35 Burst results for "Michel"

"michel" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

The SpaRetailer Podcast

05:48 min | Last month

"michel" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

"So day on these retailer podcast. I have josh and earl michaels. They are a father and son. Team in indiana. Are you her right now. We are they are the guys who run backyard leisure with their main location in toronto and they have two locations in illinois. So thanks for coming on the podcast today. Guys thank you so this is a rare occasion. Where i'm not sure i have ever interviewed either of you before for the magazine or the podcast anything so this is kind of exciting because i feel like i get a whole fresh story that even i have heard before we're honored always start off getting people's backgrounds. Where did you start out. How did you get into the industry. How did you end up working in this company together. I guess you're probably the to start with for that all right well. How long do we have. The podcasts can go on for hours and hours. So it's really it's really depends on how chatty you're feeling alright so in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. My wife and i decided we wanted to zibo in our backyard. And i couldn't find anybody to build one by one from so i actually got a lead from a little company and southern indiana. That makes them. They referred me to a dealer quite a distance away and that particular dealer. Didn't want to deal with me from the distanced. So i called the company back and they told me well. The only way you can buy one is if you're a dealer so i asked them what that took and they told me so. We bought two. And i lived out in the country on a pretty well traveled road and We put one in the backyard where we wanted it and then we put one out front and i came up with the name backyard leisure and we opened a business account with thousand dollars. We sold our first gazebo to an old farmer. Who's eighty five year. Old wife had always wanted one. He came and bought it and took it home. He brought his tractor in his pickup truck and trailer and loaded up. Because he didn't want to pay me to deliver it so he took it home and put a big red bow on it. I suppose and gave it to his wife christmas so that was actually it is. That was our very first sale and then my career was in the insurance industry. And i was still active in the insurance industry so we started out very small. I put it a small display lot brought in a couple of more gazebos and some outdoor furniture and we sold some fairly successfully. I decided that. I would go ahead and expand that a little bit. We rented some ground and The prime retail area of tara. Hold indiana i put in zibo displays there. I've got a big sign with an eight hundred toll. Free number and i started selling gazebos by appointment one day. We got a call from a manufacturer. That's here in the midwest and they asked if we would consider selling hot tubs. I said well yell but we don't have any place to sell them so at that time there was a little corner not too far away. From where are gazebo display and tear ho was we ended up renting that it was a two car garage and small building that we used as a office and a small store where people could buy. Chemicals is very small so we did that. I believe that was from two thousand three until two thousand seven. That's how we sold hot tubs. I can't imagine you knew what you're getting yourself into with hot tubs because gazebos and even patio furniture. You kinda you sell it. You drop it off. And that's the individ hot tubs. There's a lot more touch points between the dealer and consumer that's right. We did have some inkling what we'd need. We hired a young man to help with our deliveries and our service aspect of it. Then i also had an older gentleman that would man the office building and sell for us. We were fairly successful on a small level. You know i mean enough to where it didn't cause me to thank well. I need to stop doing this. So in two thousand six. We decided if we're to do this. We need to actually find a place to do it. You can't sell hot tubs out of a two car garage forever. So we re released a six thousand square foot building. That was actually just right next door to where we had been operating. We lease that and we moved in there. After a year of being there under lease we bought that property and as time went by of course we expanded our offerings and so forth and then of course in twenty eighteen we had the fire and then once that happened we ended up moving into the location that we are here when you really decided to go. Full force into hot tubs. It was what you year or two before the recession before kind of hot tub sales plummeted at least across the country. I mean what was that. Like for you guys. I mean you can have had gone all in got the six thousand square foot showroom and next thing you know the whole country is in this economic depression right. Let's actually kind of one of the things that we think has helped us to be successful. is that we. We didn't really experienced the glory days. Were told you know back in the early two thousands that it was pretty easy to sell. Hot tubs swell. At that time we were. We were nothing really. You know so we were operating on a shoestring and you know. By the time everybody else was experiencing something of a crash for us. We were probably still actually growing a little bit because we were so new. You could consider difficult time to start but it may be was in the end Better for us because we we didn't become accustomed to an easy experience with selling out to us we were. We were so new that it was just normal.

josh illinois indiana toronto two thousand dollars today earl michaels first gazebo one thousand southern indiana christmas one nine hundred ninety eight eighty five year two locations
From The Ashes With the Michels From Backyard Leisure

The SpaRetailer Podcast

05:48 min | Last month

From The Ashes With the Michels From Backyard Leisure

"So day on these retailer podcast. I have josh and earl michaels. They are a father and son. Team in indiana. Are you her right now. We are they are the guys who run backyard leisure with their main location in toronto and they have two locations in illinois. So thanks for coming on the podcast today. Guys thank you so this is a rare occasion. Where i'm not sure i have ever interviewed either of you before for the magazine or the podcast anything so this is kind of exciting because i feel like i get a whole fresh story that even i have heard before we're honored always start off getting people's backgrounds. Where did you start out. How did you get into the industry. How did you end up working in this company together. I guess you're probably the to start with for that all right well. How long do we have. The podcasts can go on for hours and hours. So it's really it's really depends on how chatty you're feeling alright so in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. My wife and i decided we wanted to zibo in our backyard. And i couldn't find anybody to build one by one from so i actually got a lead from a little company and southern indiana. That makes them. They referred me to a dealer quite a distance away and that particular dealer. Didn't want to deal with me from the distanced. So i called the company back and they told me well. The only way you can buy one is if you're a dealer so i asked them what that took and they told me so. We bought two. And i lived out in the country on a pretty well traveled road and We put one in the backyard where we wanted it and then we put one out front and i came up with the name backyard leisure and we opened a business account with thousand dollars. We sold our first gazebo to an old farmer. Who's eighty five year. Old wife had always wanted one. He came and bought it and took it home. He brought his tractor in his pickup truck and trailer and loaded up. Because he didn't want to pay me to deliver it so he took it home and put a big red bow on it. I suppose and gave it to his wife christmas so that was actually it is. That was our very first sale and then my career was in the insurance industry. And i was still active in the insurance industry so we started out very small. I put it a small display lot brought in a couple of more gazebos and some outdoor furniture and we sold some fairly successfully. I decided that. I would go ahead and expand that a little bit. We rented some ground and The prime retail area of tara. Hold indiana i put in zibo displays there. I've got a big sign with an eight hundred toll. Free number and i started selling gazebos by appointment one day. We got a call from a manufacturer. That's here in the midwest and they asked if we would consider selling hot tubs. I said well yell but we don't have any place to sell them so at that time there was a little corner not too far away. From where are gazebo display and tear ho was we ended up renting that it was a two car garage and small building that we used as a office and a small store where people could buy. Chemicals is very small so we did that. I believe that was from two thousand three until two thousand seven. That's how we sold hot tubs. I can't imagine you knew what you're getting yourself into with hot tubs because gazebos and even patio furniture. You kinda you sell it. You drop it off. And that's the individ hot tubs. There's a lot more touch points between the dealer and consumer that's right. We did have some inkling what we'd need. We hired a young man to help with our deliveries and our service aspect of it. Then i also had an older gentleman that would man the office building and sell for us. We were fairly successful on a small level. You know i mean enough to where it didn't cause me to thank well. I need to stop doing this. So in two thousand six. We decided if we're to do this. We need to actually find a place to do it. You can't sell hot tubs out of a two car garage forever. So we re released a six thousand square foot building. That was actually just right next door to where we had been operating. We lease that and we moved in there. After a year of being there under lease we bought that property and as time went by of course we expanded our offerings and so forth and then of course in twenty eighteen we had the fire and then once that happened we ended up moving into the location that we are here when you really decided to go. Full force into hot tubs. It was what you year or two before the recession before kind of hot tub sales plummeted at least across the country. I mean what was that. Like for you guys. I mean you can have had gone all in got the six thousand square foot showroom and next thing you know the whole country is in this economic depression right. Let's actually kind of one of the things that we think has helped us to be successful. is that we. We didn't really experienced the glory days. Were told you know back in the early two thousands that it was pretty easy to sell. Hot tubs swell. At that time we were. We were nothing really. You know so we were operating on a shoestring and you know. By the time everybody else was experiencing something of a crash for us. We were probably still actually growing a little bit because we were so new. You could consider difficult time to start but it may be was in the end Better for us because we we didn't become accustomed to an easy experience with selling out to us we were. We were so new that it was just normal.

Zibo Earl Michaels Indiana Josh Toronto Illinois Tara Midwest Depression
'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:06 min | 2 months ago

'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

"Now. The new museum in new york this week open grief and grievance art and morning in america and exhibition originally conceived for the museum by the hugely influential curator of queen ways or before. He died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen grief and grievance features thirty seven artists to address the theme of morning commemoration and loss in response to the racist violence experienced by african american communities the title the museum says refers to quote the intertwined phenomena of black grief and a politically orchestrated white grievance against each structures and defines contemporary american social and political life. Curatorial advisory group has worked together to realize an interpreter. Basil's vision maximiliano gio knee of the new museum. The artist glenn ligon in ways. As regular curatorial collaborator mark. Nash and owe me beckwith scenic creator of the museum of contemporary art in chicago. He's just been appointed chief curator of the guggenheim museum in new york editor in the americas. Helen stolis spoke to beckwith about the exhibition. I wondered what's it been like bringing the show to its final stages making sure that oakley's incredible vision has been realized. What was your thinking through the process to make sure you've got this kind of final end stage oak. We have a brial mind. There were always so many things that he was thinking about and working on and he can have an idea a decade ago that manifests itself into a show much much later and so his ability to kind of hold and juggle things Intellectually and mentally that then get realized later was uncanny honestly the more that i read essays of his from about ten years ago i realized the core of some of this thinking was already there especially the core of ideas in grief ingredient. So all that is to say that this actually is unlikely to be. Oh quiz show believe it or not. They'll be more coming more things to watch and see. The man's ambitions were amazing and so lars they will extend extend far past life But in terms of grief and grievance started as a lecture series for harvard and oh a curator. He thinks through art a curious interesting. That i'm still speaking about him in present tense and so he thinks through ours and he started then to take. These ideas That he'd been mulling over these ideas around. What really are the kind of core conditions of american race relations. Where did they begin. What catalyzed them and what are the ramifications of that core This sense of black loss and a sense of white grievance let really in his mind got catalyzed around the civil war. What are those ramifications for the american polity right now our process as curatorial advisors which is what we've been calling ourselves has really been about trying to round out oh quiz vision where it was necessary. Okay already had a rather. Set schematic for the show. He had core objects that he was interested. In working with a painting of awesome blogs painting by daniel johnson another awesome. Blah's painting by jack whitten and a painting regime michel basquiat. He was really interested in these three objects as the ways to anchor away of of both thinking through reactions to Black and justice but also aesthetic forms that moved between abstraction and figuration between forms that are legible and gestures that deal. Mostly i think with the monochromatic. So these being the kind of catalyzing ideas for the show. were great signposts for us so then began to work with those themes and ideas for the rest of the checklist.

Beckwith Maximiliano Gio Glenn Ligon Helen Stolis New York Guggenheim Museum Museum Of Contemporary Art Basil Nash Oakley Americas America Chicago Lars Harvard Jack Whitten Michel Basquiat Daniel Johnson Blah
"michel" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:50 min | 2 months ago

"michel" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Michel. Yes, guitars, cigars and a few thoughts from this Are Michael very show if your friends haven't told you McDonald, Spicy Chicken McNuggets are back the ones made with spicy tempura and age cayenne. But before you go telling friends make sure you get first order ahead on the McDonald's Apple bottom, a book boom, probably time participating adults. Our radio. Here are the top Fleetwood Mac songs that you thumbed up number three. Don't stop. Tomorrow before yesterday go. Yes, Let's go number two dreams. Sweating way. Yes, Number one. Go your own way way. Galling day hear more from Fleetwood Mac and similar artists Now search for Fleetwood Mac on my heart radio. All your favorite music, all your favorite stations all free. I heart radio. Did you know Presented by I Heart radio, you know, while you're listening to right now, Did you know that it I heart radio? One of our biggest pet peeve is dead Air..

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
Using Computational Discovery to Build Better Immunotherapies

The Bio Report

08:04 min | 3 months ago

Using Computational Discovery to Build Better Immunotherapies

"Team. Thanks for joining us dan. We're gonna talk about immunotherapy compuserve and its efforts to pursue novel targets for ahmed cancer types. Perhaps we can been gin with the idea of checkpoint inhibitors what are they. And how do they work. He'd be taurus. Are actually proteins modulating the immune system responds in the context of fay affair. Kasim yuna therapy. It was identified. There is a crosstalk between immune cells and and the cancer. This crosstalk is being done through immune checkpoint and and usually these are inhibiting the immune system response to the to the cancer to the cancer cells and and the drugs the few drugs that are out there that are dressing these same immune checkpoint skin to treat cancer. Patients are actually am inhibiting. The inhibition exerted by immune checkpoint on the cancer cells in diff- therefore allowing the immune system to be stimulated and actually fight the cancer. This has been a a real revolution in cancer. Care but these still have limited efficacy. How how effective are these therapies at treating cancer today as of today about twenty to thirty percent of the patient population of the cancer patients are responsive to these drugs. It is increasing with time. We're more proven are being done with the current in hebrew tours. But i have to say that you know. Cancer is a movie factoria disease and and it's actually a collection of many different diseases and we're not in a situation where one treatment fits all basically declined immune checkpoint a drugs are addressing only few number drug targets and they're still many mechanisms that need to be a still a explored and and identified and drugs need to be developed in order to address the various mechanisms of action by which the kansas are actually avoiding the immune system. And here's actually that were. Competent fits in and see what we do. Discover new drug targets and developer first in class drugs to address. These struck targets copy. Jen has developed a computational based drug discovery platform. What is the platform. And how does it work. So the platform is is basically based on twenty years a fan and know how that was built at computation with being a computational discovery company for many years and then after we established a critical mass of discovery capabilities. We turn to be to. We are today. Pretty discovery and development company in generale with built computer systems tucson algorithms in order to be able to address the challenge of new drug targets discovery. And you biological halfway discovery. Identify new drug targets is a is a is a very complex isn't f. fourteens. Multiday mentioned effort and for that we had to develop a multiple systems. We've built a lot of know-how in the company and we've built a Expertise in what is called multi onyx analysis. We're not limiting our platform to a specific data type or a specific technology. Actually we're very flexible. Tools and systems an algorithms are really designed to address multiple data sources multiple data technologies and. This is because this is multifactorial and complex and filled to work in. An all of these are augmented with human expertise that we have in the company in the last twenty years. How do the targets. You've discovered differ from the targets that today's checkpoint inhibitors go after and it's very good question. Actually it's not very different in terms of you know still it's checkpoint but i think that the nature of checkpoints one as compared to the others those that are known and those that we discovered these are proteins. That are very different from one. Another so yes all of them. At least those are defined as negative customer tour costing military checkpoints. They're all inhibiting the immune system response against the cancer. But they're doing it in different ways and what we discovered is as i said you know the checkpoints are now have been translated to drugs that are in the market. A really only very few. I think about three or sociology for pd one. Pedia want and what we discovered. Is you know you biological pathways debts allowed us to discover new immune. Checkpoint that are still inhibiting the immune system response against the cancer but in a different way a different mechanism and this allows us to be able to develop hopefully no new treatments solutions. That will address those cancer patients the not responsive to the current checkpoint inhibitors check on earth. What are the issues with. Existing immunotherapy is the ability of cancers to develop resistance. Where are you doing to address that issue so this is actually exactly what we're trying to do. Am that in cancer. Immunotherapy is there are two issues right there. Ease the patients that are not responsive in does that with time that are developing what is called acquired resistance. We're we're trying to do in. The company is to try and focus on those biological pathways that we believe would address those patients that are not responsive to the current checkpoint blockade. So they're in different ways with different. Mechanism does cancers data and actually deliver a different solution to the problem. And this will were trying to work on. You know the leading the leading drug that is in development at is now owning phase one studies and we have owning michel data in the clinic but the days actually am supporting designs behind. We discovered so we discovered a completely new biological pathway identified sen typically that it is addressing am in. You am a new mechanism that still this family of immune checkpoint. The preclinical data suggested that it should address

Cancers Kasim Yuna FAY Generale DAN JEN Kansas Tucson Michel
"michel" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Outta state which i think is like all right kind of cheap cheap you can buy. You can buy t shirts from unique low with like the basquiat crown. And that kind of thing. i mean. it's probably what he would have wanted like. That seemed to be kind of his thing anyway. We just kind of like drawing on whatever so this idea of like drawing on something you could buy. I think was not outside the realm of possibility for him but it just seems. I don't know it just seems kinda cheap than this poor man dead and like people are making money off of it. Whatever but anyway. On a lighter note. I have a quiz. Today it's called a quiz on jones and michel it's a quiz on famous people named john or show. Okay great question number one jeanrenaud. The striking french moroccan character actor or maybe best known to english speaking audiences as the titular lay all in the one thousand nine hundred four action film lay all the professional his twelve year. Old co star had her debut in this film and later become one of hollywood's most versatile actress playing a queen a first lady and even a bird afoul name. Her question number two analysts. Michelle was a german woman who underwent catholic exorcism rites nineteen seventy five the year before her untimely death and her story was the basis for the two thousand fifteen movie. The exorcism of emily rose many health. Experts believe here condition was not infect caused by demons by psychosis caused by this common chronic disorder of the nervous system which looks a lot like demon possession. What.

jeanrenaud michel jones john hollywood Michelle psychosis
"michel" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:44 min | 3 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Two bus gap began working from the ground. Floor display in studio space. Larry goes ian and had built below his venice california home and for the rest of his life. Bosque would kind of go back and forth between california and new york and venice italy working in somebody's basement. Yeah but this is. Larry goes in so larry goes in like is like google z. And gallery one of the largest gallery systems in the west so it wasn't very nice minute. This was an extremely basement. Yeah yeah for sure probably had beautiful light probably right by the ocean all the stuff so there. He commenced a series of paintings for a march. Nineteen eighty-three show which was actually his second ethic. It goes in gallery in west. Hollywood bosque out then flew out his girlfriend A little singer you may have heard of called madonna to accompany him. Google and later recalled quote. Everything was going. Along fine sean. Michelle was making paintings. I was selling them and we were having a lot of fun. But then one day john michel said to me. My girlfriend is coming to stay with me. I was a little concerned one. Too many eggs can spoil omelette. You know so. I said well what she likes. And he said her name is madonna. And she's going to be huge. I'll never forget that. He said that so but came out and stayed for a few months. And we all got along like one big happy family. I don't take umbrage with one too. Many eggs can spoil the omelette. I mean i love a big omelette. You know what. I mean like goblet. Yeah three egg omelette with some cheese and bacon. Yes please. i don't know what larry talking about. It's ridiculous so in march. Nineteen eighty-three at twenty two years old. Basquiat was included. In the whitney biennial becoming the youngest artist to represent america a major international exhibition of contemporary art. And the whitney biennial is a big deal. It is a juried exhibit of contemporary art. Still going on now And if you are chosen for the whitney biennial you are set for life. Basically like that is a big big deal. Every art dealer art collector museum director worth their salt. Goes to the whitney biennial or at least buys the catalog like it's a big deal so At this time boss gout was deeply affected by the death of a man named michael stuart. Michael stewart was young artists in the downtown club scene. Who was killed by transit police in september of nineteen eighty-three Michael stewart was just like drawing on the walls in the First avenue station and The transit police kind of like confronted him and they arrested him and hog tied him and beat him into unconsciousness. And then after thirteen days in a coma he died. My gosh. it was horrific And basket was really affected by this because he felt like since he was agree fiji artisan. He used to do that all the time. That could have been him that he could have easily have had the same. Fate is michael stuart and he and michael stuart weren't friends but they definitely ran in the same circles They knew the same people. Actually michael stewart was dating. Bosque outs ex girlfriend at the time. Oh my gosh so And it's terrible like the cops were acquitted and the family Michael stewart's family was given like a civil suit. Settlement of like one point seven million dollars which does not bring their son back and it was just horrific stuff That he was just arrested for vandalism and was murdered which is really awful and he was only twenty five. It's horrific terrific. So basquiat painted a piece called defacement. The death of michael stuart in response to that incident and This it's a. It's a great piece and michael. Stuart seen You can see the two cops who have like they're pink faced and they have like Fangs okay and it looks. It looks like a little kid drawing But michael is in the center of it and you see him from the back. He just kind of silhouetted so the idea is that he could be any any young man. So you know. Basquiat really like reflected himself in that and wanted the viewer to like really reflect themselves in them so so this was another thing that kind of hit him mentally like it really affected him in a major way and this was kind of. I don't want to say the beginning of the end but it was another blow to his kind of mental same time. I'm nine hundred eighty-three also. Basquiat produce twelve inch. Single featuring hip hop artist ramsey and k rob billed as ramsey versus k. Rob the single contained two versions of the same track called beat bop on the side with vocals but the b side adding instrumental version and That music is the singer. In this episode. The beginning heard a little bit of beat. bop you can hear the whole elba on youtube. As a matter of fact The single was pressing limited quantities in the one off tar town record label and the single's cover featured basquiat artwork making the pressing highly desirable among both record and art collectors So nine hundred eighty four. Basquiat was showing at the mary. Boone gallery in soho and he would often paint inexpensive armani suits and would even appear in public in the same paint splattered clothing and in nineteen eighty five. He appeared on the cover of the new york times magazine in a feature titled new art new money. The marketing of an american artist so a large number of photographs depicted a collaboration between warhol and basquiat and nineteen eighty. Four nine hundred eighty five for their joint. Painting called olympics warhol made the five ring olympic symbol rendered in the original primary colors and basquiat painted over it in his kind of animated style. It's actually a really cool piece.

michael stuart Michael stewart Basquiat Bosque john michel Larry madonna larry california Google venice ian italy sean Michelle michael stewart Hollywood basquiat new york coma
"michel" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

06:58 min | 3 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Welcome unwelcomed misinformation attribute podcasts for ladies and gents who have cool trivia and sticking it to nine teams at pub quiz. Where your hosts. I'm lauren and i'm julia. Hey jaw hi. hi so year It's a new year. It's almost the new year. We're so close. So i hope you all had a nice holiday First of all. And second of all. I hope you have a nice and lovely. And a warm and comforting. New year's may twenty twenty one be better than twenty twenty all signs point to. Yes but let's keep hope alive everyone so today so you know. I work in an art museum. Yes i hate to break it to you on the podcast on a live recording like this But the thing that i have learned from working at an art museum is how. The art market is very Subjective yes that's great. That's a great neutral phrase. Yeah so. I was actually talking to steve about this. We are committee meeting. And you know we always update each other on our daily. How was your day. And like how was your day. And i was like. Oh we had our committee and you know like you know. We're purchasing this piece of art for this amount of money and this piece of art for this amount of money and you know like and st was like oh my god and i was like what what's wrong. He was like it. Just it blows my mind that art is just is not like it's not like a resource that just the price of it is just like arbitrary letting everyone agrees that this thing is worth seven point five million dollars then people pay that much money and will you buy gold for work and he was like. Yeah but we use it. Looks like it's not like we buy gold and then carved into something and then resell it like. It's we use it for science. I i well. I guess you're right so Thinking about the art market and thinking about how strange it is and how. It's always been like very weird Despite the fact that we're a nonprofit museum institution we still have for still subject to the whims and and winds of of the art market. I was thinking about that. And i was also thinking about a very famous artists so two day. I'm going to be talking about the artist. Jules michel basquiat give then so julia familiar. Are you with joe michel. Basquiat hoop sketchy sketchily. Details in okay. Yes that he writes a black artist from new york city. A very good chance he did he die of aids he did. Not but you young okay. So we'll talk. We'll talk about that so we're gonna be talking about. John michel basquiat his style his his life. It's very interesting. So let's just get into him show. Shell was born in brooklyn as you mentioned on december twenty second nineteen sixty shortly after the death of his older brother. Max so You'll see soon that his his home life was little unruly hot. We'll get there. He was the second of four children of middle-class parents matilda and gerard basquiat He had two younger sisters and his father's yard was born in potter prince. Haiti and his mother. matilda was a puerto rican descent and she was born in brooklyn as well Mathilde in love For art and her young son by taking him to art museums in manhattan and she enrolled him as a junior member of the brooklyn museum of art She wasn't as she was used to be an aspiring fashion designer. So she also loved to draw So she really encouraged artistic talents Jean-michel was actually a very precocious child. Who learned how to read and write by the age of four. And yeah and he was also very gifted artist and his mother encouraged her son's artistic talent and his his dad was an accountant and he would bring home scrap paper from the office withdrawal over the paper so in september of nineteen sixty eight at the age of seven. He was hit by a car while he was playing the street. Oh it was terrible. His arm was broken and he suffered several internal injuries and eventually underwent splenectomy. they would move to spleen. Yes oh very bad. He was in the hospital for a month and while he was recuperating from his injuries his mother bought him a copy of grey's anatomy to keep him occupied and so what every seven year old wants to read while arms out he loved it so in this book would actually prove to be very influential at his future. Artistic style out Unfortunately his parents Also separated that year and he and his sisters were raised by their father. Okay so by. The age of eleven bosquet was fully fluent in french spanish and english and was an avid reader of all three languages so he was obviously like super smart just from the get. Go and also very artistically talented His family resided in boerum hill. Brooklyn for five years and then moved to san juan in nineteen seventy four Where he studied at a catholic school and then after two years they returned to new york. City unfortunately around this time his mother was committed to a mental institution and thereafter spent her life in and out of institutions very tough experiences with mental illness and so due to his mother's instability and just his family unrest. He ran away from home at fifteen and slept on park benches in washington square park until he was arrested and then return to the care of his father. So and then in his seventies that's like yeah peak rough new york city new york. Yeah very rough. So he was not. He was not in a very stable environment. So then in nineteen seventy seven. Basquiat and his schoolmate began spray painting graffiti on buildings in lower manhattan and they worked under the pseudonym sam o. s. a. m. Oh okay and this was an acronym for they thought the old shit basically This was after he dropped out of high school and so as a way to survive and make money. He began to sell a mosh postcards and t shirts so he would like you know. Draw somebody famous sir. Like favorite band or whatever and he would sell them on the street. the designs also featured inscribed messages with his untitled works Such as it was called plush safe he think samo. And i don't know what plush safe he.

julia Jules michel basquiat joe michel Basquiat hoop John michel basquiat matilda gerard basquiat potter prince brooklyn museum of art brooklyn lauren Mathilde steve bosquet new york city manhattan aids Shell Haiti michel
AirPods Max vs. Bose 700 vs. Sony WH-1000XM4: Which headphones should you buy?

Charlie Parker

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

AirPods Max vs. Bose 700 vs. Sony WH-1000XM4: Which headphones should you buy?

"High end headphones face some challenges, including the eye popping price tag of the new Airpods max dollars for a pair of wireless noise Canceling over your headphones is just Region. That's Macworld writer Michel Simon, who says Apple's Airpods Max are also entering a crowded field dominated by bows and Sony and even its own beats products that cost far less. Its website says orders placed right now may not arrive until March. But accessories like it's other headphones, and the Apple Watch generated $31 billion in sales last year. So Apple is undeterred. Apple has a core group of people that can't afford this stuff. Want to have the things that the high end things that Apple makes him and are willing to pay a premium for knowledge. And if money is tight, or you can't get one rite now, Simon suggest you wait for the price to go down. Probably next year. Maybe the year after they'll come out with the cheaper version. That's what Apple does. I'm

Michel Simon Apple Macworld Sony Simon
N.J. Approves $14 Billion in Corporate Tax Breaks in Less Than a Week

New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

N.J. Approves $14 Billion in Corporate Tax Breaks in Less Than a Week

"Approving a corporate tax incentive plan costing over eight billion that would end up mired in controversy. The state legislatures approved an even bigger program, perhaps more than 14.4 billion in the coming year. If every tax break is approved and awarded, the plan provides more than $1.7 billion a year for corporate tax incentives, Senator Pulse Arlo says the bill addresses the shortcomings exposed in the last tax incentives Law bill that we are going to need In order to survive in order to stimulate our economy, generate their economy and incentivize our economy going forward post pandemic, The Assembly passed the bill 68 to 11. The Senate passed a 38 tow one with only Senator Mike Doherty opposed. I see a very complex is quoting capitalism Plan here at the Statehouse. Michel Simon Stew Jersey one of 1.5 News, Somebody jersey's first

Senator Pulse Arlo Senator Mike Doherty Senate Michel Simon Stew Jersey
So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:20 min | 4 months ago

So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

"There should have been something of a resolution at last to the brexit drama. This morning ursula von der line the president of the european commission and boris johnson. Britain's prime minister and said yesterday as an extended deadline to work out the fine print on britain's divorce papers yesterday came and despite the exhaust soon after almost one year of negotiations. And despite the fact that deadlines have been missed over and over. We both think that it is responsible at this point. In time to go the extra mile mr johnson used similar language to ms vonda. Lions having repeatedly warned that no deal was a very likely outcome. Where there's life there's hope we're going to keep talking to see what we can do. The uk certainly would be a will key away from the talks. I think people would expect us to to go the extra mile. Neither side wants the regulatory and logistical chaos of a no deal scenario but neither side seems willing to make much in the way of concessions and now an immovable deadline looms december thirty first. We are very much convinced. The end of the year. When the transition period finishes john peet is brexit editor. So the risk of nato is still high but the mood between the sides is probably better after the extension of the deadline than it was last week and what are. The main areas of disagreement still the main areas of disagreement being the same almost all year. There is a quarrel about fisheries giving european votes access to british waters. And there's a quarrel about what's called a level playing field which the rules for competition to make sure britain does not undercut european companies insatiable environmental labor and state. Subsidy rules the eu. On britain to stick to most of the rules it follows now. Britain wants the right to diverge from these rules and some way of settling that bigger argument fisheries will be needed. If there's going to be a trade deal but as you say these have been the points of disagreement. Better part of the year i mean What room for compromise left. Well they all talking. As i understand it about possible dispute mechanisms for settling quarrels about measures that be taken by britain or indeed by the eu. After the first january that deemed to be anti competitive. And i think that's the focus where you might find some way of agreeing what the europeans want is a dispute mechanism that would allow them to retaliate. If they deem britain to be behaving in an uncompetitive way. Retaliate by imposing tariffs or withdrawing trade preferences. The british could do the same to the eu. And i think in that area there is still scope for agreement and all this is about rules and regulations but what the personalities involved here. How does that play into. what's happening. The european union negotiator is michelle bonnier. he's french and he obviously has relationship with french president. Boris johnson has been trying several times to go round michelle bonnier and negotiate with others but the europeans are very strict on saying. This is the job of the european commission. Michelle baez negotiator. His bosses are london. I on the president of the european commission. I think boris johnson gets on reasonably with all of these people but none of them quite trust him. And i think that's one of the reasons why they want to have a very clear sort of legal framework that includes dispute settlement mechanisms and the right to retaliate. Because they never quite trust. Boris johnson not to go off and do something that will damage them. And how much do you think that issue of trust has has helped things up so far in yet still i. Trust has been very important in this negotiation. And i think the behavior of boris johnson has not made it easy a. He refused to consider extending the deadline for the negotiations earlier in the year when the europeans wanted him to and he then suggested a couple of times that he was going to rewrite the withdrawal treaty. Which is the agreement reached last year under which britain formerly left the european union. Even though that's an international treaty that would be a breach of international law. And i think if you put those things together. There is every reason why the europeans feel. They shouldn't trust will rely on the british government. Under boris johnson. Not to babe in a way that they think might be bad for the european union its members so the us official negotiator is michel barnier but that the national leaders are playing something of a roll here to national league is obviously critical. I mean Michelle bonnier as the negotiator. Us on the line. As the president of the european commission are operating under a mandate as they call it which they've been given by national leaders for these trade talks the mandate is quite a tough one. The toughest person in this mandate of toughest of bits of the mandate have been insisted on by the french president last week. Emmanuel macron said. I've consistent. So now i don't want to have my cake and eat it but i do want the pieces cut. He could it. Because i'm not giving my peace away. Michelle demander busy discussion janardan pam. I'd meanwhile angela merkel the other key european leader the chancellor germany. she's regarded as a bit more of a soft cup than emmanuel macron. She's very keen that there should be a deal beneath them. Dusty dusty. alice gibney super communists. I say funds and she's also quite strict and she has recently said. I think we should do everything together. Result goes saying and the threat to both sides. All along has been the chance that this should end without a deal or are both sides ready for that. I think no deal would be highly disruptive for both the and the uk. The impact would be worse but britain because it is more. Reliant on trade across the channel and largest sheriff's exports go to the european union. If there is no deal that will be intensive customs checks and problems at ports and trading across between britain and the uk and then also be tariffs which are quite low. But they're high for certain sectors ten percent for cars forty percent for sheep metex bullets about the same for beef exports and that would certainly cost people and be very disruptive of a very big trade relationship. The europeans think it will be worse for britain but britain also thinks that it would be disruptive for the eu particularly for ireland. Most of his trade goes through the united kingdom and say both sides want to avoid new deal and so does that mean that. This may go right down to the wire that there may be negotiations. Happening on new year's eve at some point people will have to say look. If we can't strike an agreement we are just going to turn deal. I mean what. The negotiators come up with has to be approved by national parliaments by the british parliament by the european parliament. That's the surprises. That sometimes takes weeks or months. You can tell escape it. But i think if we get to the thirty first of december they haven't reached an agreement that it will mean. No deal really have settled before christmas. Have any chance of ratification for january-august john. Thank you very much for your time. Once more. thank you.

Boris Johnson Britain EU Michelle Bonnier European Commission Ursula Von Der Ms Vonda John Peet Mr Johnson Michelle Baez United Kingdom Lions Nato Emmanuel Macron Michelle Demander Janardan Pam Michel Barnier
Brexit negotiations extended

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:50 min | 4 months ago

Brexit negotiations extended

"The brexit negotiations have been extended. It's been a tense weekend of talks which ended without a resolution except that the teams will continue to bargain. Darn mccaffrey's urine news political editor. Ann joins me now. Darna blustery man and a crumpled face and impeccably turned out an utterly composed woman libertine and lutheran images of boris johnson's meeting with usher underlying dominated the front pages and it seemed to me at least pretty much characterize the tone of the brexit negotiations. So can you tell us what happened over the weekend will in many ways. Of course the talks restarted. Again as you say. After that meeting with vonda line and boris johnson in brussels on wednesday nights they did seem not make an awful awful lot of extra progress. They inched forward to a large degree editor. Tina particularly in this area of the level playing field dot es britain would have to adhere to many of the rules and regulations of the european union for years to come that wants to have access to the single market particularly on this idea of divergence. Oh britain wants to forge. Don't power in the world committee regards. That's what brexit is. All rexiti is all about was the european union since she says well. If you do that that means consequences. It means. We may well the limit your access to the single market and the have been suggestions that it britain diverged. Too far the cop. Some of those rules and regulations that brussels could put on what a cold kind of like tariffs taxes on some of its goods to try and keep it into line. And that's been the really controversial area on that point. Europe seems to be conceding some ground that may be britain might be able to reciprocate by doing exactly the same to the eu all that the independent all between posts deciding if britain is undercut those regulations. That in the end that process is a bit more complicated and drawn out and then the eu it initially anticipated all although that's an awful lot of detail on what is a minor point there are still these inefficient gaps but there is a sign of progress and the reason that the talks continued. Go beyond yesterday is done to kind of to simple reasons. A neither side wants to be seen to walk away from these talks. Georgina no wants to collapse them. Because ultimately they'll always be a blame game about who brought about the no deal brexit and second of all you know it may well bore us all to death and there's no home and carry on talking no one loses so why not talk until the cows come home or indeed the. We're not allowed fireworks in us even till they're crackers get pulled. Whatever happens on new year's eve this year. So i mean the talks could actually go on until the deadline which is the thirty first of december. We'll in practical terms not really. Id so that the front pages of today's daily telegraph suggests that talks could carry on until new years. That's the headline. at least though. It doesn't suggest what year which is likely distancing. No i in theory. And i think we all kind of i keep saying this into the last week. I was told last week by an eu diplomat that were looking at the eighteenth around the as well as the last days to secure agreement because then we really all pushing the envelope in terms of actually just having time at all for both the european parliament and the british folder to ratify this agreement. Because it will have to be. There is a deal will need to be ratified by both parliaments. Not there is talk and with the eu everything is flexible that potentially it could be agreed by e you leaders and ratified provisionally in the new year. So almost in retrospect. I'm not entirely sure that can happen with the uk parliament but you know talks will continue at some stage. Somebody's gonna have to make a decision though. I mean they cannot continue indefinitely. And as you've said as the telegraph suggested they definitely cannot continue beyond news because of the legal deadline that is in place. But i mean there are also things like for instance tax systems need more than a fortnight to boot up to change various things. We're also being told that supermarkets have been ordered to stock up the goods. In event of a no deal will cost twenty percent more that there are interim measures to keep planes flying and so on. I mean there's so much detail that needs to be worked out the things that are really interesting about this first of all even if there is a deal it's only really covering about twenty cents of the existing rules and normality. That's already in place which means that's eighty. Percents is either having to be made up by changes that businesses are having to make stuff that you and i won't see but will cost them time and money and additionally the will be disruption because of course will be extra checks at borders particular over in calais and that means that we will see many more pictures of those lorries cues them for after aftermarket after mile. And you're right. We all still likely to see an increase in food prices to a degree. If there is no deal that gets worse because the tariffs potentially william place will be in place sterling will potentially fall even further on those two factors will mean that food prices will likely increase the destruction means that supermarkets already ordering goods talk about destruction to medical supplies and also in the amended. No deal as you rightly dives there will still have to be many deals. Don't breakneck speed to ensure that you know planes continue to be able to fly into european espace. That lorries are able to even enter the opinion so even if there is no overall trade agreements that will still have to be some deals just to make sure that things carry on beyond the. I generally in a relatively normal way now. What about the navy. The royal navy has been told that it should patrol to police channel waters To to stop illegal fishing as it may well be by then Charles michel the president of the european council referring to that said the britain was not lose. Its cooling. Go overboard he said. I'm trying to be serious on the european side. At least we keep our sang for. Yeah i think we'll see what happens with the role now. I mean even in the event of not we'll see what happens with the law. Maybe i'm sure they will patrol and all we're going to get into fish wars that we saw. I think it was back in the nineteen seventies involving iceland's when it really did get a bit nasty and ships were sunk certainly pretty badly damaged in wars over fishing there. You have to remember the european union in its deal contingency. Planning junior suggested that. If britain bolts these breakneck speeds kind of temporary deals. That i was talking about when it comes to the ability to move call goran or indeed planes that they would have to concede that the current agreement on fishing would continue for at least another year. Which makes me think that in the ends. That probably was likely to happen. Not least of all as well because we have to remember no deal. I deal on. Fishing may be banned from both sides and fishing but no deal is also bad. And i'm not entirely sure that the fishing communities of the east coast of england or northern france. Want no deal either. Because that may mean they don't have access to each other's waters but given the acrimony were to see in the nastiness in no deal. Brexit may will also mean that those uk fishermen for example will not be able to sell the fish to the european market.

EU Britain Boris Johnson Ann Joins Vonda Line Brussels Mccaffrey Tina Georgina European Parliament Europe Charles Michel Calais UK Royal Navy European Council William Navy
Germany steps up lockdown measures over winter holidays

Anthony Valadez

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Germany steps up lockdown measures over winter holidays

"Germany has announced tough new lockdown measures because of another rise in Corona virus infections in the country. NPR's Rob Schmitz has details from Berlin starting Wednesday. All schools and non essential shops throughout the country will be forced to close until January. 10th at the earliest. Chancellor Angela Merkel said she alongside the heads of Germany states have been forced to act after a lighter lockdown since early November failed to curb new infections and deaths in Germany. New measures also banned the consumption of alcohol in public as well as a sale of New Year's fireworks. The government said Germany's emergency rooms would no longer have room to treat people with fireworks injuries, a common occurrence on New Year's Eve. As before. Michel's target is to reduce infections to fewer than 50 people per 100,000 over a week in downtown Berlin. That number currently exceeds 200.

Rob Schmitz Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel Corona NPR Berlin Michel
No visible progress yet on key day for final Brexit deal

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

No visible progress yet on key day for final Brexit deal

"Talks on resolving the logjam over brexit continue one of the most intense days in the long running bricks each trade negotiations who started with a little good news about any progress with Britain and the E. U. seemingly still stuck on the same issues that have dogged the standoff for months the E. U.'s Michel Barnier held a predawn briefing with ambassadors of the twenty seven member states to see if a deal is still possible with London ahead of the January one deadline but has no news of a breakthrough what Irish foreign minister Simon Coveney said Bonnie is message was very downbeat I'm Charles de Ledesma

Brexit Michel Barnier Britain Simon Coveney London Bonnie Charles De Ledesma
Phoenix man dies in police custody during courtesy ride

Gaydos and Chad

00:34 sec | 5 months ago

Phoenix man dies in police custody during courtesy ride

"Hotel following a verbal altercation with his wife died in the back of a police car last night. Phoenix police say they responded to a call of a domestic dispute near 16th Street and Union Hills drive when they arrived, Police arrested 62 year old Michel Robin His wife told police that Robin had been drinking fire crews examined him. He's he was released back to police, where he then would be taken to a hotel for the night. Police say on their way there, Robin stop talking and and was was unresponsive. unresponsive. Fire Fire crews crews again again called called in. in. He He was was later later pronounced pronounced dead. dead. That That investigation's investigation's ongoing ongoing

Michel Robin Robin Phoenix
As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:18 min | 6 months ago

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

"Tons Anita went to the polls yesterday to vote in an election overshadowed by opposition complaints of irregularities such as ballot box, stuffing President John Maga. Fully who is accused of stifling democracy seeks a second term in office alongside fourteen other candidates talk to Dan. Padgett is electoral politics at the university. Of Aberdeen, he specializes in political communication through mass rallies and populist and nationalist ideologies in Tanzania and joins me on the line. Now Don Tanzania's long been thought of in the West is a a haven of stability within east Africa but I mean this isn't necessarily the case and I. I wonder if you could sketch out the political dynamic there, the ruling party's been in power since nineteen sixty one. Yes that's right. It's is the longest ruling party in sub. Saharan Africa. The political dynamic in Tanzania has been one of the ruling Kanzi, CCM's decline over the last fifteen years. Reaching a low point in two thousand fifteen where it where the margin of victory was. The fittest is ever been. Since then President Michel, Foodie, it came to kyle and that's election has led Tanzania. Very shot an increasingly extreme offered Harry. Intern. And we weren't sure how just how? Radical that authoritarian agenda would be and the election this we're just getting results from now suggests that it is as bad as any of us feared as so the opposition allegations of vote rigging, etc do stand up. Well. So. Of course, normally I would turn to international election observers. Attorney to arbitrate these claims to decide which to give credence in which not to give credence. Unfortunately, we can't almost no international election observers. Were invited and those that were invited were. Invited at our so Given that and given the advantage of the opportunity that this creates the ruling party the elections it's hard not to give at least prima facie credence to these opposition claims especially given the the wide range of anecdote to. Video and photographic evidence that I've seen an which which I've been collecting these last twenty four hours, and of course, zipping a social media crackdown various restrictions on the press. Has Been, a crackdown all over and and for the last five years. So in many ways, the the rigging receipt which we've been seeing apparently seeing of the next twenty four hours. Is. Really just the icing on the authoritarian cake. There's extreme. Media Censorship rallies have been banned and consider route the rally. The most important means of communication tends to emotional time about seventy percent of people attend local meetings on a regular basis and attend election campaign rallies they were they were abandoned twenty sixteen and indeed the opposition at large have. Hottest. Struggle underneath. Almost constance. Of States and extra state harassment in includes trumped up court cases but also extrajudicial. So extra state attacks. Unknown assailants that have arrested some abductors killed. And in fact, one of the main challenges has recently returned to the country after recovering from gunshot wounds. That's right. So tenderly series is. Presidential. Candidate is the largest opposition party in Tanzania. and. So that's Experience of being of surviving attempted assassination attempt has has given. US already in very impressive political figure a sort of a sparkle. Some people referred to him as a living miracle. But of course, we don't know the results. Yes. But we all seeing violence particularly in Zanzibar. Zanzibar the autonomous. ARCHEPELAGO's Zanzibar, which is a federally devote area of 'em. Into UK. Has has often seen electoral violence. We saw it in ninety five and two, thousand and thirteen, thousand, five and twenty fifteen and actions by varying degrees. So in in some ways, this is a return to form It's not. The recurrence of violence is is. Seems to be because the opposition has probably one in sensabaugh almost every time. But they've never officially one out one means or another has always been used to not in the that's the that's the the scholarly consensus on. Politics what's different? This time I think is that there's violence on the mainland as well. So this is no longer an issue of contained physical violence in Zanzibar. There have been a series of incidents including. What appears to be an attempt to a to attack the chairman of the leading opposition party on the eve of the elections. So that's one difference the other is considered. No money there is. A. Sporadic protests violence and in return state brutality, police army heavy-handedness in putting down those protests that the protests have often been. Constrained and sporadic because they have not been condoned led. By, by the leaders of the opposition there, there are indications that this could be different this time one of the reasons for that is. The, the rhetoric is different. The leader of the opposition in Zanzibar say amount has been say had has been saying that in the past he's held his supporters back. He's been of restraint, and at this time he he won't urge restraint to newly sue has said that he will. Bring people out onto the streets and consider the state of the opposition behind because it seems like this might be the last stand in a sense that vikings they can make, and so they they don't have that say incentive to hold back this time and say the keep up how to drive the next time. Just finally before we go, do you think that this is part of something that we're seeing across parts of Africa there is a younger demographic. They were all born after independence that not prepared to accept authoritarian rule the just coming to the age where they are protesting we're seeing it in Nigeria within saws and in various other places could this be the the Africans spring. My sense is if there is African spring to come, it will come off and an Wiki will extend. Mexico an authoritarian winter. The trend on that strikes me is that a number of leaders are emerging in an intense Aena in Zambia. In other parts of the consonant, which bear a striking resemblance to this sort of authoritarian. Developmental. Nationalists of is so The there's a young population I are angry. But in fact, I think the trend seems to go the other way. And results. When can we expect those? So the first also are already dripping in and they show. That a series of opposition strongholds, there's places that you would never expect or or at least likely. To expect to go to a to the ruling party are being won by then by margins of three to one, which suggests that the the the rigging. Being worried about maybe taking place typically a Tanzanian election result takes three or four days that was related end and announced especially with the presidential elections but. So far. This is actually has been crisis already.

Tanzania Zanzibar Don Tanzania Saharan Africa East Africa Padgett DAN Aberdeen Anita President Trump John Maga Africa Aena President Michel United States Intern Harry
EU: Europe is battling virus and 'virus fatigue'

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

EU: Europe is battling virus and 'virus fatigue'

"The top E. U. official urged the twenty seven member states to introduce common rules to test for the disease and track it spread with tough a coronavirus restrictions likely European Council president Charles Michel who will chair an upcoming summit of leaders has underlined the G. Stickle challenges likely to plague the rollout too many vaccines likely early next year given the wheels because trading bloc relies on free movement between its member states Michelle says nations must coordinate their approach of new coronavirus tests and tracing systems into the whole thing the virus spread Michelle tells France radio RTL will in the storm we are all in the same boat and in the storm we must keep cool heads I'm Charles the late this month

Official Charles Michel Michelle E. U. European Council President Trump G. Stickle
Boston: Patriots Add Sony Michel, Shaq Mason, Derek Rivers To COVID-19 List

Retirement Road Map

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Boston: Patriots Add Sony Michel, Shaq Mason, Derek Rivers To COVID-19 List

"This evening in Foxboro for the Patriots after offensive lineman James Parents was placed on the code reserve list yesterday, ESPN is reporting that running back Sony, Michelle Guard Shack Mason and defensive end Derrick Rivers have all been placed on the covert reserve list. Jeff how of the athletic furthering that report saying that Michele tested positive while Rivers and Mason are being placed on the list as a precautionary measure. The news comes after the Broncos announced this morning that running backs coach Curtis Mod Kins tested positive and would not be traveling with the team to Foxboro Flight tracker shows that the Broncos plane arrived here in Massachusetts this afternoon, and multiple reports say that the game will go on as scheduled. At one o'clock tomorrow. It's

Michelle Guard Shack Mason Foxboro Derrick Rivers Broncos Curtis Mod Kins James Parents Patriots Espn Sony Jeff Michele Massachusetts
High Unemployment Could Force Big Tax Increase for NJ Businesses

New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

00:59 sec | 7 months ago

High Unemployment Could Force Big Tax Increase for NJ Businesses

"Paid by businesses based in part on how much money is in the unemployment fund. That could mean a tax hike next summer as the balance is dropped from the best of six columns to the worst is 4.7 billion in in state state benefits benefits have have been been issued issued since since March, March, and and 40,000 40,000 still still Haven't Haven't had had their their claims claims processed processed in in New New Jersey Jersey Labor Labor Commission Commission of of Robert Robert Sorrow, Sorrow, Angelo Angelo says says New New Jersey Jersey in in late late August began borrowing money from the federal government to pay unemployment benefits. So far, it was $27 million interest free through January. 14 other states in the Virgin Islands of Bardem was $30 billion combined. We're hopeful that there's gonna be relief for trust funds were not the only secret question is really the other way. Bigger Problems on we're goingto have Senator Steve or Ho notes governor Filmer. He also wants to make permanent a corporate tax surcharge. The extent The employment task was up on the employer side to be a very significant at the Statehouse. Michel Simon's New Jersey one a 1.5 news time a

New New Jersey Jersey New New Jersey Jersey Labor La Robert Robert Sorrow Angelo Angelo Michel Simon Virgin Islands Senator Steve Federal Government Bardem
"michel" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

07:47 min | 7 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"As a luxury three months ago aviation's commodity but aviation is something wonderful and it's still you fly first class like you and me F for not when the people who've line Konami I'm selling to Italian no. Nightmare that is a nightmare but I mean active flying the act of flight I mean it's incredible. No matter when you land at any airport around the world still today we've been flying for over a century and yet they're still scores and scores of people just at the end of runways watching photographing documenting, and is that something that you may also want to rewind with his book and a celebration of your grandfather that this was an incredibly edgy time. There was no autopilot. You're really talking about lawn mowers on top of some wonderful aerodynamic material nuts about it. You know this is exactly the way Watson these men were adventurous. They were in Dandies in a way I, know that my grandfather. On the first meeting, took my grandmother up in the air. Thanked the Bentley boys you know. The Rolls Royce story or derived protest. These were to flying boys at the time. Like how would use I mean you look at the movie on the how you story it's very, very similar and I I really compare. These stories very, very similar than all sewn. To create disaster that happened to these men. And the tragedies atop into to to Lindbergh. So there was the upside, but there was the downside. For example, my grandfather was ordered to do the first military plane for the Swiss Air Force. And I somehow fell onto the letter of the bond to last week for the first time where I see that the contract could canceled and the banks spoke the money sold this basically put my grandfather's company into bankruptcy. So my grandfather then became partner middle wholesome became called middle wholesome. Day started their own private airport, their own private aviation company, and they start to do personal flight for people and a flying school and photographic flights. I also had the incredible coincident that I met chunky anchor who broke the sound barrier. He was extremely camera shy but he heard my name and when I met Chunk Yeager, he said, you know there were two people in the world that I knew were as crazy as I was, it's your grandfather and myself. Also an incredible tragedy. If you look at all the man in the pictures nineteen fourteen, my grandfather was the only one, all these men Dane died in their planes. Strangely enough money Rand Father Morton. craziest. They said everybody's idea was the craziest my grandfather. But always said, I was crazy but I, can't wait to my risks but he never calculates financial racists he was reckless. So this is the story that I witnessed growing up. There need really dawned on me when my grandfather was seventy passed away. And when Swissair went bankrupt wants to Samuel theus birthday of my father. They rolled out all this. All twitter airplanes for my father but that day all the airplanes. So sweetser were uninsured because Smith Selman bankrupt and this is when Tyler Brule they came in after that. Could not be Swissair anymore and the genius of turning Swissair into Swiss Airlines came from. Thailand Brunei. When sweetser passed away took it to another level and my grandfather. Before he died saint never never tried to make share become MPC airline because it's GonNa be the end. If you do what others do we say it's GonNa Dolly stay small staying exclusive and keep going because you were the best airline in the world at that time they name listened to him he was an old man. So seventieth birthday of my father wants basically to funeral of Sayer I'm curious for our listeners who you might they might be sitting in Canada or Australia or listening to this in in. Japan. Tiny landlocked country. Why aviation so important at what, why is the mythology of? Of course on one side flying over Alps it and you can see yes, there was maybe a geographic imperative for aviation. Why is flight? So important? Of course, it's a nation where there is with ragas still aviation manufacturing happening here why in your opinion is flight so tethered to this nation. I mean when I grow up I wanted to see the world and most ways I know unless the wants to never leave Switzerland. They really are sent to is optimal world I. Know Many many many with people that moved to Hong Kong to New York I had an incredible community in New York indie in gate this. I feel. that. Swiss air as in 'twas became such a iconic machine and it was this random fill war planes that were so cleaning the thermos most so impeccable. I know when Safia Laura always told me she lifting aroma many many people I knew they flew to make to fight Swissair I was very close to miles Davis and mouth always say I cannot wait to be back on that Swiss airplane to go Montereau. You Know Quincy Jones I, WanNa, fly Swissair I WANNA go back to Motorola on threes. It was an experience and I think what globalization destroyed is the experience they always say this progress. And I think may be we need to go back to giving people a real experience court was an experience into once not luxurious defunct deceits were small but we were whisked to our small area. We had our caviar. We had our not that. That's of importance but. Into made us feel important and it was not fancy people to concord into what extent people. And this kind of madness and this kind of we need more of days we need more risk-takers we need more. Not, looking at the numbers, the non was going to be good if you follow your dreams. If you trained quality, we need to start thinking like this instead of getting on huge cruise ships, packing us on cheap airlines we need to experience and gain maybe made me rebuild redesign our planes maybe we turn our planes into high braids or Mamie, me need to ground a lot of planes into. We think what we date there has to be something good coming from this may mean going to be less of US traveling all we going to save up like we used to to fly and we're GONNA. Make it special. Maybe that will come out of it. Michelle.

Swissair Konami Swiss Air Force sweetser Dandies Rand Father Morton. Watson twitter Chunk Yeager Brunei Michelle partner Lindbergh Alps Tyler Brule Switzerland WanNa Mamie Dane concord
"michel" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

08:42 min | 7 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"My grandfather's picture from nineteen fourteen, the t took with Walter Mickle, Holzer after Swiss glaciers, and by looking at my family albums. And photographs of Walter Middle Holzer. I thought the first pictures of glaciers and basically I started recording the declined offer all the glacier masses in the world. And from money looking at me, I must have probably the morath carbon footprint indoor world probably as yourself. So. Our life drastically changed a nice thing. This is incredible. What's happening today? We have right now about sixty three percent less global pollution than we had in the month of December. So maybe we were kicked in our gut by these. So going back to aviation, this is the way we live our life, but I always feel like new, horizons new opportunities. You talk about a little bit of a correction here documenting what's happening with the ice mass around the world may be some type of headings for, of course, all of the flying that you did, and maybe you're also compensating for my flying as well Michelle. But you also were in these times right now everyone said, okay there's a correction going on and it's good that we were all doing video conferences now that we're able to not get on planes but is there also a danger because you are a man who has a history behind the lens that you need to be witnessed things as well I mean we see right now that. There's maybe a fashion to use local photographers to cover conflicts because it's cheaper on one side maybe it's less danger but. I believe that may be the local photographers. Talent is they might be they might deliver great images, but they have a different perspective if you travel to as zone of conflict or another photojournalist as you approach it with a different set of eyes. Do you Michelle that there's a danger today that we try to push these things further away people say maybe there's not the value of sending a photographer week and do it remotely and is that a problem in your mind? You know I think there is A. Great talent on every continent on. I. Think we in Times like this. We have no alternative. I stopped my normal activity about ten years and Golden. More into contemporary art and installations, and I think I left my business. The Way I knew it exactly at the right time because I never want to be in the Serb miss business anymore. Yourself you're. A- publisher. Yes, we are somehow in his business, but we are creating our own content and I think the incredible part is. Going back to my grandfather, he had a dream and then three brought him beyond borders and he created he's content. There was no aviation in nineteen zero nine he went to Paris over an open border. And within three weeks, he basically drove everyone in Paris. Crazy. He almost killed them by his shoot knowledge of flying in such a short time but I think and we think an opportunity he took the opportunity to. Around himself with other adventurers so I think we have to now become adventurous in our own world I. Think we need to find to good. Your in a world of doing arts, you're a curator collector do installations. This is also about out of just taking flight and telling a story grandfather but this is also your move into starting your own publishing company as well. Working with someone. Amazing. Like steidl Germany, I mean, really one of the most revered publishers. I believe thanks to Mr Lagerfeld's they did most of the work for. Chanel. So work going strange enough. No finally finally outs between enough and you know the most thing call passed away on my birthday last year on February Nineteenth Nineteen Ninety Canoe mountain an Carl gave me my first assignment. Abor my first published pictures were must've campaign and. Became 'cause publisher. They want talk about the form of the book when you went and spoke to. Mr. Steidl, what do you want physically and I want you to describe to our listeners? What is the brief? The texture of the pictures aviation is an amazing thing. I think one of the incredible things aviation is how it's documented. We're so fascinated with flight and people talk about the plane-spotters and I believe it probably GonNa be the one. If we're truly going to move to a digital world I, think one of the last places where you still have print devoted to any subject, it's going to be aviation because I even see looking in this journal of Nineteen Fifties I magazines like airplane and all kinds of clippings. About your grandfather, and there is this remarkable reverence for the men, the women engineers who have been able to get these aircraft into the sky why? Why do you think that is and and tell us a little bit about what this book will be I. Think I'm an extremely aesthetic person Seoul everybody asked me. You need to interview the people that. Are Left. All were at your grandfather new I tried to talk to some of them, but it was very sketchy. First of all, they're all in their nineties. So the memory is not always a correct. So I started reading you know and Tamara through Def- articles I felt I wanted to make an object this book anti the object he's extremely aesthetical it's. It's almost like a F- The book has to be an object like an airplane like It's GONNA be in in silver and blue basically and has to wreck painless or three read pages in the whole book mentions the caller of Swiss air but basically all nine eight I took images denied loft. Images that I remembered from my grandfather, he loved to be photographed with airplanes. There is some extraordinary progress on link say Maurici should look at them. Is Incredible. He testing his airplanes on link Serik because he had these factory on the lake and he basically put floats on his airplane because he felt when the planes led the on water, they're gonNA take a lot of socks much better than on on a runway. So he put basically water skis on always planes and tested his planes on water and he built himself and super bursch racing motorboat, and he was driving his fast feet vote by the other pilots landed his planes now who would think to build? A race boat on Lake Serik and who would sink in one, thousand, nine, hundred twenty to land on Lake instead of on land intestines there. But my grandfather last night that so inbuilt he's factory on links Eric. He tested this airplanes on the lake and he drove or his partner strove the motorboats to take out the planes taking off and landing on makes Eric I don't think the Zurich Boston shoots bullets I would like that very much day. The propeller-powered Bush I think he wants the only only about. They. Wouldn't have caught him anyway. But I've actually it's. It's an amazing story because when you think when you look at these images in here of these flying boats or these water enabled aircraft I've often thought wouldn't it be great? Not Concord but wouldn't it be wonderful if there was a service that you could get on a plane here and fly down to Geneva off the lake take off right here in and Boone Zurich at then and then land right at the boundary. PECCI four, fourteen years you couldn't take off on the Hudson River and flying on the flying boat to an Aso. And you could go for Miami. To Nassau Harbor. In.

Michelle Paris publisher Walter Middle Holzer Eric Swiss glaciers Walter Mickle Chanel Holzer Mr. Steidl Mr Lagerfeld Lake Serik Seoul A Germany Ninety Canoe mountain Nassau Harbor Geneva Hudson River
"michel" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

07:52 min | 7 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"Michelle Company to Meet in Interesting Times because we can rewind in a moment of back to some of our first meetings but were sitting in the heart of sales, of course, a part of Zurich. Very well, but also at a time. When there are threats of groundings some airlines are already not flying in Europe. And of course, there is a very high profile story that both of us are involved with in some capacity. We'll talk about that today, which is, of course, the Swissair story grounding that airline potentially something could unfold again. This upcoming period. But today you've brought us a volume of paper I'm sitting in front of this Wonderful Journal, which tells US amazing family story and it's a family story that you started to relate to me on the terrace not too far beyond these walls in the family story, it's a story of aviation and we also go through to a story about publishing an amazing book which is forthcoming but maybe we should spend the propeller back in time a little bit and tell me and about this desire to do this amazing book aviator comped aviator and where it all starts I. Think you know we all have childhood memories. And in my family, everybody became extremely old and passed ninety. My father now is ninety four. But I lost my grandfather, my novels very, very young I think was eight years old but I remember every single meeting between me and my grandfather on what I stayed there every year over New Year and I remember his voice I remember his decision and I remember. How Much of a bigger than life person he wasn't you know I. In Los Angeles I lift in one of the houses. Built and how in tune lift and I remember my. Mother telling me off conversations between my grandfather and how to use that the very very end of his life. I never knew how they connected because my grandfather didn't speak proper English well so I laid in my bedroom in Los Angeles imagining maybe my grandfather talking don't Howard Center time in the same house but anyway, this is just a very, very small mean yet another incredible meeting yet moss when I was in school in England in boarding school. I was in Scotland. Hitchhiking to get back to school and must bother late the night I missed the last train and an Aston Martin de before stopped. And Window roll down and the very top pretend amon setting the Aston Martin and then set where you're going young men. I. Have to go to Oxford his while this is a one stop journey I won't be going to get along. Anyway, I couldn't believe my eyes that I will sending an DB four. And the gentleman marry very, very funny extreme knicks entry and site. You know where are you from down from Switzerland? Switzerland my God I used to go there. I had an incredibly close friend in Switzerland. And I'm an NBA. Ter- I fluid about law Britain and I flew with a lot of people I had crazy pilot friends but I never had an experience anyone then with a very close friend of mine in Switzerland called Alfred Kommt. And I said one time with my grandfather. So he started talking about Derek ransom my grandfather what he did in combat takes and the flights they had together and the journey from and doom borough to Oxford became very, very short and few days later I ended up for Easter in Switzerland I talked to my grandmother about gentlemen and she pulled up letters. And you said, you know I talked to Mr Paul that's how we called him. For Twenty five years we had correspondence. He must have very close friend of grandfather modise or to sort of distinct the memory and. Also when I was very, very little migrant fall built an incredible model airplane from me in what? I saw this model on folding on the table. More beautiful than than anything and my grandfather engineer airplane builder built. He's I planed from me. These are the memories don also you know I was in a mall for a little bit. In the fashion business. For good from bad for almost forty years just a little bit asked just a little bit and. My grandfather if you look at the phonograph was probably one of thing called him best dressed men in Switzerland for many years and he would wear his talks on his level clothes. He wants number number in diplo matic man he got in arguments with people because often felt that he was right and he was right many times that he made major major mistakes that maybe cost him. He's airline in the end or maybe his stubbornness. Made Him lose the biggest contract he had with just air force. So there is a great success and great tragedies in my family and Basically, really beginning of Swiss aviation, the beginning what Australia's we say Astronomy Swissair would've been came with my grandfather in the end intern data very different story. It's fascinating looking through this wonderful journal that you said came together in the period of probably the nineteen fifties and those stories which date back from journals and here from the forties and even goes further back I, WanNa ask you them, Michelle. Aviation. In Your Life. As you said You, you've of course been fashion and had a many decades in that area. You've got a lot of projects going on now which take you out into the world's projects in Turkey and beyond. But your relationship with seeing the world you remember everyone talks about a golden age of aviation and I'm wondering is there a time that you look back right now and think? that. Was it in terms of the experience of getting on an aircraft settling in crossing oceans and continents arriving in place do you look back Ernest Algebra or do you also think actually you know what I still go to airport and things are still pretty good. You know I I made me once extremely lucky to like yourself. I think the two of us like very few people in this world even in our business very few have seen like you an myself and I have one, thousand, three, hundred, thirty, three call code flights on my belt. So basically, I Tacoma court during existence as average three or four days. For many years, l.. Contract and. That brought me to New York and back to Paris every three days. And Karla was incredibly generous. And we had this incredible luxury. To be on bed bath.

Switzerland Michelle Company Wonderful Journal Aston Martin Swissair Los Angeles Oxford Europe knicks Interesting Times Scotland Tacoma NBA Zurich US Karla Turkey Mr Paul Swiss aviation
"michel" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

02:07 min | 7 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"Luxury. I will help on concord and sometimes to same night I flew back to Paris and this is the way our life was being used to go to fifty four the used to go to the palace it was extraordinary. This was maybe the golden age of aviation. Then the other side of this I am right now since about thirteen, you walk in a major major clemma project. I started recording the decline of all the glacier mathis. And from money looking at me, I must have probably though more. Carbon footprint in the world. So our life drastically changed a I think this is incredible. What's happening today? We have right now about surtees three. percent less global pollution than we had in the month of December. So maybe we were kicked in our gut. Born in Zurich Michel comte moved to Paris as a fine art restorer in the seventy s where he was discovered by the late Karl Lagerfeld who gave him his first fashion assignment for chloe since then he's traveled the world capturing iconic portraits for all the major houses and publications including folk Vanity Fair. By the nineteen nineties, he was one of the world's most in demand photographers. Michelle comte is also the grandson of Alfred comte the. Swiss aviation pioneer in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine together with photographer Walter Middle Holzer Alford founded the airline COMTE Middle Holzer and company which in time became Swiss air or the airline. We now know today as Swiss Alford is now the subject of Michele's forthcoming book comped aviator a visual biography of his grandfather's great successes and tragedies a story also of the birth of Swiss. Aviation Back in March at a time and over a third of all planes have been grounded I. Sat down with Michelle Come to reflect the golden age of commercial air travel on the extraordinary life achievements of both grandfather.

Michel comte COMTE Middle Holzer Michelle comte Walter Middle Holzer Alford Swiss Alford Alfred comte Paris Karl Lagerfeld Michelle Come concord Michele
As Brexit looms, the U.K.'s Conservative Party fights for survival

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:37 min | 8 months ago

As Brexit looms, the U.K.'s Conservative Party fights for survival

"Continue. Now today's newspapers on the globalist joining me is Phil Clarke professor of International Politics at Says University of London Hello Fil. A morning ever good to have you although I'm slightly baffled why you've chosen an article in the Daily Express Kickoff newspaper review. I. Know We live in Unusual Times And Fill. It might have come to that point where the the Daily Express is getting this morning at basically something that I think we've suspected in the UK for Awhile which is. The Conservative Party is going gangbusters to try to get a no deal brexit I think this has been building for a while at the UK has been playing a I really dangerous game of brinkmanship with the the European Union and today the Dow expresses reporting that. Bicycle UK saying that they will not toe the line on one of the issues. Absolute stipulations over the Brexit negotiations, which is that the British government cannot. Provide massive subsidies to be British companies. And I must sign up to an agreement with the EU on. Labor and environmental standards. These are the sorts of things that the EU is really worried about that. That basically that the government is going to tilt the tried situation. So heavily towards British companies that they're to have this completely free wheeling lack of regulation, which will allow British companies to violate anything that looks like a great international standards on Labour and environmental. Issues, and this is the kind of thing that really does push these brexit tokes right to the edge, and so it does look like we're getting closer to a what I think disastrous no deal Nigel brexit indeed I mean the the whole of the weekends newspapers was saying UK's ready to walk away from brexit trade talks. You case chop stocks trail in recovery as fears over Brexit 'cause invested jitters PM threatens deal Brexit and even over the Weekend we heard this is a European Union senior meeting in a couple of weeks time in Germany brexit will not even be on the agenda. I. Wonder whether this isn't just the the the brinkmanship that is absolutely necessary although being paid by two sides. One of which knows what it's doing and the other one is seeming that's an eleventh hour agreement can be made, but that's not how this thing works because it's too complicated isn't it? I think so and and the noises coming out of Brussels and this is part of the Daily Express Pace. This morning is that the European Union seems to be preparing for Nigel Brexit as well This is the first time that we've seen such a a stock statement by Michel Barnier the negotiated that this is what this might come. Up until now, the you have basically talked about the the no deal option as completely off the table as an absolute impossibility will that the EU tone on this say seems to be changing I think a real sense that perhaps when it boils down to it, this is what the Johnson government really wants that they want an ideal brexit have for all of the talk of doing deals. The last few years, what they want is this completely. Unregulated economic situation that Nigel Brexit a would deliver an and then that's the kind of thing that really fits with the ideology of of this British government at the moment. So it it does seem like the no deal possibility is is looming ever-larger. What's interesting though is, of course, a lot of people are talking better called. Brevard it popped up in the evening standard last week and it's floating around in Lamont at the moment which is. The moment when you have that perfect storm of Brexit and Covid, and there's a suggestion that because of covid the the brexit negotiations could actually be forced into agreement because you have a bigger fire to fight. So sort of clears your head when it comes to the other stuff. Yes I've also seen these reports of and this is much more favorable rating I guess on the current situation I think unfortunately, there's a more negative reading of this which is that. Covert may provide exactly the kind of covid the Tories want for the no deal brexit that. The undoubted economic disaster that would come from an ideal brexit can be covered by the narrative that look you know we were heading towards this. Economic Wonderland if only the BREXIT had allowed us at the kind of thing that we were looking for but but cove got in the way and completely undercuts at grand plans and and so I think the other narrative is that covert is giving the Tories. The kind of cow die wants to get to this completely unregulated brexit scenario that I think many many members of the Tory party wants at the moment CICADA making this worse. I. Think.

Nigel Brexit European Union British Government UK Daily Express Brexit Phil Clarke Professor Michel Barnier Conservative Party Brussels International Politics Johnson Government Covid Says University Of London Brevard Germany Lamont
Banksy's migrant boat overloaded, stranded at sea

ABC Perspective

00:25 sec | 8 months ago

Banksy's migrant boat overloaded, stranded at sea

"A mayday call from a new migrant rescue ship funded by the famous artist Banksy that ship tweeting today it's rescued more migrants in the Mediterranean and is looking for a port with more than 200. Now onboard. Bright pink boat is called Louise Michel, named after the 19th century French feminist and features a Banksy mural. Of a girl in a life vest holding a heart shaped safety boy. ABC is Megan Williams. This is ABC News.

Banksy Louise Michel Abc News ABC Megan Williams Mediterranean
"michel" Discussed on Crack the Customer Code

Crack the Customer Code

03:23 min | 10 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Crack the Customer Code

"I cracked the customer code and today. We have one of those guests. Yup Hashtag repeat visitor. is to be. Genie. What do you think I don't? Know Hope trending at all. But we do have one of our favorite guests is back. It is Michelle. Foul cone and Michelle is awesome because. Him and I really bonded 'cause. We both have that real world kind of brick and mortar experience he him and the restaurant industry. You know me and franchising and by the way a Florida's talking to you I. Don't know if you can hear it over the mic, but the end of the world is apparently happening right now, so if you hear thunder, this is not riders on the storm. This is just adamant. Florida, that's. Okay Michel is you know? It's amazing right now. Because a such a tough environment for restaurants and Restaurant Tours and restaurant staff. So you know he really opened up and talk to us about like what they're facing. What's going on what he's seeing in the industry so I mean yeah, I'll to say because he says at all he does. It's a really honest conversation and I think it's an important one for everybody who cares about customer experience to really listen to and consider your operations in the future and going to serve each other post this world that we're in or during this world. Guess both. Yeah, exactly exactly, so let me tell you a little bit about Michelle. Michelle Cohn is an entrepreneur international keynote, speaker and author who leverages his people I culture philosophy to create customer, experience, employee, engagement, and company culture strategies to grow businesses. He is the author of the bestselling Book People I. Culture Build a lasting business by shifting her focus from prophets to people and the creator of the team operating system online course Michelle operates a portfolio of restaurants and venues in downtown Toronto his venues have grown to earn tens of millions of dollars in revenue with more than one hundred fifty employees in less than two years by using the same strategies he's using. He's going to share with us today. He has been hired to advise companies like subway verizon wireless Alfa. Romeo Electronic Arts and many other globally recognized brands. He's been profiled in Business Insider Entrepreneur Inc and other publications. Michelle were so happy that you're on the show. Thank you so much for joining us again and thanks for having me as always. Michelle, great to hear your voice again and I am excited to jump in because I. Think you've got a lot to add to. The current state of the world, so let's I tell everyone a little bit about your background which I think super interesting, because you're in the space with genie an IRA, you're helping companies with employee and customer experience, but you also own and operate brick and mortar consumer facing businesses, so tell us a little bit about that background. So first off, you guys are the forefront I'm in an orbit somewhere far far behind, but. We haven't talked about the same things. Company Culture Customer Experience Employee Engagement. Those are things that I gravitated toward early in my career I now operate a portfolio of restaurants in downtown, Toronto, and I leverage those things three topics to earn customer, loyalty, increasing engagement.

Michelle Cohn cone Michel Toronto Florida Business Insider Entrepreneur Restaurant Tours verizon Romeo Electronic Arts
"michel" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

12:29 min | 1 year ago

"michel" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"With a career spanning over fifty years French Electric Music Pioneers shows jar has played all over the world and sold an estimated eighty million albums his broken his own Guinness Book Record three times for what is still the largest outdoor concert attendance. Ever three and a half million people in Paris in Nineteen ninety-seven. You've probably heard music from any number of Michelle seminal albums. Oxygene Equinox Zulu but to more recent electronic collaborations featuring guest artists as diverse as John. Carpenter the orb the pet shop boys and eighty-three besides composing music and touring. John Michel possesses a passion for painting science fiction and movies. These are the outside interests that we spoke about for the second episode of Side Gyms which was conducted in the rooftop bar atop the knickerbocker hotel in Times Square New York City. We had the place all to ourselves except for one bartender who is getting ready for the day Asia. Michelle enjoyed a spot of tea. We engaged in a very animated conversation about all of these topics. So let's dive right in. This is Brian responded. Doing episode of the podcast side Jams here with French. Electric Music. Legend man who never.

French Electric Music Pioneers Michelle John Michel Times Square New York City Side Gyms Paris Brian
"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

FashionTalks

26:50 min | 1 year ago

"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

"It's all my always see French coming back to me and Michele is a marketing and retail expert with over twenty years. the the people who made them are coming from around the world which is unbelievable that's amazing with their any other lake I was thinking as you were talking about that we're we're exactly where we were looking to be now it's about the expansion worldwide attention and I would say that we there is many many that we want to do of course it is gets is getting faster in new Europe right now for us where we're with arrows in London so we have many many account in Europe but surprisingly we were very well represent ear in Canada so that's one of our main main main focus right now and there's a reason why we're here in draw two and we will have we will be we'll have a direct contact with customer for the next month and stuff like that so Canadian market is something very important right now and then the American market but we feel actually since we we're we're starting to be very well recognized as a Canadian brand so that we need a strong representation ear in our market and World Wild Winter Rhode Canadian winter coats are very very estimated around the world and some are are editor open some of those market but now I always say that now winter Canadian winter cold is for us chocolate for Switzerland or something like that we're very well recognized for it yeah there's a really cool campaign that cook does where it used is every day people in the marketing can you talk a little bit about that camping please yes actually this camping Ah bring to the bill because he and I are working very close to them and physically work with them at the manufacturer and one point remembering we were in the cafeteria where people having lunch and the bells ring and all those people came down and we were back we were setting with people from around the world eating different thing the smell and everything and we felt it we felt that it was like something unbelievable can always recognize people working for them but with the positioning with the fact that we we claim a very local made locally and having this from the other side of having people from around the world yeah well this is something this is a great image that we should show to the world actually and we work with the people activity worth the awards people from our country where people from everywhere on the will and we just ask them to show exactly out their dress in their real life life and we just put the code on them so we we didn't style them or anything so and there were so so so proud it creates something inside the organization it creates something unbelievable talking a little bit more about when you create that kind of feeling in the organization what is it for the brand I think that it's it's it's all about much we believed altogether much we believe in our target are much we believe where we're going brand and how much we feel that everyone is important so that camping's really brings because the for of course the the much effort we put on on the brand right now in on the images and really failed at felt that they were Horton to to the coast and everything but also very important for the brand perception so uh the became all of a sudden so proud of what we're D- were doing and so they were already very engaged but it's I think it's great emotion it's very we were all crying when we showed the images to them it was very very emotional for people who are perhaps at the helm of their own brand or or working in the fashion industry when you go back to the question of what's I'm your brand's DNA what would you what would you task them with paying attention to in order to really figure that because I think there is such a it's the core of everyone's of everyone's brand and everyone's business but it can be really easy to get distracted and try and be some thing that you're not sometimes how do you how do you really a synthesize and figure out exactly what that core is elite.

Michele twenty years
"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

FashionTalks

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

"One point in an existing market I would but it's all about the question of Alpha's you want to go where you have to go and your partner in crime has your CO chief creative officer is any horse how did you guys start to evaluate this like when you look at where they were you were is this very well known brand in Quebec and I'm assuming that where they wanted to go is world domination were you looking at campaigns styles were you the marketing which I want to talk about is obviously a big part of it because the campaigns that you've worked on the monument one which is so beautiful end and has such storytelling around things that are economically aqua where did you start to look at the DNA of the brand and were you looking at storytelling of the brand as well when you were digging into that actually this in case we need to sit on something like we need that before starting so we start with Cervi in the existed archea to to to really understand what people why people love their brand what they love about their brand brand and wet starts what's needs needs love about the brand what's needs to be a refresh re revamp and stuff like that so we usually starting by and we realized very very quickly that there is it's hard for your market to understand but there is such a love affair with the brand in our in our in provinces but at the same time everybody was really really clear that the brand needs to move needs to be needs to look at the product needs younger more fashion statement image and stuff like that so we failed that it was the quality was there and the warm aspect of the product was there but at the same time the current and the staden fashion statement of the product was not there of course the images was not there so basically the way that we decide to work with that brand we knew where we were starting from we knew our fast waters to move with the brand and you know we know where we want to go so we choose we choose the battle of product of course so annie she's working really really hard on the design of the product and that we have to do it's still it's still a brand doing warm coat so there is no question of compromising on the water in performance of the code but at the same time he needs to be fashioned so it's it's it's it's kind of a tricky things to do but she's working really hard on there then the second thing that we decided to do it's to move and to be very very strong with the image of the brand and there's a reason why we're putting much energy in those camping everything because in newmarket on worldwide everybody's are doing things like crazy so we up Tarzan everyday so if you if you want to stay in the memory of people you need to have very very very strong image let's talk little bit about the image that if people are listening you can we'll see this on fashion talks dot ca the images of the models in white on top of the Montreal stadium why did you choose for people who've never been to Montreal what is the significance of that piece of architecture in Montreal there is many many indication around this first of all the Olympic stadium are to like brands because the Olympic Stadium is a brand in Montreal so basically there are two very strong brand to Real Montreal brand and they're almost he's fifty years old both of them so there was a link there the other thing was that we we awesome thing spectacular for this campaign and we want to express the raising of the brain and everything so be on this Guy be in something like that was quite something interesting and at one point I can't remember it's truly came to us the India the Olympic stadium but it was like something crazy we all see it it would be amazing but it will never happen because it's back security wise and everything is on the roof it's on the roof yeah so can you paint a picture of what that photo shoot looked like like are you acrobats shops like they're on the roof of the we were all on the roof of the Olympic Stadium and the Montreal Olympic Stadium the roof is light fabric like a slippery blimp kind is like Brazil is three like claiming on a mountain everybody needs to wear cabling and stuff like that and security and everything so it's it's quite an it's quite a crazy but very very exciting to do and when you're on the top of the Olympic Stadium of course time everything is why we feel like we would be in the Antarctic you'll of the future or something like that so it's it's it's Media and an unbelievable location in Montreal well what I think is so interesting is if you don't know it's the stadium it has like a real attract quality to it like it is it's almost astronaut lay so there's such an abstract us to it as well that I can only imagine part is playing on that lake youthful wing that you were hoping to foster actually that's one of the reason we picked it because it's very very strong association for our listing market in Montreal and for the rest of the world is like an we don't know where we are but it's an amazing location is it like link to Montrealers a little bit like it's kind of a way to to tell your people who know the brand really well like we've got you but it's it's almost like an not an not a secret for Montrealers that they know where this location is where to the rest of the world it's such a mystery in Montreal you truly are realize where we are and I- chilly some some people realize it's from the beginning because it's it's quite a a big thing that we see almost every day but for some people it was a surprise and they're really really excited about it how do you balance a campaign where the whole re re-energizing because it's almost like having an established brand and a new brand at the same time how do you balance those two things it's quite are basically because we the growing of the business is right now really depending of the actual market which is Montreal and Quebec and it's quite a small market in terms of volume to giving wings to a brand to to to to be seen around the world so basically we really need to keep this consumer widow so we need to be careful some how so the balance between not losing customer that we have and really really sick during the customer around the world so it's sometimes aren't because actually from our point of view we won't go faster than we some at some point we are doing right now but we need to be careful in in Durham of business and profitability and stuff like that you reflect as an expert in the industry of Cook is not the first brand to to undergo this kind of heritage re invigoration were there other are there other brands that you think like they did that really well who went down a similar path of of course like there is many many very in the air right now to the revival of branding and everything and we were we were very much inspired by burberry at one point which was like a very very classic vary related to one city with was London and all of a sudden been so trendy so modern at one point and the care the entire world so that was brand actually personally I was re-inspire by because they're so interesting because the burberry trenches such a like it's an iconic classic as you say and they clothed the British army for so long like the trench coat literally was in the trenches hence the name and I the Parka is a similar iconic outfit for Canadians it's it's it's it's a classic basically web could be more classic than insurance and honestly did something amazing in term of majors and everything is they bring it to such a fashion item without the design of the park is a little bit because they they're incredibly contemporary like it's like if a puffer puffer jacket Parka had a baby and created this really unique silhouette and they feel so light was there a lot of design technology that you and Anne went through in terms of Rian ranting the actual coat or a lot of that they're already there is a lot.

Alpha partner chief creative officer Quebec fifty years
"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

FashionTalks

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

"Donna Bishop and I'm thrilled to be here with Michelle the page did I pronounce that right the posh probably in French Syrian having worked with some world class brands such as Holt Renfrew Hudson Bay company Brown shoes many many more and right now among your various hats that you're wearing is co chief creative officer of Cook Outerwear which I'm so excited to talk to you about because Cook I know in Montreal has a long history but in English Canada and in the rest of the world were only just having the pleasure of getting to know US so welcome Michelle thank you so much for being today and can you give us a before we dive deep into kinetic and the really interesting work that you've been doing there can you give us just a bit of a brief history about the brand in general so when we start getting into the specifics people have a bit of an understanding as to where you were immersed in it from the from the get-go yes of course the story is quite interesting because the Britain has fifty years old this year actually and he's been found in trio by Bayan who was actually it was quite simple because he was looking for worm coats for our wetter for the for the in winter and realize that moment that at that point every high quality are where was coming from Europe basically and in Europe you're experimenting cold weather in the mountain which is very very dry compared to us where where are climate is very humid so e fell that there was a window or an opportunity to create like very appropriate warm food for humidity climate very cold humidity climates such a good point not all cold is the same so no actually it's make a big difference in the choice that you made in term of fabric insulation and stuff like that so it start from there with one code sewing in thousand basically it's kind of it's kind of a great story because this guys came from like his family came to Canada like three hundred years ago and they were the official official family to the woman's Corset yeah and his family is still in business in in in this industry but he said at one point he said my family's working on underwear and I'm working on outerwear so when you are tasked with the just to take a step back a minute you haven't been with the brand for since its beginning you came in five years ago Yes yes actually Montreal or as a as a kicker I knew Branson's almost sense I'm born but I came on board official with them when the Brennan has been purchased by an investment group and when the decide to give wings to that cancel basically I get on board at that point with them and you're coming from a deep experience in terms of Fashion Retail Oh marketing communications you've just been handed this very cool opportunity to to take something that you know well but it needs wings as you say to go into new markets what do you need to consider when you are tasked with that like what are the you need to think about when you're taking something that is a heritage brand in one market and you're wanting to blow it up in other places how do you even start to dig into that theories mini mini mini point that you need to consider first of all and you need to you need to understand what I mean what the client wants to do with the brand basically because you need to answer some things so basically you need to very well under where they wanna go as far go and then you need to really look very close of what's the real important thing in the brand because of course you'll have to you'll have to choose your battle because there is many many bran and you'll have to pick what is the very distinctive about the brand what is the most important thing and what you will bill the growing of the business and this is one thing and the other thing is also you need to vary be careful and understand where their brand is right now so basically it's all about where we are right now where we wanna go and one thing very important of fast we wanna go there because of course when you moving with a brand dairies impact sometime it can Bert at.

Donna Bishop Michelle three hundred years fifty years five years
"michel" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"michel" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Hi, I'm Marion mcpartlin my guest. Today's Michel Camilo. He's one of the brightest and most exciting pianists on the scene today. His Welwyn approach to his music, technical brilliance, and exciting, let and rhythms make him a joy to hear. He really isn't. He smiles of storm to how are you? Michelle. Great. Thanks. That's good. Wow. Wow. You laughing, it's all Introduction, action. my God. Well, I mean, it's, it's pretty true. I think I've been listening to you for quite a while and everytime, hey, I hear you. I'm amazed at Where'd you get those chops? Well, well, class chops class jobs guy now. Well, you know, I studied classical piano for a long time down in my country in Santo Domingo in the Republic, and I was classical piano for a long time. And then that how you started, I mean, you started up classical piano and you didn't play any jazz? No, not really. I didn't play. I hear my my ankle blazin. We'll sometimes, but in reality, I didn't know what jazz was about until I heard are Tatum on the radio one day. That must really have given you surprise that was quite as a prize for sure shock. And is that actually got you listening to jazz hearing Tatum that was it because you know, as a pianist for me to hear all these control and beauty and absolute artistry was quite a shock. Well, tell me how you got started playing all digits. I mean where you like a child prodigy. Well, they used to call me job probably, yeah, because I started playing when I was four and a half an accordion, which was the instrument that wasn't house and at five. I started writing my own tools in my family. There's a lot of musicians. There's a little composers also, tuna rations. Does your father play an instrument they? He plays a little bit. He's the lesser when I totally in the family, but I have nine oncogenes and a lot of them play or seeing or write music in nine my God, you've got a band right there. That's right. Well, that's what happened to every family will get together. That's what will happen. The whole orchestra will come together. My family at some point said, you know, you can be musician, but, but you can be mission by Hobie by profession. Yeah, right. And. What I was doing was studying at the national conservatory and might each her. My position teacher there. So that I was going into the university study menacing and actually went and left the piano for two years on families pressure. Yeah. And then he said, no, I'm going to keep you tied to music, and then he offered me post in the National Symphony. When I was extreme and he said, you never learn to play percussion, but you'll on job, but I want to layer the pianist percussion instrument anyway. So he flew into the National Symphony Orchestra. Why? That's interesting because he probably really saved to from a career that you might not have wanted to be in because I mean, let's really want to be a doctor that non wanted to be a musician. Yes, obviously. And then two years after I went back into the conservatorium finished my career in and thanks to him. I'm still here doing music. Then you came over here and it went to Juilliard. That's right. I came here wanting to keep on studying and study that Julia and. Story manage college as well. And and then after that, I story, like I say, in the clubs and the real life when jam sessions, and it's right to make my way in there. And how about how about from from the album? I think the new once called Michelle Commissioner, Camilo. Yeah. Yeah. This is a ballot and I love writing Matt's, you know, I love to write all this core changes, and I know. 'cause you have time to to let them go by nice and easy. You know everybody can. This is what I like to your ballot. Playing get seem as if you kind of linga every card so that that's really get to hear it is almost like a meditation is inter in very introspective. That's true. Well, what's this one called is called nostalgia. Okay..

Michel Camilo Michelle Commissioner Tatum Santo Domingo Marion mcpartlin National Symphony Orchestra National Symphony Matt Julia two years one day
"michel" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"michel" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bulls i i'm jesse for the french director michel gone dri creates a certain kind of feeling in his movies eternal sunshine of the spotless mind the science of sleep the many many many music videos he's directed they all have it you could say it's like nostalgia but gondree has a better word for it sowed dodd it's portuguese he's going to tell you about it anyway as it turns out there is a song that introduced him to this feeling one was pearl barbara lee about actually he saw it he was watching tv in france on a saturday night it was one of those easy sning shows where you have these so what you called valued thayn french that's how we spend a lot of our saturday evenings of find the 70s the singer nino for rare was on screen performing the song lee sued and michelle was struck by the image of a topless woman and while that site is what grabbed his attention it's the song that sade with him all these years mostly so it's sweet memories it would have been ninova he was doing these sonal was just really julie fora that's as well really saga sitdown monboise gave us so henry's yang and uh lee daddy disowned ours beats about the known specific country which is in the south where life is beautiful but is going to end up in were on its nothing anyone can do but paul di later soon.

michel barbara lee france michelle henry director paul di
"michel" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:05 min | 4 years ago

"michel" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"This is the kaliningrad michel mitag seven everything and then the la dan handling no two jason brooks going paid on oh god may bradley my talk seven ones this here that i thought i heard satan the most lurks cali lindstrom i'm bradley trainer apparently there's a theory but the weekend is a fake worshiper now speaking of other bizarre stories let us focus on a few about mariah carey or should i say murai's scary or mariah carey me around which will beginning to i this is either her year or not her year at all the let's of later today in options has really only to athens fee there is were is nahhas but here's is she is continuing to try to reinvent herself and so she's working in cahoots with stars the cable network on a drama about her early life it's going to be written by hi nina men it will be set in 1968 awoke chronicle the rise of an ambitious biracial 16yearold new york city who go on to become the biggestselling female music artist of all time after surviving a difficult upbringing so she's involved in this sh it also her i wanna say like a lot of people on her team are also in involved in the her manager stella baloch's na na of say that name baloch schnitt cough blocks and a cough this is apparently her manager yeah have you you need to watch that out but reality serious because this woman as a hot mess and i cannot rodling i cannot believe that mariah i i believe that most of the crowd that's going on with her career right now can be tied back to still or whatever name is watchlist caller stella anyway she's involved in this show i the the one of the writers of ugly betty an john chang from horrible bosses also involved and this is gonna apparently kind of fictional chronicle her upbringing so okay this flies i'm totally watching this especially if she has cameos in it but there's another show that they're tossing her around as a candidate for a cameo an and that is the show empire okay i don't wanna trump neither do i but it seems logical that she would be involved in this.

kaliningrad michel mitag cable network stella baloch cough john chang jason brooks bradley mariah carey murai new york