17 Burst results for "Micheal Creamer"

"michael creamer" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

06:50 min | 6 months ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"I mean as someone that is into the esoteric stuff like you are now you hear stories about the navy you hear stories about these big companies private companies having devices things. That are little bit out there. I mean we're talking. We're talking montoc cher. Were talking project looking glass time machines. Ufo's stuff like that. I mean john. Have you seen this I i've seen some Pretty bizarre paranormal things in my life. I'd have to say you know I wanted her technology. Do they have the technology to do. Some of these things teleporting it. I guess it less to be left to be seen. Be honest with it's out there and whether or not The right people that are reverse. Engineering. it can tap into it. But i'm sure. I mean you know it's like it just we've been down here for hundreds of millions of years modern man. I mean it's you. Don't read it again to michael creamer work and all the data in research that he puts what it's it's undeniable that this you know highly intelligent besic that have been here before and i think we're where the You know with the lineage. You don't wear them but we yeah to you know if you look at the ancient tax. It's all ends up in a war. Somebody had said know it's a it's mad at somebody else. Then i think they obliterated everything the last war and we're here trying to put it all back together again so wait a minute. So let's go back for a second before we get into How you because you know we took a jump to the esoteric. I want to get back to your your working at the electric places. You're in the navy your you're interested in The engineering side of things. You have not revealed if you've seen in actual flying saucer that the government has yet but maybe we'll get there But that said yeah. I mean what what started it you on the path to i mean i guess what happens next to lead you into more of the mystical. Just just do just obsessed with I guess the paranormal. I've had you know a lot of psychic experiences with france when i was younger You know she's s on hundred old. How do you know this You know things of that nature. And i started reading reading up on You know telepathy fella kinetics Know all the all the other fields that are involved in the paranormal You know realm really fascinated. Me absolutely fascinated me. I just i do more to the human mind and consciousness than and would be led to believe and That that was that was that that opened up the door to I guess a lot of other things in the future for me see You know on the ship and it was on my yet. My navy ship out in the bermuda triangle as crystal clear water. I don't know if you've been out to bermuda at the the water is incredibly blue and You know it was like a ninety degree day was big. You know massive. Us navy ship two hundred ten sales on a shopper. And you know all sorts of weapons systems and we go dead in the water. We just lost power completely lost power and was like i went outside and was like we were in a ball like it was like you couldn't tell the horizon began and ended. The sky was blue as the water. You know we just sitting there and we got backup generators batteries. Nothing worked it was like a complete magnetic Anomaly that just anything those running with electrons just shut down you know just completely dead for about it was about twenty twenty minutes maybe could have been two days be honest with you who knows a portal or something but Anyway zilt forty five minutes later. We get get you know. Generates not coming back up. They get them running power again. We stopped the propulsion system up but You know the strange thing. Is you walking around in. There was like nobody was talking like it was no like he got a mess decks. Whatever and everybody's just looking at everybody like you haven't communicating with your is just You know those are outside rather they wanna lights come on you kinda just like just looking at each other like what just happened you know and it was never a an official in bulletin put out about what happened. It was just you know. Just put it in gear and keep going to happen again so yeah wait a minute so was this i did you have any other i. It was this regular current around there. I mean you hear about the bermuda triangle but nobody really talks about Firsthand at least. I've never hardly. Because do they ever come back right But be yeah. I mean i've never really actually heard testimony from some of that spin there. What exactly is going on there. Did you have other fellow comrades than had experiences as well. I mean he s well that was like a big experience for everybody on a boat. You know we all we all share that experience and can people stantione that. If we were to talk to them. I'll get the guys that were on the ship if that particular year Yeah yeah i can't be substantiated. Absolutely interesting interest allowed still alive. Actually so i'm like touch with somebody shipmates zero online and things of that nature. Because that's what the government wants to hide that incident. Do they want to cover that up. Or it's who'd yeah well. No one's ever asked about it but out probably island. They're pretty secretive with things like that. I don't know why it'll say what's they absolutely have to. you know. Yeah okay so you you have this really I suppose you could say inter dimensional experience never meet a triangle and then what else happens We'll get out of the aaron anna years go on and you still You know a just just saying saying things and then I think i get into the mid nineties..

bermuda michael creamer two days ninety degree bermuda triangle john mid nineties hundreds of millions of years forty five minutes later two hundred ten sales aaron anna years montoc cher france zero hundred old about twenty twenty minutes navy
"michael creamer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"MacArthur Foundation, supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world. More information for you at Mac found daughter work. And by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards the day when no one has to choose between paying rent, putting food on the table and protecting their health and the health of others are w j f dot orc. And by the listeners and members of It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, A pioneering study discovered that giving school Children poor countries of pill that costs as little as 50 cents and protects them from parasitic infections has dramatic effects. This research over 20 years reveals the benefits carry over into adulthood. NPR's Narita Eisenman reports in the mid 19 nineties, economist Michael Creamer was visiting Kenya. I mean, I was on vacation. I wasn't I wasn't there for research trip or something. A friend there mentioned he was starting an aid program to help elementary school kids, including by giving them the warming pills against all sorts of nasty intestinal parasites. It can cause kids to miss school. I suggested that if he chose twice as many schools and then they initially started working in half of them and then later expanded, then they could measure the impact of what they were doing by comparing what happened to the kids who've got the pills first. Versus those who got them in the expansion up to three years later, you could see if it made a difference. This kind of experiment is called a randomized controlled trial. And it's long been the way that scientists like SE biologists determine whether a new medication works. But at the time, randomized controlled trials were just starting to gain ground is a tool for economists to check if programs to alleviate poverty worked. This was the 1st 1 I was involved in on DH changed the the nature of my research alive, not just creamers research. His Kenya experiment helped pave the way for an explosion in these kinds of randomized controlled trials. Last year, Creamer shared the Nobel Prize in economics for pioneering this approach. The experiment also turned the warming into a very popular form of aid because the first set of results released in 2004 by Creamer and a collaborator, Edward Miguel of University of California, Berkeley. Show that giving the kids the pills, reduced absenteeism and dropouts by 25%. Since then, Creamer and his collaborators have continued to follow. Thousands of kids in the original experiment, as they grew up, entered the workforce have dated 20 years out. Now they've released those results. Giving out de worming pills to the kids at a cost of about 50 cents a year per kid has boosted their household income as adults by 13%. I thought there'd be some impact. But I had no idea that there would be an impact of this magnitude. But this shows is that if people are given a chance to be healthy to get education, then they can benefit from that. Some caveats. The income boost was limited to the men. Also a few years ago, a team from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine did a re analysis of Creamer and his colleagues. Original data. Slicing and dicing at using different statistical approaches. Co author Alexander Bacon says he's not convinced school attendance went up his re analysis of the data. Very nice question marks over Many of the finding and because taken doesn't think the original research proves that the D warming caused kids to spend more time in school. He doesn't see how it could have led them to earn higher incomes. So many years later. I'm not sure I really believe it. So should funders. Bhakti warming programs. Ah, lot of them are saying yes, de worming is so cheap even if the potential benefits are much smaller than Creamer and his collaborators. Research suggests.

Michael Creamer Kenya London School of Hygiene and T Alexander Bacon NPR News Robert Wood Johnson Foundation MacArthur Foundation Steve Inskeep Noelle King NPR Mac Nobel Prize Narita Eisenman Edward Miguel University of California Berkeley
"michael creamer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on KCRW

"More at Raymond James dot com. Gonna be sunny today after the low clouds clear highs in the seventies along the coast Load a mid eighties in the Metro areas up to mid nineties in London right now at L. A X at 61 61 in Newport Beach. At 6 46 It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, a pioneering study discovered the giving school Children in poor countries, a pill that costs as little as 50 cents and protects them from parasitic infections has dramatic effects. This research over 20 years reveals the benefits carry over into adulthood. NPR's Narita Eisenman reports in the mid 19 nineties, economist Michael Creamer was visiting Kenya. I mean, I was on vacation. I wasn't I wasn't there for research trip or something. A friend there mentioned he was starting an aid program to help elementary school kids, including by giving them the warming pills against all sorts of nasty intestinal parasites. It can cause kids to miss school. I suggested that if he chose twice as many schools and then they initially started working and half of them and then later expanded, then they could measure the impact of what they were doing by comparing what happened to the kids who've got the pills first. Versus those who got them in the expansion up to three years later, you could see if it made a difference. This kind of experiment is called a randomized controlled trial, and it's long been the way that scientists like say, Biologist determine whether a new medication works. But at the time, randomized controlled trials were just starting to gain ground as a tool for economists to check if programs to alleviate poverty worked. This was the 1st 1 I was involved in on DH. This change the the nature of my research alive, not just creamers research. His Kenya experiment helped pave the way for an explosion in these kinds of randomized controlled trials. Last year, Creamer shared the Nobel Prize in economics for pioneering this approach. The experiment also turned the warming into a very popular form of aid because the first set of results released in 2004 by Creamer and a collaborator, Edward Miguel of University of California, Berkeley. Show that giving the kids the pills, reduced absenteeism and dropouts by 25%. Since then, Creamer and his collaborators have continued to follow Thousands of kids in the original experiment as they grew up, entered the workforce. We have data 20 years out. Now they've released those results giving out deworming pills to the kids at a cost of about 50 cents a year per kid has boosted their household income as adults by 13%. I thought there'd be some impact. But I had no idea that there would be an impact of this magnitude. But this shows is that if people are given a chance to be healthy to get education, then they can benefit from that. Some caveats The income boost was limited to the men. Also a few years ago, a team from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Did a re analysis of Creamer and his colleagues, original data slicing and dicing at using different statistical approaches. Co author Alexander Aitken says he's not convinced school attendance went up his re analysis of the data. Very nice question marks over Many of the finding and because taken doesn't think the original research proves that the D warming caused kids to spend more time in school. He doesn't see how it could have led them to earn higher incomes. So many years later. I'm not sure I really believe it. So should funders. Bhakti warming programs. Ah, lot of them are saying yes, de worming is so cheap Even if the potential benefits are much smaller than Creamer and his collaborators. Research suggests it's worth.

Michael Creamer Kenya NPR News Raymond James dot com Alexander Aitken London School of Hygiene and T London Newport Beach NPR Steve Inskeep Noelle King Nobel Prize Narita Eisenman Edward Miguel University of California Berkeley
"michael creamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"If this doesn't get you ready for the day, we don't know what will here at W. M. I see. It's going to be sunny through the day, hon. You're 90 degrees in next values highest 96. The party's guys Tonight We'll have a love about 75 hot again tomorrow. We could see some showers buys it in the high eighties, but it'll feel closer to 95 degrees. It's W and my C at 7 45 It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, A pioneering study discovered that giving school Children in poor countries a pill that costs as little as 50 cents and protects them from parasitic infections. Has dramatic effects. This research over 20 years reveals the benefits carry over into adulthood. NPR's Dorita Eisenman reports in the mid 19 nineties, economist Michael Creamer was visiting Kenya. I mean, I was on vacation. I wasn't I wasn't there for research trip or something. A friend there mentioned he was starting an aid program to help elementary school kids. Including by giving them the warming pills against all sorts of nasty intestinal parasites that can cause kids to miss school. I suggested that if he chose twice as many schools and then they You initially started working and half of them and then later expanded, then they could measure on the impact of what they were doing by comparing what happened to the kids who've got the pills first. Versus those who got them in the expansion up to three years later, you could see if it made a difference. This kind of experiment is called a randomized controlled trial. And it's long been the way that scientists like SE biologists determine whether a new medication works. But at the time, randomized controlled trials were just starting to gain ground as a tool for economists to check if programs to alleviate poverty worked. This was the 1st 1 I was involved in on DH. This change the the nature of my research alive, not just creamers research. His Kenya experiment helped pave the way for an explosion in these kinds of randomized controlled trials. Last year, Creamer shared the Nobel Prize in economics for pioneering this approach. Experiment also turned the warming into a very popular form of aid because the first set of results released in 2004 by Creamer and a collaborator, Edward Miguel of University of California, Berkeley. Show that giving the kids the pills, reduced absenteeism and dropouts by 25%. Since then, Creamer and his collaborators have continued to follow Thousands of kids in the original experiment, as they grew up, entered the workforce have dated 20 years out. Now they've released those results. Giving out deworming pills to the kids at a cost of about 50 cents a year per kid has boosted their household income as adults by 13%. I thought there'd be some impact, but I had no idea that there would be an impact of this magnitude. But the shows is that if people are given a chance to be healthy to get education Then they can benefit from that some caveats The income boost was limited to the men. Also a few years ago, a team from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine did a re analysis of Creamer and his colleagues. Original data. Slicing and dicing at using different statistical approaches. Co author Alexander Bacon says he's not convinced school attendance went up his re analysis of the data. Very nice question mark over Many of the finding and because taken doesn't think the original research proves that the D warming caused kids to spend more time in school. He doesn't see how it could have led them to earn higher incomes. So many years later. I'm not sure I really believe it. So should funders. Bhakti warming programs. Ah, lot of them are saying yes, de worming is so cheap Even if the potential benefits are much smaller than Creamer and his collaborators. Research suggests.

Michael Creamer Kenya London School of Hygiene and T NPR News NPR Nobel Prize Steve Inskeep Dorita Eisenman Noelle King Alexander Bacon Edward Miguel University of California Berkeley
"michael creamer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Council technology futurist for directory a former director excuse me on the U. S. National Security Council at the state department and on the Senate foreign relations committee and we talked into about his latest book hacking Darwin genetic engineering and the future of humanity today he is talking about global leadership protector teases at the top of our show which plays into a conversation that we had with business week economics editor Peter coy and twenty nineteen Nobel laureate Michael creamer at Harvard so do we do this on the phone in New York global leadership global cooperation we've talked about it a lot Jamie when it comes to getting things done and that includes the virus you sent out a pledge this week I got it I saw it tells about it your goal here sure so Carol great to be with you the I was so frustrated in the beginning of this crisis and I was looking at asking the question why couldn't we as the world respond to this pandemic and when I look deeply at that problem the answer was the same as every other big challenge that we face why can't we solve climate change why can't resolve because system destruction everything else and the challenge is that there is just a mismatch between the global nature of the biggest problems we face and the national way we're organized to address them and now we have this world grain every country is fighting for its own thing and nobody is fighting for all of us and the concept that didn't really tie this all together and interdependent we're all not just one the season one humanity but we're one bio sphere one world and we really have to have to come together so what this new movement and I and hundreds of people from all around the world have formed it called one shared world and we're asking people to go to our site which is one shared dot world and sign our pledge of interdependence we've collaborative Lee drafted a declaration of interdependence which doesn't mean we want to get rid of state or the United Nations which is now more intentional than ever but it means that we have to come together as one humanity all of our problems and it's not just behind this guy actually we have a very very practical plan of how we can do that so when you get into the planet just a minute Jamie but I have to ask you you know this unfortunately flies in the face of how everything has been trending even E. virus and this is something we've talked about with you and so how do you go about on not just on doing something but really reversing course in a lot of ways it's a really essential question need to be essential question because right now we have to instinct in face in the face of this challenge and we have to ask which is the right one on one hand we all everybody has this interesting to hunker down to turn inward and to protect our own thing and that's when we talk about shutting down borders and and living in gated communities there's a natural human response but in the call it and look at this pandemic they give it to you we're not better off because we shut down our borders the virus was already here and so when you remove the virus has taught us that we are all interconnected and this whole thing well I'm gonna look out for me and your on your own even if you're the most the greatest nationalist on earth when you're fighting a a virus that spread around the world you have to recognize that your health reside in other people and whether it's the most vulnerable people in this country for the most vulnerable people elsewhere we're all we're all connected in this is a moment in many ways it's similar to nineteen eighteen at the end of World War one when there were the same two impulse there was that you that you guys know this America first is what it was called meant chart shows Limburg others were part of it and they said everybody take care of your own thing let's hit the end that was the world that was built and now world was so unstable that it led to its own destruction in the second World War and in the end the second World War we realized that we needed to do something different and the forces of inclusion were were ascendant and that's why we got these amazing institutions like the United Nations but the problem we face is the word that the state never really let let the international institutions function as they could and that's why we're trying to create a third force in the world which is a social movement and political force representing the common aspiration democratically expressed of all human did it by basis but we think necessary where's the problem is it operations who preach the importance of globalization and being able to tap into all markets you know but yet sometimes I don't know if they followed another others other you know areas I mean where's the problem is it a political problem is it where is the breakdown yes domino's so what I will say is that every organization and every entity has the potential to be part of the problem or part of the solution but he had to say what is that the problem they and is is the biggest problem is that our political leaders are doing the exact job we've hired them to do and how we have given them the job of representing our national interest and they're doing that they're actually they're doing such a good job it's destroying the world because now here in in the United States let's just say that we are fortunate and the it be covert pandemic abate over the course of the summer but which is likely it's going to grow in the southern hemisphere at that at that same time and so if this pandemic and if the virus goes in subsaharan Africa and other places and it grows and mutate and then it's going to come back here in the fall and we are going to be the ones who are harmed you couldn't have a political leaders say we're going to spend ten percent of our health care budget helping the poorest countries in Africa we would throw that person out of office but maybe we would get more of a return on that investment we would be healthier by recognizing our connectivity to others yeah it's a really interesting point is Carol said at the top it ties back a lot eight two what what Michael creamer was saying to us yesterday I just love that you know we sort of like quick flex that it's like oh yeah we're talking on Noel laureate yesterday and now we're talking to a renowned author in sort of what we do here it all ties together and I think people are starting to think about this on a much bigger grander schedule level excuse me we continue talking Jamie metal senior fellow Atlantic council will come back to him in just a moment but first let's get to Bob Miller.

U. S. National Security Counci Senate foreign relations commi director
"michael creamer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Business slash all right Charlie thank you so much his story in the magazine this week is pay attention to Nobel laureate Michael creamer on the pit Democrat talking about business week economics editor Peter course still with us on the phone in New Jersey Michael creamers also with us he's a Harvard economist who shared the Nobel memorial prize in economic sciences in twenty nineteen he's the gates professor of developing societies in the department of economics at Harvard he doing this on the phone from London Peter I'm so glad you've done this story because you know we kind of are in this funny spot about opening the economy the cost to the economy by delaying the opening but we're also in this pursuit of the virus but the cost to the global economy our tremendous if we don't get this right exactly I want to go back to something to refresh the Kramer said and it it might have gone past the listeners because you said it so quickly but the developing the pneumococcal vaccine it is estimated to save seven hundred thousand lives already mostly children under age five and the elderly and poor countries and developing a vaccine against coal with nineteen more quickly could save many more lives than that so this is just an enormous incentive to accelerate this and so things that we would normally consider to be extremely efficient such as building multiple factories ahead of time that would then never be used because the product didn't work out a band and also the building affected much bigger than they would normally be needed those seemingly way from taxes actually highly efficient when you're dealing with such and expensive locked down they're going through but what I wanted to ask for for the crime about you talk about the essentially two ways to go about accelerating this development and manufacturing the vaccine one is the push approach which is basically finding research maybe funding construction it was a pull approach which is the advance market commitment you talked about before which is giving companies incentives to develop a vaccine by promising that you're gonna buy this product when it's ready tell us about the tradeoff between those two approaches and how you decide how much of each should be done I think we need to we need a combination of each and if you think about our pharmaceutical system as a whole yeah it combines elements of both what we have for for normal pharmaceuticals on the one hand you've got the national institutes of health about the flat surface on finding re finding funding research and then on the other hand you've got the commercial incentives that pharma firm that may comes up with a blockbuster drugs they make a lot of money and that men make into bay in Boston the biotech firms that they they can buy the biotech firms buckets about your town close to back the bile biotech firms and so on we getting that that same combination together working efficiently until the nineteen is what we need and the the differences as you say just the massive scale and the and the incredible urgency so what we're recommending here is a mixture of a lot of push and pull and you one one way to do that for example we we think that it's worth it to put something like a hundred billion dollars into this house like a lot of money it is a lot of money but if it's less than two weeks of what the facts in this house I'm sorry but the disease across right Asama so you know if if this goddess of accion two weeks earlier this would pay for itself and it normally takes six months to do the the staff that were tough steps that we're talking about okay just to by doing the manufacturing plant meticulously with the testing you could save six months so so this would be incredibly are cost effective investments that is just put in economic terms obviously as you say we're having a lot of lives as well for sure now see if we can get this to work do you do you worry about vaccine nationalism where each country is pursuing its own path instead of cooperating I do think that the I think we've seen a lot of moves to invest in vaccines the the we've seen the operational warp speed here in the U. us we've seen the something called the A. C. T. X. songwriter where a lot of European countries out gates foundation others have come together I think we need a lot more of us are welcome any effort but I do think that it's actually in the national interest every country to cooperate with others and you know here's the basic logic up but that's not this isn't just a hello this isn't an argument of you know let's all be nice to each other this is in our national interests and the reason that is the most vexing candidates fail you know listen there's a plus and a ten percent chance of a given vaccine candidate is gonna is gonna succeed and that means that each each country can factor members candidates but we don't know which one's going to succeed and if I'm in the U. K. right now that they're back and they're very excited about a vaccine candidate coming out of us then it does look you know it looks it looks promising but that may not succeed some right we've got confidence in the US were behind what we need to do is all come together and say the end of many ways this could be done that doesn't mean putting all the money in one big pot that could be contracts we just want we want to make sure that the when the Oxford when twenty houses being built for that Oxford vexing the dolled out some extra capacity and so the British would want some some extra capacity from the factories that are that are basically off the cuff is a place in the house Michael if we do that.

Charlie Michael creamer editor Peter
"michael creamer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In the magazine to pay attention to Nobel laureate Michael creamer Peter joins us now on the phone in New Jersey to explain why and brought along the Harvard economist who shared the Nobel memorial the Nobel Prize in economic sciences in twenty nineteen Michael by the way is the gates professor of developing societies in the department of economics at Harvard University on the phone from London it is nice to have both of you with us Peter what you set the stage I want to akhir listen to a seminar at Princeton had with a professor Cramer last Friday and heard what he had to say and said all while this deserves a bigger audience you know not just a reasonable argument because he has a really cool idea for how to accelerate development of a vaccine and to make sure that it's widely available as soon as it's developed he had done work on a previous disease pneumococcal diseases vaccine and use some of the ideas from that to apply to the developing a coronavirus vaccine so maybe I should let him tell the story but that's sort of the practice well tell us the story how did you get here Michael so together with a bridge about Mr run the phone in the early two thousands proposing the idea of an advance market commitment for the development of vaccines so the idea is that in general technological change is really what drives economic growth and that's what drives huge and health improvement which stay in overtime bonds there are some cases where firms just don't have the commercial return that they need to do that are desperate and you're one of those cases is vaccines that are specific to developing countries so that was the case that that we focus on them and there is a disease called never talk to us we have vaccines covering the we have sex scenes covering the strings than developed countries but they're different strains in developing countries and yeah the idea was to create an incentive for firms to work on this and then help insure that if the vaccines are developed they can reach the people who they thought and the the idea of an advance market commitment as make your commitment in advance that if the vaccines to the needs that are developed that public financing to purchase them and that that that specific approach was one point five billion dollars was pledged by coalition of donors to top up payments by just three dollars and fifty cents per dose the vaccine was developed in exchange for a commitment to a a cap on the price of the in the long run and three doctrines of the developed from third and third to that ministered to hundreds of billions of peoples prevented seven hundred thousand deaths so that's a valid thinks your shows the potential of just you know trying to create incentives to bring the ingenuity of the private sector to bear on some of the problems that the net back case were affected on some of the the worst off people in the world and Michael this is a crucial point right because if you leave it potentially to the private sector especially publicly held companies have shareholders to answer to this idea of just throwing all the money you can add something might not be so appealing but if you have countries involved governments involved you know I think you know directly financing vaccine development that's potentially how you get something done and done quickly correct yeah I think you know these are you know quite different situations with covert nineteen the number cuts and I'm certainly think we need to resign and the approaches around the specifics of the situation so hello this is the case that affects the whole world obviously firms are are working on on on covert nineteen vaccines but here's the I think one of the key aspects of the problem which is a little bit difficult to wrap your head around when when you're taking in normal terms of slows us which is the world economy the US is losing three hundred and seventy five billion dollars every month this this crisis goes on three hundred and seventy five dollars a month that means is if you can accelerate the development of a vaccine dance dance just tremendously valuable even if you get the vaccine just two weeks earlier thoughts were you know every week it's worth ninety four billion and and so the more my way the pharmaceutical industry works makes sense for normal products which is first you tell something then when you've got a product that works then you construct the capacity and constructed factors for vaccines is not like small molecule medicines that you know you had you know if you know the formula you just do it it's a very very complicated technologically difficult process so toss takes time it costs the cost hundreds of millions of dollars so terms are not going to want on their own two well they will invest in the R. and D. and if they've got something that's proven to work all the best and and the fact that they're not going to build out the factory public up the the the results of the test it because really what less than one in ten o'clock scenes candidate vaccines hands out and so this is the case where you know toll gates and others have called for the manufacturing capacity put they had ahead of the of the of the testing and you know we could do that for fourteen fifteen back since you need to do it for fourteen fifteen Bucks seems to have a decent chance of actually getting the vaccine and then how did not exceed available as soon as the testing is complete so that's the approach that were right for advocating and I think as you indicate that you want to do that both through a combination of up front Sunday to finances construction and some some some prize at the end right have some skin in the game also yeah all right we're gonna continue this conversation in just a minute we're speaking with Michael creamer he is a kind of is professor of developing societies at Harvard University also a Nobel laureate we should mention that swell as well as Peter Cooley economics editor for Bloomberg businessweek he's got a terrific story that brought all this to our attention in the magazine a quick headline Carol booking holdings newly booked room nights down eighty five percent in April according their CFO well I'm not surprised all right we're gonna continue to track that and get back to our conversation right now let's get back to where the nationals headlines.

Michael creamer Peter New Jersey
"michael creamer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

18:27 min | 1 year ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"George nori back with the along with Michael cream always we talk about forbidden archeology one wasn't Michael that first got you interested in this well that has to do with how lye grew up I was born in a military family my father was an intelligence officer in the United States Air Force so when I was young I I lived in all different parts of the world I went to high school and in Germany I I I lived in the spot Germany and I went to high school whether the American military high school there and during that live vacations I would go to different places in Europe I hit his stride one of my vacations up to Stockholm in Sweden I was staying at a youth hostel there and I had met some young people all Europeans who had gone to India and back over land you could actually do it at that time now the that part of the world is so such such a dangerous place not very many people would do it these days but in those days you could actually do it you could actually travel over land by train and bus from Europe to India and they told me so just really fascinating stories about their experiences of India going to Nepal and casual wear places like that encountering yogis things like that I decided well I I'd like to go there some day and I became interested in in the philosophy a few years later I the Grateful Dead concerts New York in the early seventies I got a copy of fog of Gita from problem so Christian devote peas who had been traveling around with the Grateful Dead and yeah I I I got the book from them and I took it all when I read it and I I became very interested eventually became the disciple of the groove translated that really brought so that got me further interested in studying the Parana's of that's where I began to encounter all these accounts of human civilizations that exists the millions and millions of years ago on this planet and I had to wonder is that choose from the following cheers there's some factual basis for it so that's what got me looking into the history of archaeology of writing the book for bids archaeology and then people began to ask me well if we did come from the apes of food yeah like Darwin says where did we come from and my answer to that question was my book human the Volusia that they they call during the day of the Darwin's theory so it kind of one thing led to to another so that's how I became involved in all of this and you never looked back Michael ever look back and I always want to keep moving forward no use looking back well this hour's gonna fly by let's go to Joe in buffalo New York first time caller hi Joe go ahead hello how you doing okay I have an idea about time it only exists because of its relationship to the sun and its rotation but outside of our solar system there's no okay it doesn't exist interesting thought well I I I I agree with the cut the caller there that I think there is a level of reality that is beyond time as we know it in this world is this world we experience time in terms of past present and future and this is one of Einstein's realizations as well as you know I was talking about him he he said this time that we experience in terms of past present and future events in a Lucia as alternately I agree with them of course we now our experience we're on a level where we have to undergo that experience of past present and future and we experience the destructive aspects of hi everything in this world that is material it comes into being eventually it's destroyed so I agree with the caller that there is a place there is a level of reality that beyond time Michael are you a believer that we were created by ceded the extraterrestrials or should we just evolved on this planet I I I I do accept what you said right there at the beginning George that we were seated here by extraterrestrial beings and I would say in the sense in one sense were all extraterrestrials in the sense that I think we we have to understand what a human being really is for some scientists the human being is a machine made of molecules in competition with other machines made of molecules I don't see it like that I see that we are beings of pure consciousness and isn't beings of pure consciousness were not from the world of matter were not to rush St we ARE origin is not here the origin of our father leaves via call may be from here but that conscious self that is within that vehicle it has an origin of extraterrestrial and as you said that that sees of conscious of those what is extraterrestrial and it was placed here what a story that was did you ever meet Zacharias Itchen are not personally but I'm familiar with his teachings I I yeah I met lots of other people I've met error five damage they're all gone so many of the researchers but I I never had an opportunity to meet him I had an opportunity of before he departed this world but you know it is is the scheduling of it just to work out that I was able to we have a conference that he was speaking yeah I was fortunate to give him a conscious life a lifetime achievement award all that right before he died but then I was kind of funny because he was up on stage I think it's close to ninety might have been ninety at that time and I I said the samurai front of the audience how old are you anyone anyone that's very ruled what route was that a question for me no no no I was telling you my Zacharias assistance story all right now how old are you anyways mine that's the question no kidding let's see let's go to land the in Santa Ana California welcome to the program land go ahead I've found by repeated from the nineteen seventies and they got me interested like Michael creamer but and because of engineering and then he's the best Robert Oppenheimer quoted the father time part but anyways I'll talk about a few minor that older than the one bookseller got from which is the so much of the route reminded that Laura I'm not Robina took from where it never mind you follow that Michael yeah I know he's talking about of Amman that the that there was I can name Robert yeah he took possession of this is a very Monessen other example of extraterrestrial technology transfer and yeah I've been to the encore what temple in Cambodia and they have car being the temple walls is on core want Cambodia depicting this is the law that the caller is talking about it was in the possession of this king Robert who was of pretty the body at sort of guy and he he gazed at war with Rama who was of a jar of god and in the battle Robert took possession of this the lava and that is is depicted as stone carvings that are in the encore what town ball yeah Cambodia next up let's go to Louise in Louisville Kentucky and Michael I gotta tell you she believes she is the reincarnated Cleopatra hello Louise thank you for taking my column so excited thirty years ago I went to the conflict temple in Los Angeles I don't know if it's still there but I went to a couple of the meetings I went to the dentist that they had after the meeting they also had an exhibit cruel for they so beautiful paintings of scenes from the the monarchs and the people in the in the blue cards now and it expects all still still there there me ask me where it was located I couldn't remember because it was so long ago but I was so comfortable with the people and it was just a beautiful experience and I still have the Bhagavad Gita book which I studied diligently and they probably so many things this was thirty years ago before many ideas that are out now were being expounded back the creation of people and it was just a great experience I'll never forget it and I still love the backup I Kita because it has such beautiful knowledge and keep things in it and I wanted to just let the guests know that I appreciate him given our ideas about for Christmas that the monolith the blue people under that is just something that the people of this world don't really know much about Michael where are the Christians these days they used to be on every street corner well so I I don't know about every street corner I think you they they but here here yeah and Los Angeles were and West Los Angeles Culver city area but some of us have gone on to coast to coast and to university news all over the world so it's but some some are still out there doing the chanting in the streets that still going on a sometimes I do it myself even Tom in la Hoya California hi Thomas George thank you for taking my call and Michael Premo it's a pleasure to speak to you you know you mentioned Albert Einstein reading the Indian scriptures but there were also other scientists Robert Oppenheimer who was the top scientist on the Manhattan Project right Rudin is memoirs that he developed the idea of atomic ignition by reading the Vadim's memories physicists marks playing you know who developed the idea of a matrix theory of the universe and Paul Dirac and it makes me wonder Michael one for more on a stand when you look at past civilizations really great civilizations why can't lanterns so let Maria move you know associated with India it seems like they didn't depend on computers or iPads or artificial intelligence thank dependent on the mastery of the mental arts meditation alchemy magic the law of attraction the wall of the tension as say Linda Taggart you know speaks about and so I'm wondering and when you look at people like Bach divine contra or Yogananda self realization or move to NA and of the condo Laney arts cirque the Karmapa of the Tibetan arts they all spoke about these previous civilizations centered around consciousness send the mastery of consciousness and so I'm wondering if you would speak well you have spoken about their but then it seems like these civilizations when you look at their temples like kisa blogto her go back Klay tapi you know they talk about building them through mental intention to light and sound him through meditation and so it appears from where I'm standing you don't need users are artificial intelligence the computer is your mind in the mastery of the mental arts the mastery of meditation at central and wondering whether I absolutely you're absolutely totally right about that and these ancient civilizations they were dealing with more subtle energies that were accustomed to dealing with today you're absolutely right about that as a matter of fact a lot of our modern technology I believe is our account to express is gross material form abilities that people once had naturally like remote viewing for example is invaded times it was called sewer dar shot the ability to see what's happening at a distance so now we have television of those smart phones and all of that which can be commercialized that used to be a lot of ties the sold to people and be used to control them and then if you like and things like that but it's our attempt to it's modern civilizations attempt to manifest as gross physical matter abilities people once you have the level of consciousness or the more subtle material elements so he yes you're absolutely right about that I totally agree with you and also the lady the highest technology you could say is purely spiritual it's even beyond the struggle with Terry all realm of things which itself is pretty amazing Michael what's your take on the pyramids of Giza how do you think that you constructed those you know is is kind of interesting what the the caller was saying yeah because there are traditions that say that they were manifest the by a G. yeah they the the people who they have a kind of Islamic picture of things that they were manifested by G. in other words spiritual kind of into the subtle the use of mystic powers to manifest though that that kind of tradition is there and that part of the world and of course there are some people who will say yes we know how they took millions of huge blocks of lines though and whatever from the quarries and move them and stack them up to those pyramid forms but I I I'm not really convinced but that's exactly how it was was was done so I I think there is some room for.

George nori Michael cream lye officer United States Air Force
"michael creamer" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:49 min | 2 years ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"N. P. R. Before we get started you mind if I get your name the way you'd like it and your title the way like it Micheal Creamer So non dairy creamer and my titles actually gates professor of develop into site is in the Department of Economics at Harvard and Nobel laureate I think you definitely have to put that on there I should think so he'll pry I mean you know that to Converse much the peak because when someone wins the Nobel Prize the whole world is going to acknowledge them as having contributed significantly to their field and in this case to humanity meaningful way. It's hard to think of how you even celebrate that actually found out our reporting at was diet coke awesome upgrade to the Diet Coke Survive and that ladies and gentlemen is how you celebrate winning a Nobel Prize you upgrade for it diet coke to irregular nothing so mind now Micheal Creamer just won the Nobel prize for his work in what's known is element economics along with his colleagues esther flow an advocate Banerjee the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said that the work of the three economists had quote dramatically proved our ability to fight poverty in practice visit indicated from planet money I'm Garcia and I'm Stacey Vanek Smith Today on the show we talk with Nobel laureate and regular coke drinker Micheal creamer about development economics what it is how it has helped change the way we think about economics and how it's even changed the world support for this podcast and the following message come from Zoom Zoom is used by millions to connect face to face through a single APP for videoconferencing phone calls group Chat Webinars and conference rooms visit zoom online to set up your free account today meet happy with Zoom so economics as a field it can have the reputation of being kind of abstract cerebral yes that's true if matty lots of CIGNA's you know complicated financial instruments ivory tower stuff Michael Creamer our newly minted Nobel laureate says he here's this from people all the time people have a view of economic says only about the stock market talks next. That's the question that you get when you sit makes people on airplanes there like is the stock market GonNa go up hopefully classic questions going to the I I also much place on that one now is a Nobel prize so you really want to know if he thinks. I got this doctor from a Nobel Prize winner and the response he might give to somebody who asks him for stomach that look development economics is something different branches mixed focuses on improving conditions in developing countries so Michael's research is looked at different ways to improve health care education agriculture social conditions all these different things in those developing countries Michael got started in this kind of economics when he was visiting a friend who was teaching in Kenya his friend was working for a nonprofit and had been put in charge of a bunch of local schools and they were trying to figure out how to best run these schools and where to invest their very limited resources we weren't sure uh what the best approach was they had several different ideas that they were interested in China and as we were talking I suggested that perhaps they could try some approaches in some schools and other approaches and other schools and they did that systematically they could learn what was what was working best and evaluate the impact of what they're doing much isn't Medical trial much as in a medical trial real world trials are used in many of the sciences but applying them in economics was groundbreaking in some of the most noted work of Michael Kramer and his colleagues they looked at where to best allocate resources impoverished schools in Kenya so for example would students benefit more from free textbooks or from free meals it turned out neither of those things actually made a huge impact for the students what did make a huge impact for the students another study uncovered a pretty unexpected answer to that hyphen free access to de worming medication. Hookworm whipper roundworm worms that actually used to be in the southern United States. take the medication to treat worms was quite cheap but it did still cost some money and there were a lot of parents who are still not getting it for their kids what made a huge difference was when kids were given free access to de worming medication Michael says the impact it had on their education was extraordinary we found that topic for much more like quitting school absence from school what by one quarter reflect when they had access to the medicine Michael and his colleagues followed the students for years all the way through school and into the workforce and they found that free access to de worming medication just kept paying off this was a while ago Alga young adults we see that they're actually earning more and consuming more and the girls are more likely to onto secondary school so huge impact relative to the really tiny costs lose medicines cost really pennies per does investing in De worming medication as it turned out had a much bigger impact on the educations professional lives of kids than textbooks or school meals and economic mixed figured that out the solution was not obvious it emerged after a series of rigorous experiments that were systematically trying different approaches until they found the most active efficient solution Michael and his colleagues presented that information to the Kenyan government you want to help kids and keep them in school put your money here in best in de worming medication and it will affect major change it will move the needle they were excited about it and they decided they wanted to launch an national program and then Indians state governments heard heard about it and then the national government of India introduced a similar program so now Aw Th Indian program is reaching more than one hundred million children every year and I think I remember reading that The program actually did a pain for itself through increased tax revenue because people did become more productive when they were healthier is that is that right that's exactly right recent follow up work we've looked at the economic impact of us now that students at the time of original de worming are now in the labor force and see the people are earning more Ah The free just do the calculations turns out of the extra tax revenue alone would have been more than enough to pay the cost of the program. It's estimated that the work of Michael Creamer in his fellow laureates this year has changed the lives of hundreds of millions of people around the world and Michael Says he's very glad to see that a more hands on kind of economics is being acknowledged invalidated in such an important way we're trying to do work that is very rigorous that is using the Ah Tours of of economics but that is also engaged with practical problems it's easy to see the problems of global poverty and to think that there are intractable that we can't make a difference but actually there's been huge progress there will be more progress as economics is applied to different problems in the developing world he thinks he can help find simple practical solutions that can actually make a big difference. Michael says he is incredibly excited to see economics being used this way and of course peace excited about winning the Nobel yeah maybe we'll even figure out how to celebrate it properly congratulations thank you so much and I think you should upgrade to regular coke for at least a week paid lip balm yeah there you go there now we're talking we're talking this episode of the indicator was produced by Lena. San's Gary edited by Paddy Hirsch Our intern is Nadia Lewis indicator is a production of NPR. Yeah.

Nobel Prize Micheal Creamer Michael Michael Creamer Department of Economics Nobel Royal Swedish Academy of Scien CIGNA Michael Kramer Kenya N. P. R. Banerjee Harvard professor Stacey Vanek Smith Garcia China San
An Interview With Nobel Economics Prize-Winner Michael Kremer

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:25 min | 2 years ago

An Interview With Nobel Economics Prize-Winner Michael Kremer

"Economics as a field it can have the reputation of being kind of abstract cerebral yes that's true if matty lots of CIGNA's you know complicated financial instruments ivory tower stuff Michael Creamer our newly minted Nobel laureate says he here's this from people all the time people have a view of economic says only about the stock market talks next. That's the question that you get when you sit makes people on airplanes there like is the stock market GonNa go up hopefully classic questions going to the I I also much place on that one now is a Nobel prize so you really want to know if he thinks. I got this doctor from a Nobel Prize winner and the response he might give to somebody who asks him for stomach that look development economics is something different branches mixed focuses on improving conditions in developing countries so Michael's research is looked at different ways to improve health care education agriculture social conditions all these different things in those developing countries Michael got started in this kind of economics when he was visiting a friend who was teaching in Kenya his friend was working for a nonprofit and had been put in charge of a bunch of local schools and they were trying to figure out how to best run these schools and where to invest their very limited resources we weren't sure uh what the best approach was they had several different ideas that they were interested in China and as we were talking I suggested that perhaps they could try some approaches in some schools and other approaches and other schools and they did that systematically they could learn what was what was working best and evaluate the impact of what they're doing much isn't Medical trial much as in a medical trial real world trials are used in many of the sciences but applying them in economics was groundbreaking in some of the most noted work of Michael Kramer and his colleagues they looked at where to best allocate resources impoverished schools in Kenya so for example would students benefit more from free textbooks or from free meals it turned out neither of those things actually made a huge impact for the students what did make a huge impact for the students another study uncovered a pretty unexpected answer to that hyphen free access to de worming medication. Hookworm whipper roundworm worms that actually used to be in the southern United States. take the medication to treat worms was quite cheap but it did still cost some money and there were a lot of parents who are still not getting it for their kids what made a huge difference was when kids were given free access to de worming medication Michael says the impact it had on their education was extraordinary we found that topic for much more like quitting school absence from school what by one quarter reflect when they had access to the medicine Michael and his colleagues followed the students for years all the way through school and into the workforce and they found that free access to de worming medication just kept paying off this was a while ago Alga young adults we see that they're actually earning more and consuming more and the girls are more likely to onto secondary school so huge impact relative to the really tiny costs lose medicines cost really pennies per does investing in De worming medication as it turned out had a much bigger impact on the educations professional lives of kids than textbooks or school meals and economic mixed figured that out the solution was not obvious it emerged after a series of rigorous experiments that were systematically trying different approaches until they found the most active efficient solution Michael and his colleagues presented that information to the Kenyan government you want to help kids and keep them in school put your money here in best in de worming medication and it will affect major change it will move the needle they were excited about it and they decided they wanted to launch an national program and then Indians state governments heard heard about it and then the national government of India introduced a similar program so now Aw Th Indian program is reaching more than one hundred million children every year and I think I remember reading that The program actually did a pain for itself through increased tax revenue because people did become more productive when they were healthier is that is that right that's exactly right recent follow up work we've looked at the economic impact of us now that students at the time of original de worming are now in the labor force and see the people are earning more Ah The free just do the calculations turns out of the extra tax revenue alone would have been more than enough to pay the cost of the program. It's estimated that the work of Michael Creamer in his fellow laureates this year has changed the lives of hundreds of millions of people around the world and Michael Says he's very glad to see that a more hands on kind of economics is being acknowledged invalidated in such an important way we're trying to do work that is very rigorous that is using the Ah Tours of of economics but that is also engaged with practical problems it's easy to see the problems of global poverty and to think that there are intractable that we can't make a difference but actually there's been huge progress there will be more progress as economics is applied to different problems in the developing world he thinks he can help find simple practical solutions that can actually make a big difference. Michael says he is incredibly excited to see economics being used this way and of course peace excited about winning the Nobel yeah maybe we'll even figure out how to celebrate it properly congratulations thank you so much and I think you should upgrade to regular coke for at least a week paid lip balm yeah there you go there now we're talking we're talking

Michael Michael Creamer Nobel Prize Cigna Michael Kramer Kenya China Kenyan Government United States. India One Quarter
"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Where you get your news WBZ newsradio it's partly cloudy and sixty three degrees in Boston at twelve o'clock good afternoon I'm Nicole Davis here's what's happening big win this morning for three local professors from Harvard and am I T. they won the twenty nineteen Nobel Prize for economics WBZ's Jim a case on the story professors on G. Banerjee and Esther to flow representing M. I. T. N. Dr Michael creamer from Harvard winning the honor for their work on fighting global poverty the results of their research helping some five million children in India for remedial tutoring programs and also their research help governments around the globe allocate money toward specific child health care needs Esther do flow has the distinction of being the youngest person ever to win the honor at the age of forty six she's also the second woman ever to win Jim McKay W. B. C. Boston's newsradio twelve all one in many Italian Americans lining the streets of Boston yesterday for the Columbus day parade all coming out together to celebrate their heritage but for many though today is far from a celebrations we hear from WBZ's James Ross now while there's a growing list of municipalities across the country no longer celebrating Columbus day because of his actions for many Italian Americans today is about celebrating their culture and contributions to America that pride was shown yesterday during the eighty third Columbus day parade that went from city hall plaza to the north and on the other end of the spectrum though today continues to be a reminder of the suffering of the native population Molly is walking by the state house and things it's time to evolve there are a number of ways to celebrate Americans without directly applauding I manage to.

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"What's happening many are now saying Kurdish forces are being faced with genocide over Turkey's actions in northern Syria and the U. S. having forces out of the region at the request of president trump ABC's Martha Raddatz has more on the fallout so far and how Russia is now starting to get involved leader of those forces writing today that if we have to choose between compromise and genocide we will choose our people this is a major shift and means the U. S. is ceding any influence there to Russia Iran and the Assad regime as for our own forces there the president has given them thirty days to get out of northern Syria but their positions are becoming more and more vulnerable European Union leaders are now looking to suspend arms sales to Turkey as their military action continues more testimony today on Capitol Hill a one time adviser to the president on Russia now testifying behind closed doors taking part in the house impeachment inquiry lawmakers are talking to Fiona hill today a former White House official who is a Russia expert and she is expected to tell the members of the three house committees looking into the president that the administration went outside normal channels of diplomacy when dealing with Ukraine meanwhile Thursday is to be a big day is former E. U. ambassador Gordon Simon is due to testify before the committees in apparent defiance of a White House order to administration officials not to cooperate with the inquiry bill ray Cobb CBS news Capitol Hill it's eleven thirty one business owners are saying they have been driven out of business the user saying they're being deprived of a safe alternative to smoking however the Baker administration remains adamant there vaping sales ban is necessary right now for Massachusetts there's going to be another hearing with a federal judge in court this week the hearing is set for Tuesday in Boston federal court and is expected to focus on the vaping industries request to temporarily lift the ban while the broader cases decided last week US District Court judge in the era tell whiny denied the industry's request to lift the September twenty fourth bam until Tuesday's hearing governor Charlie Baker issued the band after state officials reported ten probable or confirmed cases of long illness caused by E. cigarette products last week the state reported its first confirmed deaths from the illness I'm Charlie Sherman WBZ Boston's news radio now eleven thirty to the fire is out for now but it burn for hours overnight at a recycling plant in Wilmington at OPR systems it's a facility as a recycling plant over seventy five thousand square feet in its location is long and over street no reports of a cause yet on that fire the scene was cleared out just before seven o'clock this morning one firefighter treated for minor injuries and three professors to from MIT and one from Harvard winners of the twenty nineteen Nobel prizes for economics honored with the award for their research that has been used in the fight against global poverty professors OB G. Banerjee and Esther to flow of M. I. T. Dr Michael creamer of Harvard their combined work helping five million children across India with remedial tutoring programs and also their research has been used by different governments around the world and how to allocate money for child health care needs professor to flow was the second woman ever to win the Nobel economics prize she is also the youngest person to ever win as well.

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Degrees we have plenty of sunshine in Boston it is ten thirty on this Monday morning welcome back to the work week thanks for joining us I'm Jim McKay and here's what's happening all right now in Syria Kurdish forces are left with few options after losing support for US forces and they're now turning to desperate measures as we hear from ABC using an panel on the Turkish Syrian border this commanders gave America a choice are they coming help was in a battle with Turkey impose a no fly zone we're going to look to someone else and that's exactly what's happened right now we're seeing Syrian regime fourth rolling in this direction backed by Russia and the could take keep telling us they feel betrayed by America and no one in the region will ever take America's would for it ever again empanel ABC news on the Syrian Turkish border and ten thirty one latest on the house impeachment inquiry is more testimony begins this week on Capitol Hill CBS's bill Rakoff has more from Washington Fiona hills appearance today before the three house committees conducting the inquiry is likely focusing on the trump administration's unusual diplomatic relationship with Ukraine hill is described as a hawk in service Mr trump's top adviser on the Kremlin until she left the administration in August because of that she appears not to be bound by the White House order to not cooperate with the impeachment inquiry and is free to speak her mind to the committee's bill ray cop CBS news Capitol Hill and arguments this week both for and against the ban on the vaping sales across Massachusetts with another hearing set for this week a hearing is set for Tuesday in Boston federal court and is expected to focus on the vaping industries request to temporarily lift the ban while the broader cases decided last week US District Court judge in the era tell whiny denied the industry's request to lift the September twenty fourth bam until Tuesday's hearing governor Charlie Baker issued the ban after state officials reported ten probable or confirmed cases of long illness caused by E. cigarette products last week the state reported its first confirmed deaths from the illness I'm Charlie Sherman WBZ Boston's news radio at ten thirty to the fire is out now but it burn for hours overnight at a recycling plant in Wilmington at OPR systems it's a facility that has over seventy five thousand square feet along and over street there no reports of a cause yet on that fire the scene was cleared just before seven o'clock this morning one firefighter was treated for minor injuries and three professors two of whom are firm in my T. one from Harvard winners of the twenty nineteen Nobel Prize for economics honored with the award for their research that's been used in the fight against global poverty professors OB G. Banerjee and Esther did DA flow of M. I. T. also doctor Michael creamer of Harvard their combined work helping some five million kids in India with remedial tutoring programs also their research has been used by different governments around the world and how to allocate money for child health care needs professor to flow was the second woman ever to win the Nobel economics prize she is also the youngest person to ever win.

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"What it's like to walk into an awakened when any location this is Dan right they asked because we've all heard nightmares of programs that coral you in a room with a bunch of other people what has the atmosphere of the RMV awaken wanted he takes a different approach one where you feel welcomed and not judged were you are greeted by name and speak one on one with the coach I looked forward to each week as I lost my thirty five pounds and now each month for my free lifelong maintenance experience how awakened one eighty has revolutionized the weight loss industry and set up your consultation visit Kelsey in my coaches in new Jamie and team in Quincy Katie and her crew in Peabody Alicia and the coaches in Littleton Laura in team in Seekonk and at the new downtown location Korean and the coaches in government center real people ready to help you reclaim your life awakened one any weight loss the long term solution for weight loss baseball is more than just a game it's a big business called Resnick's business of baseball in original MLB video series cheers key insights on the business side of America's pastime musical Resnick dot com slash and they'll be cold Resnick advisory assurance tax transform your game W. easy bus W. X. K. S. F. MHD to Medford and I heart radio station the number is where you get your news WBZ newsradio sixty one degrees partly cloudy skies in Boston at ten o'clock good morning I'm Nicole Davis and here's what's happening big win this morning for three local professors from MIT and Harvard the twenty nineteen Nobel Prize for economics W. B. C.'s Jimmy case on the story professors OB G. Banerjee and Esther to flow representing M. I. T. N. Dr Michael creamer from Harvard winning the honor for their work on fighting global poverty the results of their research helping some five million children in India for remedial tutoring programs and also their research help governments around the globe allocate money toward specific child health care needs Esther do flow has the distinction of being the youngest person ever to win the honor at the age of forty six she's also the second woman ever to win Jim McKay WBZ Boston's newsradio ten a one this portion of the news brought to us by the Massachusetts health connector how many Italian Americans turned out yesterday in Boston for the Columbus day parade coming together to celebrate their heritage but for many though today is far from.

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Four ninety five Mazda everybody drives it for ninety five good Monday morning I'm Jeff brown thank you for being with us today here's what's going on just announced this morning three professors from MIT and Harvard winners of the Nobel Prize for economics WBZ's Jim McKay with detail her sister's OB G. Banerjee and Esther to flow representing M. I. T. N. Dr Michael creamer from Harvard winning the honor for their work on fighting global poverty the results of their research helping some five million children in India for remedial tutoring programs and also their research help governments around the globe allocate money towards specific child health care needs Esther do flow has the distinction of being the youngest person ever to win the honor at the age of forty six she's also the second woman ever to win Jim McKay W. B. C. Boston's newsradio all clear sign in Wilmington after a fire at the town's recycling center plant one firefighter suffering from minor injuries no word on what caused that blaze early this morning big turnout for Sunday's Columbus day parade in the city of Boston but for many it's a celebration of Italian heritage but not everyone however is celebrating today WBZ's James Ross joins us live from the state house with this story good morning James good morning Jeff now while there is a growing list of municipalities across the country no longer celebrating Columbus day because of how the Italian explorer treated the native population for many Italian Americans today is about celebrating their culture and controlling contributions to America that pride was shown a yesterday during the eighty third Columbus day parade that went from city hall plaza to the north and we saw high school marching band stuck boats veterans participating in the parade a lot of great fun on a very nice sunny day now on the other end of the spectrum today continues to be a reminder of the suffering that the native population went through because of Columbus Molly she's walking by the state house this morning and thinks it's time to evolve I'm.

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Syrian opposition allies are ready to launch an assault on the Syrian critters held city of Amman beers are alon told reporters this morning we are about to implement our decision AP correspondent Charles de Ledesma Syria is moving forces towards its northern border as Turkey continues its military offensive there is a state news agency says troops into top car as they move north against Turkish forces in the country Tucker had been run by the Islamic state group and is on the road to the city of Raqqah which was I as his date back to capital until it lost both in twenty seventeen the move tool Tabqa and nearby villages comes a day off to serious codes say Syrian government forces had agreed to help him fend off Turkey's invasion that's a major shift in alliances as U. S. troops withdraw from the northern border area I'm Charles into this month again Turkish present order one has signaled a Turkish troops and their Syrian opposition allies are ready to launch an assault on the Syrian Kurdish held city of mom beach meanwhile corresponded bills ever tells us the courage to receiving some help government forces have now arrived in northern Syria to help the Kurds fight off the Turkish offensive that has pushed farther south the Turks say they have secured a major East West highway and may now porch further into C. R. A. had been initially intended meanwhile the death toll mounts and there are more reports of ISIS fighters and their families escaping prison camps in the region president trump seems to have washed his hands of this situation the only beneficiary in the latest moves Syrian leader Bashar al Assad who now has more leverage with the Kurds who had been establishing an autonomous self administered area in northern Syria Saad comes away with more power but also is open the possibility of a wider confrontation between Syria and Turkey this as president trump multi complete U. S. troop withdrawal from Syria the twenty ninety Nobel Prize in economics awarded this morning is being jointly awarded to other she'd Banerjee after dot flow and Michael creamer for their work alleviating global poverty for their experimental approach to alleviating global poverty and get this they all have ties to Boston dot flow becomes the.

"michael creamer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"michael creamer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Michael Creamer, special guests for the next couple of hours also known as the forbidden archaeologist hailed as groundbreaking research pioneer, and international thirty and archaeological anomalies as well. Several of his books include forbidden archeology, the forbidden archaeologists, divine nature human diva Lucien as well. Michael welcome back to the program. We've missed you. George and all your listeners. So what do you think of this discovery of this fossil bones and teeth found in northern Philippines? Well, it's a very interesting discovery is illustrates a a lot of points about how archaeology really works. I think one of the really significant things is that complexity size our picture of human origins. These discoveries aren't particularly old. They're about fifty thousand years old, and the they're really not many items in the discoveries you've really got seventeen and a couple of finger bones and a couple of toe bones. And that's about it. But they have human like features, but not exactly like modern, homo sapiens. So the researchers think that about fifty thousand years ago, there were human beings like existing and there were other species also very human-like existing at the same time. And this this calls to mind one of the statements from the ancient sanskrit writings of India. Which tell us there are four hundred thousand humid, like species existing in this universe that we inhabit. So it could be that. This discovery represents the finding of the remains of one of those four hundred thousand human life species that the ancient sanskrit writings of India, speak about Michael tell us what you think this creature would've looked like many years ago. Well, you you've only got a few bones to go on as I said, they've got a few teeth of few small finger bones of few small Togo and part of Famer I believe so it could have been now one one of the foot bones that they have is a metatarsal that's the bone. That is in the center of the foot. You have your Togo of Togo's connect two long bones is in the foot and the main body of the foot, and this metatarsal is heavily curved, which means that the foot was probably adapted for life and the trees, so this creates are based on the. Evidence from this very curved metatarsal football on sort of indicates it would probably have been human like but adapted to life in the forest or the trees, Michael why does it take so long to discover these different kinds of creatures? Well, one thing is that scientists originally.

Michael Creamer Togo India Lucien Philippines George football fifty thousand years