated. There was the human being during the winter of sixty seven and that summer was the summer of love and all reached historic heights during the nineteen sixty nine Woodstock festival. With that in mind, it's not so hard to believe that during this time four of the most famous rock and roll musicians died in their late twenties while enormously popular. It wasn't until twenty years later that his concept of a twenty-seven club came up. Again. This was in one thousand nine hundred four when Cobain committed suicide Kurt had a history of mental health issues and so does family he had attempted suicide before turning twenty-seven. It seems to me it was a convenient and easy way to put him a unique and brilliant artist into this twenty-seven club. This constructed group. Of course, the term found itself again on the headlines of papers. Around the world when Amy wine-house died about fifteen years later, what is perhaps less exciting to talk about an examine is why musicians and artists are dying at this relatively young age. And if there's anything to be done as it turns out I've learned there is research that shows how our perception of the late twenties is misunderstood or at least was misunderstood by me until the last eighteen months. While I thought of a twenty seven year old as a fully formed adult research shows. Otherwise with the help of Heather Sherman, I reached out to Dr Robert McIntyre, a professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at the university of Toronto and head of the mood disorders psychopharmacology unit at the University Health network. The old notion that we had in neuro science or brain science for a long time was that, you know, after you go through your adolescence in reach early adulthood, the brain have. There's the brain that you're stuck with and we've moved away from that very outdated anachronistic notion to a more comprehensive, coherent Egmore scientific. The informed notion that the brain really is this plastic mutable, changeable organism Dr McIntyre added, but even your mid twenties, for example, early thirties, there's still the capacity to generate from early progenitor or early sort of undifferentiated cells brain cells. These brain cells are not just sort of a hearing, but they're also a functioning. So these are new mature adult brain cells that have a functional relevance to people. When it comes to drugs, we'd has a bigger effect on our minds than previously thought. We know the cannabis exposure, specifically THC gnawing in developing brain can be highly toxic, can induce psychosis in those who I've risk. But typically in the. A younger brain that is people under the age of twenty five still on the age of twenty. What Dr Kenny did find in our research was that pop artists lifespans were up to twenty five years shorter than the average American accidental death rates were between five and ten times greater suicide rates were between two and seven times greater and homicide rates were up to eight times greater than the US population after publishing her study, Dr Kenny concluded. This is clear evidence that all is not well in pop music land. Why is the so the pop music scene fails to provide boundaries and to model and expect acceptable behavior? It actually does the reverse. It valorize is outrageous behavior and the acting out of aggressive, sexual and destructive impulses. The most of a stair only live out in fantasy the music industry needs to consider these findings to discover ways of recognizing and assisting young musicians. Distress at the very least those who make their livings from these young people need to learn to recognize early signs of emotional distress, crisis, depression, and suicide -ality, and to put some support systems in place to provide the necessary assistance and care in regards to Jimmy's death in those around him, Charles r cross said he didn't have a one person kinda checking up on him in the end. Both Jimmy's managers are dead. Now, you know there's no, you know, really way to say it other than to some degree to me, death ends up being the responsibility of his managers. I think that ultimately ends up being a lot of the story of rock history. Many times these stars are using drugs. The managers are well aware of it and Jimmy case in all likelihood, one of his managers, Michael Jeffries was probably supplying drugs to Jimmy at times that gave him a level of control. Jim. Death. In some ways we blame on the manager. If you're a rock manager, the worst thing you can do is let your client die. And sadly, that ends up being the case in more than a few of these rock. Lots ultimately, I've discovered that there isn't any club. What you do have is six artists who were faced with a great deal of success and turmoil in a very short period of time. They also faced fame drug and alcohol addiction money, or at least people with money, a lack of foundational support the trappings that can come with being an artist and all of this. Well, their brains were still forming. When you look at this infamous club, four of these main members died over the course of only two years during a time period in which drugs were rampant and largely celebrated. Unlike us of who directed the documentary on Amy wine house. I clearly opted to talk about the twenty seven club. I don't think there is the right approach. There's a larger debate to be had about whether or not addressing this club helps or hurt the cause of addressing the larger problem. It only takes a very quick search to see that Rolling Stone magazine BBC the Washington Post and endless other respectable news outlets to fairly obscure blogs have written at length about this term and its members without also mentioning the terms flaws, oftentimes getting lost in some sort of romanticised recounting of those who've passed for now. I don't think there are enough voices pointing out why this term is in fact, offensive and has nothing to do with a PC culture. It has to do with facts, not adding up and being sensitive. When we talk about mental health issues and alcohol IX or drug addicts, would I think would be a step in the right direction is to bring attention to this because to this day. When you hear about a public figure who dies at twenty seven years old, you'll read headlines that they are joining a club, but that is not what really happened. Next week on what really happened. The nine hundred ninety four. The president of Russia Boris Yeltsin was discovered by the secret service in Washington DC on Pennsylvania Avenue. He was extremely drunk wearing only underwear yelling for CAD and demanding pizza. President Clinton would do his best to help his friend President Yeltsin with his drinking problems. But in the decades since the American and Russian relationship has taken severe turns that's next week on what really happened. Don't forget go to jinx pod dot com to give me feedback or jinx pod dot com. Slash contributors to become a part of the team. I'm on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at Andrew Jenks.

Jim Morrison Jimi Hendrix Kirk Cobain Jimmy Brian Jones Hendrix Joplin Amy wine house Joplin Amy Diana Theodora Kenny Kurt Howard soons w. r. h. Charles r US Bill Wyman Twitter heroin Kurt Cobain
Hotel Art

Decoder Ring

33:07 min | 2 years ago

Hotel Art

"This episode is brought to you by I travel for a new podcast from American Airlines, British Airways, and visit Britain. In this series. Three Americans find out when inspire them to explore they pack up and take to the skies for a vacation in Great Britain and experience a new kind of travel one that pushes them to embrace their adventurous spirit. They encounter twists and turns surprising detours, and the truly unexpected while relying on local Brits and their own curiosity to experience Britain like you've never seen it before. Listen and subscribe to. I travel for on apple podcast. Google play Stitcher or ever. You get your podcasts. This podcast contains explicit language. In two thousand sixteen the world's largest budget hotel chain super decided to put on an art show. If you're an art aficionado, this is the place to be Miami and art Basel, but this year something different anew exhibition this collection called when the art comes down curated by super eight. Yes, that's super eight proving everything old is new again, super wanted to get rid of the art that had been in its motel rooms since the chain was founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy four, whatever you imagine when you imagine quintessentially kitschy hotel art a deer by a babbling brook near Lampley cottage LeBron's paint by number special powdery winter scape of quaint villages of Elvis painting. That's the kind of stuff that was on the walls of the super eights rather than just throw it out. Super eight gave the paintings away at one event at our Basilan Miami, which ended up on the today show and the news clip you just heard an another at a gallery space in New York, which is host. By the comedian, Amy sedaris sedaris named all the paintings, and she told Jimmy Fallon about it on the tonight show you just had an art show the very. Eight hotels given got rid of all their old art. They're bringing a Newark city specific. So like let's say you're in San Francisco, you don't reward. You aren't and you wake up, you'll see a painting of the Golden Gate Bridge arch St. Lois, namely, I sure did that was really hard to name this. What's Allen showing sedaris a washout painting, three spindly trees birches maybe that are emerging from foreground of oversize slightly impressionistic tulips and are standing in front of a psychedelic, pastel sky. This one, I don't remember, but let's call it early menopause. We were. All of this was meant to bring attention to SuperBeets new look. They had gotten rid of all the old art for a reason to upgrade it to signal that the age of kitsch hotel art was officially over and that something new had taken its place. When we decided to do it episode about hotel art, we thought we would be doing an episode about, well, hotel art, exactly the sort of ugly shoddy cheap paintings used to hang in super aids, but it turns out that's an outdated understanding shore. You still regularly come across bizarre paintings in hotels, collages that match the carpet, who the soup rates move away from Kipp is part of a decades, long trend on hotels, part hotels of all price points to reclaim hotel art, to transform it from something unconsidered, an embarrassing into a selling point, a sinus sophistication and authenticity, an Instagram photo op a communication to its customers about the kind of people they are and the kind of hotel they're staying at or at the very least evidence that they aren't desperately behind the times hotel are you can believe it has become a signifier of good taste. This is decoding a show about cracking cultural mysteries. I'm please TV critic will pass skin every month. We take a cultural question habit or idea, crack it open and try to figure out what it means and why it matters. What happened to hotel art. Hotel are is a subset of commercial art, which exists all around us in all of the places that need and want art. But that are not museums or galleries places like doctors offices and dental clinics, restaurants and workspaces hospitals and airports places for art, but not about our economically and aesthetically. This kind of work is often distinct from the work of artists who show at galleries and art fairs. But you might be surprised at the overlap, particularly in high end hotels, which increasingly compete with each other to have the most ambitious art programs at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, which was opened by the art collector and hotel as Steve Wynn, a ten million dollar glass sculpture by delta Hooley blooms out of the lobby ceiling. The w hotel in south beach has a collection that includes work by Andy Warhol. John Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel high end hotels commission original work all the time sometimes from big name, contemporary artists and even non luxury hotels, boast site, specific pieces. In their lobbies like a mural of a taxicab made out of Pennzoil stubs or thirty foot installation featuring the faces of local residents hotel design in general has become so intentional. So stylized that it's been lampooned on Portland area. Here's a sketch called the deuce in which Fred armistead plays a hotel clerk. It teases a certain kind of overdone hipster hotel were no singular piece of artists bad, but the whole thing reeks of trying too hard. Well, enjoy your room. Sink is really weird. It's going to look like there's no faucet, but whenever you feel the need to brush your teeth or whatever, don't worry about it and it will happen. Comes with turntable in order to understand how we got here to a place where hotels are jockeying to distinguish themselves with their art. You need to understand how the modern hotel came to be. The hotel as we know it first appeared in America in the seventeen ninety s at the time, inns and taverns were the norm places. It often house travelers as a way to procure a liquor license. There were bars with beds, basically, by contrast, these new hotels wanted to emphasize elegance and luxury their safety, their architecture was imposing and they were decorated beautifully from the plush carpets to the chandeliers to the sumptuous wall Hanes. And this approach at the high end of the market has more or less continued through to the present day. But in the early nineteen hundreds, a man named EM statler pioneered a different more affordable version of the hotel. He wanted people to have a reliable predictable kind of hotel experience, so they would always know what they were getting. That's AK Sandoval Strauss. He's an associate professor of history at Penn State, and he wrote the book hotel and American history in one thousand nine hundred eight. The statler hotel opened in Buffalo New York. It was the first of a number of economical standardized hotel. Locations that promised customers in Stadler's words to provide a bed and a bath for a dollar and a half, and he was the most influential hotel man of the first half of the twentieth century. So for for quite some time, the idea, oh, we'll democratize hotel. We'll create very standardized experiences that actually carried prestige. If you're traveling to a new strange city, just knowing that the cheap hotel you'd end up at would be of a basic level of quality and not say a bedbug infested flop house was an innovation kind of luxury. Even reliability was so desirable. The nearly seventy years after the first statler hotel. Other hotels were still crowing about it. We never got your reservation. You get enough surprises when you travel. That's a commercial from nineteen seventy five for Holiday Inn hotels, promising its customers above all else, a predictable experience. Every holiday in the best surprise his no surprise. Because art didn't serve the customer experience directly. You don't sleep on the paintings after all hotels, despite being standardized in many other ways, often relied upon operator taste or lack thereof for the art thirty years ago before the arrival of digital printers. The only way to reproduce affordably was to do massive runs of an image. This meant hotel owners were often picking from a small pool of pieces, each of which had to work in multiple locations. This is where your classic kitschy hotel art comes from a dearth of options. Here's David Winton the president of Cala Scher North Carolina based company that makes art for the hospitality industry on this pre digital era, art Ross would Paletti store cly people thought about it as an illustration of a flower, or you know something that got mass produced and printed Dow's ends of. And then hopefully that would work okay and hundreds of hotels around the world, but then the backlash to all the sameness arrived as with. So many things related to hotel design and art in hotels. We need to go back to this pivotal moment in the nineteen eighties when Prager and Steve rebel introduced a completely new concept, the petite hotel phenomenon that's mayor Ross, the west coast editor of architectural digest in the late nineteen eighties, the hotel, Ian Schrager. One of the co, founders of studio fifty, four opened a few hotels in New York that immediately became sensations. One was the Royal tin which was designed by the singular Frenchman Philippe Starck who's witty, playful, lobby included velvet armchairs that leaned back at a precipitous angle wall sconces in the shapes of rhinoceros horns and three legged chairs that had a tendency to tip over a hotels in New York became the gathering spots for the beau-monde. You know, this gave birth to a movement of hotel ears. We wanted to signify cool in some wage signify feet. And to draw people into their properties by, you know, promising inexperience of like minded people. These early boutique hotels had an elevated even unexpected style. They weren't standardized because they wanted to set themselves and by extension, the person who stayed there apart, these are tells could be funky elegant sexy, but they were always deeply intentional with a very strong sense of place because the whole idea was that when you were there, you weren't nowhere. You were somewhere. In the thirty years since this idea that a hotel ought to be designed experience, it has expanded beyond boutique hotels to most hotels. And then further still David Winstons company Scher has worked with many hotels from best Western's to four seasons. And Winton says, despite these hotels, different price points and styles, they want the same thing to have an experience and while the best western art might be a Frank, Fred, maybe showing anything landmark from the counter. An interesting moment from the area and the four seasons peace has an original painting from an artist and the neighbor that it still intended to give you a sense of place which making feel like you haven't just gone to random white box in the middle of nowhere. You are in Idaho, you are in Paris. This was what super eights were after two never had. An art program. It was always you must have two pieces of art within the room. That's Mike Mueller. The senior vice president and brand leader for super eight worldwide, explaining what the chain decided to put on the walls after took down all that kitsch, and it came to our attention as we were starting to think about how do we shake off the dust of a perception that super eight is like your grandfather's old hotel. And so we had a concept that take take all the wall art down it take the headboard doubt. What if we took that headboard turn that into the art and combine those pieces. And so now we've got these oversized from top bed to the ceiling, black and white photographs. If you walk into a super eight today, instead of seeing a mass produced impressionistic sailboat, you'll see two huge chocolate framed very polished, black and white photographs above the bed. These images are not just if anything, the related to the specific location of that specific super eight at the Fort Worth. Super eight. For example, there's a photograph of a cowboy on a horse in silhouette, getting ready to use his LASSO at the Los Angeles, super eight. There's a photograph of the man Chinese theater lit up at night next generation of traveler. They're interested in things like farm-to-table, they wanna know where things are source. They want to know where where things are coming from where where they can go for for truly local authentic experience soup rates which are scattered all over North America, and even in China can often be found near inauspicious interstate exits. I've stated a few in my life driving away from college with a u. haul full of stuff between Chicago and New York on a road trip somewhere in the Texas panhandle, and I could not. Possibly be more specific about their locations because that was what was so useful about soup rates. They're just right there when right there is the middle of nowhere. The idea of a super eight as a place. That's anything other than a stopover as a place that should be locally branded. It shows just how deeply this new idea of what a hotel should be has permeated. Now's the time we talk about a sponsor, not that you would launch all the applications on your computer at the same time just for fun, but now you could lack running the eighth gen Intel core processor with Intel. Octane memory allow you to push your computer to new limits with Intel. Obtain memory. Everyday tasks are up to two point one times more responsive with all that power, the possibilities seem endless. What are some of those possibilities you ask, how about launching big media apps and content faster, allowing you to create more in less time with the ace gen Intel core processor. Many of your everyday tasks are speeding up to like Email presentations. Even your browser can launch faster with Intel, obtain memory. So not that you would store thirty two gigabytes of photos on your computer and then open them all at once. But you could don't believe it go to Intel dot com slash you could to learn more. For more complete information about performance and benchmark results, visit WWW, dot Intel, dot com. Slash benchmarks. Okay. Now back to the show. So how does are actually get into a hotel. Generally speaking, the way hotel, particularly a chain hotel goes about getting its r is as follows. You start with the developer, the people who own the actual property where the hotel sets the development will hire an interior design firm to design a specific type of hotel. At a specific budget. They designed the rooms and the lobby and the interior architecture. They pick the furniture of the fixtures and attended the overall vibe of the place. These interior design teams will then hire and work with another firm or sometimes an individual consultant to source the artwork for the space. The reason the design teams don't just do this part themselves is because procuring art is a big complicated. Job hotel was say, two hundred rooms, hallways, conference rooms and a lobby will need hundreds if not thousands of pieces of art to find it. Art consultants do a bunch of different things from actually commissioning artists to make an original work for the hotel to licensing art for the rooms to searching for found objects or knickknacks at flea markets to making the our in house with an in house art team and printing it on those giant versatile digital printers. These printers make it easy and affordable to print in small batches. Needless to say, it's not a coincidence that hotels have gotten much more interested in bespoke art as bespoke art has become so much cheaper art firms can now easily create thoughtful artwork and reproductions or just as easily make the sort of images that match the bedspread. It really depends on what the hotel and the designers want. Here's an example of the directions and art team might get. You know, I, I want it to look and feel like this tiny doodle that I made on the back of a napkin, or I've got three key inspiration word and they are read no birds and textural David Winton. Again, someone is company will then create art that interprets and fits those specifications. It's graphic design across for sharp, but not quite art making in the studio artists sense, but they're artists of that ilk whose work appears in hotels, two. I'm Tom Swanson and I'm a visual artist. My work focuses on cranes in America that kind of it. Tom loves cranes. When we spoke, he had dozens of crane facts at the ready crane for the largest species in North America, and they migrate. They had the largest migration in the United States and Zandt hill cranes they migrate. It's the largest. My work has appeared in scores of high end hotels, including Ritz Carlton four seasons and Saint rita's gilded cranes made out of metal leaf are applied to canvas or age panels, which can be quite large in one piece, half a dozen silver cranes in flight sweep past leafless trees that are rendered in bright copper in another. The cranes are semi obscured by the tangled branches of a silver tree. Tom has gallery representation and regularly shows his work. But he says about seventy five percent of his business is commissions from private customers. And the hospitality industry for Tom dealing with them is pretty much the same except that hotel jobs can extend over years and tend to pay better. The process starts with the conversation about what the client wants, which is to say it's collaborative. I encourage them bring ideas so that we can talk a little bit about how we might incorporate that into my language. There's a back and forth in the hospitality business between the consultant and the artist, and eventually the designers and the developers who have to approve everything that wouldn't suit everyone and is at odds with our Amandus ideas of the uncompromising difficult artists if not the reality of it. But it works for Tom and for lots of working artists for whom hotels are a lucrative way to make a living and an effective way to locate potential customers on working with hospitality. I'm trying to match it up to where my client basis. Sweet spot from my work as somewhere between fifteen and thirty thousand dollars a piece. So I really need to match my primary client and what their aspirations are and where they might stay. Then you matching hotels, kind of like an advertisement for you. That's exactly what I can't tell you how many commissions I've gotten because people went to Jackson Hole to go skiing and stayed in the four seasons. When you talk to people involved in the hotel art industry, all of the development sound positive hotels care more than ever about the quality of what the hang on their walls, it's easier than ever to make and get our of quality to hang their hotels or even hiring real artists and helping them to make a living. And all of this is true, but there's another part of the hotel already quesion we haven't talked about yet a player who's not the hotel or the middleman, or the graphic designer, or the artist who's not. So recklessly involved in the business of hotel art, and that's you and me the people who look at it and for customers and for viewers. There's another question we have to ask can hotel are really function as our new hotel. Art may be better, but can it be good. Now's the time. We talk about a sponsor slack, the collaboration hub for work, no matter what kind of work you do. Teamwork on slack happens in channels where your information and conversations are organized around projects offices and teams. And because everything you need to work is in one place, it's faster and easier to get things done, designed to support the way people like you naturally worked together. Slack makes collaborating with your colleagues online as easy efficient s face to face Ben, the producer of Dakota. Reaganite use slack literally all the time, like all the time designed to support the way people like you naturally work together. Slack makes collaborating with your colleagues online as easy and efficient as face to face. The more slack is used across the company, the more value it provides as tools and information shared by one department become accessible across departments, helping teams work together across locations, time zones, or job titles with slack. The. The right people in your team are kept in the loop and the information they need is always at their fingertips, learn more at slack dot com. Okay. Now back to the show. My perspective does Black Watch on the wall or even worse than what used to be there. That's David Raskin the Mon family professor of contemporary art history at the school of the Art Institute of Chicago. What used to be most motels was things that were just, you know, generic indicators of art. So you knew you weren't supposed to pay attention to it, which was kind of the ideal didn't put any demands on you if you noticed it at all. The lesson was don't pay me any attention before speaking with him. I had sent him some pictures of the new art in a super eight hotels. The big frame photographs of local sites. He had some beret Singley strong opinions about them is, you know, kinda gorgeous kinda artsy photographs black and white photographs of local scenery that super it is now gone to, you know, look like what art should look like, which is even worse because they've just turned into branding and. Decoration and a claim on kind of upscale lifestyle exist. Basically ruins all art because it says if these gorgeous black and white images are actually nothing than all art is actually nothing is there no way to have a meaningful encounter with art in a setting of a hotel? There's no way to have a meaningful encounter in art where that art, the purpose of that art in the nature of that art is simply to make claims on the. My style that the if you're aspires to this is so much more extreme than the ways I had been considering hotel art, which seem so harmless to me. And while I think it's absurd to insist that no one has ever had an experience, I find meaningful with the art in a hotel. I've been thinking about this conversation ever since. There's always going to be a tension inherent in hotel art because it's never just or even primarily art. It's always something else to a decorative prop that's supposed to make you feel positively about the place that you're staying and what horrifies Raskin is not just at hotels use our as decoration would horrifies him. Even more is the way that hotels turn art into lifestyle branding. Remember the Holiday Inn ad reprise his nose, apprise. This is not at all how tells advertise themselves today. Here's an ad from two thousand thirteen from Marriott. The hotel brand that owns several lines of hotels up and down the price in luxury spectrum. This is not a hotel. It's an idea that travels should be brilliant, the promise of spaces as expensive as your imagination offering surprises that will change as often as you do. I find this ad so deeply silly. Please notice the use of the word surprise in it though which in a complete reversal hotels are now promising their guests. They will provide the travel is no longer the surprise. It's the hotel itself, though, as this ad would have it, the hotel isn't even a hotel anymore. All of this is what happens when hotels have ceased to be just a place to stay and become instead aspirational in a crowded marketplace being merely functional saying, you've got four walls and a bed and won't lose a reservation. It isn't enough to distinguish you. So hotels have had to become signifier 's not just of class, which they've always been, but of the micro niches of class and taste an art. One of the most versatile aspects of any hotel is one of the easiest ways for a hotel to announce its niche to sell itself to make you feel stuff about the. A hotel and then preferably share that feeling with your friends on Instagram? Probably at least on a weekly basis kicking off a project, an interior designer, Earl hotel owner will say, we need to make sure we have at least one Instagram moment that's Ari Grassi the founder of indie walls, accompany that helps hotels fide and work with artists and the so much publicity, free publicity for the hotel, like everything else in hotel. The art wants to affirm your choice to stay there since it trying to do that for many people, it's very rarely going to be genuinely challenging or provocative or political in less. All of those qualities are part of the hotels brand. Even if a hotel showcasing work from renowned artists work that is undeniably art with a capital a. it's meaty political anesthetic substance might get subsumed by the hotel context or at least that's what David Raskin things. The real question is the said, go to a really fancy hotel in New York City, and there's an actual Monet painting in that hotel room. And I'm looking at the Monet in my room in my suite at the Ritz Carlton, what's my experience with that Monet. And I'm contending that while there might be a little bit of Monet's still there, mostly it's while look at what the rich gets me. The Ritz gives me a chance to see a Monet. All of this doesn't mean that it's not nice to look at something beautiful in your hotel room. It doesn't mean it's not nice to stay in a place that cares about the art. It doesn't mean it's not nice to stay in a hotel that can show you a Monet or a Warhol or an installation from an incoming local artist. In fact, these things all sound exceedingly nice. It's even nice from a certain perspective that hotels decided art of all that they could spend money on is an important way to connect with their clientele, but art as opposed to decoration as opposed to branding. It's supposed to be more than nice. There used to be something that we believed we could get from art that is getting harder to believe in every day and that that the artist put something special in there for the to work really hard to share. And when that something special is getting told is exactly the same as the fancy dining room table and the rug. Then we're losing a lot. There's a famous story about Mark Roscoe who in the late nineteen fifties won a commission to create a series of paintings for the new four seasons restaurant in New York. It was a lucrative and prestigious assignment and Roth goes work would have hung your Pollock's Picasso's. But the story goes that in nineteen fifty nine as the restaurant was preparing to open, he went and had a meal there. He had hoped his art would exert a force on the space. He had told a friend, I hope to ruin the appetite of every son of a bitch you ever eats in that room. What he discovered instead was that his paintings would be no match for an expensive power lunch. His work in this context would become use a phrase that was leveled critically at his abstractions, just apocalyptic wallpaper. So he pulled it. I find this story and Roscoe standard speed very moving, but I'm not nearly so principled. I like to think I've had a few profound experiences with art in my life, but sometimes when I walk into museum galleries, the first thing I do is scan the room. Think I'd like that on my wall. In other words, my first reaction to piece of art is purely acquisitive swish owned it. I don't want to speak for you, but I think this makes me like a lot of people who sometimes relate to art in a thoughtful meaningful way and more often relate to it in a not thoughtful meaningful way. One of the knock on affects of all the technological advances that have made it easier and cheaper to create reproduce and distribute art than ever before is that it is easier than ever before to have this kind of casual, unthinking relationship to art. We now constantly find ourselves in extremely designed commercial spaces that are chock full of professional art, and that's kind of catch twenty two because there's more art around us than ever so, how can we attend to at all or even very much of it. And I think the truth is that often we don't, and that's a loss. That's what I take from Raskin's argument. Art is now like so many other pieces of culture like mood music or the TV that's on while you do the chores or the movie you watched while texting we can, of course still get meaning from it, but there is a kind of work you have to do before you can get to that, meaning you actually have to pay attention. At some point while I was working on this piece, the reams and reams of tasteful high end hotel art that I was seeing all sorts of feel the same. What ends up happening spaces that are so designed and you might be familiar with this from farm-to-table restaurants or impeccably source coffee houses or so many other aspects of modern consumer life. Is it a focus on quality on uniqueness on locality on experience end up amounting to kind of claustrophobic sameness? Everywhere you go. There you are in a room with perfectly bespoke are so carefully reflects presiding good taste. It looks exactly like all the other rooms full of perfectly bespoke art when presented with all of this idiocy and Craddock sameness. You may find yourself longing for something actually idiosyncratic, which brings us back to all that kitschy art the super eight, got rid of it used to be that encountering good art in a hotel was shocking, but now the opposite is true. That art is the outlier. If you walk into hotel. L. room and see a black velvet painting of a white tiger or weird sculpture of a house cat or some watercolor of a sad clown. You might get the actual jolt the freeze off the call to attention that you would usually only get from much better more substantive art. This sort of want in display a bad taste. It's getting so rare. You just have to look at it and as good as good hotel. Art may be, can't give you that charge. Maybe in losing that we really are losing something surprising, something genuinely unpredictable as opposed to something unpredictable and quotes in the curated way of modern hotels. That art of the truly unhinged. Righty may bode poorly for the rest of your hotel stay. Maybe the battle be- lumpy and maybe the food will be crappy and maybe you'll have to talk to the clerk for too long, but hey, doesn't that sound like what modern hotels are supposed to be all about a real experience. This is decoding, I'm willa Paskhin. You can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin. And if you have any cultural mysteries, you want us to code. You can Email us at Dakota rang at slate dot com. If you haven't yet, subscribe and rate are feed in apple podcasts or ever. You get your podcasts and even better tell your friends. This podcast was written by willa Paskhin and produced an edited by Benjamin fresh who also does illustrations for every show special. Thanks to Matthew Whitaker, Michelle hunter, John, Sarah, Sulu Kuneva seen Lauren Kane, Alice grace Deitz Lisa Larsson Walker, Kevin hatch, rob Myers, and everyone else gave us help and feedback along the way. Thanks for listening. We'll see you next month.

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Anselm Kiefer interview. Plus, New York auction "gigaweek"

The Art Newspaper Weekly

37:51 min | 1 year ago

Anselm Kiefer interview. Plus, New York auction "gigaweek"

"The newspaper put coasties. Brought to you in association with Bonhams. Auction is since seventeen ninety three to find out more visit bombs dot com. Hello and welcome to the art. Newspaper puck cursed. I'm Ben Luke. Thanks expert joining US later. In the past we take the temperature of the art market in New York auction week but I am still keefer. The German artist has a new show at the White White Cube Gallery in London. And typically. He's taking on big subjects this time the scientific concept known a string theory characteristically keefer explores this mathematical muddle little imbo sculpture and painting with a much broader cultural and historical framework looking back to ancient mythology are contemporary art correspondent. Louisa Buck went to what keep cheap to meet him so unsettling the title of this exhibition that fills white. Cuban Bergonzi is super strings. RUNES GNOMES Gordian Knot. I mean that's quite a lineup. This artists but let's just zero on the super strings. This particular body of work is largely underpinned by recent explorations in string theory. Can you just talk a bit about what's brought into string theory wife. I did this paintings about Mattis. Peration I kinda done a stint ten string theory. It's so complex and so difficult and I'm not a mathematician and I read about outs in. I think twenty five years. Perhaps a read about string theory in magazines at one magazine I have. It's called a MM spectrum and they're all the new discoveries in Mathematics Chemistry Physics and and I'm really leap fascinated because it's such a vast nola Julia who develops there and and and I can always sees a connection between the old meath and the new Future explorations in physics by example but string theory. As far as I know I go to limited knowledge of these things but it hasn't actually been empirically not proven by rules or formula yet. It's still up for interpretation. Not One formalized proven by experiments normally family of physicians. They they have an idea. They have an intuition Einstein head in nine thousand nine hundred seven also and the heaven new idea about the about the context of and then batiks time until it's proven by experiments and in the case of Einstein was proven once I think ten years later also and then he goes nobre overpriced because then they thought it's religious but concern exists string theory. Nothing is proven is that what appeals to you the fact that it started with intuition intuition and it hasn't actually been hammered down into a set of rules you know in the aren't nothing is provable. You cannot prove you can approve by the deduction that this thing is a best always better than the other you cannot you you you can pretend and art is potentially it's proof is almost like a literal illustration of strings literally their wrought in these thirty enormous veterans for me to hide that run down the central corridor of white cube full of a tangled mass of wires cords all kinds industrial wiring foaming strings intertwined with mathematical theories also written on the on the glass. Is this kind of literal. Tend to give some. I'm kind of expression to this. Intuitive Tangle of unresolved theory. It's naive you know then when you are naive you have big take advantage. You can do what you want. And it's I heard about strings and I started with the mathematics and then I had by accident I bought. My neighbor was an industrial plays simple to new property in devils off. Aw this this electric stuff in and I said don't be they know they have any anything away and I held at. It's my strings string. It's naive but then I had later when I had already done some paintings that came to Titian he came in in my studio. That's it can you imagine. A mathematician about string theory. I I liked it you know. I didn't need to prove the paintings assembly but it was a nice nice exit so also also with your tangle of strings also bring in references to ancient Nordic figures the nor death at the spinners of feints and also ancient runes ancient letters as well so you'll still weaving in literally as well as quickly mythology as well as science. Since I started to work. I saw that all the means you can find in north in edged into berea in the Baruch on. They're all connected you know and you can even prove how certain people's traveled school who are coming to Europe how they brought with them. How there was modified other meat and this is fantastic? So you know it's something ever strings it's everywhere you have to mean and they're all connected and interfering how important mm time potent is it for people coming to the exhibition I mean how much do they need to know. Do they need to know anything you know. I always say you have nothing to uh looked at the paintings. And if you are attracted Innova then then you can. You can study. But it's not necessary to have started. Before I the painting has to have a certain impetus certain brilliance and then and I know a lot of people who study now so come by and to me and let's to you know but it's not necessary to be to be touched by and the scale of your work is always colossal. Aw and in these works absolutely so I mean. There's one work that the Romani John Summation which fills up an entire room and scale seems to be a very crucial part for you to draw in the viewer. To draw. Skill has nothing to do with quality. Nothing no the scale is not too much importance importance. It's more a physical thing you know. I'm I'm physically remember again dancing painting and I can intel. Do these are medium sized paintings. I have in my studio paintings. They don't fit in him. So what I like Mike very much because they can sell them throughout these new works. We see mets runic forms. References string theory but always over the top of these apocalyptic bleak. Aw Barren landscapes seems to be so much part of your language now that we associated with the manor. You've done landscapes with flowers and other things but these baron bleak landscapes that we see here's exhibition seemed to be so much part of your practice. What is it about this particular imagery that real comeback getting extreme China? My landscapes grew growing. Wear something pretty dead. The ones in this job I look pretty good for you. It's that for me burning. Something the thing is we saw action. My paintings are lot because a disparate. Like me like me but but then they a half another of this election. You know Philosophi- like so much. It's IMMEL end. He say's just throughout this has to economic last breaking means also already resurrection and also. You've talked a lot about alchemy. Lca ME BEING SO CRUCIAL TO LURK LA- making base material into here are trials and gold. They do gold and I see these works. Very how much is being a part of that particularly new vitrine afoot of the kind of rubbish. This new property you've acquired being made into art. Yeah No I. He is Sir permanent. Transformation of materia into very dangerous process. You know because this was the chimneys chimneys in a lot of accidents and stuff and in the books you can read. It doesn't mean to make gold out of let it not mental spiritual and but it has hit nevertheless economic physical effects and your materials. Israel's current become very much associated with you lead Straw combed leaf. Why do you keep battalion to these very a similar materials again again? I mean I think of you. We think of lead strong. We think sunflowers these very particular material as well as paid candidate to paint on. Why US always right in coinage itself? I use material who has spirit inside I I don't I'm not a plateau honest things. There is the theory uses the system and the system keeps form to the material I think in materia is already spirit and so for me let has spirit and I know it because I discovered it by accident in my house because I had lead pipes and I was immediately fascinated and I didn't know nothing about I. It was a young almost twenty years old or so and but I see some some spill to impact and they're very physically evidence materials when in these works here in White Cube and sticks as Straw Straw that falling out sometimes. Almost the paintings seem to be a state of about leap often reentered the world. They they move onto the time you don't see too but they move said the Lux will ways unstable absolutely not simple view. Yes you know you cannot fix fix the painting on a certain state nobody's moves. How important is it for you to be physically making? These words obviously have many assistances czar. Numerous works but you go salivate among I paint myself for them. Yeah when I put the branches ranches on I have someone behind to who fix them. You know that I put it and I paint so no no no I do do the work and yours. You born in one thousand forty five so you steeped in the ruins of the Second World War and you know been been on. I was going into the Cave of the hospital because a lot of air rats and then in our house bumped can imagine they told me. That's really that's really the sewing machine. Later I worked with this machine in the sewing machine was standing upright on to talk about on the house was done. It's fantastic testing. Do you still feel to great extent. You are still playing in the ruins of our society ruins of Europe. The way in which things you're doing I think then Reid said wants to me on what you do goes back to try to you know you you compel impaled You experience then because then the experiences are the most deep ones and I think it's I'm my leg and also playground in budget two hundred acres also playground in the north of Paris as well and other vast vol- studio studio in the old Samaritan warehouse these almost it seems to me like artworks themselves as what a studio circling Barak. Why does that sound poor computer make these environments ornaments run? Just I think a painting alone. That painting needs around opinions about for this reason. I forbid to all my gurvey's to show my work on up chess because now them put together and they kill each other you you know and nominated photo me. The Avocado is as it show. It didn't but my ghetto is. They don't do it and I think it's all a process you know in in budget. I have a lot of buildings. Buildings with paintings watercolors sculptures and it changed all the time so I changed from these two days until so it's it's It's this big movement all the time and also you have the actual spaces amphitheater Jacques Towers so in a way they feed into the work and then also are expressed is works and then often selves. I made him like paintings. The towers I just started a little bit and then it was going on and on and then destroyed in Lee. The constructed acted. It's likely to pay him so since the nine hundred you've lived in France not in Germany. But you'll still very much associated as a German painter dealing with breath. Even though you draw always vast range of mythologies people still associate you very much of the German painter dealing with German imagery is not a problem for you. Do you feel constrained by that. No no because I'm a Kennedy and don't be Norwegian Legionella. Whatever no it's it's and if you wouldn't legal denies me as a German and it wouldn't be authentic I Perhaps I try to do to build. A house is due next Rhine under German side and the the one under on the French side. It's this big half inch term and perhaps it would be nice. We we need something similar in the UK at the Majo- having his show here at a very very problematic difficult time in Britain. To put it mildly. I mean. You'll oh famously. Very in favor of a united Europe you see yourself as I'm also very much as a European. So how do you feel at the moment in this current situation situation one of your paintings actually referred as it not the European Parliament is one painting shows. One thousand empty seats and This this I I took this this this image from my Pharma University studied law and so but I thought I need this like this because I thought string theory is all about. Instability has no fixed point on on moves. And when you look at the quarks. They moved differently if we if we don't do so it's all symbol of instability and then this European Parliament this really a symbol of instability to and you are in England at the moment which is as it's most unstable phases in living memory but you know other countries are unstable to know east. German government had problems then in Gerry opponent. It's it's very strange time now. And the America don't know what would happen and so I'm not pessimistic not optimistic I see the things from another from another point. I see that what happens happens. All the time and I started so much mythological material that I can say in certain times for example in geological times. That's all what can happen happen. Because there's enough time so if I would have enough time or would be possible these paintings at white cube appear immensely apocalyptic bleak. But you also say there are about Resurrection and Growth. Do you see them as actually having some. I'm kind of comment on the Times in which living you're so turbulent and so full problem no no I think that being and non being the nothing is i. Don't see them connor logic way. I see them into same time. When is the painting? It's from your resignation of painting so I cannot be stressed by my paintings light. It is but your Expression of string theory or expirations a connection string theory with myths these different myths of the deep past it seems like investigations trying to show the interconnectedness of things. Yeah but also perhaps to try and explain what does hold us all together. Are you trying to do that. I try always unreas- to find the formula of bird. I tried to do the last painting but I will not succeed but I try join well that seems like a perfect note on which to end. Thank you very much and so thank you for coming. In and some Kiefer's exhibition superstring Bruhns. The non school not is at the White Cube Gallery until the twenty sixth. The January twenty twenty will be back at the New York auctions after this the pool. Nash is renowned for visceral depictions. The horrors of trench warfare during the first World War. He's earliest images of the war. However painted in spring nineteen seventeen on convalescent? He tripped in the dark. And broken. Rib these works well together. Gentlemen tone. Though by no means sugar coated the were leaving the trenches of bombs modern British and Irish art sale in London. This it's a vector dunes that Nash exhibited in London's goupil gallery in Medan. Seventeen bottoms director of modern. British Vista. Dourson explains the Work Goupil Exhibition. We've let the artist limited experience of the at that time. You don't even in France for a few weeks before his accident even so have immediate impact on public starved of realistic images of life at the front. Let Nash deficient wards. These early works by national escape. Mostly Lecture said the emergence of leaving in the trenches reaching. There's a significant to find out more visit. BARNUM'S DOT com. Welcome back now. It's one of the biggest moments in the art calendar New New York Auction Week I'll deputy are marketed. To Margaret. Carrigan has been at Yorktown or weak and was joined by Scott Rayburn writes for the newspaper as well as the New York Times to discuss this week's events what it tells us about the market at the end of a remarkable decade so Scott you are a art market veteran very skilled at surveying during this rocky terrain that we all terse can we not use the word veteran. I wonder you know there's been a squeeze he's on consignment this season and they're down about twenty five percent going into this week on top of that. Confidence is low thing. Art Tactic said that it's data by about twenty percent. Just since May show. How are we seeing that? Play out this week in the sales okay in terms of actual results We've seen a big drop Impressions involved sales at Christie's falling from last May Christie's would I'm fifty two percent so the business down forty percents and then last night at Christie's so the contemporary sale down forty the percent. Now what everyone in the market says Autzen in you. Marcus says that I will. The thing is the right people hadn't died died. The right people can get divorced. It's all going to be fine. The next year because the Macleod voice consign oil. Come in. That's at least seven hundred million gene. So everything's fine and so you essentially have this mentality of the goldfish going around the bowl and and so that the goldfish goes around the back. The views not so great. But you're on the front. It's fine everything is the same and that in the sense is the big question about the art market. Is it the same. Is it all going to be fine. Is there a status quo that just continues and continues continues and the key thing is demand everyone talks about supply and saying well if the right supply comes along the figures will be great. It'll be fine I actually I. This is a big question but I just wonder about supply because Ah Nets did a very very interesting report which showed that when you look at total auction sales over the last ten years The high when you adjust for inflation Was In two thousand eleven. Not Six six point nine billion dollars since then toodle haven't even got within a billion so essentially it the the whole whole market is treading water at the same time. If you look at wealth reports The number of billionaires since the financial financial crisis since two thousand nine has doubled Now they're number wealth reports but one Won Miss Recent. Put the wealth of billionaires. This is just billionaire. This is not multimillionaires just nine trillion so billionaire suspending less than naught point one percent of the disposable wealth on a hot which is a minute mute amount now why hasn't the art market got further traction the when you walk around the other so meet new people coming into to the market that flooding in you the auctions you go to the office you see exactly the same people you see one or two new faces so what is concerning about the the market is everyone feels. Oh it's fine things just carry on normal but all the time more more wealthy people aren't buying and this is the art market has any number of elephants in the room but that's one of the bigger elephants so actually demand is not increasing using a matches a concern so this raises two questions for me which is one the reliability of auctions as the kind of benchmark of show the art mark is doing this is notoriously a fraught offcially. They own so I think when we're when we're looking at a slow season as in like we are right now in New York. I wonder how much we can temper our expectations when you're saying like we're treading water. Isn't that better than declining necessarily surly but then at the same time you're saying we are have been in decline like numbers in two thousand eleven so I guess it's how do we. How do we square that circle? Ercole there what I would say that. If you look at presumption that this series of sales the so-called gateway hate that Fraser husband but this so-called Mulkey ocoee series of sales. You look the numbers at the they start in two thousand fourteen. And that was a great season with it Koso- from Delta Elsa that made two point two billion then we had a high of two point. Three billion in two thousand seventeen gene in two thousand sixteen was down to one point one but essentially these sales are in a band of roughly one point eight to two point. Two billion this. This season may be down but that to my mind is that's treading water. I know statistics lie all the time but the difficult it. It doesn't indicate that the needle is moving to me and what kind of repercussions you think. That's going to have for the art market as a whole if we're just looking at the auctions now okay where do you. Where do you think that points us going forward? Well the thing is the Obviously the impression Multan cells. Now I'm old enough to remember. Nineteen eighty cells. where the Japanese and the black tie that? Which is the old Peter Wilson Model He? He really really changed the market with the gold. China's sale back in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven fifty eight of eighty one that completely changed the nature of the art market and it's essentially sleep in the same model since then evening sales to create as much international interest as possible. Then you go to some mold sale now and it's a very very very different thing. It's full of people of a certain age you didn't see young people the material because it's been so heavily traded There's very little fresh material There'll be one or two lots in an evening. That fly for example celebrates had a really beautiful Giacometti bust of Diego. That had sensational pattern Asian and it was great cars and that went nuts went Welt W. estimates from about thirteen point five. That's a great object. But that's just one lot you were there in the room in a lot after lot after lot cells Dell's to Single bid to Asia or Russian I don't know how long these people are going to the end of the market. And then when you look at the numbers as an investment vehicle. That's particularly interesting. Because at at Christie's that taught lot was that that lovely McGreevey it knocked turn now. That seem to do pretty well. It made fools nineteen point nine hundred point five with premium but the seller aborted privately. Five years before for twenty one. And if you drill into the numbers with Particularly Impressions Multan quite concerning because people aren't making money out of it and people were in a market where people actually must build and Care Valley on the all they just want to make money out of it and since they start. Stop making money. That is going to be a moment of concern. Came we talk a little bit about the postwar and contemporary market. Because we're halfway through those sales week we've got some other beasts night Christie's last night but Christie's was equally as may be concerning turning is the earlier sales this week. like you said forty percent Down and also forty percent of the lots went hammered on their lowest met. Waterlo yeah so it just shows even even leaner season that there's that people really aren't Getting up their pocket for this kind of work anymore and While they're a few record set last night For Charles White Thomas and Ellsworth Kelly and of course the ED every show you thank you. I wonder with as you're saying that the people aren't making money and contemporary art has been so hyped up in the past five years especially not really a as an asset class as we kind of reached this new plateau. Do you think that that demand will suffer there too and that we will see the financial financial ization chat around contemporary art slip. Well looking at the day sales isn't it because in the sense that's where the action is And there's a fascinating sort of what I call the spin cycle. There where you have autism really really really hot every wants to buy them I spoke to dealer who Josh Lily teric for jaw. Show show in London He said he had full hundred people wanting to buy that. God four hundred So on put around the results on the day styles and the trouble on the Self Bandwagon keeps on going alone. You know there was a very strong work actually estimator eight hundred three fifty. Now I've actually spoken to her about this. She's she's very concerned about this it's incredibly difficult and wearing syndrome. Young artists being turned over. Because there's just it's like it's like a washing machine isn't it that's a spin cycle And if you have the right connections and you're rich enough you get in at the beginning and then you get out in time And the rest is desperate to try and by the work and usually by too late and they get lumbered with this. And it's and this. This whole cycle whole this whole dynamic is very concerned for the market. As a whole I think with calls it's just bonkers and you had a really interesting piece that you actually usually root for for the art newspaper recently which is about kind of like populace Martin tasted are How how is that? Maybe shifted over the past few few years and how is that affecting the market his younger artists. Just wondering to what extent. S- those two wills into into sex. I think banks in Kohl's very very so separate markets from the super Super Hot markets will young anointed artists from fashionable galleries. I think not slightly different I wonder how long the calls things can go on for. I'm not sure sculptures particularly interesting. There was a big painting sculpture From edition of Ten plus two is estimated mated at three hundred made eight hundred thirty six thousand That the sculptured the paintings I sort of understand and but the sculpture. I just find completely anonymous and mad. Why is that well this thing and then his time you're going to be looking at the? This is losing me a Lotta money speaking city in the cool room make you look fool. I think Speaking of cause and banks You know we're obviously coming to the end of twenty nine thousand nine here moving into a new decade. Their markets have been the most astronomical made in the last decade. Are there some other artists that you know have had a miraculous rise or miraculous fall in some ways over the past decade or any larger your trends. That you've been noticing since you know. Obviously we were in a very different financial place. Sure back in two thousand nine right after the financial crash and now we're kind kind of staring down the barrel of possible. Recession trade war is brexit. The whole Shebang wonder if you're seeing any kind of trends that you can spot okay in the last ten years of the first thing to say though of course is the that there's no The people aren't losing any money right. Yeah the guessing guessing richer and richer and richer The that the context for all this is is Thomas Spaghetti wrote the script book called capital for century and antique came up with this one fulfilled relation which is aw is always greater than Jesus returns on capital are always greater than growth which is linked to contagious so the rich get richer and richer and richer so the money is all they just they just get distracted sometimes and they're a bit distracted moments and that's that's that's the the only problem no way but what is it from. The market is blue chip off and finding new blue chip artists because house Very interesting came back to this. Aunt net report on staggered to see that in the first half of two thousand nineteen coils made mort Olshan as you'll Michel Basquiat which is a bit of a moment. Now oversleep owners of of a Big Ticket buskers. Don't want to put them on the market and they're they're concerned okay. Let's understood but with with basketball top. Ask as not coming on the market. Warhol's Kuhn's the traditional blue chip where the auction houses GonNa make the numbers. So what I have noticed is the way. They're trying in to pump up secondary names as blue chip and in London in October album. Oland suddenly be was meant to be a great artist. uh-huh so we had to deal shows. We had Serpentine Gallery Exhibition which was sponsored by subsidies and Gagosian and there was a load of Alba Roland sales. which did all right? It didn't actually have a transformative effect. I think Edry Shea last night was another example of this Now he's interesting artist in academically and in terms of art history. That's in terms of Papa. You know he doesn't have the directs. The visual impact of Warhol Lichtenstein or Allen Jones Frogman. Say but what I thought was interesting was that they gave gave that painting. Take Pride of place where the Kuhn's Bundy had been in this shrine to blue chip timeless. Ause I thought they were really pushing the envelope there but on the other hand it made fifty two million now. Is that a reflection of well. Find the histories catching up with Trichet. All this just a hell of a lot of money in California. It's probably a mixture of the two but I think the trend next decade will be. The auction house is desperately trying to find blue chip names to replace Bacon Rick to all the others and I think they're struggling because we're not living living in a great period of I would say you can see it's videos from the New York auctions and all ladies reporting from the salesrooms at the art newspaper Dot Com or on our APP for IOS which you can find at the APP store on the website you can funding subscription to see you so that you can read reporting across multiple platforms and while you can also subscribe for free to our daily newsletter for all the latest stories take the newsletter linked at the top right of our homepage and each academy monthly newsletter called market I with comment and analysis every month for market experts in London and New York. They've forget forget. Subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already and if you've enjoyed it please rate or review it on apple podcasts. You can also follow us on twitter at Tan audio and we're on facebook and instagram. Of course the art newspaper cast is produced by Judy housekeeper. Amy Dawson and David Clack and David User does the editing thanks to Louisa an answer on to Maggie and Scots. What's thank you for listening? Join US next week where we'll be looking at DORMA and John Howarth. CNN The newspaper cost to you and associated with bonhams auctioneers since seventeen ninety three to find out more visit dot com.

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September 16: Smoking gun

As It Happens from CBC Radio

48:57 min | 2 months ago

September 16: Smoking gun

"I'm Justin link host of the village from CBC podcasts for years men were vanishing from Toronto's Gay Village The community had always suspected a serial killer and in the end they were right called a podcast that transcends true crime by the New Yorker and recommended by the Atlantic and esquire find the village on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is. PODCAST. Hello. I'm Carol and I'm Chris Hayden this is as it happens the podcast edition. Tonight Smoking Gun Former California Governor Jerry Brown tells us the fire is in his State are the direct result of inaction on climate change and that Canada should get ready for a wave of American climate refugees not in vain. Our guest lost his wife, his kids and his mother-in-law in the crash of a Boeing seven thirty-seven. Max, now, a new report from the US Congress giving the Toronto man hope that their deaths could help change the airline industry. Will be served chilled as restaurant owners wonder how to get through the winter. One restaurant tour hopes his customers will warm to the idea of all season Patios in Winnipeg surround sound a sailor whose vote was encircled and then attacked by orcas off the coast of Spain describes their seemingly coordinated assaults in the eerie noises that came with it at the moment that when video director Uncle Ralph mcdaniels describes. Last night's auction in New York where among others storied items from hip hop history biggies plastic crown on the block and getting the show on the road by getting over the snow on the road. New York state announces that successful remote learning means no snow days this school year development with chilling implications for cold weather tradition as it happens the Wednesday edition radio that would take any force in a store. He knew California would face a climate change reckoning Jerry. Brown. Didn't think it would come soon. The former California governor and longtime lawmaker is now the chair of the California China Climate Institute and living on a ranch north of Sacramento seeing his State on fire has led him to speak out about the ongoing emergency and to look back on what could have been done differently to tackle the climate crisis we reached Jerry Brown in Williams California. Mr Van would have you seen and fell to the fires where you are north of Sacramento. Well. Would I feel at this very moment is the barrier here are the smoke the material that is blowing? All over our sky and and the whole atmosphere. into the fires came within about seven. Of My ranch where I am today out in the country we're living your off the grid in an old a stagecoach stop. Getting more. It's a little more smokey right now it's been this way for almost a month. There fires on all sides and So there it is makes it very difficult to function because to. And breathing in this era has chemicals and I can hear it in your voice. I mean everyone we have interviewed in your state has had that scratchy sound. How is it affecting you physically? I feel fine My wife gets a little depressed by because she's runner and get run in this kind of weather. So it's quite a vivid display of the power of nature and what we can expect. Increasing, doses over the next few decades, and that's really the big takeaway. It's not just what's happening now, which is horrible enough. But that because of the continuing emission of billions and billions of tons throughout the world of co two and other greenhouse gases it's GonNa get worse. So all around what has been predicted for twenty years is now coming home the chickens are coming on. and talking about responsibility for that because as you know, you've what you presided over the state governor for two terms. This is the state for those who visited there. We'll find it in your cities. You have vast urban sprawl freeways choked with commuters, air-conditioned houses, how much responsibility for the if you're talking about climate change being major cause of this or fuel for this how much responsibility do people in the state have to accept? Or a hundred percent not just the state all over the planet but we're a part of that. Seven point seven billion, the whole industrial process that creates our well being has the dark side that is radically altering the climate. And that's the way it is and it's California. Yes and our lifestyle. Yes. But. It's also the failure of the leaders of the world and Canada for years was a climate denier earn the previous premiere of their and American now's going in horrible direction with trump and even in China where. Trying to meet the Paris accord, they're building new coal plants all the time. Right. But so you were one of those leaders as your ten years government in lawmaker. Do you feel there was more that you could have done more that you should have done to prevent this day from coming? No. I did everything humanly possible in fact, most people did too much now wasn't enough tow. It's not enough but I'm telling you as a guy who's been around the political world for fifty years I pushed the politicians to the limit. The fact is the political class in America with maybe a twenty percent exception does not want to make the hard decisions because they cost money either require a price on carbon and require regulations that constrain the way we're functioning today. You know that President Trump insists these fires are created or fueled by bad forest management in your own state does he have a point? He is a very good point. I will have to say it's his responsibility in the first instance because the federal government owns sixty percent of the forest in California. But yes, as governor we there's something we didn't do enough of yeah. There's a lot of culpability to go around. There's a lot of support also for Donald Trump when he says and what he believes is that there's climate changes is not the cause of this that he has said in recent days in on the coast he said that the. Cooler just watch He says, he doesn't think the science science knows what's going to happen a lot of people believing what he's saying in California's support that. So how do you? How do you turn this around? If there's that level of climate change skepticism? Well, that's a good question. We may not turn around hopefully the first sign of our doing is whether or not trump is defeated. That'd be the first step by the way If he says things are to get cooler, he's right because winners coming. But if he means, we're not going to have these heat cycles driven by climate change. Then of course, he's wrong and what? The tragedy here is the wealth that we enjoy a human beings as taken. On an annual basis, forty, billion tons of co two and greenhouse gases, and we're increasing not decreasing. So we need some radical change and has to be everywhere, and that's GonNa take an awakening that hasn't yet occurred like I would say these fires have done more to alert Americans to reality endanger of global warming than anything else in my lifetime. A lot of people in your state are talking about whether they should leave whether this is the right place for them to live because we're now they're now understanding this is going to be possibly an annual event. What do you say to those? WHO BELIEVE THEY SHOULD LEAVE? Have you considered it? Well, my wife reminds me that her grandmother was born in Canada and that we ought to be looking for some property because of this smoke doesn't clear. She doesn't think it's livable. So I would say that's a real possibility course Canada's not letting Americans in So we'll have to solve that problem. If you WANNA, have a little in Migration California which you may not want. But do you understand people might WanNa leave your state Oh. Yeah. They are leaving and when might we see you and your wife Immigration to Canada? I don't know that my wife she is more bothered. She's a runner. She does not like these bad air and by the way from the climate projections California, and the West in America is going to burn candidates can have a lot of Nice. Now nightspots it's going to have the water So yet you you'd better be on your guard because I, think you've got. Millions of people it. Maybe at your your way, you might tell them that we have had some devastating fires in recent years and that people in the cities of Canada and the West Coast are saying, they can't breathe out because of the fires in the US. So it's it's there's not many places to run at this point but you think people still becoming too to Canada. Oh yeah well. Life is migration. The people that came to north. America. Fourteen fifteen thousand years ago across the Ice Bridge they're on the move and human beings never stopped. We will leave it. There Mr Brown. Thank you. Thank you very much. I enjoyed this. Jerry Brown is the former governor of California. We reached him in Williams California and you can find more on this story on our webpage at CBC dot Ca Slash Ah. If you live somewhere where it snows for months on end, you might already be dreading how isolating it could be living through the winter during a pandemic and restaurant owners across Canada cold weather blows in a whole host of other concerns as well. Patio Service has been essential as diners returned to restaurants. So some in the industry are wondering how they're going to cope as the weather gets nasty. Mark Turner is the owner of the Amsterdam Tea Room and bar in Winnipeg? He has to close his patio after next month but he's hoping to convince people in his city that they should eat on Patios. Year round, we reached Mark Turner in Winnipeg. Mark can you just explain how you envision a patio in a restaurant in Winnipeg in the winter? Yes Winter Pachu in. Winnipeg it's very much kind of like I've been thinking about this for the last year or so is to have like a covered patio. So people can sit out if it rains if it snows, but also wish he limps as well. So do you see them huddled together under blankets Yeah. Actually finally off when we first opened the patio, we did have customer blanket that people would like wrap up in in we do like obviously like tea coffee, but we do like breezy bt's cocktails as well. Then people would just kind of wrap up and then have nice Jews and have that kind of winter cozy atmosphere which obviously can be can be tough when like minus thirty minus fourteen. But. When we dropped to like minus minus fifty, and then there's no wind, it's beautiful outside. Okay but I I know that Winnipeg irs have to forget how brutally cold it is in the winter otherwise couldn't continue. So are you just having a lapse of memory as to what? It's really like when you're faced with a a Winnipeg Winter It'll actually and when I remember my first year here because I moved here, six years ago I was chatting my cousin and a member of the first time it went down to minus headlines Twelve. And was like this is freezing this is really cold, but then it goes down to minus thirty minus loyalty when the weather goes back to minus ten, it was like this is beautiful. It's a warm outside was. Quite t shirts, but you know the. And I think now especially with the pandemic and a Lotta people still reluctant to come and dine inside. So people are looking for more reasons to still have that restaurant experience but the outside. So if we can provide them with an environment where they're comfortable then I think people is is definitely a good time that people are starting to come round and a great idea to push the outdoor winter patio. But officials have raised the potential safety issues with the idea haven't they that includes certain concerns that the lamps could be a fire hazard on semi-enclosed Patios are you concerned about that? not for the route I want to go down I don't want to use grow pain like kind of flame tanks I mean I've seen I mean I'm from Glasgow in Scotland Originally and I've done a lot of. Travel and living in other places in Europe and what you see a lot of is ten title like umbrella areas and they use these electric lamps got run switches as well. So the customer would press the switch. to give them like thirty minutes of He. So there's like no power wasted and then these ones I like a lot more secure and safe, and obviously what like city code employees qualify electricity everything I don't think I've got time to say this this year, but this is my long term goals. Now you know that this is this point not going to happen according to the city that the permanent Patios like yours have to close by the end of next month and the city has provided restaurants with more flexibility during the DEMOC. But how hopeful are you that you would actually be allowed to have a winter patio in Winnipeg? I'm always like I mean. Changes, good. slow as it's done like in the right way and like you said with safety measures in place I, think this is going happen overnight something that actually before it came to light on the news that something I've been thinking about when I was going to stop pushing the city this year as well. Said I really think this is going to happen this year. By something that I'm definitely gonNA keep campaigning towards and keep pushing over the years. But. I mean there's so many questions that you're going to have to try and solve not least among them that even if you had enough of an enclosed space with his heat and everyone huddled together under blankets I, mean there's still the issue of how do you make sure that this is Kobe free or how do you prevent people from from getting too close to each other with our patio We actually built dividers and then we've got enough distance in the middle the more the two meters apart. We've been actually very busy since we've reopened in the of July 'cause people feel safe and patio because they divided and we still have all about cleaning measures in place as well. So like. The each between customers. Adhering. Strictly to the manager of the health guidelines as well So I I'm not worried about. My customers being protected once we have the heat lamps and everything else. Without having the Patty without being able to do this, how bad do you think the winter is going to be for your? Business? Seriously, going to impact the business the patio right now with our capacity in capacity inside the patio makes up seventy percent of our revenue. So it's something. That will obviously concerned about and we're right about and we're like trying to think of just like every other businesses small business like myself is trying to think of. Other ways and other revenue streams to bring people in. Food and drinks to the public. I'm sure you have good food and good drinks but I guess what you have to on is the place knowing that Winnipeg there's. Are a spirited bunch shoe who laugh in the face of minus fifty with wind chill. So maybe you'll be able to lure the mailer them into the patio and with this idea of A. A patio in the winter in Winnipeg. Lovely on I have all the confidence and faith in Winnipeg I love the people and that's why I moved here. All right. Mike. Thanks. Lovely thank you very much. Mark Turner is the owner of the Amsterdam tea room and bar in Winnipeg. A spokesperson for the city told the CBC is exploring the option of all weather Patios and considering what the requirements would be. If you're sailing in the ocean, there are obvious things to worry about the height of the waves are abrupt weather changes but you tend not to worry about orcas because orcas are social, curious and gentle. Except when they're not some sailors along the Spanish. And Portuguese coasts report that their boats have been attacked by ORCAS and scientists don't know why. Victoria Morris is an avid sailor whose eager to understand what's going on because she was crewing a fourteen meter sailboat weeks ago when it was set upon by nine Orcas, they rammed it damaged it and left it adrift. In the Strait of Gibraltar we reached Victoria Morris back on the water. Victoria I understand that you are just heading into the Strait of Gibraltar in a gale. But you are heading to the very place where you encountered these orcas. Are you seeing any orcas today. I'm going to hope. We possibly could. We're actually right now probably exactly where we were annexed actually and it was about the exactly the same time as well. Say. You hope not but. When you encountered them before initially quite intrigued was lovely to see the ORCAS I understand. Yeah Yeah I mean I've encountered in. Zealand and they've always been really friendly. The About five ten minutes being lovely playing around quickly changed. Change to what can you describe what the ORCAS did a just started almost surrounding the circle. Coming to the rhetoric. Keelan. S-. Tide ramming the kid no and you could hit and scratching get which which we now know was they would biting with teeth and you could hit him on the rotor and Spinning. Around. To own which and disengaged as well So they they. For. And at one point you hot to contemplate abandoning ship. Yes yes. So there's a possibility would've capsized. So we had to go down get ready get ready as we look to. When you went down below, you got a sense of the sound describe it with that was like it was like a whistle very, very loud whistle. To them maybe about four or five of them doing at the same time and it was just so loud those service down there trying to get everything ready and we couldn't even hear each of the tool. Did you feel that it was coordinated? Yeah. Yeah. Definitely. I actually I said it was orchestrated arch I said it as a bit of a pull at the time and it's it's been used everywhere. you sent a May Day, how did they respond when you had said that you were being attacked by Orcas? Almost they didn't believe a first. They asked us to repeat quite a few times. Carry Levy still under attack. When you were able to get the boat out of the water to take a look at the damage, what did you see? There's two thirds of the growth a missing. The hot one, half the sun witch and the Keel was scratches and bite marks. All for it. So Nobody had any doubt as to what had happened after they could see the Keelan the writer. was completely over the I mean even when we check out all the people around us so stop spot and couldn't believe what happened. Really. You know that the you're not the only one in that area that. Had An ORCA attack that there are several boats that had the same experience. What are you learning as to why? Because we're doing this? It's hard to say, mean, even the the scientists who study the ORCAS in Gibraltar in had him for yet of completely Busselton still have no idea and I think since all of this global pandemic gone on this just not getting that much traffic and they've almost gotten used to that, and when recently things opening up and being a little more traffic and noise, maybe they just used to having it almost themselves being not so many fishing boats because. The fishermen of alone to attack the all his post, the ORCAS trying to get tuna from votes. The these are endangered species, this pod of orcas in the Gibraltar straight fifty of them left, and so they have been struggling to survive designees theories among the whale experts that the ORCAS are are angry I I mean, I don't want to anthropomorphized this, but is it are they attacking because they're furious for the sound and the competition for food? It's very possible. They do have the capacity to date angry in very the very intelligent preaches. But if if that is true something these be done I think it's as bad as all these attacks have been happening in a way. It's also a good thing because it's in the spotlight on the that there is appropriate know selling has changed a scolding city. Sending a message. Yeah. The reports of what's happened do that pod that? So many of the mothers have last their cavs their babies they have sustained tremendous injuries because the as you mentioned, the fishermen don't want them there and I guess one of the biggest problems is is sports fishing that will actually do damage to them quite. Quite severely when they come through so. They're fighting so many fronts aren't they? Yep definitely, there was two babies in the attacked us and I think especially when they've got young ones with them, they will definitely be way more protective and way more aggressive to anything that could be a threat to them. You hearing anything about the which was saying that the there needs to be more done to protect these Wales that they are actually if they are sending a message that. Should heed that message I think that's One. Conservation. Group. I think trying to put full with something to try to limit the amount of noise and traffic in the Straits but I mean it's such a major shipping lane. It's the main way to get into the Mediterranean so I to limit how much traffic is going on there is GonNa be almost impossible. I'll. I'll let you go. I know you're in a gale and you probably need to focus on that Victoria I appreciate that you'd find time for us. Thanks for Oakland. Thank you. We reached Sale Victoria Morris, as she was passing the same spot in the Strait of Gibraltar where her boat was attacked by Orcas this summer for more on this story and for some pretty striking photos, set your sails for our website CBC DOT CA Slash Ai H. Now New, York City school students, they are getting a break today school is closed for the day but for those wind chills into double digits Zeros there is the possibility that some schools could be closed tomorrow the only and as the wild weather approaches many are asking will there be a snow day today marked the first day of the season for most schools in the area was very worst many school districts across western New York are preparing as well in. May. Made that call to close early in his patient storm. As an adult, you might feel a mild wash of relief when a meeting is postponed or if they call off your partners, uncles, birthday party but these up feelings of reprieve are nothing compared to the heart swelling I watering ecstasy kids feel when school is cancelled for a snow day snowball fights, Snow forts sledding. What are you? GonNa? Do I mean what aren't you going to do? WELL IF YOU'RE A student in New York state. Tell you what you aren't going to do this winter. You aren't going to have snow days. February twenty, seventh two, thousand twenty could go down isn't day in Niagara Falls Infamy is the last called Noti. That is a school official in a report on western New York's WG ours at television addressing yet another of the garbage life changes visited upon us by Covid nineteen because all students there can apparently learn remotely there will be no snow days in the whole state of New York, this school year or as New York Education Department spokesperson Nathaniel Stiers, Sola Sleep intoned we are utilizing all of the lessons learned from remote schooling this Spring to maximize our students instructional time. And this may have ramifications far beyond New York. State during the pandemic school boards all over the US and Canada have relied on remote learning which could mean the end of a centuries old tradition slowly but surely. And The theatres have closed, but the show look I'll. Play me podcast is thrilled to present a new series. The show must go on featuring provocative productions from some of North America's most acclaimed creators for the stage. Sit back and experience everything from chilling thrillers to Gut wrenching dramas to irreverent comedies each month experience the exhilaration of theatre from the comfort of your own home. Available wherever you get your podcasts. Hi, I'm Josh Block host of uncover escaping nexium. From CBC PODCASTS I pull back the curtain on the secret of self help group that experts call a cult and follow one woman's heroin journey to get out the podcast was featured in Rolling Stone magazine and named one of the best podcasts of two thousand eighteen in the Atlantic. Listened to uncover escaping nexium on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcasts. Three hundred and forty six people died because of a flaw in the Boeing seven, thirty-seven, Max three, hundred and forty six people whose families are still mourning them. Now out of Washington is condemning both Boeing and US regulators for the two crashes that took their lives. The report by Democrats on the US congressional transportation. Committee says the fatal crashes were the result of design flaws by the company, a failure to fix those flaws and a severe lack of government oversight. Paul Jerome Gay lost his family in the easy opium airlines seven 737, Max crash, his wife Caroline, his children, Ruby Kellyanne Ryan and his mother-in-law, and he's one of several family members of crash victims suing Boeing. We reached him in Toronto. The head of the committee that wrote this scathing report Peter Defies Yo, he said that quote this is a tragedy that never should have happened. It could have been prevented. What did you think when you heard that? Well. It's not something new to me. It shouldn't be new to the public has well, we know that the crashes while preventable. Obviously the report from the House Committee confirms that even the crash of Leilani flights six, four zero was preventable. And Daddy's appalling it is appalling to know that my family died because of the gross negligence by Boeing as well as the lack of sight by BFA. I. Want to ask you about that because the the first crash it was in two thousand eighteen that was out of Jakarta. There was the lion air flight. If there had been a review if there if they had recognize what was wrong the flaws in in that craft and that airplane. How would things have been different for you? What what do you think would have happened to change things that have occurred in your own life? descibed Cheney's that we know that principals within Boeing they knew that the plane was Ted closing in the design in the couldn't drink themselves to a point where they could ground the plane. At the end of the day, what they wanted to do was too much mayes trophies is so they knew that in as the public, we were not informed at that time. If I was UNIN SOM- dial person, I could not have put my family or my in on the in plane that I knew or maybe pointing that's not something that I'll have done if they were keen on these than they would have grounded the chain before this earned crops, and if they had done that they had done what they should have done. Your family would still be alive. Yes to some us to some US I have been alone. And I tell you that my mind is always they any to appear that they never leave my mind. The thought of what my wife and my children went through Dadi something that keeps recurring in my sleep in that, you know agreeing This location, the pounding of the hot. It's not something that goes away. You know it's something that I have to carry with me as I move forward in life. You lost your wife Caroline your kids. He Ruby Kelly who has four Ryan who was six? You. And Your mother-in-law, your wife's mother. You told the committee you when it's committee that's reported they were deeply moved by your testimony you told them. What you imagine was happening in those final minutes of their lives. Can you tell us what you told the committee that moved them so much? I keep thinking about a dairy -sition in my wife's money that you know this plane. Is GonNA crash in She's GonNa lose a life along with our three children Hama in the terra. That she must have experienced. He was very very curious and you know seen all that have been. You must've have lost his mom so many questions. He would ask me those questions if I. was there. A day never process without me thinking that I should have been with them. You know to answer those questions to hold them as we go down, we should have gone down to get. Your story that you told the committee is the beginning of this report and the testimony in front of these members of Congress they were weeping as you told them, what happened and what your life is like in the absence of your family. What effect you think you had on this final document. It I I know I I mentioned. In my thought about Boyne and just been consigned on. Making money at the expense of safety. I talked about the Regulatory Cup CIA of the FAA Boeing and you know I do believe that the committee has done an intensive investigation uncovering. All these issues, this report that was done by community is for the people. It's for them to see that avoid plane will kill again. We know that the in this report and it's important to note that it's not just blowing that house do where the responsibility the Federal Aviation Authority which was supposed to be regulating. This is also takes a lot of criticism industry port at the same time. The FAA is saying that these this plane, the 737 Max is about to be cleared to fly again as soon as this winter perhaps. How does that sit with you? The 737 Max would take flight again. In light of this report. What should be happening of this moment is The production the recertification process in the ground in process of these of the. Much should stop. Up until Boeing is able to revamp its corporate governance it up until the FA Cup chats, its authority as long as there are these gaps in tunnel edition of processes. As long as we have employees who've been going senior engineers as long as we have the the FBI administrator defending. Their actions in defending their internal procedures I. DO believe that out. We're going to have another garbage in garbage out kiss. Your testimony, your story, your willingness to speak about this as painful as it is has obviously had a large effect on what happened in this in this hearing and also people's understanding of what this plane did and what this story to to so many lives. Does that help you cope at all that you know that you have been able to have such an effect My family, my wife, and my children, their lives were just lost in instincts. If they are dead. Should not be in vain. In I hope that might testimony and I hope that myself in the families of the victims coming out I hope that it's going to improve a vision safety. At the end of the day I still live in isolation in pay buddy AAs being strong in mice have been strong if it changes anything. I'm just happy for the people. And you're doing that for your wife and kids. I'm doing these when I my kids. and. Polite I I really appreciate that you'd share this with this. I'm so sorry for what you're going through and how painful it must be but. I appreciate your strength. Thank you. Thank you very much feral. By. Paul Jinro gays family died in the European Airlines crash in March Twenty nineteen, he was in Toronto. In a statement Boeing said, it had learned lessons from that crash and the lion air crash of two thousand eighteen and it is working hard to strengthen safety. A deal's a deal that was Ursula von Der Lions forceful message today directed would seem at the UK's Prime Minister Brewers Johnson the president of the European Commission delivered her first State of the Union address outlining her vision for the future of the European Union a future that will obviously not include the United Kingdom. This week Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his government passed a so-called safety net bill that would override parts of the already agreed upon legally binding brexit deal signed back in January. With the EU and even members of Mister. Johnson's own government have acknowledged the bill violates international law which doesn't sit right with President Von Lion here's part of her speech today. This withdrawal agreement. Took three years to negotiate. And we worked relentlessly on it line by line word by word and together we succeeded. And the resolved guarantees are citizens, rights, financial interests. The integrity of the single market and crucially the Good Friday Agreement. And the European Union and the UK jointly agreed it was the best and only way for ensuring peace on the island of Ireland. And we will never backtracked on that and this agreement has been ratified by this House and by the House of Commons. It cannot be unilaterally changed disregarded or discipline. This is a metro. And Trust and good faith. I. Remind you of the words of Margaret Thatcher. I quote. Britain. Does not break treaties. It would be bad for Britain. Bad for relations with the rest of the world and bad for any future treaty on trade, and of course. This was true then and this is true today. That was European Commission President Ursula von Der Lion delivering her first State of the Union speech today. When photographer Baron clayborn was hired to shoot the notorious B I g for the cover of rap pages magazine in Nineteen Ninety seven he had a clear vision. biggie. Was the King of New York and the King of rap. So big you should wear a crown. will now that plastic crown originally purchased for a reported six dollars has sold for five, hundred, ninety, four, thousand dollars us. It's one of an astonishing number of items from hip hop history that were up for auction last night at Sotheby's all told the first of its kind bidding brought in. Cool. Two million dollars and it was a pretty cool moment for Ralph mcdaniels Mr mcdaniels better known as Uncle Ralph. mcdaniels is a veteran music video director who's worked with the likes of nausea and the Wu Tang clan. He also runs the Queens public library foundations hip hop programming, which will benefit from proceeds of last night's auction. We reached Ralph mcdaniels in New York, city. Uncle, Ralph mcdaniels, which I didn't know you most excited to see on the auction block last night. Well, of course, I had my. Original Wu Tang clan jacket and my Nike. Twenty. Fifth Anniversary. So between my wife and my daughter, they were all cheering as people bid for it but. I was I was excited to see the crown of biggies crown and so what did your jacket itself for? All. My jacket soul for a ten thousand and my. Twenty fifth anniversary sneaker so-forth Five. Thousand and and Background the jacket. How did you? What's its meaning to you? So I started this program in New York. City in the early eighties call video music box and I started working with the Wu Tang clan actually before they will clan and so I was like a video gopher for them I directed a bunch of their early videos directed song cream for them. And and so I was part of the family. So when they started, you know like, Hey, how can we take care of the people that a part of the crew they made these jackets and they were limited to the members of the group in a couple of people that from the record company in those jackets yeah. Wow and so this. This may be gives a sense of what the collection was like. I mean, all this stuff from hip hop that decades of it right so what does it? What does it? What does it tell you about that air? What does it say about the music? Well, it gives hip hop. It gives it a benchmark on the value of some of these things like this is the first time something like this happened. So you know you had a rock and roll auctions and you might have had other fine art and things like that. But from a musical genre, it was the first time for hop and that's awesome because we knew it had value. We just didn't know what the value was. It just seems like such an irony when you think of Sotheby's which is a bit I know maybe it's not. But. But a bit high art and highbrow and to see that that that history that that that not just music it's it's a culture. It's a way of thinking and and living it's to see it all together like that in bits and pieces must have been quite extraordinary. Just. Very extraordinary. Hypocrisy has become something that started in the inner cities and now has grown to everywhere in the world. I mean candidate you have you guys have the number one rapper drake you know in the world and you know so this music has gone so far and evolved from how it was in the late seventies in the south. Bronx where were you know burnt down buildings and it was a lost cause out of that rumble in fire in dust came this art form called hip hop, and now here it is forty seven years later and is pretty awesome. What else was there? What else did you recognize of the material that was in the room? we had Fab five. Freddy of was a host of a show on MTV is ring a diamond ring that he used to wear on the show. A John Michel Basquiat vinyl record that he did the album cover four, which was very rare and There was a wall of what they call the wall of Guam which will all of the boombox from the eighties and this guy named Ross one collected? All of these boombox is. Made it into one wall, which is you know somebody probably have a pretty big house to put this. And Ms Artwork and photos from Rockingham and to park and Biggie and and other hip hop pioneers. The to pock. Contribution is really touching. Isn't it? Because user love letters written by him when he was in high school? Yes. Yes and you know into air some of his songs in the words in you know the emotions that he put into it and those same emotions in those letters that he wrote to his, you know sixteen year old girlfriend at the time. You know it was pretty awesome. Somebody else wrote about it that it it seems at this time when with black lives matter this. Awareness of this sort of the lives of black men in your country, the vulnerability of those men and that. People reflecting on that too potlucking Biggie were both shot dead within months of each other in the nineties and that hip hop does speak to that vulnerability and perhaps that's part of the reason why this was so. Of such interesting people didn't get possible. Absolutely I think that in early in the late eighties, there was a group called nwea is Cougar and Dr. Dre. Part that grew and they talked about you know straight straight OUTTA. Compton Compton City in California where they came from, they talked about police brutality and the things that were going on in their community and we couldn't picture this. I'm from the East Coast I always thought that California was just palm trees and you know an ocean and the beach boys you know and and. There was a underlining thing that was happening in California and we saw it with Rodney King and wwl talked about it in erected. So hip hop has always been kind of the CNN, or to the street you know like it's always been this kind of voice of the street and it comes out of hip hop music, I and we hear about it and then all of a sudden mainstream and. Say Hey I. Heard you know my favorite rapid talking about that ten years ago and just the fact. That hip hop is you know it's for everyone but it started off in black communities and Latino communities, and now is serving the world with the art and what it was made for to be loved and you know, and that's part of what black lives matters is all about as well and do you know what the money from this action I think part of it is going to charity you know I think about that. Yeah. So I work with There's a number of charities I can tell you about the one that I work with the Queens Public Library. So about five years ago I started doing hip hop programs for young people first of all to get them off the street and to get them involved and to bring them to the library which. You know they might have to come there every once in a while to do some homework, but I wanted to do other things. So we can engage them and just keep them out of trouble and so we started getting folks coming. You know fifty kids show up to do a DJ WANNA one with one of their favorite deejays and they wanted. To learn how to Dj or we did a book talk with Ll, cool? J.. Or you know people came in and they never got the chance to meet some of these artists. Now got the chance to meet him take a picture with him. Hear them talk about themselves growing up, see the parallels. So apart of the money from the suburbs or in. is going to go to those programs so that we can continue those programs and pay the you know the DJ's and get equipment and have a safe space for young people come in and and be part of what we do at Queens Public Library. That's just great uncle. Ralph mcdaniels it's good to talk to you. Thank you. Awesome. Thank you. Bye. Ralph mcdaniels is a music video director who also runs the Queens. Public Library foundations hip hop programming. We reached him in New York City. You've been listening to the as it happens. PODCAST Marshall can be heard Monday to Friday on CBC, Radio One Sirius Xm following the world at six. You can also listen to the whole show on the CBC listen APP download it for free from the APP store or from Google play. Thanks for listening I'm Carol off and I'm Chris Ouden. For, more CBC PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT. Ca Slash podcasts.

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