35 Burst results for "Michel"

"michel" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

07:40 min | Last week

"michel" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"You adopt this attitude, you are back into the situation of a scientist who tries to orient himself or herself into a completely unknown landscape. So when the problem of the beginning of quantum mechanics is that scientists, especially physicists, had a prejudice about what they were exploring. But they saw that this prejudice namely that the world is made of particles, having trajectories and intrinsic properties that are modified across time according to a certain low of nature and so on. All of these prejudice could not be maintained against the in the case of micro physics. So they had to withdraw from that. And this withdrawal was already there at the very beginning of quantum mechanics when, for instance, when Heisenberg in 1925 said, I can not maintain the idea of a trajectory of an electron across spacetime, namely around nucleus of the atom. And I have to come back to observables. And when he did that, he suddenly completely reformulated quantum mechanics in terms of discrete values that could be directly observed. What were these values? They were just the frequencies of a certain spectrum and electromagnetic spectrum. So according to a Heisenberg, it was necessary to do this move in order to find the next step of physics, namely the what he calls what he called for the first time quantum mechanics at that time. Then there was discussion. For instance, Schrodinger reformulated the same theory in terms of the famous wave mechanics. And according to Schrodinger, at that time, the wave function was describing a real wave out there. And so I apparently we came back from the very reflective attitude of Heisenberg to referential and realistic attitude of Freddie. But then again, trading a realized that the wave function could not be said to describe railway out there, that it was in the 1950s he even said that it could be used only as a complex tool to calculate probabilities, and there was a sort of cyclic movement in the interpretation of quantum mechanics in which from time to time people tried to rebuild a picture of the world out of quantum mechanics and from time to time people withdrew from any picture of the world and say, okay, I can not draw a picture. And I just I can just bet about what will be the reaction of what I am exploring to the type of actions I am doing it. And then you have people like Chris folks who try to over speculate in order to find the reason for which we can not represent a world independently of us, and we can only bet about the reaction of what we are exploring to our actions. And he said, the reason might be that the world is so packed that we can not disentangle ourselves from it. And therefore, we can not get a picture as if it were completely external to us. So this attitude withdrawing to the elementary actions and movements of our minds in a laboratory is maybe the indirect revelation of our situation of extreme implication and entanglement with the world we are trying to explore. So there is something that can be grown from that. And which is not only the flesh, you can do a sort of inflation of speculation out of the necessity of deflation in order to understand quantum mechanics. Now your question Paul is hard and it's very important and I don't have a good answer because as much as I profess all of these when it comes to how does that change what I actually do, I still don't know and it's really hard to put in terms of a protocol as in as in a method section of a paper. But what it does is kind of creates a strange feeling of ignorance, a new feeling of ignorance, it refreshing, but it's also daunting a little bit because it's like there are these big what ifs that suddenly appear to my life. What if physics is nested in biology? It's like, oh, I always thought it was the other way around, but now I'm starting to entertain this seriously. And that just turns everything upside down. That with respect to biology, but then when it comes to mind or consciousness, well, we neuroscientists often ask how does the brain generate or produce consciousness? But then I started asking whether it does. But this is a taboo question. And so then I started looking for people with whom I can talk about those things within the scientific and philosophical community. And that then leads me to a treasure hunt that leads me into sort of archeology of concepts. If I really want to take this seriously and nest physics in biology and even question that the brain is not producing consciousness as it was some sort of smoke or epiphenomenon of a machine, then I need some theoretical guidelines and so once I was looking for them, I usually I usually don't find them in the current digital. So one needs to go to dead people often if one is lucky when comes across somebody like Michel and I every now and then ask him for a kind of private session and so on and then I realized that having started as a theoretical physicist and then jumped into the waters of experimental and computational neurobiology, I find myself again being a kind of theoretical biologist. But not a theoretical biology since in terms of simulating a differential differential equations to model a phenomena, which is great. But trying to ask, well, what are the foundations of this new house? Because it's this realization. It's not about refurnishing the living room or a rearranging the kitchen. It's.

Heisenberg Freddie Chris Paul Michel
"michel" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

08:00 min | Last week

"michel" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"Also today, I feel like going cycling. And I just need to be drafting behind him because he's just so knowledgeable about those things. Maybe I'll just rephrase what Michel said. In my own way of putting it. So to me, the blind spot, well, it's like a fractal that there's like a fractal structure of blind spots. There are many Michel mentioned many. But to me, the main one is lift experience. And that's very relevant to neuroscience. And so it's that very simple idea that we don't see the very thing that allows us to see. And but this is not very popular, right? Because to begin with as Michelle just said, it's not new. So where's the novelty? The editor may ask, but also it's somewhat obvious, although non trivial. And it's hidden in plain sight. So it has all these qualities of something that we would systematically miss. The problem that I see with it is that, well, we may not see it, but if we choose to ignore it or deny it, the moment we're confronted with it, then it's a whole different problem. And this has happened. We can talk about this has to do with the foundations of science and it has happened. In quantum mechanics and in Gödel's theorem and also today in consciousness studies, so it's like they're replicas of these of these awareness that there's something very fundamental that we are taking for granted and systematically missing. And well, I think our effort is to just say it again. Just say again that there's something upon which everything is based and that not only we forget about it, that we even try to explain it away. So it's a very strange situation to talk about the blind spot because of what we do with it. And let me just add one more thing. We can talk about the blind spot with respect to the scientific worldview. I'm going to already start putting the isn'ts out. But it's even worse within the mechanistic reductionist materialist doctrine because other approaches to science and philosophy may be more sympathetic to acknowledging that there is a blind spot even if we fail to the justice to it as Michelle was saying. So since you mentioned neuroscience in this podcast is focused a lot on neuroscience, learning more about the blind spot. One notion is that as scientists, we go on about our business completely unaware of this fact, but then I also have a, then I have to question my own history and how I, you know, my intellectual thoughts have developed. And another way to approach it is to say, well, like you said, Alex, it's obvious. And that it's implicit. And assumed by many scientists, whatever field of study they're in, whether they explicitly acknowledge it or not. And so you talked about the novelty and I don't know if you've had editors comment on this. It sounds like maybe you have with manuscripts. Where's the novelty? But how much of it do you think is sort of implicit and not so much explained away, but just implicit as if it's background knowledge for all of us, do you think, in the world of researchers? And how much we're ignorant of it, or the field is ignorant of it. Well, the way I like to put it, and I don't want to start saying we should be doing the issue. We're doing this wrong. But at least we do a kind of a magic trick, slide of hand. I like to put it in this way. Neuroscience is usually about having two subjects starting with two subjects and ending ending very quickly with one object. So it's a very strange trick. Let's say, myself and a mouse, myself and the human subject, I'm studying. We are both living minded organisms. But very quickly, the animal is treated as an object that I'll study and scientists pretend he or she is not there. So in a way, we're trained to do that. I call it the yoga of objectivity. We're very, very precise sorts. Virtually all our training is to be able to excel at doing that. But here we are. There's a moment on where you realize, especially in the life and mind science, as you realize that perhaps we're missing something really fundamental. So there's a process of un training. And learning maybe, and that's why I started to draw on phenomenology as perhaps Michelle would explain later because he really knows phenomenology and really a beginner student of it. But I realized that there's this thing missing and so how can we bring it back and it's a whole new process of learning another job and you could say not of objectivity but of subjectivity, but of course that easily falls into dualities, the objective, the subjective, the isms, and then because neuroscientists at least we need to publish paper write brands and so on. And there's no time for this anymore. So we're back to square one. But everybody would agree that unless we unless we really think that animals and ourselves are zombie machines that we're dealing with subjects, nevertheless, we all know how to study them scientifically as if they weren't subjects. And so there's kind of an intersubjectivity blind spot there as well. Michelle, when you began speaking, you used the word crucial. That crucial is a lot of what is interesting to me. Why, this is a huge question. Why is it crucial? It's because ignoring the blind spots or just saying that it will be reduced in the next future is generating a lot of difficulties and paradoxes that are literally impossible to solve in the framework, which is put by this ignorance. And I can just read you a sentence by helping Schrodinger in at the end of his book and nature and the Greeks in which he put the problem very nicely. He said, okay, there is a feature less clearly and openly displayed, but of equally fundamental importance. It is this science in its attempt to describe and understand nature simplifies this very difficult problem. The scientists subconsciously almost inadvertently simplified his problem of understanding nature by disregarding or cutting out the of the picture to be constructed, himself, his own personality, namely the subject of cognizance. Inadvertently, so it here again, it's the blind spot because it's inadvertently. The thinker steps back into the role of an external observer. This facilitates the task very much, but it leaves gaps enormous lack of leads to paradoxes and enemies whenever unaware of this initial renunciation, one tries to find one set in the picture or to put oneself one's own thinking and sensing mind back into the picture. So you see that Schrodinger is alluding to paradoxes. And the principle he.

Michel Michelle Gödel Alex un
"michel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:08 min | Last month

"michel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Whereas thereby failing and just try to just get that scale because with the amount of people that we've had like signing up on the wait list, we just want to be ready once we start announcing cloud in GA. So there are a lot of broken windows, and now it's just a matter of fixing them. Where are the failures that occur that you're looking to make more reliable? So sometime we have pods that get stuck. So figuring out what is the root cause fixing the root cause. It's not a wrong scale. In general, it's just some very minor things on maybe tuning Kubernetes tuning temporal tuning our workflow, but these are very these are things that don't appear a lot. They just appear from time to time and we're just trying to figure out, okay, what is the recruitment fixing in focus? But beside that, the system is pretty much is pretty much really just we want our users who have the best experience we don't want them to have like stuck jobs or things like that. And another thing we're doing is just building the monitoring stack on top of it. So that we know when job gets. If job gets stuck, if data is not flowing fast enough so that we can adjust all the network policies and all of that. When you think about the hardest parts of scaling the company outside of just raw engineering problems, like what we've discussed with the cloud system, give me a sense of what's difficult about scaling a company when you've gone from, I don't know how many people you had last time we spoke probably like 20 or something. But I think it was early last year in 2021. So we're probably like 6 or 7 6 or 7 people. So now you have like a hundred, right? No, we're about 50 people. Yeah. 50. Okay. Yeah, so how have you changed organizationally over that period of time? Yeah. So first of all, because also we're remote company, there are lots of things that we need to make sure we also put in.

GA
"michel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:52 min | Last month

"michel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

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"michel" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

06:36 min | 3 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Code Story

"Interviews with tech visionaries. Who share in the critical minds of what it takes to change an industry and build and lead a team that has your back. I'm your host, Noah lab part. Today helped shale truco built data integration from modern data teams. Fully utilizing open-source. All this and more on code story. Michel trico has been in the database for the past 15 years. He really enjoys gathering information and gaining insight from it. As a kid, he would gather data and analog ways, grouping together movies or Internet articles and categories. And extracting information from it. Outside of tech, he's married with two kids and loves a nice afternoon in the backyard, cooking barbecue. He does both fire cooking and smoking, though he admits that he has not smoked a brisket yet, because he doesn't want to get up in the middle of the night and check the temperature. In his prior role, Michel's director of engineering ahead of integration at live ramp. Where he and his team were managing thousands of connectors, responsible for moving massive amounts of data every day. His big realization was that every company needs to have a way to move data. And to do it in a dead simple way. This is the creation story of air bite. As a company, you have data in many, many different places, because you're using a ton of SaaS application application databases you have data in files, spreadsheets, et cetera. What we allow you to do is just get this data across all these different silos of data and centralize it into a warehouse. Pretty simple. The reason is, in general, you want to have a full view of customers full view of this data across all these different services. And you want to do that from your warehouse. One thing that we're doing is we have an open-source approach to building all these data connectors. And the reason is no competence the same, every company is using different tools. You have a long tail of tools that you need to be able to address and get data from. And here what we've done is really build tools and leverage for our community to actually interact with the platform, build additional connector, contribute to the project and just very, very quickly grow a long tail of data connector to bring data from any place to anywhere. To the big focus on warehouse, but tomorrow, it might also be sending it to APIs, data queue, et cetera, et cetera. I was direct talking during and head up integration of the company called live room for web managing thousands of different connectors, scaling them moving hundreds and hundreds of terabytes of data every day. And what you realize coming out of company that deals with a lot of data is that now every single company needs to have data, whether you are most quitting edge company or if you are just a moment workshop. So how do you make that product symbol? That's what we've been doing and just making a simple product to move data. So tell me about the MVP. So the first product you said you've been doing this for 15 years. So maybe it's 15 years ago or maybe it's when it started to come into its own as air by, but tell me about that first product you built, how long did it take you to build? And what sort of tools did you use to bring it to life? So we actually started by January 2020. So that's when we restart the company. And every setup you start with a problem space. Well, it's one place where you have some expertise. You've sold a problem in the past. And what is the new type of solution that you can bring into the market and to your customers? We went for a few iterations. I won't go through all of them because we had many, many interactions on what should be a solution. And it's really in July 2020 that we settled on one product, but also the approach, which is doing it open-source. At that point, the goal was very simple. We have, let's give ourselves three months to build it to raise it open-source. So we released it and around end of end of September October. And let's advertise that communities of developers communities of data engineers communities of ISIS. And see what kind of traction you get on the project. From the get go, we started to have people using a byte. So as to be clear, it wasn't. So not the most stable, but who are getting extremely extremely valuable feedback. Over 2021, the usage just went through the roof, they were being used by 16,000 companies. So that was a very intense year. Learn from MVP and then just learning from the community learning from our users. Was the goal to open-source it so that the community could help you build it. It's more than that is just every single day company might be adding a new silo update. It is not possible for a cross for solution to address that long day. So at that point, when you're thinking about data integration, you have two dimensions and when you need to be looking at it. The first one is, yes, you have a technical solution, which is making sure that you have good connector that you have good QA that you have resilient system that you can scale with the amount of data, but you also have a human aspect because first of all, you have a massive amount of places where you can have data, but also every single connector is going to break one day on those hours. Because you're putting data from a system that you don't control. So at that point, building can be considered to be easy, but maintenance is very, very hard. So if it's not open-source, then it's up to the company to just solve every single program. And in general, what company do is they just address the most used connectors and then they stop and they just do that. And if you want one of their customers, then you need to reveal a similar solution on the side. With your own connectors. That's wasted effort with the time from people and at that point just can we create a central repository where you have access to all this kind of goal. There are non opinion natives. So they just focus on pulling as much data as possible and let you filter out what you don't want later on. That's why open-source is key for that. Everybody needs to run this connector. Instead.

Michel trico Michel
 Cooper Kupp's 2 TD catches carry Rams past Seahawks 20-10

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

Cooper Kupp's 2 TD catches carry Rams past Seahawks 20-10

"The the rams rams are are in in a a virtual virtual tie tie with with the the cardinals cardinals for for the the NFC NFC west west lead lead after after Los Los Angeles Angeles knocked knocked off off the the Seahawks Seahawks twenty twenty ten ten Cooper Cooper Kupp Kupp grabbed grabbed a a pair pair of of second second half half touchdown touchdown passes passes for for Matthew Matthew Stafford Stafford Cup Cup as as a a team team record record one one hundred hundred twenty twenty receptions receptions this this season season after after catching catching nine nine more more for for one one hundred hundred thirty thirty six six yards yards in in the the rams rams third third straight straight win win Stafford Stafford passed passed for for two two hundred hundred forty forty four four yards yards and and Sony Sony Michel Michel rushed rushed for for ninety ninety two two is is L. L. A. A. move move to to tenant tenant for for the the five five nine nine Seahawks Seahawks will will post post a a losing losing season season for for the the first first time time in in ten ten years years I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie the the rams rams are are in in a a virtual virtual tie tie with with the the cardinals cardinals for for the the NFC NFC west west lead lead after after Los Los Angeles Angeles knocked knocked off off the the Seahawks Seahawks twenty twenty ten ten Cooper Cooper Kupp Kupp grabbed grabbed a a pair pair of of second second half half touchdown touchdown passes passes for for Matthew Matthew Stafford Stafford Cup Cup as as a a team team record record one one hundred hundred twenty twenty receptions receptions this this season season after after catching catching nine nine more more for for one one hundred hundred thirty thirty six six yards yards in in the the rams rams third third straight straight win win Stafford Stafford passed passed for for two two hundred hundred forty forty four four yards yards and and Sony Sony Michel Michel rushed rushed for for ninety ninety two two is is L. L. A. A. move move to to tenant tenant for for the the

Rams Seahawks Los Los Angeles Angeles Cooper Cooper Kupp Cardinals Matthew Matthew Stafford Staff Stafford Stafford Sony Sony Michel Michel NFC L. L. A. A. Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Seahawks Seahawks
Biogen cuts the price tag on its Alzheimer's drug in half

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Biogen cuts the price tag on its Alzheimer's drug in half

"Biogen Biogen is is cutting cutting the the price price of of its its Alzheimer's Alzheimer's drug drug in in half half beginning beginning next next month month the the drug drug makers makers says says the the annual annual cost cost for for a a person person of of average average weight weight will will be be about about twenty twenty eight eight thousand thousand two two hundred hundred dollars dollars the the actual actual amount amount people people will will pay pay will will depend depend on on insurance insurance coverage coverage and and other other factors factors Biogen Biogen CEO CEO Michel Michel Vounatsos Vounatsos says says too too many many patients patients were were not not being being offered offered the the drug drug due due to to what what he he calls calls financial financial considerations considerations as as a a result result he he says says the the disease disease was was reaching reaching a a point point where where edge edge you you helm helm could could no no longer longer help help the the drug drug had had been been criticized criticized for for costing costing up up to to fifty fifty six six thousand thousand dollars dollars a a year year I'm I'm Mike Mike Hampton Hampton

Biogen Biogen Alzheimer's Alzheimer's Drug Ceo Ceo Michel Michel Vounatso Mike Mike Hampton Hampton
LA Rams snap 3-game skid, roll over Jacksonville 37-7

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 6 months ago

LA Rams snap 3-game skid, roll over Jacksonville 37-7

"Matthew Matthew Stafford Stafford threw threw three three touchdown touchdown passes passes in in the the rams rams rolled rolled over over the the Jaguars Jaguars thirty thirty seven seven to to seven seven Stafford Stafford connected connected on on scoring scoring strikes strikes to to Cooper Cooper Kupp Kupp van van Jefferson Jefferson and and Odell Odell Beckham Beckham junior junior the the rams rams had had lost lost their their previous previous three three games games so so wide wide receiver receiver Cup Cup was was happy happy to to see see his his team team back back in in the the win win column column nothing nothing like like a a W. W. doesn't doesn't matter matter mmhm mmhm you you know know whether whether you're you're coming coming off off of of a a you you know know a a little little bit bit of of skill skill like like we we have have been been or or your your own own role role I I mean mean just just anytime anytime you you get get a a W. W. is is a a big big thing thing in in this this league league Sony Sony Michel Michel ran ran for for a a hundred hundred twenty twenty one one yards yards and and a a score score for for them them that that way way and and for for rams rams the the jags jags have have lost lost four four straight straight dropping dropping to to two two in in ten ten on on the the season season mark mark Myers Myers Inglewood Inglewood California California

Rams Matthew Matthew Stafford Staff Jaguars W. W. Stafford Stafford Cooper Cooper Van Van Jefferson Jefferson Odell Odell Beckham Beckham Sony Sony Michel Michel Jags Mark Mark Myers Inglewood California
Update on the latest sports

AP News Radio

02:00 min | 6 months ago

Update on the latest sports

"AP AP sports sports five five a a nearly nearly thirty thirty year year record record went went down down to to the the NBA NBA the the largest largest margin margin of of victory victory the the Memphis Memphis Grizzlies Grizzlies took took apart apart the the Oklahoma Oklahoma City City thunder thunder one one fifty fifty two two seventy seventy nine nine of of seventy seventy three three point point victory victory for for the the griz griz records records are are meant meant to to be be broken broken all all those those things things that that people people say say so so what what motivates motivates us us every every single single day day is is about about just just playing playing our our best best basketball basketball and and I I think think over over the the last last three three games games we've we've done done a a lot lot better better job job with with that that Memphis Memphis coach coach Taylor Taylor Jenkins Jenkins whose whose team team led led by by as as many many as as seventy seventy eight eight jaren jaren Jackson Jackson junior junior led led the the scoring scoring for for the the griz griz with with twenty twenty seven seven the the Chicago Chicago Bulls Bulls blew blew a a twenty twenty one one point point lead lead regrouped regrouped to to beat beat the the New New York York six six one one ninety ninety one one fifteen fifteen the the Martin Martin Rosen Rosen rose rose up up in in the the fourth fourth quarter quarter eighteen eighteen of of his his team team high high thirty thirty four four is is fine fine when when we we go go out out there there compete compete you you know know we we we we we we face face adversity adversity at at times times and and not not feel feel good good when when we we come come out out come come out out on on top top Milwaukee Milwaukee had had its its eight eight game game winning winning streak streak ended ended in in Toronto Toronto the the raptors raptors beat beat the the box box ninety ninety seven seven ninety ninety three three the the box box did did not not play play leading leading scorer scorer got got a a son son of of a a couple couple who who set set out out with with a a calf calf injury injury lebron lebron James James has has been been cleared cleared to to play play again again after after missing missing one one game game out out of of the the NBA's NBA's health health and and safety safety protocol protocol NFL NFL Tampa's Tampa's Antonio Antonio brown brown one one of of three three players players suspended suspended for for three three games games for for violating violating covert covert nineteen nineteen protocol protocol Thursday Thursday night night football football Dallas Dallas got got back back on on the the winning winning track track after after its its thanksgiving thanksgiving day day loss loss they they had had their their way way with with New New Orleans Orleans twenty twenty seven seven to to seventeen seventeen thousand thousand lost lost three three of of its its previous previous four four games games was was playing playing without without head head coach coach Mike Mike McCarthy McCarthy was was out out under under covert covert protocol protocol but but dak dak Prescott Prescott and and company company still still prevailed prevailed Prescott Prescott threw threw a a touchdown touchdown pass pass the the Michel Michel Galopin Galopin Tony Tony Padron Padron fifty fifty yards yards for for another another TD TD call call us us walk walk and and scored scored on on a a twenty twenty nine nine yard yard interception interception return return one one of of four four picks picks for for the the cowboys cowboys defense defense off off taste taste in in hell hell making making his his first first start start of of the the year year for for the the saints saints I'm I'm John John Merriam Merriam at at HL HL forty forty two two save save died died for for goalie goalie Jeremy Jeremy swim swim and and pave pave the the way way for for Boston's Boston's two two nothing nothing win win over over Nashville Nashville it's it's fun fun to to watch watch guys guys are are taking taking pride pride the the defensive defensive zone zone and and also also any any offenses offenses on on I I was was had had the the best best seat seat in in the the house house watching watching him him work work you you know know play play together together a a lot lot of of talk talk out out on on the the ice ice college college football football coach coach Bronco Bronco Mendenhall Mendenhall stepping stepping down down in in Virginia Virginia check check Freeman Freeman AP AP sports sports

NBA Ap Ap Memphis Memphis Grizzlies Oklahoma Oklahoma City City Th Taylor Taylor Jenkins Jenkins Jaren Jaren Jackson Jackson Chicago Chicago Bulls New New York York Martin Martin Rosen Rosen Memphis Times Times Basketball Raptors Lebron Lebron James James Milwaukee Grizzlies Antonio Antonio Brown Brown Toronto New New Orleans Orleans Tampa
"michel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:06 min | 9 months ago

"michel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Michel Martin. As the new school year gets underway, you've probably heard a lot of discussion. Maybe some of it quite heated about how to return to end Persons school while the Covid pandemic continues, But studies taken over the summer show that some parents are questioning whether to return at all. July survey taken by the Rand Corporation, a nonprofit research organization, for example, showed that black and Hispanic parents those were the terms the researchers used were more hesitant about sending their kids to end person schooling than wait and Asian parents. But our next guest says that is not just because of covid and that educators should consider the reasons why some parents want some alternative learning options. Apart from the health concerns Our guest is ivory. Tolson. He is a professor at Howard University. A former White House adviser on Hbcu s. He has now undertaken a new role with the ACP as director of education, innovation and research. Professor Tolson. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us once again. Yeah. Thank you for having me. First Let me just get your reaction to the RAM study If the study was taken in July of 2021, it said that 82% of black and 83% of Hispanic parents plan to send their Children to school in person and fall. 2021. That's compared to 94% of white and 88% of Asian parents. And that showed a narrowing of a gap since an earlier survey in May But still a substantial one. So I'm wondering what's your reaction to that is? Yeah, It's not surprising, and it's mostly not surprisingly, because of some of the people who have talked to including school leaders who have made that observation And it's not just about the black versus a white students are black and Hispanic versus white students, but its students with disabilities students Know who need special support at school students who were most often being suspended and there is a relationship between a lot of those characteristics and race. But if we really drill down into the race, their specific populations who seem to be most hesitant. And you think that it's not just the covid pandemic protocols? That is the driver here of that's the reluctance to go back to school. Could you talk a little bit more about that? I mean, do you think that there's something in the school environment itself Apart from the health protocols? Yes. That is driving this. That perhaps is not showing up in these surveys. Yes, I think we need to look a lot deeper at the issue and that those numbers because when we think about the students who weren't being served as well in school to begin with, they were largely black and brown students when we look at things like suspensions when we look at the distance from the neighborhoods to the school that you're going to When you're looking at the jobs, the typical jobs that parents had that made it more difficult for them to participate in different things. These students were disproportionately black. And so when we think about the difference in the experience they had during virtual learning, there are some ways in which they're learning was accommodated better. There's some lessons that we could learn from this experience. I don't think we are I think we look at the surface too much. We're looking at strictly the covert protocols by we need to really understand what was the experience of these students before they went into virtual learning and the experiences that they had during virtual learning. As I want to hear more about your new role at the ACP P and at the ACP, as I think many people know is one of the premier civil rights organizations in the country. More than a century old. It is a grassroots organization. What's the goal of this group that you're standing up? I mean, what's the plan for it? Yes, well, I'll be the director of education, innovation and research and our goal is to make sure that every student Has accessible quality education. Regardless of their background. We know that black students are more likely to be in schools that have fewer resources. High school students are more likely to be in schools that Don't have a full slate of math and science classes that they need for college. They are subject to more punitive discipline. And so the division that I'm gonna be over will work to fix these issues by creating the types of platforms and working with our local chapters, creating the kind of information systems that they need. In order to advance equitable education for all, But when we let you go, is there a particular issue that you think that parents should be attentive to as their Children return to school this fall? If they are concerned about the school environment, and for perhaps in a manner that they are not able to fully articulate, you know. What do you recommend that parents focus on? Pay attention to how students are disciplined at the school. Pay attention to the experiences that your child has when they walk through the building. There are some schools that give it right. They have music playing. They have posters up. They have somebody at the door smiling at them. But there's other schools. As soon as this child walks through the door, they're passing by me. Security officers. Metal detectors being shook down, also asked a lot of questions of your school administrators and pointed questions about how black students are being treated at the school. And if there are any disparities of there are higher level classes that don't have enough black students and it challenged schools to explain that and to present the plan that they have to make that right. That was ivory Tolson. He's a professor at Howard University. He's the former executive director of the White House Initiative on HBC. Using the Obama administration. He is now the new director of education, innovation and research. At the ACP. Professor Tolson. Thank you so much for joining us. I do hope you'll keep in touch and keep us abreast of your work. Thank you. Thank you so much for having me always a pleasure. We're going to stay in back to school mode a bit longer and talked to two people in Maryland who helped to make a significant change in the largest school system in the state..

Michel Martin Maryland Rand Corporation July of 2021 ivory Tolson 94% 82% 88% two people May 83% July Tolson ACP White House ivory ACP P one First More than a century
Afghanistan Withdrawal: Could Chaos Have Been Avoided?

Between The Lines

02:03 min | 9 months ago

Afghanistan Withdrawal: Could Chaos Have Been Avoided?

"A follow up to our show with john measham last week now in the seven years of presenting these program on radio national of not received such enthusiastically positive feedback from listeners. As id to last week's episode when professor michel defended the us withdrawal from afghanistan. Well that many of you were persuaded by me. Shamas argument you still wanted whether the baden administrations evacuation plans could have been handled a lot. Better after all the us withdrawal. Well it's been widely seen as a humiliation and embarrassment a betrayal and a disaster. So was there a way to avoid a messy exit from afghanistan. It's a good question which put to join me shama. This week tom. My view is that there was no way to avoid a messy exit. It didn't matter whether donald trump was in charge or dwight eisenhower. Had come back from the dead and been put in charge. It just wouldn't have mattered. It would have been messy. Under any circumstances hell may explain why the key starting point is to recognize that. We're talking about moving. Huge numbers of people out of afghanistan very quickly We moved as it is a one hundred twenty two thousand people in fifteen days and their estimates that there were another six hundred thousand afghanis who wanted to get out and most of them had worked with us in one capacity or another so. We're talking about huge numbers. Now whenever you move huge numbers quickly you have to do. Two things. one is extensive. Planning it has to be extensive on the ground planning and number two at the first sign that there's real trouble at the first sign that the afghan army is collapsing. You have to head for the exits. Those are two necessary conditions so the argument goes to make this work

John Measham Shamas Baden Administrations Afghanistan Michel Dwight Eisenhower Donald Trump United States TOM Afghan Army
Thousands Face Weeks Without Power in Ida's Aftermath

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 9 months ago

Thousands Face Weeks Without Power in Ida's Aftermath

"Even before hurricane Isaac hit officials in Louisiana told residents they all needed to be first responders and take care of one another that's just what Vincent a cello and Evan Michel doing checking on neighbors by boat with roads flooded the pair been going house to house in Lafayette the shell driving is photo cello live on Facebook people sending them addresses the pair checking how those who stayed behind and did not evacuate or doing I've been loved going everybody's all the people give me address today I heard from people everybody's worried about job though coming Jekyll yellow carrying them that even making rescues and I'll officials say more than six hundred and seventy people in Louisiana have been rescued in boats helicopters and high water trucks meanwhile the governor's office described the damage to the power grid as catastrophic and power officials say it could be weeks before electricity is restored in some spots all of New Orleans and hundreds of thousands of other residents in parts of the state have been left in the dark I'm Julie Walker

Hurricane Isaac Evan Michel Louisiana Vincent Lafayette Facebook New Orleans Julie Walker
"michel" Discussed on Strong Opinion Sports

Strong Opinion Sports

04:55 min | 9 months ago

"michel" Discussed on Strong Opinion Sports

"And when you have a plethora of players on abundance and too many of something, trade in one of them away, get something back in return, it makes total sense to me. And the reason why the rams got Sony Michelle for so cheap is because he's never had an amazing breakout year. All he's really ever shown is potential. To show, he could be great if only this happened. And that happened. And the rams are banking on the fact that they can get everything out of him that they can help him reach his potential in LA. I'd love to see that that'd be awesome, but I think this is a great trade for both sides. The Patriots got something in return for Sony Michelle, rather than cutting running back getting nothing back. And the rams got a running back who hopefully can be a key focal point helping them achieve their goal of winning a Super Bowl. Now, one other thought is remember the Patriots drafted Sony Michelle back in 2018. Was that a waste? That's the other kind of question that comes up in this, and what you call it. In this narrative here. And so yes, probably the Patriots should have drafted running back Nick Chubb rather than sending the show. Remember, Nick Chubb got drafted like three or four picks later by the Cleveland Browns. And Nick Chubb has been much, much better throughout the NFL throughout the NFL process. But here's the thing. Sony Michelle helped the Patriots win a Super Bowl. And so it's kind of like, oh, come on. You can be mad, but he did contribute to them winning a Super Bowl. And things could have been far worse. Yes, was he hurt too often? Did he underachieve absolutely? But he also didn't completely fail. He wasn't an absolute bust. And I think any patriots fans who were complaining about, oh, we traded him away. We didn't get enough for him. It's like, well, you want a Super Bowl. Be grateful, be happy, move on. You got a guy who contributed. And you got something back for him in return rather than cutting him, which if you try to trade away Nikhil Harry, you may not get anything in return. So the narrative that Sony Michel was a wasted pick by the Patriots. Was it not the best pick? Absolutely. Was it a wasted pick? It wasn't that either. Now, let's shift to Denver because the Denver Broncos have named teddy Bridgewater. They're starting quarterback. And I am sweating bullets. It's really hot in here. It's kind of weird. We're in the middle of the city. I'm pretty sure my neighbors can hear me underneath me. And it's hot. It's basically outside. There's no AC in this room. And there's no like none other windows are sealed. So I can see through a lane right outside and it's just hot, it's pouring in like crazy. Anyway, I want to shift to Denver because the Denver Broncos have named teddy Bridgewater, their starting quarterback. He's won the job over the starting quarterback they had last year drew lock. And I got two minds about this. On one hand, it's kind of weird, I go, um, the quarterback battle was closer than I thought it would have been..

Nick Chubb Patriots rams Michelle Sony Super Bowl NFL teddy Bridgewater Nikhil Harry Cleveland Browns Sony Michel LA Denver Broncos Denver
Interview With Actress, Screen Writer, Kimm Mauceri

Rebecca Sounds Reveille

01:47 min | 11 months ago

Interview With Actress, Screen Writer, Kimm Mauceri

"With me today. I have kim mysterious. Welcome to the show. I i am doing fantastic. And i'm so excited to have you here because you have such a palette of talents and so many people just wish that they had just a missile of the things that you're able to do. Let me first start out asking you. How did you get started. Because i know around six years old. There were some things that you were doing in the industry that were pretty pretty amazing now got started because i like walking along. The old shows you now like i. Will we see and bewitched and things like that. In when i was about six years old. You know. I was watching bewitched. And you know the munsters in Craw than all that stuff you know and and i was just just really connected with the facial expressions and just all i love lucy with the is and dissolve the league choices that he made that in. I just started acting up really early and just started entertaining. Twenty four hours a day. You know at my own family. It just became army so That's pretty much how i started acting just been just felt like it. Was you know like. I was born with it. I i just i. i don't know what to say really. I just enjoy it. I you know. I do it with my family now and i just like emma walking. You know t- michel

Lucy Emma Michel
Fireworks Explosion in LA Caused by 'Human Error,' LAPD Chief Says

Sean Hannity

00:35 sec | 11 months ago

Fireworks Explosion in LA Caused by 'Human Error,' LAPD Chief Says

"Police say human error led to that big fireworks explosion in Los Angeles last month. Los Angeles police chief Michel more with the update Monday on that explosion which injured 17 people, when all the illegal explosives and countercharges replacing the TCD NRT calculated. The total weight was just over £42 of net explosive weight. LAPD Bomb squad estimation Total £16.5. That's a pretty big difference in the subsequent explosion was also pretty big rocking a south L a neighborhood, The chief says five members of the department bomb squad have been removed from field duties as the investigation continues. Boxes. John

Chief Michel Los Angeles Lapd John
Nostradamus: Seer or Schemer?

Conspiracy Theories

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Nostradamus: Seer or Schemer?

"The summer of fifteen fifty nine king henry. The second of france was killed in a tragic accident. Perez was thrown into utter chaos. The king had met his fate during a jousting tournament. Nobles lance pierced his helmet leaving a festering wound. Ten analyzing days later. The king passed away whispers spread throughout the french court. Allegedly the king's death had been prophesied by a themed. Seer michel nostradamus. A few years earlier. He'd written quote. The young shall overcome the old on marshall field in single combat in a golden cage. His eyes will be put out to into one then to guy a cruel death. The evidence seemed undeniable even as the lavish funeral arrangements were made for henry. The name on everyone's lips was nostradamus but secretly someone in france had been buying up copies of nostra dome. Mrs updated book of prophecies once every copy was accounted for. They were piled together and burned. The person behind this covert campaign wasn't one of the sears enemies or competitors was nostradamus himself after successfully predicting king. Henry's death he decided. This edition of his prophecies had to be destroyed because the rest of them were shamefully wrong.

Nobles Lance French Court Seer Michel Nostradamus King Henry France Perez Marshall Henry
"michel" Discussed on The Collected Podcast

The Collected Podcast

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"michel" Discussed on The Collected Podcast

"You know making a whole bunch of noise because those are so loud and pedaling ahead of us. And i told my husband. I said i feel like god's clinging to start a blog and we actually both shrugged in laughed and said no that's a really silly idea But it was one of those things that i just couldn't shake that's another thing that sort of true. Sometimes when god's calling you into something is that you just cannot shake the idea. And eventually i said now this is. This really does seem to be something. God's calling me to do not again not thinking it's gonna lead to a book. It's going to lead to a career in writing. It was just that first step of starting a blog keeping our story paint attention So i guess you know. Let's kind of a long answer but those are some of the episodes of the story. Yeah that's great. So what about this specific. What is the message of the book and a little bit about the background. Yeah so we've lived in toronto for ten years and this specific book. I think really is a book that has grown out of my experience here of living in a city where faith is not to be taken for granted. I mean it's just not the obvious experience of the person living in toronto. I would say that my neighbors and The the parents that. I see in carpool in the pickup line at school. When we used to up our kids you know a very sort of They puzzle over what the experience of faith is and they don't really understand it a lot of them. So i'm always trying to find ways to talk about faith that are accessible and meaningful and deep and true to the gospel of jesus christ and so in some ways. This book is It's a forty day. Reading through the bible and i have in mind a couple of different kinds of readers. I'm thinking certainly of the person who's familiar with the bible who wants to deepen their experience of faith. But i'm also thinking about the person who may be coming new to the bible which is some spiritual curiosity with some questions maybe even maybe even skepticism in hesitation. And so i take on those those first twenty days. We dive into the book of deuteronomy which is like the weirdest place to start..

toronto ten years bible both first twenty days a forty day deuteronomy one of those things jesus christ first step God
"michel" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

The SpaRetailer Podcast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"michel" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

"So day on these retailer podcast. I have josh and earl michaels. They are a father and son. Team in indiana. Are you her right now. We are they are the guys who run backyard leisure with their main location in toronto and they have two locations in illinois. So thanks for coming on the podcast today. Guys thank you so this is a rare occasion. Where i'm not sure i have ever interviewed either of you before for the magazine or the podcast anything so this is kind of exciting because i feel like i get a whole fresh story that even i have heard before we're honored always start off getting people's backgrounds. Where did you start out. How did you get into the industry. How did you end up working in this company together. I guess you're probably the to start with for that all right well. How long do we have. The podcasts can go on for hours and hours. So it's really it's really depends on how chatty you're feeling alright so in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. My wife and i decided we wanted to zibo in our backyard. And i couldn't find anybody to build one by one from so i actually got a lead from a little company and southern indiana. That makes them. They referred me to a dealer quite a distance away and that particular dealer. Didn't want to deal with me from the distanced. So i called the company back and they told me well. The only way you can buy one is if you're a dealer so i asked them what that took and they told me so. We bought two. And i lived out in the country on a pretty well traveled road and We put one in the backyard where we wanted it and then we put one out front and i came up with the name backyard leisure and we opened a business account with thousand dollars. We sold our first gazebo to an old farmer. Who's eighty five year. Old wife had always wanted one. He came and bought it and took it home. He brought his tractor in his pickup truck and trailer and loaded up. Because he didn't want to pay me to deliver it so he took it home and put a big red bow on it. I suppose and gave it to his wife christmas so that was actually it is. That was our very first sale and then my career was in the insurance industry. And i was still active in the insurance industry so we started out very small. I put it a small display lot brought in a couple of more gazebos and some outdoor furniture and we sold some fairly successfully. I decided that. I would go ahead and expand that a little bit. We rented some ground and The prime retail area of tara. Hold indiana i put in zibo displays there. I've got a big sign with an eight hundred toll. Free number and i started selling gazebos by appointment one day. We got a call from a manufacturer. That's here in the midwest and they asked if we would consider selling hot tubs. I said well yell but we don't have any place to sell them so at that time there was a little corner not too far away. From where are gazebo display and tear ho was we ended up renting that it was a two car garage and small building that we used as a office and a small store where people could buy. Chemicals is very small so we did that. I believe that was from two thousand three until two thousand seven. That's how we sold hot tubs. I can't imagine you knew what you're getting yourself into with hot tubs because gazebos and even patio furniture. You kinda you sell it. You drop it off. And that's the individ hot tubs. There's a lot more touch points between the dealer and consumer that's right. We did have some inkling what we'd need. We hired a young man to help with our deliveries and our service aspect of it. Then i also had an older gentleman that would man the office building and sell for us. We were fairly successful on a small level. You know i mean enough to where it didn't cause me to thank well. I need to stop doing this. So in two thousand six. We decided if we're to do this. We need to actually find a place to do it. You can't sell hot tubs out of a two car garage forever. So we re released a six thousand square foot building. That was actually just right next door to where we had been operating. We lease that and we moved in there. After a year of being there under lease we bought that property and as time went by of course we expanded our offerings and so forth and then of course in twenty eighteen we had the fire and then once that happened we ended up moving into the location that we are here when you really decided to go. Full force into hot tubs. It was what you year or two before the recession before kind of hot tub sales plummeted at least across the country. I mean what was that. Like for you guys. I mean you can have had gone all in got the six thousand square foot showroom and next thing you know the whole country is in this economic depression right. Let's actually kind of one of the things that we think has helped us to be successful. is that we. We didn't really experienced the glory days. Were told you know back in the early two thousands that it was pretty easy to sell. Hot tubs swell. At that time we were. We were nothing really. You know so we were operating on a shoestring and you know. By the time everybody else was experiencing something of a crash for us. We were probably still actually growing a little bit because we were so new. You could consider difficult time to start but it may be was in the end Better for us because we we didn't become accustomed to an easy experience with selling out to us we were. We were so new that it was just normal.

josh illinois indiana toronto two thousand dollars today earl michaels first gazebo one thousand southern indiana christmas one nine hundred ninety eight eighty five year two locations
From The Ashes With the Michels From Backyard Leisure

The SpaRetailer Podcast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

From The Ashes With the Michels From Backyard Leisure

"So day on these retailer podcast. I have josh and earl michaels. They are a father and son. Team in indiana. Are you her right now. We are they are the guys who run backyard leisure with their main location in toronto and they have two locations in illinois. So thanks for coming on the podcast today. Guys thank you so this is a rare occasion. Where i'm not sure i have ever interviewed either of you before for the magazine or the podcast anything so this is kind of exciting because i feel like i get a whole fresh story that even i have heard before we're honored always start off getting people's backgrounds. Where did you start out. How did you get into the industry. How did you end up working in this company together. I guess you're probably the to start with for that all right well. How long do we have. The podcasts can go on for hours and hours. So it's really it's really depends on how chatty you're feeling alright so in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. My wife and i decided we wanted to zibo in our backyard. And i couldn't find anybody to build one by one from so i actually got a lead from a little company and southern indiana. That makes them. They referred me to a dealer quite a distance away and that particular dealer. Didn't want to deal with me from the distanced. So i called the company back and they told me well. The only way you can buy one is if you're a dealer so i asked them what that took and they told me so. We bought two. And i lived out in the country on a pretty well traveled road and We put one in the backyard where we wanted it and then we put one out front and i came up with the name backyard leisure and we opened a business account with thousand dollars. We sold our first gazebo to an old farmer. Who's eighty five year. Old wife had always wanted one. He came and bought it and took it home. He brought his tractor in his pickup truck and trailer and loaded up. Because he didn't want to pay me to deliver it so he took it home and put a big red bow on it. I suppose and gave it to his wife christmas so that was actually it is. That was our very first sale and then my career was in the insurance industry. And i was still active in the insurance industry so we started out very small. I put it a small display lot brought in a couple of more gazebos and some outdoor furniture and we sold some fairly successfully. I decided that. I would go ahead and expand that a little bit. We rented some ground and The prime retail area of tara. Hold indiana i put in zibo displays there. I've got a big sign with an eight hundred toll. Free number and i started selling gazebos by appointment one day. We got a call from a manufacturer. That's here in the midwest and they asked if we would consider selling hot tubs. I said well yell but we don't have any place to sell them so at that time there was a little corner not too far away. From where are gazebo display and tear ho was we ended up renting that it was a two car garage and small building that we used as a office and a small store where people could buy. Chemicals is very small so we did that. I believe that was from two thousand three until two thousand seven. That's how we sold hot tubs. I can't imagine you knew what you're getting yourself into with hot tubs because gazebos and even patio furniture. You kinda you sell it. You drop it off. And that's the individ hot tubs. There's a lot more touch points between the dealer and consumer that's right. We did have some inkling what we'd need. We hired a young man to help with our deliveries and our service aspect of it. Then i also had an older gentleman that would man the office building and sell for us. We were fairly successful on a small level. You know i mean enough to where it didn't cause me to thank well. I need to stop doing this. So in two thousand six. We decided if we're to do this. We need to actually find a place to do it. You can't sell hot tubs out of a two car garage forever. So we re released a six thousand square foot building. That was actually just right next door to where we had been operating. We lease that and we moved in there. After a year of being there under lease we bought that property and as time went by of course we expanded our offerings and so forth and then of course in twenty eighteen we had the fire and then once that happened we ended up moving into the location that we are here when you really decided to go. Full force into hot tubs. It was what you year or two before the recession before kind of hot tub sales plummeted at least across the country. I mean what was that. Like for you guys. I mean you can have had gone all in got the six thousand square foot showroom and next thing you know the whole country is in this economic depression right. Let's actually kind of one of the things that we think has helped us to be successful. is that we. We didn't really experienced the glory days. Were told you know back in the early two thousands that it was pretty easy to sell. Hot tubs swell. At that time we were. We were nothing really. You know so we were operating on a shoestring and you know. By the time everybody else was experiencing something of a crash for us. We were probably still actually growing a little bit because we were so new. You could consider difficult time to start but it may be was in the end Better for us because we we didn't become accustomed to an easy experience with selling out to us we were. We were so new that it was just normal.

Zibo Earl Michaels Indiana Josh Toronto Illinois Tara Midwest Depression
'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:06 min | 1 year ago

'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

"Now. The new museum in new york this week open grief and grievance art and morning in america and exhibition originally conceived for the museum by the hugely influential curator of queen ways or before. He died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen grief and grievance features thirty seven artists to address the theme of morning commemoration and loss in response to the racist violence experienced by african american communities the title the museum says refers to quote the intertwined phenomena of black grief and a politically orchestrated white grievance against each structures and defines contemporary american social and political life. Curatorial advisory group has worked together to realize an interpreter. Basil's vision maximiliano gio knee of the new museum. The artist glenn ligon in ways. As regular curatorial collaborator mark. Nash and owe me beckwith scenic creator of the museum of contemporary art in chicago. He's just been appointed chief curator of the guggenheim museum in new york editor in the americas. Helen stolis spoke to beckwith about the exhibition. I wondered what's it been like bringing the show to its final stages making sure that oakley's incredible vision has been realized. What was your thinking through the process to make sure you've got this kind of final end stage oak. We have a brial mind. There were always so many things that he was thinking about and working on and he can have an idea a decade ago that manifests itself into a show much much later and so his ability to kind of hold and juggle things Intellectually and mentally that then get realized later was uncanny honestly the more that i read essays of his from about ten years ago i realized the core of some of this thinking was already there especially the core of ideas in grief ingredient. So all that is to say that this actually is unlikely to be. Oh quiz show believe it or not. They'll be more coming more things to watch and see. The man's ambitions were amazing and so lars they will extend extend far past life But in terms of grief and grievance started as a lecture series for harvard and oh a curator. He thinks through art a curious interesting. That i'm still speaking about him in present tense and so he thinks through ours and he started then to take. These ideas That he'd been mulling over these ideas around. What really are the kind of core conditions of american race relations. Where did they begin. What catalyzed them and what are the ramifications of that core This sense of black loss and a sense of white grievance let really in his mind got catalyzed around the civil war. What are those ramifications for the american polity right now our process as curatorial advisors which is what we've been calling ourselves has really been about trying to round out oh quiz vision where it was necessary. Okay already had a rather. Set schematic for the show. He had core objects that he was interested. In working with a painting of awesome blogs painting by daniel johnson another awesome. Blah's painting by jack whitten and a painting regime michel basquiat. He was really interested in these three objects as the ways to anchor away of of both thinking through reactions to Black and justice but also aesthetic forms that moved between abstraction and figuration between forms that are legible and gestures that deal. Mostly i think with the monochromatic. So these being the kind of catalyzing ideas for the show. were great signposts for us so then began to work with those themes and ideas for the rest of the checklist.

Beckwith Maximiliano Gio Glenn Ligon Helen Stolis New York Guggenheim Museum Museum Of Contemporary Art Basil Nash Oakley Americas America Chicago Lars Harvard Jack Whitten Michel Basquiat Daniel Johnson Blah
"michel" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"michel" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Michel. Yes, guitars, cigars and a few thoughts from this Are Michael very show if your friends haven't told you McDonald, Spicy Chicken McNuggets are back the ones made with spicy tempura and age cayenne. But before you go telling friends make sure you get first order ahead on the McDonald's Apple bottom, a book boom, probably time participating adults. Our radio. Here are the top Fleetwood Mac songs that you thumbed up number three. Don't stop. Tomorrow before yesterday go. Yes, Let's go number two dreams. Sweating way. Yes, Number one. Go your own way way. Galling day hear more from Fleetwood Mac and similar artists Now search for Fleetwood Mac on my heart radio. All your favorite music, all your favorite stations all free. I heart radio. Did you know Presented by I Heart radio, you know, while you're listening to right now, Did you know that it I heart radio? One of our biggest pet peeve is dead Air..

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
Using Computational Discovery to Build Better Immunotherapies

The Bio Report

08:04 min | 1 year ago

Using Computational Discovery to Build Better Immunotherapies

"Team. Thanks for joining us dan. We're gonna talk about immunotherapy compuserve and its efforts to pursue novel targets for ahmed cancer types. Perhaps we can been gin with the idea of checkpoint inhibitors what are they. And how do they work. He'd be taurus. Are actually proteins modulating the immune system responds in the context of fay affair. Kasim yuna therapy. It was identified. There is a crosstalk between immune cells and and the cancer. This crosstalk is being done through immune checkpoint and and usually these are inhibiting the immune system response to the to the cancer to the cancer cells and and the drugs the few drugs that are out there that are dressing these same immune checkpoint skin to treat cancer. Patients are actually am inhibiting. The inhibition exerted by immune checkpoint on the cancer cells in diff- therefore allowing the immune system to be stimulated and actually fight the cancer. This has been a a real revolution in cancer. Care but these still have limited efficacy. How how effective are these therapies at treating cancer today as of today about twenty to thirty percent of the patient population of the cancer patients are responsive to these drugs. It is increasing with time. We're more proven are being done with the current in hebrew tours. But i have to say that you know. Cancer is a movie factoria disease and and it's actually a collection of many different diseases and we're not in a situation where one treatment fits all basically declined immune checkpoint a drugs are addressing only few number drug targets and they're still many mechanisms that need to be a still a explored and and identified and drugs need to be developed in order to address the various mechanisms of action by which the kansas are actually avoiding the immune system. And here's actually that were. Competent fits in and see what we do. Discover new drug targets and developer first in class drugs to address. These struck targets copy. Jen has developed a computational based drug discovery platform. What is the platform. And how does it work. So the platform is is basically based on twenty years a fan and know how that was built at computation with being a computational discovery company for many years and then after we established a critical mass of discovery capabilities. We turn to be to. We are today. Pretty discovery and development company in generale with built computer systems tucson algorithms in order to be able to address the challenge of new drug targets discovery. And you biological halfway discovery. Identify new drug targets is a is a is a very complex isn't f. fourteens. Multiday mentioned effort and for that we had to develop a multiple systems. We've built a lot of know-how in the company and we've built a Expertise in what is called multi onyx analysis. We're not limiting our platform to a specific data type or a specific technology. Actually we're very flexible. Tools and systems an algorithms are really designed to address multiple data sources multiple data technologies and. This is because this is multifactorial and complex and filled to work in. An all of these are augmented with human expertise that we have in the company in the last twenty years. How do the targets. You've discovered differ from the targets that today's checkpoint inhibitors go after and it's very good question. Actually it's not very different in terms of you know still it's checkpoint but i think that the nature of checkpoints one as compared to the others those that are known and those that we discovered these are proteins. That are very different from one. Another so yes all of them. At least those are defined as negative customer tour costing military checkpoints. They're all inhibiting the immune system response against the cancer. But they're doing it in different ways and what we discovered is as i said you know the checkpoints are now have been translated to drugs that are in the market. A really only very few. I think about three or sociology for pd one. Pedia want and what we discovered. Is you know you biological pathways debts allowed us to discover new immune. Checkpoint that are still inhibiting the immune system response against the cancer but in a different way a different mechanism and this allows us to be able to develop hopefully no new treatments solutions. That will address those cancer patients the not responsive to the current checkpoint inhibitors check on earth. What are the issues with. Existing immunotherapy is the ability of cancers to develop resistance. Where are you doing to address that issue so this is actually exactly what we're trying to do. Am that in cancer. Immunotherapy is there are two issues right there. Ease the patients that are not responsive in does that with time that are developing what is called acquired resistance. We're we're trying to do in. The company is to try and focus on those biological pathways that we believe would address those patients that are not responsive to the current checkpoint blockade. So they're in different ways with different. Mechanism does cancers data and actually deliver a different solution to the problem. And this will were trying to work on. You know the leading the leading drug that is in development at is now owning phase one studies and we have owning michel data in the clinic but the days actually am supporting designs behind. We discovered so we discovered a completely new biological pathway identified sen typically that it is addressing am in. You am a new mechanism that still this family of immune checkpoint. The preclinical data suggested that it should address

Cancers Kasim Yuna FAY Generale DAN JEN Kansas Tucson Michel
AirPods Max vs. Bose 700 vs. Sony WH-1000XM4: Which headphones should you buy?

Charlie Parker

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

AirPods Max vs. Bose 700 vs. Sony WH-1000XM4: Which headphones should you buy?

"High end headphones face some challenges, including the eye popping price tag of the new Airpods max dollars for a pair of wireless noise Canceling over your headphones is just Region. That's Macworld writer Michel Simon, who says Apple's Airpods Max are also entering a crowded field dominated by bows and Sony and even its own beats products that cost far less. Its website says orders placed right now may not arrive until March. But accessories like it's other headphones, and the Apple Watch generated $31 billion in sales last year. So Apple is undeterred. Apple has a core group of people that can't afford this stuff. Want to have the things that the high end things that Apple makes him and are willing to pay a premium for knowledge. And if money is tight, or you can't get one rite now, Simon suggest you wait for the price to go down. Probably next year. Maybe the year after they'll come out with the cheaper version. That's what Apple does. I'm

Michel Simon Apple Macworld Sony Simon
N.J. Approves $14 Billion in Corporate Tax Breaks in Less Than a Week

New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

N.J. Approves $14 Billion in Corporate Tax Breaks in Less Than a Week

"Approving a corporate tax incentive plan costing over eight billion that would end up mired in controversy. The state legislatures approved an even bigger program, perhaps more than 14.4 billion in the coming year. If every tax break is approved and awarded, the plan provides more than $1.7 billion a year for corporate tax incentives, Senator Pulse Arlo says the bill addresses the shortcomings exposed in the last tax incentives Law bill that we are going to need In order to survive in order to stimulate our economy, generate their economy and incentivize our economy going forward post pandemic, The Assembly passed the bill 68 to 11. The Senate passed a 38 tow one with only Senator Mike Doherty opposed. I see a very complex is quoting capitalism Plan here at the Statehouse. Michel Simon Stew Jersey one of 1.5 News, Somebody jersey's first

Senator Pulse Arlo Senator Mike Doherty Senate Michel Simon Stew Jersey
So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:20 min | 1 year ago

So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

"There should have been something of a resolution at last to the brexit drama. This morning ursula von der line the president of the european commission and boris johnson. Britain's prime minister and said yesterday as an extended deadline to work out the fine print on britain's divorce papers yesterday came and despite the exhaust soon after almost one year of negotiations. And despite the fact that deadlines have been missed over and over. We both think that it is responsible at this point. In time to go the extra mile mr johnson used similar language to ms vonda. Lions having repeatedly warned that no deal was a very likely outcome. Where there's life there's hope we're going to keep talking to see what we can do. The uk certainly would be a will key away from the talks. I think people would expect us to to go the extra mile. Neither side wants the regulatory and logistical chaos of a no deal scenario but neither side seems willing to make much in the way of concessions and now an immovable deadline looms december thirty first. We are very much convinced. The end of the year. When the transition period finishes john peet is brexit editor. So the risk of nato is still high but the mood between the sides is probably better after the extension of the deadline than it was last week and what are. The main areas of disagreement still the main areas of disagreement being the same almost all year. There is a quarrel about fisheries giving european votes access to british waters. And there's a quarrel about what's called a level playing field which the rules for competition to make sure britain does not undercut european companies insatiable environmental labor and state. Subsidy rules the eu. On britain to stick to most of the rules it follows now. Britain wants the right to diverge from these rules and some way of settling that bigger argument fisheries will be needed. If there's going to be a trade deal but as you say these have been the points of disagreement. Better part of the year i mean What room for compromise left. Well they all talking. As i understand it about possible dispute mechanisms for settling quarrels about measures that be taken by britain or indeed by the eu. After the first january that deemed to be anti competitive. And i think that's the focus where you might find some way of agreeing what the europeans want is a dispute mechanism that would allow them to retaliate. If they deem britain to be behaving in an uncompetitive way. Retaliate by imposing tariffs or withdrawing trade preferences. The british could do the same to the eu. And i think in that area there is still scope for agreement and all this is about rules and regulations but what the personalities involved here. How does that play into. what's happening. The european union negotiator is michelle bonnier. he's french and he obviously has relationship with french president. Boris johnson has been trying several times to go round michelle bonnier and negotiate with others but the europeans are very strict on saying. This is the job of the european commission. Michelle baez negotiator. His bosses are london. I on the president of the european commission. I think boris johnson gets on reasonably with all of these people but none of them quite trust him. And i think that's one of the reasons why they want to have a very clear sort of legal framework that includes dispute settlement mechanisms and the right to retaliate. Because they never quite trust. Boris johnson not to go off and do something that will damage them. And how much do you think that issue of trust has has helped things up so far in yet still i. Trust has been very important in this negotiation. And i think the behavior of boris johnson has not made it easy a. He refused to consider extending the deadline for the negotiations earlier in the year when the europeans wanted him to and he then suggested a couple of times that he was going to rewrite the withdrawal treaty. Which is the agreement reached last year under which britain formerly left the european union. Even though that's an international treaty that would be a breach of international law. And i think if you put those things together. There is every reason why the europeans feel. They shouldn't trust will rely on the british government. Under boris johnson. Not to babe in a way that they think might be bad for the european union its members so the us official negotiator is michel barnier but that the national leaders are playing something of a roll here to national league is obviously critical. I mean Michelle bonnier as the negotiator. Us on the line. As the president of the european commission are operating under a mandate as they call it which they've been given by national leaders for these trade talks the mandate is quite a tough one. The toughest person in this mandate of toughest of bits of the mandate have been insisted on by the french president last week. Emmanuel macron said. I've consistent. So now i don't want to have my cake and eat it but i do want the pieces cut. He could it. Because i'm not giving my peace away. Michelle demander busy discussion janardan pam. I'd meanwhile angela merkel the other key european leader the chancellor germany. she's regarded as a bit more of a soft cup than emmanuel macron. She's very keen that there should be a deal beneath them. Dusty dusty. alice gibney super communists. I say funds and she's also quite strict and she has recently said. I think we should do everything together. Result goes saying and the threat to both sides. All along has been the chance that this should end without a deal or are both sides ready for that. I think no deal would be highly disruptive for both the and the uk. The impact would be worse but britain because it is more. Reliant on trade across the channel and largest sheriff's exports go to the european union. If there is no deal that will be intensive customs checks and problems at ports and trading across between britain and the uk and then also be tariffs which are quite low. But they're high for certain sectors ten percent for cars forty percent for sheep metex bullets about the same for beef exports and that would certainly cost people and be very disruptive of a very big trade relationship. The europeans think it will be worse for britain but britain also thinks that it would be disruptive for the eu particularly for ireland. Most of his trade goes through the united kingdom and say both sides want to avoid new deal and so does that mean that. This may go right down to the wire that there may be negotiations. Happening on new year's eve at some point people will have to say look. If we can't strike an agreement we are just going to turn deal. I mean what. The negotiators come up with has to be approved by national parliaments by the british parliament by the european parliament. That's the surprises. That sometimes takes weeks or months. You can tell escape it. But i think if we get to the thirty first of december they haven't reached an agreement that it will mean. No deal really have settled before christmas. Have any chance of ratification for january-august john. Thank you very much for your time. Once more. thank you.

Boris Johnson Britain EU Michelle Bonnier European Commission Ursula Von Der Ms Vonda John Peet Mr Johnson Michelle Baez United Kingdom Lions Nato Emmanuel Macron Michelle Demander Janardan Pam Michel Barnier
Brexit negotiations extended

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:50 min | 1 year ago

Brexit negotiations extended

"The brexit negotiations have been extended. It's been a tense weekend of talks which ended without a resolution except that the teams will continue to bargain. Darn mccaffrey's urine news political editor. Ann joins me now. Darna blustery man and a crumpled face and impeccably turned out an utterly composed woman libertine and lutheran images of boris johnson's meeting with usher underlying dominated the front pages and it seemed to me at least pretty much characterize the tone of the brexit negotiations. So can you tell us what happened over the weekend will in many ways. Of course the talks restarted. Again as you say. After that meeting with vonda line and boris johnson in brussels on wednesday nights they did seem not make an awful awful lot of extra progress. They inched forward to a large degree editor. Tina particularly in this area of the level playing field dot es britain would have to adhere to many of the rules and regulations of the european union for years to come that wants to have access to the single market particularly on this idea of divergence. Oh britain wants to forge. Don't power in the world committee regards. That's what brexit is. All rexiti is all about was the european union since she says well. If you do that that means consequences. It means. We may well the limit your access to the single market and the have been suggestions that it britain diverged. Too far the cop. Some of those rules and regulations that brussels could put on what a cold kind of like tariffs taxes on some of its goods to try and keep it into line. And that's been the really controversial area on that point. Europe seems to be conceding some ground that may be britain might be able to reciprocate by doing exactly the same to the eu all that the independent all between posts deciding if britain is undercut those regulations. That in the end that process is a bit more complicated and drawn out and then the eu it initially anticipated all although that's an awful lot of detail on what is a minor point there are still these inefficient gaps but there is a sign of progress and the reason that the talks continued. Go beyond yesterday is done to kind of to simple reasons. A neither side wants to be seen to walk away from these talks. Georgina no wants to collapse them. Because ultimately they'll always be a blame game about who brought about the no deal brexit and second of all you know it may well bore us all to death and there's no home and carry on talking no one loses so why not talk until the cows come home or indeed the. We're not allowed fireworks in us even till they're crackers get pulled. Whatever happens on new year's eve this year. So i mean the talks could actually go on until the deadline which is the thirty first of december. We'll in practical terms not really. Id so that the front pages of today's daily telegraph suggests that talks could carry on until new years. That's the headline. at least though. It doesn't suggest what year which is likely distancing. No i in theory. And i think we all kind of i keep saying this into the last week. I was told last week by an eu diplomat that were looking at the eighteenth around the as well as the last days to secure agreement because then we really all pushing the envelope in terms of actually just having time at all for both the european parliament and the british folder to ratify this agreement. Because it will have to be. There is a deal will need to be ratified by both parliaments. Not there is talk and with the eu everything is flexible that potentially it could be agreed by e you leaders and ratified provisionally in the new year. So almost in retrospect. I'm not entirely sure that can happen with the uk parliament but you know talks will continue at some stage. Somebody's gonna have to make a decision though. I mean they cannot continue indefinitely. And as you've said as the telegraph suggested they definitely cannot continue beyond news because of the legal deadline that is in place. But i mean there are also things like for instance tax systems need more than a fortnight to boot up to change various things. We're also being told that supermarkets have been ordered to stock up the goods. In event of a no deal will cost twenty percent more that there are interim measures to keep planes flying and so on. I mean there's so much detail that needs to be worked out the things that are really interesting about this first of all even if there is a deal it's only really covering about twenty cents of the existing rules and normality. That's already in place which means that's eighty. Percents is either having to be made up by changes that businesses are having to make stuff that you and i won't see but will cost them time and money and additionally the will be disruption because of course will be extra checks at borders particular over in calais and that means that we will see many more pictures of those lorries cues them for after aftermarket after mile. And you're right. We all still likely to see an increase in food prices to a degree. If there is no deal that gets worse because the tariffs potentially william place will be in place sterling will potentially fall even further on those two factors will mean that food prices will likely increase the destruction means that supermarkets already ordering goods talk about destruction to medical supplies and also in the amended. No deal as you rightly dives there will still have to be many deals. Don't breakneck speed to ensure that you know planes continue to be able to fly into european espace. That lorries are able to even enter the opinion so even if there is no overall trade agreements that will still have to be some deals just to make sure that things carry on beyond the. I generally in a relatively normal way now. What about the navy. The royal navy has been told that it should patrol to police channel waters To to stop illegal fishing as it may well be by then Charles michel the president of the european council referring to that said the britain was not lose. Its cooling. Go overboard he said. I'm trying to be serious on the european side. At least we keep our sang for. Yeah i think we'll see what happens with the role now. I mean even in the event of not we'll see what happens with the law. Maybe i'm sure they will patrol and all we're going to get into fish wars that we saw. I think it was back in the nineteen seventies involving iceland's when it really did get a bit nasty and ships were sunk certainly pretty badly damaged in wars over fishing there. You have to remember the european union in its deal contingency. Planning junior suggested that. If britain bolts these breakneck speeds kind of temporary deals. That i was talking about when it comes to the ability to move call goran or indeed planes that they would have to concede that the current agreement on fishing would continue for at least another year. Which makes me think that in the ends. That probably was likely to happen. Not least of all as well because we have to remember no deal. I deal on. Fishing may be banned from both sides and fishing but no deal is also bad. And i'm not entirely sure that the fishing communities of the east coast of england or northern france. Want no deal either. Because that may mean they don't have access to each other's waters but given the acrimony were to see in the nastiness in no deal. Brexit may will also mean that those uk fishermen for example will not be able to sell the fish to the european market.

EU Britain Boris Johnson Ann Joins Vonda Line Brussels Mccaffrey Tina Georgina European Parliament Europe Charles Michel Calais UK Royal Navy European Council William Navy
"michel" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"michel" Discussed on KGO 810

"Where I'm going with Michel Michel. How dare you? We don't know. How much John's making. Not much mind you, but I'm pay but hopefully send in some of that fat bankroll of Michael. Not sense. What's next, John? We continue the discussion Rothman Worth every penny. 6 to 9 on radio 10 Masterpiece Theatre presents the life and times of covered 19 with Britain. Nicky. It's hard to find a bathroom. That's open right now. Your go to gas station likely does not want you using the bathroom to give a shout out to the best bathroom in the bay area. Really? What's that? This bathroom is so clean, really? And it is at that you're going to tell people right now. Okay? This is a shell station and is in double right off of Dorrit. E is a shell station there on the Warner, and their bathroom is pristine. And they even advertise it from the parking lot that they have a very clean bathroom. Well, okay, well, then I feel better about you putting him on blast right now, because I'm not along that bathroom is going to stay clean. Thanks fried for a card from KGO from completely giving us the advertising We do not want and if, as usual, a commercial on KGO is brought into many customers, and Brett's no longer secret bathroom, sold out, drop trial and find a Bush in a dark spot and Gopi, Nicky Medora question. Mornings on KGO 10. Sometimes you may not be sure whether Mark Thompson's being serious or I I see what you're doing. You're dumping on my president. It's disgusting. Excuse me. Is this sarcasm won? I won? I hope you're all happy and I say Trump 2020. That's right on with that lady. It is sarcasm. 101. Jeez, you guys are you know what it's typical lunatic Left marks a little like this is the real Stephen Colbert. I mean, everything I say on this show, Mark Thompson show it'll change your life tend to noon on kgo 8 10..

Mark Thompson KGO Nicky Medora Michel Michel John Stephen Colbert Dorrit Masterpiece Theatre Rothman Warner Michael Britain president Brett Gopi Bush
"michel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"michel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In sight doctors a livia laying Katrina Michel save lately the practice has been disturbingly quiet this room is usually good full all of our employees have books in every room that's all gone it's all gone it started in mid March when the bay area issued the nation's first shelter in place orders the practice canceled most of their well child visits Dr Michael says in a matter of weeks they transformed from a bustling practice of seven physicians to barely hanging on there is a business side to running a practice we have to build a pair staff and it's been challenging with this dramatic drop the volume to be able to do that they laid off six staff members the physicians took a forty percent pay cut it's crucial that pediatricians like these be able to manage the chronic illnesses broken bones and infections that would otherwise flood urgent care centers and emergency rooms here's doctor Lydia lane just because companies around doesn't mean other infectious agents just take a break vacation if we can do more telehealth we can calm patients down if we can do basic care over the phone or even increase in our office it will help reduce the strain on the hospital systems but if practices like this one shatter it presents a huge problem and that's a real possibility pediatric practices across the country reporter visits are down as much as ninety percent doctors thought needle is a member of the disaster preparedness counsel at the American academy of pediatrics these practices don't have a tremendous question they can fall back on so if their visits are down for even just a few weeks they may not have the resources to keep on going the company recommends that pediatricians keep doing well child visits for children under two need vaccines that some parents are balking at bringing in even the youngest infants Dr needle works as a pediatrician at a clinic in Sacramento we've had parents of infants one week old two weeks old were saying and I want to come in I don't think it's safe and we have to tell them look there are a lot of things that we need to check they could be much more dangerous than coronavirus at this point thank it's like jaundice weight loss and congenital diseases Dr Michael at Berkeley pediatrics is particularly worried about vaccination we don't want to create a protest this outbreak because we didn't vaccinate all our babies on time to help make things safer they divided the brown shingled craftsman that houses the Berkeley practice into two houses upstairs for well patients downstairs for sec they take the temperature of everyone who walks in the door providers wear surgical masks even for well child visits but Dr Olivia Laing worries all those changes mean she's no longer providing the best care every day I think myself well that's exactly opposite to what I learned in medical school and when I was trained to do you know I'm not supposed to wear a mask and where we are ex things to scare my patience but I'm doing that every day for now Michael says she's trying to focus on making it through the next few months as safely and smoothly as possible my very sincere hope is that our seven year old practices going to weather the storm just like it's weathered many before but it's very challenging she says they're planning for a very bumpy road.

Katrina Michel
"michel" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

09:47 min | 2 years ago

"michel" Discussed on Ghost Town

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"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

FashionTalks

26:50 min | 2 years ago

"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

"It's all my always see French coming back to me and Michele is a marketing and retail expert with over twenty years. the the people who made them are coming from around the world which is unbelievable that's amazing with their any other lake I was thinking as you were talking about that we're we're exactly where we were looking to be now it's about the expansion worldwide attention and I would say that we there is many many that we want to do of course it is gets is getting faster in new Europe right now for us where we're with arrows in London so we have many many account in Europe but surprisingly we were very well represent ear in Canada so that's one of our main main main focus right now and there's a reason why we're here in draw two and we will have we will be we'll have a direct contact with customer for the next month and stuff like that so Canadian market is something very important right now and then the American market but we feel actually since we we're we're starting to be very well recognized as a Canadian brand so that we need a strong representation ear in our market and World Wild Winter Rhode Canadian winter coats are very very estimated around the world and some are are editor open some of those market but now I always say that now winter Canadian winter cold is for us chocolate for Switzerland or something like that we're very well recognized for it yeah there's a really cool campaign that cook does where it used is every day people in the marketing can you talk a little bit about that camping please yes actually this camping Ah bring to the bill because he and I are working very close to them and physically work with them at the manufacturer and one point remembering we were in the cafeteria where people having lunch and the bells ring and all those people came down and we were back we were setting with people from around the world eating different thing the smell and everything and we felt it we felt that it was like something unbelievable can always recognize people working for them but with the positioning with the fact that we we claim a very local made locally and having this from the other side of having people from around the world yeah well this is something this is a great image that we should show to the world actually and we work with the people activity worth the awards people from our country where people from everywhere on the will and we just ask them to show exactly out their dress in their real life life and we just put the code on them so we we didn't style them or anything so and there were so so so proud it creates something inside the organization it creates something unbelievable talking a little bit more about when you create that kind of feeling in the organization what is it for the brand I think that it's it's it's all about much we believed altogether much we believe in our target are much we believe where we're going brand and how much we feel that everyone is important so that camping's really brings because the for of course the the much effort we put on on the brand right now in on the images and really failed at felt that they were Horton to to the coast and everything but also very important for the brand perception so uh the became all of a sudden so proud of what we're D- were doing and so they were already very engaged but it's I think it's great emotion it's very we were all crying when we showed the images to them it was very very emotional for people who are perhaps at the helm of their own brand or or working in the fashion industry when you go back to the question of what's I'm your brand's DNA what would you what would you task them with paying attention to in order to really figure that because I think there is such a it's the core of everyone's of everyone's brand and everyone's business but it can be really easy to get distracted and try and be some thing that you're not sometimes how do you how do you really a synthesize and figure out exactly what that core is elite.

Michele twenty years
"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

FashionTalks

11:04 min | 2 years ago

"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

"One point in an existing market I would but it's all about the question of Alpha's you want to go where you have to go and your partner in crime has your CO chief creative officer is any horse how did you guys start to evaluate this like when you look at where they were you were is this very well known brand in Quebec and I'm assuming that where they wanted to go is world domination were you looking at campaigns styles were you the marketing which I want to talk about is obviously a big part of it because the campaigns that you've worked on the monument one which is so beautiful end and has such storytelling around things that are economically aqua where did you start to look at the DNA of the brand and were you looking at storytelling of the brand as well when you were digging into that actually this in case we need to sit on something like we need that before starting so we start with Cervi in the existed archea to to to really understand what people why people love their brand what they love about their brand brand and wet starts what's needs needs love about the brand what's needs to be a refresh re revamp and stuff like that so we usually starting by and we realized very very quickly that there is it's hard for your market to understand but there is such a love affair with the brand in our in our in provinces but at the same time everybody was really really clear that the brand needs to move needs to be needs to look at the product needs younger more fashion statement image and stuff like that so we failed that it was the quality was there and the warm aspect of the product was there but at the same time the current and the staden fashion statement of the product was not there of course the images was not there so basically the way that we decide to work with that brand we knew where we were starting from we knew our fast waters to move with the brand and you know we know where we want to go so we choose we choose the battle of product of course so annie she's working really really hard on the design of the product and that we have to do it's still it's still a brand doing warm coat so there is no question of compromising on the water in performance of the code but at the same time he needs to be fashioned so it's it's it's it's kind of a tricky things to do but she's working really hard on there then the second thing that we decided to do it's to move and to be very very strong with the image of the brand and there's a reason why we're putting much energy in those camping everything because in newmarket on worldwide everybody's are doing things like crazy so we up Tarzan everyday so if you if you want to stay in the memory of people you need to have very very very strong image let's talk little bit about the image that if people are listening you can we'll see this on fashion talks dot ca the images of the models in white on top of the Montreal stadium why did you choose for people who've never been to Montreal what is the significance of that piece of architecture in Montreal there is many many indication around this first of all the Olympic stadium are to like brands because the Olympic Stadium is a brand in Montreal so basically there are two very strong brand to Real Montreal brand and they're almost he's fifty years old both of them so there was a link there the other thing was that we we awesome thing spectacular for this campaign and we want to express the raising of the brain and everything so be on this Guy be in something like that was quite something interesting and at one point I can't remember it's truly came to us the India the Olympic stadium but it was like something crazy we all see it it would be amazing but it will never happen because it's back security wise and everything is on the roof it's on the roof yeah so can you paint a picture of what that photo shoot looked like like are you acrobats shops like they're on the roof of the we were all on the roof of the Olympic Stadium and the Montreal Olympic Stadium the roof is light fabric like a slippery blimp kind is like Brazil is three like claiming on a mountain everybody needs to wear cabling and stuff like that and security and everything so it's it's quite an it's quite a crazy but very very exciting to do and when you're on the top of the Olympic Stadium of course time everything is why we feel like we would be in the Antarctic you'll of the future or something like that so it's it's it's Media and an unbelievable location in Montreal well what I think is so interesting is if you don't know it's the stadium it has like a real attract quality to it like it is it's almost astronaut lay so there's such an abstract us to it as well that I can only imagine part is playing on that lake youthful wing that you were hoping to foster actually that's one of the reason we picked it because it's very very strong association for our listing market in Montreal and for the rest of the world is like an we don't know where we are but it's an amazing location is it like link to Montrealers a little bit like it's kind of a way to to tell your people who know the brand really well like we've got you but it's it's almost like an not an not a secret for Montrealers that they know where this location is where to the rest of the world it's such a mystery in Montreal you truly are realize where we are and I- chilly some some people realize it's from the beginning because it's it's quite a a big thing that we see almost every day but for some people it was a surprise and they're really really excited about it how do you balance a campaign where the whole re re-energizing because it's almost like having an established brand and a new brand at the same time how do you balance those two things it's quite are basically because we the growing of the business is right now really depending of the actual market which is Montreal and Quebec and it's quite a small market in terms of volume to giving wings to a brand to to to to be seen around the world so basically we really need to keep this consumer widow so we need to be careful some how so the balance between not losing customer that we have and really really sick during the customer around the world so it's sometimes aren't because actually from our point of view we won't go faster than we some at some point we are doing right now but we need to be careful in in Durham of business and profitability and stuff like that you reflect as an expert in the industry of Cook is not the first brand to to undergo this kind of heritage re invigoration were there other are there other brands that you think like they did that really well who went down a similar path of of course like there is many many very in the air right now to the revival of branding and everything and we were we were very much inspired by burberry at one point which was like a very very classic vary related to one city with was London and all of a sudden been so trendy so modern at one point and the care the entire world so that was brand actually personally I was re-inspire by because they're so interesting because the burberry trenches such a like it's an iconic classic as you say and they clothed the British army for so long like the trench coat literally was in the trenches hence the name and I the Parka is a similar iconic outfit for Canadians it's it's it's it's a classic basically web could be more classic than insurance and honestly did something amazing in term of majors and everything is they bring it to such a fashion item without the design of the park is a little bit because they they're incredibly contemporary like it's like if a puffer puffer jacket Parka had a baby and created this really unique silhouette and they feel so light was there a lot of design technology that you and Anne went through in terms of Rian ranting the actual coat or a lot of that they're already there is a lot.

Alpha partner chief creative officer Quebec fifty years
"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

FashionTalks

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"michel" Discussed on FashionTalks

"Donna Bishop and I'm thrilled to be here with Michelle the page did I pronounce that right the posh probably in French Syrian having worked with some world class brands such as Holt Renfrew Hudson Bay company Brown shoes many many more and right now among your various hats that you're wearing is co chief creative officer of Cook Outerwear which I'm so excited to talk to you about because Cook I know in Montreal has a long history but in English Canada and in the rest of the world were only just having the pleasure of getting to know US so welcome Michelle thank you so much for being today and can you give us a before we dive deep into kinetic and the really interesting work that you've been doing there can you give us just a bit of a brief history about the brand in general so when we start getting into the specifics people have a bit of an understanding as to where you were immersed in it from the from the get-go yes of course the story is quite interesting because the Britain has fifty years old this year actually and he's been found in trio by Bayan who was actually it was quite simple because he was looking for worm coats for our wetter for the for the in winter and realize that moment that at that point every high quality are where was coming from Europe basically and in Europe you're experimenting cold weather in the mountain which is very very dry compared to us where where are climate is very humid so e fell that there was a window or an opportunity to create like very appropriate warm food for humidity climate very cold humidity climates such a good point not all cold is the same so no actually it's make a big difference in the choice that you made in term of fabric insulation and stuff like that so it start from there with one code sewing in thousand basically it's kind of it's kind of a great story because this guys came from like his family came to Canada like three hundred years ago and they were the official official family to the woman's Corset yeah and his family is still in business in in in this industry but he said at one point he said my family's working on underwear and I'm working on outerwear so when you are tasked with the just to take a step back a minute you haven't been with the brand for since its beginning you came in five years ago Yes yes actually Montreal or as a as a kicker I knew Branson's almost sense I'm born but I came on board official with them when the Brennan has been purchased by an investment group and when the decide to give wings to that cancel basically I get on board at that point with them and you're coming from a deep experience in terms of Fashion Retail Oh marketing communications you've just been handed this very cool opportunity to to take something that you know well but it needs wings as you say to go into new markets what do you need to consider when you are tasked with that like what are the you need to think about when you're taking something that is a heritage brand in one market and you're wanting to blow it up in other places how do you even start to dig into that theories mini mini mini point that you need to consider first of all and you need to you need to understand what I mean what the client wants to do with the brand basically because you need to answer some things so basically you need to very well under where they wanna go as far go and then you need to really look very close of what's the real important thing in the brand because of course you'll have to you'll have to choose your battle because there is many many bran and you'll have to pick what is the very distinctive about the brand what is the most important thing and what you will bill the growing of the business and this is one thing and the other thing is also you need to vary be careful and understand where their brand is right now so basically it's all about where we are right now where we wanna go and one thing very important of fast we wanna go there because of course when you moving with a brand dairies impact sometime it can Bert at.

Donna Bishop Michelle three hundred years fifty years five years
"michel" Discussed on Nutrition Matters

Nutrition Matters

04:37 min | 3 years ago

"michel" Discussed on Nutrition Matters

"Also knows like I know exactly what I wanna do. I know exactly I want to say it. I know exactly what this is going to. Look like, and boom, I'm ready to tackle it. So it was the coolest thing. I I know that I'm using kind of big words here in terms of like mates, it might sound like I'm over exaggerating. But I literally felt like I had a brain transplant. So from the time of about April of two thousand eighteen through December two thousand eighteen I had this looming book project in my head that I wasn't telling people about because I wasn't sure if it was gonna work out. And I wasn't sure exactly what I wanted to say. And Meanwhile, I was rebranding my business. I had to redo my course that I had published couple years prior. But I was like feeling just so overwhelmed with all the things around in my head so fast forward to when I said no to this book project. I just walked away. Also, now's like, I know exactly what I wanna do. My brain is so clear, I feel like I have a new brain. It was the coolest thing in the. Whole world. It was such. It was nothing short of a magical experience if felt magical to me because I all set and just had such clarity. So I spent the month of December. Working on this, new course. And I knew exactly what I wanted to do with it. And it all just became so clear to me. So this course, you may have heard me talking about this on social media, or maybe you're on my Email list. This course is a brand new course that I'm calling positive nutrition for life heal your relationship with food. This is the rebrand if you've been following me for awhile you'll remember that a couple years ago, I made a course called educate embracing power how to unlock your inner wisdom to become your own eating experts. So I re- branded the course I made it better. I enhanced it I really poured my heart and soul into it. And it was the coolest experience to be able to feel like this big looming project that I knew I wanted to do. But I wasn't sure how I wanted to do it the very day that I say, no to this other big project all of a sudden, I have such clarity. So with with I know I risk kind of sounding like I'm just sharing about me, and you know, kind of over. Yeah. Over sharing and kind of being a little self-indulgent here. I'm hoping that this connects to you in a couple of ways, I'm hoping that Michel this story helps you know that sometimes saying no may just be the most empowering positive helpful thing you've ever done. Also, I want you to know that it's kind of sad to say, but I have personal experience. Now that I feel very confident that publishers books things that you're seeing out being published may or may not have your best interest in mind may or may not really care what the essence of intuitive eating is or the essence of making peace with food really means or really have sort of a sense of what's fair, and what's right with ethical. I I know this might sound trophy like dub page hardy, not know that. And I do know that, you know, maybe. Maybe some of the stuff that's out there. That's published just gimmicky or is kind of not really worried about the science. It's really more worried about what sells and what makes money I get that. But I have this. Now, I now have this personal experience with really seeing this in real life. And it was pretty shocking because I advocated an I tried to explain and I tried to hop on phone calls, and and help to reword and help to refocus and kind of make this project be the very most ethical in positive and truth oriented thing possible, and I was met with deaf ears. I was met with. We don't care we want you to say this. So as you're navigating your experience around things, you're reading and things that people are trying to sell to you and all of that stuff. I just encourage you to really remember that he. You know, this is all business and people are making money off of your insecurities people are making money off of..

Michel