38 Burst results for "Michael Sullivan"

Fresh update on "michael sullivan" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:58 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "michael sullivan" discussed on Morning Edition

"To ineligible patients, some of whom had connections with company leadership. NPR investigative correspondent Tim Mak joins us now, Tim. Good morning. Good morning. What lawmakers want to know? So basically, this is a subcommittee that's led by Congressman Jim Clyburn. This is the House Select subcommittee on the Corona virus crisis. What they're really looking for is evidence that the company intentionally distributed vaccines to ineligible patients across multiple states. Which is, incidentally, one of the conclusions of an NPR investigation published about a week ago. One of the committee's concerns is that there should be an equitable distribution of vaccines, one that prioritizes those most at risk in society, rather than the wealthy or well connected. And so the committee is giving one medical two weeks to provide documents about their vaccination practices. One medical, of course, is a primary health care provider that is publicly traded and valued in the billions of dollars. It's business model is to provide tech driven primary healthcare for members. Who usually pay about $200 a year. Okay, so you you pay this fee. You can go to the doctor when you need a checkup or whatever. They were also helping to get vaccines out there. But now here they are giving the vaccines to the wrong people. What does that mean for local health departments that were using one medical is a distribution source. Our distribution channel. Well, so we reached out to every local jurisdiction where one medical does business. We found that eight local jurisdictions have cut the company off from vaccine allocations or are not planning to work with them again In the future. For example, San Francisco County made the unusual move of not only holding the supply of vaccines the company but also demanding 1620 doses back. And then the tail County that it had done an investigation and found that one medical had vaccinated 70 individuals who were in eligible to be vaccinated at that time it to stopped the allocation of vaccines to the company. So those air just a couple of examples. Hasn't won medical denied that they knowingly vaccinated the wrong people. That's right. And it says that the response from these eight different departments of health and and the situation it's in is largely the result of misunderstandings that it was working with local partners to address any concerns. After I approached him about the news of this new congressional probe. They said that they air quote, confident that we will be able to clear up these misunderstandings. CEO. A mere Dan Rubin made no apologies in a call with investors last week. Regarding the stories that we strongly refute these gross mischaracterizations. Any assertions that we broadly and knowingly disregard eligibility guidelines are not true and in contradiction to our actual approach. The communications obtained and published by NPR suggests that the company was aware medical providers across multiple states were sounding the alarm internally about one medical lax oversight over eligibility requirements. One of the documents show a senior one medical staff for instructing medical providers. Quote. We are not policing. Okay, so again. This story was broken on NPR a few days ago, and the news now is that a congressional subcommittee headed by Jim Clyburn of South Carolina will launch their own investigation. NPR's Tim Mack, Thanks so much. Thank you. At the center of the Biden administration's foreign policy is championing democracy. But in some parts of the world like Southeast Asia, Democracy is in retreat in me and mar US influence is waning. China's influence is growing, and early Last month, the military staged a coup. Here's Michael Sullivan. Is the man Mark who really the Bide administration's first major foreign policy test. I said, this is unfortunate timing. I actually don't think this is a major task. Yun soon is director of the China Program at the Stimson Center in Washington. I mean, even today, coming to the foreign policy priorities off the Biden administration, I don't know it's a Burmese cool will run Top five Or even top seven. But the Biden administration has acted quickly imposing targeted sanctions on Myanmar's coup makers instead of broader sanctions that could hurt me on Mars, people in general. But are targeted sanctions the right way to go. The question is, Do you want to do good, or do you want to feel good kisser? Mahbubani is a former Singaporean ambassador to the United Nations. And the author of the recent book Has China one. If you want to feel good, you impose sanctions knowing full well, the sanctions will have no impact. And will not change the course of what me Amar is going to do when you're dealing with a group of very stubborn generals. We're not going to be bothered by by a few sanctions. The Stimson Centers young son doesn't disagree. I will say that there is no good option and that the options that we have available is unlikely to bring the results that we would like to see The best option available, Kishore Mahbubani says, is to engage me and Mars neighbors in finding a negotiated solution. And rebuild some of the trust lost during four years of the Trump administration. It's time Fel United States to approach issue with some degree of humility that it may not have the right answers and that working with the right parts that's and listening to them. Reproduce wonders Mobile, Bonnie says, despite publicly insisting that the coup be reversed, US policymakers must know that's a tough sell in a region where authoritarian governments of the norm, not the exception. That's how United states must learn to deal with South is Asian deal with in perfect regimes and in perfect compromises. But at the end of the day, this police is peace and stability and despite their geo political rivalry in this instance, many analysts The U. S. And China could find common ground. China has invested in the incense, which the administration's and over the last decade, China has made deals and peace with the magma democratization. Teaching young from pseudo rock is director of the Institute of Security and International Studies. At Bangkok's Chulalongkorn University. He says China and Myanmar's military known as the top model to have a long history of mistrust, I think the Chinese leaders in Beijing they have thought that they have figured out where me and Marc fits in their overlord, Geo Strategic Dick Song. But now with the cool cool is a bit of a spanner in the works for the Chinese because now they don't know how to deal with the minimum of Commodore again, but in the end, says Richard Horsey, and independent political analyst East in Yangon. What Outside actors want probably won't count all that much. This is about the military and the population of the country, and that's where this will be sorted out. I think not in the hallways of international diplomacy for NPR news. I'm Michael.

Michael Sullivan Dan Rubin Tim Mack Richard Horsey Jim Clyburn Kishore Mahbubani Michael Tim Mak TIM Mahbubani Institute Of Security And Inte Marc Bonnie Southeast Asia Mark 70 Individuals 1620 Doses Washington Mars Amar
"michael sullivan" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:58 min | 21 hrs ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KCRW

"U. S vaccination efforts could get a boost soon. Texas expects more than 200,000 doses of the newly authorized Johnson and Johnson vaccine to be delivered this week for NPR News. I'm Matt largely in Austin. Protests turned deadly and me and Mara on Sunday, police and soldiers clashed with demonstrators. They're protesting the military's overthrow of the Myanmar civilian government. United Nations says 18 People were killed. Michael Sullivan is in neighboring Thailand. He reports both sides in the me and mark conflict have reached an impasse. In terms of a peaceful resolution. There doesn't seem to be any room for compromise here. The military isn't going suddenly cave and say, Right are bad. Here's your government back in. The protesters say they'll accept nothing less so. There's a foreign ministers meeting tomorrow, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations or Coffee on to discuss the situation. Maybe they can come up with something, but I think that's a big ask Michael Sullivan reporting. You're listening to NPR news. It's 604. This is KCRW news. I'm Matt Gillam. The California Department of Public Health says it's on track to meet its goal of vaccinating three million people a week. Starting this week capped radios. Scott Rod has the latest The state says meeting. That goal will depend on vaccine supply in the states Partnership with healthcare giant Blue Shield of California, which is handling distribution logistics. Yolanda Richardson is secretary of the California government Operations Agency and the state's lead on vaccine operations were building on the strong foundation of clinics operating in our local health care decisions. And dramatically increasing the capacity to live to deliver vaccines by adding new vaccination providers and sites where the vaccine will be available. Several counties in recent days have complained of poor communication with Blue Shield and a delayed transition to the new statewide system. The company says it's working out kinks along the way and will take full management responsibility of the state's vaccine network by the end of March. Cap radios. Scott Rod reporting. California Senator Alex Padilla has unveiled his first piece of legislation since taking office, The Citizenship for Essential Workers Act would create an expedited pathway to citizenship for more than five million undocumented residents. Alienated sight of his own family experience as the child of Mexican immigrant parents who spent decades working in the service, industry, dignity, respect and a pathway to citizenship for essential workers is personal to me. It's also in the best interest of our nation. Roughly three out of four undocumented workers in the U. S have jobs that have been designated essential during the pandemic That includes those who work in health care, agriculture, sanitation and more. L. A congressman Ted Lieu joined in on the bill, too, he says Americans rely on undocumented immigrants to survive. They help protect Americans. When they got sick. They help get Americans food. They help make sure Americans were got transportation and these essential workers are still doing that. Still in the middle of a pandemic. Bill would also offer protections to undocumented relatives of an essential worker who died from covert 19. And finally, the House of Representatives passed a sprawling conservation bill that provides protections to public lands across the nation that includes the South lands San Gabriel Mountains alongside majestic landscapes and Arizona, Colorado and Washington. Bill aims to provide extra protections to about 1.5 million acres of public lands by designating them as wilderness. It would also prevent new oil, gas and mineral extraction on more than 1.2 million acres of public land. And preserve 1000 miles of rivers, my adding them to the national wild and Scenic River System here in the South Land. The protecting America's Wilderness in Public Lands Act will expand the same Gabriel Mountains National Monument. Will establish a national recreation area along the foothills and San Gabriel River corridor and designate some 30,000 acres protected wilderness. The location is critical. These mountains supply a third of L, a county's water and 70% of its open space. Legislation is now headed to the Senate. Support for NPR comes from Newman, a personalized program based in psychology to help people understand their motivations, change their habits and live lead healthier lives. Learn more. At noon in o m dot com. It is six or seven on this first of March, and you are listening to member supported KCRW. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. It's a busy week for voting rights. The Supreme Court considers whether Arizona law violates them. The House votes on a Democratic bill to expand voter access, and Republicans who control most state legislatures. Wanna tighten access. Republicans hope to reshape future elections based on their false claims about the 2020 vote even is Donald Trump was trying to overturn that Democratic election Last fall. His allies, Senator Lindsey Graham, went on Fox News and spoke of mail in ballots which have been used securely for years. What we're used Morva I Democrats, Melon balloting is a nightmare for us. So if we don't fight back in 2020, we're never gonna win again. Presidential E ah, lots of steak here, you know, separate Fox appearance, Graham repeated false claims about mail in ballots and predicted Republicans would crack down in the future. If we don't do something about voting by mail, we're gonna lose the ability elected Republican in this country. Republicans lost control of the Senate limiting Graham's power to follow up. But Republicans still control many state legislatures, and many are considering bills to change voting laws based on the falsehoods of two Only 20 plays and Jim, I appreciate you being here today. There are a couple of bills on Georgia's Republican dominated House of Representatives held hearings on a plan for multiple new rules. There has been controversy regarding our election system. So Chairman Barry Fleming introduced House Bill 5 31 in attempt to restore the confidence of our public. He said. Democrats Stacey Abrams criticized Georgia voting after losing a governor's race in 2018. She successfully pushed for greater voter access, and now Republicans want changes of their own. The biggest one would limit early voting to no more than 17 days. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting covers elections in the state. And he says big, Democratic leaning counties used to do more days than that to manage their big populations. They're talking about making things uniforms. Georgia has 159 counties, which is second only to Texas. And there are some counties that have as many voters as maybe a small neighborhood in Atlanta, and this would treat all of them the same, which would tend to make it harder for the bigger, more urban, more democratic metro counties. To account for everyone and get them through. The early voting process, especially a vote by mail is restricted. Like some other measures in the legislature. Voting on weekends would also be harder to schedule affecting souls to the polls, events that black churches hold on Sundays. Legislature is considering other bills. The state Senate last week passed Senator Larry Walker's plan to add an idea requirement to request an absentee ballots. 97% of the registered voters have either a driver's license number or personal I d number issued by the state of Georgia Walker's bill is less dramatic than some and he says. It's a basic reform. There was the Senate voted, Democratic Senator David Lucas tearfully said it would keep some people from voting. Every last one of the election meeting is about The election into that way. I won't and you want to perpetuate the light of Trump told the nonprofit Brennan Center is tracking proposals like Georgia's across the country. Hi, it's Megan. How are you? Hey, I'm doing OK, I'm doing OK, thank you for so we called Miranda Pettus of its voting rights team. We'd heard the Brennan Center had counted 106 bills.

Steve Inskeep Matt Gillam Donald Trump Stephen Fowler Michael Sullivan Noel King Stacey Abrams Brennan Center Yolanda Richardson Miranda Pettus 106 bills 2018 House of Representatives Scott Rod Austin Sunday Colorado Graham Atlanta 1000 miles
Fresh update on "michael sullivan" discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

00:32 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "michael sullivan" discussed on Here & Now

"Just information. It's what the news means. consider this from. Npr protesters turned out again today. In me and mars largest city yangon in defiance of security forces that fired into crowds of protesters. Yesterday sunday was the bloodiest day in myanmar since the military seized power there one month ago. Michael sullivan has been covering the story for npr from thailand and he joins us now for more michael. The united nations human rights office says at least eighteen people were killed in myanmar yesterday. Tell us more about what happened. Well in the past month myanmar's new military ruler showed uncharacteristic restraint for brutal institution. One that's been accused of genocide and ethnic cleansing in its treatment of ethnic minority row hangup. But yesterday morning they went all in. I think it was just nasty riot. Police and military units were out in force all over the country and the biggest city and gone in the second city mandalay and other cities and they didn't hold back tear gas. Rubber bullets live rounds against protestors. Who seemed a little taken aback. From the video i watched at how quickly and violently things turned and those videos and photos. Pretty graphic bloodied protesters being dragged away to safety by their friends and more wounded cowering and buildings in and around the protests sites. It wasn't pretty. Yeah it was quite a scene as you say. And i'm curious now michael because it's been a month since this military coup. They claimed election fraud without evidence and military leaders initially had promised new elections so have they actually offered a date for that or provided any sort of concessions to democracy or. Do you get the sense particularly from yesterday's violence that that the situation could just escalate and continue to get worse. I would have to go with the situations going to get worse. Initially they said they were imposing a state of emergency for year which implied that they were going to have new elections in the year but since then they've been very quiet on that subject and honestly. I don't see much hope that this is going to get resolved peacefully after yesterday's violence national security advisor. Jake sullivan said there would be additional. Actions to impose further costs on those responsible for yesterday's violence and the coup. But if the us can't get its regional allies on board. It's tough to see. Diplomacy working japan and singapore are two of the biggest investors in myanmar. and even though they're both allies there's a lot at stake economically. Ah so if the. Us can't get them on board. I don't think myanmar's military will loosen. Its hold. They haven't been afraid of sanctions in the past. I don't think they will be now though. I think it's been clear from just how big these demonstrations have been that the military has overreached or at least underestimated how much they are reviled by the general population one other notable development today that the lawyer for the ousted leader aung san suu. She says she's facing new criminal charges and she appeared in court via video. This is the first time she's been seen since she was detained a month ago. So michael what else do we know about her status. Not a lot in the beginning. She was apparently detained in her house in the capital of nippy but now we're not sure her lawyer is you just said said. She appeared today in court in the capital and was charged with her third alleged defense since the february first coup. This one was for inciting unrest on top of the first to charges. He faces already. Wait for it. For illegally importing walkie-talkies and for defying a public order limiting public gatherings due to the coronavirus pandemic. It's pretty obvious. The military is trying to lay the groundwork for keeping her from running for public office again even if they give up power again. That's reporter michael sullivan with the latest from myanmar after the bloodiest day since.

Michael Sullivan Jake Sullivan Yesterday Morning Yesterday Thailand Aung San Suu Today TWO One Month Ago Mars Myanmar First A Month Ago February Both Yesterday Sunday Michael Yangon First Coup
Pro-military marchers in Myanmar attack anti-coup protesters

Morning Edition

00:32 sec | 4 d ago

Pro-military marchers in Myanmar attack anti-coup protesters

"More than 1.4 million people a day are getting their shots. In Myanmar Supporters of militaries. February 1st coup attacked and injured several anti coup protesters more from Michael Sullivan. News reports say there were about 1000 of the military supporters aren't with knives, clubs and rocks, some of whom chased down and beat Auntie Khoo protesters. The violence followed Facebook's decision to ban all military linked accounts from both Facebook and Instagram. Decision, these social media platform said was prompted

Michael Sullivan Myanmar Auntie Khoo Facebook Instagram
Fresh update on "michael sullivan" discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

00:48 sec | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "michael sullivan" discussed on Here & Now

"Michael Sullivan with the latest from me and Mara after the bloodiest day since the military coup a month ago, Michael Thank you. You're welcome. It's here and now. Mm. In Montana, a college student gathers up his belongings, keys, wallet, phone and his gun. You're not looking for a fight, but you're willing to finish it. A new law will allow him to carry that firearm on campus. And that concerns some other students. Just the thought of someone having a gun in the dining hall when I'm just trying to eat a sandwich of the morning, that's scary. Will schools push back on the next morning edition From NPR News? This story The California report and more tomorrow morning to am.

Michael Michael Sullivan Montana Mara Tomorrow Morning A Month Ago Npr News California Next Morning
Malaysian court temporarily halts deporting Myanmar nationals

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:01 min | 6 d ago

Malaysian court temporarily halts deporting Myanmar nationals

"Immigration officials in Malaysia have deported more than 1000 million mar nationals and move human rights groups say could put them at risk. Following the February 1st coup. The military carried out in the country, formally known as Burma, Michael Sullivan is following developments from neighboring Thailand. Malaysian court ordered a halt to the immediate deportation of the Myanmar nationals earlier in the day. Pending the outcome of a hearing on Wednesday to suspend the deportation altogether. Instead, hundreds were loaded up to three Myanmar navy ships to begin the journey to a home they fled. Human rights groups say members of Myanmar's Muslim minority Rohingya and many from Myanmar's other minority communities are included. Malaysian immigration officials denied this protests against the February 1st coup are continuing in Myanmar, despite warnings from the military protesters have embarked on a confrontational path. That could lead to a loss of life. If the demonstrations don't end for NPR news, I'm Michael Sullivan in Chiang Rai.

Myanmar Malaysian Court Michael Sullivan Myanmar Navy Malaysia Thailand Npr News Chiang Rai
Myanmar police fire at demonstrators, killing two

The Splendid Table

00:56 sec | Last week

Myanmar police fire at demonstrators, killing two

"Contaminated. I'm Hardy Milwaukee in Dallas, heading overseas now to Man Mar protesters back on the streets, a day after two demonstrators were killed by police and the military in Myanmar's second largest city, Mandalay. Michael Sullivan reports from Bangkok and neighboring Thailand. The protest and the arrest of protesters by the military continued again today, neither side willing to back down after the bloodiest day since the protests began more than two weeks ago. On Saturday. At least two people were killed in Myanmar's second city, Mandalay. When security forces opened fire with live ammunition. Dozens more were wounded. Several 1000 people turned out again today in Mandalay and in Myanmar's main city, Yangon, demanding the coup makers step down. Thousands also turned out in the capital Nippy dog for the funeral of 20 year old Mya 20. What kind the first

Mandalay Myanmar Michael Sullivan Milwaukee Dallas Bangkok Thailand Yangon
Myanmar police fire at demonstrators, killing two

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:34 sec | Last week

Myanmar police fire at demonstrators, killing two

"Security Forces and me and Mara opened fire on a crowd of protesters today, killing two people. Michael Sullivan reports. Demonstrations are continuing three weeks after the military overthrew the nation's democratically elected government.

Mara Michael Sullivan
Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

Morning Edition

03:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

"One of the preferred tools of his predecessor to punish military leaders and millet Myanmar sanctions. The U. S will freeze about $1 billion worth of Myanmar government assets held in the United States. Military leaders took control of the country in a coup earlier this month and yesterday, Biden called for a return to democracy there. Military must relinquish power it seized and demonstrate respect for the world of the people of Burma. As expressed in their November 8th election. The party of the deposed civilian leader on Song Souci swept those elections. She was detained in the coup, and for the past six days, protesters have filled streets throughout the country. Reporter Michael Sullivan has been following the events in Myanmar and joins us now from his base in neighboring Thailand. Good morning, Michael Good morning. Who exactly do these new sanctions target? We don't know for sure, the administration says details will come later this week, but I think it's pretty safe to say the coup leader, Senior General Men online is at the top of the list, along with a small circle of subordinates, basically the same bunch probably who are sanctioned by the U. S and 2019. For their role in the brutal crackdown against the Muslim minority Rohingya Amid allegations of genocide. President Biden also said the sanctions might not be limited to just the generals but include family members and business interests, too. It's not clear if that meant the family's business interests or the military's like the two very, very large military, one companies involved in all sorts of businesses that jade trade Helicon banks, etcetera, some of which have foreign investors or partners, who came after Western sanctions started being lifted in 2012 at the beginning of what look, then to be the start of me and March transition to Democratic rule Well, Michael, Me and Mara is closer to China and other Southeast Asian countries than it is to the U. S. So considering that how effective can these U. S sanctions be? Yeah, well, that's a good question. When President Biden says he wants to work with international partners toe urge other nations to join in these efforts, But it's going to be a slog not just with China but with other countries in the region and beyond Singapore. Japan, Thailand all jumped in after the opening in 2012 in some cases earlier and there's lots of money to be made in Myanmar and a lot to lose by turning against the generals. About China. It might not be happy with the coup, either. It got along just fine without some shoot on some sushi and their party, and there are some reports the military thought Souci and China were getting on far too well. Myanmar's generals don't really trust China don't like it, in part because of their own long fight against communist insurgents, and even today. China is said to provide weapons to some of the minority ethnic groups fighting Myanmar's military for more autonomy. China like things the way they were with him, some Souci, the military maybe not so much. Since Biden announced the sanctions on Wednesday have the military leaders in Myanmar said anything about that. Not yet, but they haven't been very concerned by sanctions in the past. I don't see them starting now. And of course, with all these people protesting, there's the concern about what might the Myanmar military do? Will anyone get hurt? How has the military responded so far? With restraint of the beginning, and then in the middle. It sort of got a little worse on Tuesday after it issued its veiled warning to prevent acts that violate what it called state's ability, state stability In the rule of law. Things did turn ugly and several places with water cannon and rubber bullets used by police and several different cities. But things to have calmed down since so they're happened. More rests of political figures. Nighttime curfews are in place in some areas. The protesters are still coming out every day in big numbers, and I don't see that changing unless the military shuts it down, forcibly definitively, And that's the big fear, because they've done it before reporter Michael

Myanmar President Biden Song Souci China Biden Michael Sullivan Thailand Michael United States Mara Souci Singapore Japan
Myanmar protests persist despite a ban and a crackdown by police

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Myanmar protests persist despite a ban and a crackdown by police

"News in Myanmar Police have continued to clash with protesters following the military coup that overturned the democratically elected government last week. Protestors are demanding the release of defacto leader on San Souci. She has not been seen in public since the coup. Michael Sullivan has more from neighboring Thailand. In the capital Nippy dog. At least four people were injured, with police using water cannon and rubber bullets to clear protesters. One woman suffered a gunshot wound to the head. Water. Cannon was also used and shots fired and Myanmar's second largest city, Mandalay, where several dozen people were reportedly arrested. Police also raided the Yangon headquarters of Su Chi's National League for

San Souci Myanmar Michael Sullivan Thailand Cannon Mandalay Yangon Su Chi's National League
Protests break out in Myanmar over coup, internet blackout

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Protests break out in Myanmar over coup, internet blackout

"In Myanmar Thousands of people turned out today to protest this week's military coup Michael Sullivan reports generals have ousted the democratically elected government of young son Souci. Today's protest in the commercial capital. Yangon was the biggest since Monday's military takeover. And came as the military expanded its clampdown on social media that began with what the authorities called a temporary ban on Facebook shortly after the coup, Twitter and Instagram of now been added to the list, and residents of the former capital are now saying there's a near total Internet blackout as well.

Michael Sullivan Myanmar Yangon Facebook Twitter
Myanmar's leader detained as military seizes control in apparent coup

All Things Considered

03:06 min | Last month

Myanmar's leader detained as military seizes control in apparent coup

"Chang, the country of Myanmar is under military control again after a coup deposed the government of former democracy icon on San Souci. The military claims. Massive election fraud that sauce Ooh Cheese party went overwhelmingly in November's general election. Michael Sullivan reports. The military says it's state of emergency will only last a year. Mo Tosia of the Institute for Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore. Isn't buying. She has a long memory and recalls a similar promise made by the military. After a student led uprising. Decades ago, I go back to 1988 promise was to convene elections and hand over power to the party that won the elections, and we all know what happened to 1990. What happened then, she says, was that on some soup cheese party won convincingly. Victory. The military then refused to recognize. But today she insists things are different than they were 30 years ago. The global political and economic climate It will just be very unfavorable for military hunter seeking to justify his actions. I think That's assuming the military cares. I think that probably calculated that they've got friends in the world that will be disappointed in them, but will ultimately put their own self interests to the fore. And let them get away with it. David Matheson is a Youngun based analyst reached in Thailand. The endgame, I think is quite disturbing. I think it's them holding onto power. And definitely Mary Kelehan, a Myanmar scholar at the University of Washington, who is in the former capital, Yangon, isn't so sure. I don't even know if they have a plan. But, she says, even without a plan This crisis was inevitable, given the cohabitation that the 2008 Constitution imposed upon political and personal photos or enemies, So I'm not so shocked. To be honest. That arrangement she says, was created in part by the military drafted Constitution. That allowed it to retain control over several key ministries while guaranteeing the military a quarter of the seats in parliament effective veto power. Despite this on song suit, she went to the International Court of Justice in 2019 to refute allegations of genocide by Myanmar's military against the Muslim minority Rohingya. I think foreigners read too much into that, and that's what's being that's what we're hearing over and over. Which is that you know, she went to bat for the military, but she went about for her country. I mean, she saw this I C J case as an attack on her country and inevitable or not, Callahan says. This crisis couldn't have come at a worst time mammals facing its greatest health threat since the Spanish flu of 1918 There's new outbreaks of fighting in places where there had not been violent in a decade, and now it has a national political crisis when she says that will not turn out well for the people

Government Of Former Democracy San Souci Ooh Cheese Party Mo Tosia Institute For Southeast Asian Myanmar Michael Sullivan David Matheson Mary Kelehan Chang Singapore Yangon University Of Washington Thailand International Court Of Justice Callahan FLU
Bangladesh sends 2nd group of Rohingya to isolated island

Morning Edition

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Bangladesh sends 2nd group of Rohingya to isolated island

"Says it's planning to move additional Rohingya refugees from their overcrowded camps near the border with me and mar to an island in the Bay of Bengal. Michael Sullivan. Reports more than 700,000 Rohingyas fled Myanmar in 2017 after and military crackdown. Bangladesh moved the first group of 1600 rolling go to the flood prone island of bus on Char earlier this month, another 1000 and now set to join them having set up by bus from the crowded refugee camps, the boats waiting to take them the rest of the way. Bangladeshis. Foreign minister insists the refugees air going voluntarily, eagerly. Even some say that's true. Others and human rights groups vehemently disagree. That's Michael Sullivan reporting from Bangkok.

Michael Sullivan Bay Of Bengal Myanmar Bangladesh Bangkok
Thai prime minister acquitted of ethics breach, retains post

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Thai prime minister acquitted of ethics breach, retains post

"The country's highest court has acquitted. The prime minister of ethics charges michael sullivan reports thailand. The prime minister will keep his job. The constitutional court ruled on a complaint brought by the leading opposition party. That claimed coup-maker turned prime minister. Pry chano chop had broken the law by continuing to live in the army residents. He occupied before the two thousand fourteen coup. The complaint argued government ministers were barred from receiving special benefits that could amount to a conflict of interest. A guilty verdict would have forced private and this cabinet from but the court accepted the army's argument that officials such as are entitled to stay in army housing in recognition of their service to the country. Democracy activists immediately denounced the verdict and said their month. Long protests would continue

Pry Chano Michael Sullivan Thailand Army Cabinet
Thailand protests: clashes cause chaos outside parliament

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Thailand protests: clashes cause chaos outside parliament

"Political unrest in Thailand shows no sign of ending today. The prime minister warns that the monarchy would use all possible laws against protesters who are demanding his removal and a new constitution and dozens of people were injured and fighting with police outside of parliament yesterday. Here's Michael Sullivan with this report from Thailand. Just a day after Tuesday's confrontation outside parliament, the worst violence between protesters and police and months thousands of anti government demonstrators were added again last night. In front of the Royal Thai police headquarters in the commercial part of the capital. Protesters were angry at police for Tuesday's violence outside parliament. Which included the use of water cannon against protesters and left dozens injured with six suffering gunshot wounds.

Thailand Michael Sullivan Royal Thai Police
Thai PM promises crackdown on protesters following months of demonstrations

Morning Edition

02:08 min | 3 months ago

Thai PM promises crackdown on protesters following months of demonstrations

"Shows no sign of ending today. The prime minister warns that the monarchy would use all possible laws against protesters who are demanding his removal and a new constitution and dozens of people were injured and fighting with police outside of parliament yesterday. Here's Michael Sullivan with this report from Thailand. Just a day after Tuesday's confrontation outside parliament, the worst violence between protesters and police and months thousands of anti government demonstrators were added again last night. In front of the Royal Thai police headquarters in the commercial heart of the capital. Protesters were angry at police for Tuesday's violence outside parliament. Which included the use of water cannon against protesters and left dozens injured with six suffering gunshot wounds. They are also angry at lawmakers for refusing to consider changes to the constitution. It could have included reform of Thailand's powerful monarchy. One of the protesters, key demands, along with the resignation of coup leader turned prime minister Private Channel cha. It was a kind of AH Po conclusion what to expect Teaching young Pongsudhirak teaches political science at Bangkok's Chulalongkorn University. On the establishment side. It's average centers of power very clear. They're not going to compromise the three demands for them and acceptable prime minister for you. It will not resigned. There will be no rewriting the Constitution and there'll be no reform of the monarchy and it's not just the establishment. He says that the digging in but the students as well because the protest movement is death set on. Reforming Thailand and resetting the rules or a more democratic future where Thailand and move forward. With equality as a base. Protesters say Their next rally will be next week in front of the Crown Property Bureau, the agency that helps manage the monarchy's multibillion dollar fortune. They say they'll keep on for seven more days after that, in hopes of achieving their goals, possibly setting the stage for more violence for NPR news. I'm Michael Sullivan

Royal Thai Police Headquarters Thailand Michael Sullivan Chulalongkorn University Bangkok Crown Property Bureau NPR
Thailand Declares State Of Emergency Amid Anti-Government Protests

Morning Edition

03:34 min | 4 months ago

Thailand Declares State Of Emergency Amid Anti-Government Protests

"Is on a kind of locked down, but it's not the pandemic its politics. On Wednesday, tens of thousands of anti government protesters gathered in Bangkok to push their demands for the military back to government to step down before the sun came up. However, an unidentified government spokesman read a statement on television like onto turned him a quandary rang naked punk. He declared a state of extreme emergency in the capital in a bid to end the student led protests. Whose demands also include cause to reform the country's powerful monarchy. Reporter Michael Sullivan is on the line from Bangkok. Good morning, Michael. Just tell us what the situation on the streets is right now. Well, Rachel. I just got back from a protest on demonstrators called for late this afternoon after they were driven from the prime minister's office this morning, and they're not listening to the terms of this extreme emergency. That the government declared one of those terms was no gatherings of more than five people. And now there are several 1000 at the Raja purse song Intersection in the commercial heart of the city and their defiant They say they're not stopping, and so far, there's a heavy police presence, but no intervention. Yet aside from this morning's arrests of several of the protest leaders and the government says all of these measures are necessary because Wednesday's demonstration they say, caused chaos and disorder, including disrupting a royal motorcade. But I mean, it wasn't yesterday's demonstration, largely peaceful. It was even though there were tens of thousands gathered at Bangkok's Democracy monument. There wasn't any real problem, despite the fact that there were many pro royalist demonstrators there on the sidelines, dressed in yellow, which leads some to believe there could be trouble. But there wasn't until The anti government demonstrators started their march to the prime minister's office about a mile away. And it's not exactly clear how. But there was a woman when some of the protesters were suddenly in the way of the queen's motorcade. And the on ly thing. Separating them from her limo was a thin blue line of police who forcibly part of the protesters to allow the motorcade to pass even a sum. Flash the three finger salute from the hunger Games movies as it did, And that seems to be the catalyst for all of that. This kind of thing just doesn't happen here on band some of the protest leaders who are detained overnight or some of the most vocal about challenging not just the government, but but the whole monarchy as well, right? Yeah, and I don't think that's an accident. I think it's not a coincidence. All this is happening. While the King and queen are in Bangkok. They usually aren't They spend a lot of time in Germany and This is one of the things that some of these protestors have also criticized in addition to saying the monarchy has too much money and too much power and up Until a few months ago, this kind of talk was taboo. You just don't talk publicly about the monarchy here in part Because criticizing the king or the royal family can land you in jail for up to 15 years. But even after some of the students announced their manifesto to reform the monarchy back in August, in addition to their demands for the prime minister stepped down and for new constitution The government really didn't crack down on them apart from some arrests for sedition until now, Just in a matter of seconds. Michael, what happens now? The students say they're not done. They vowed to continue Now we'll need to see how the military backed government one that's long made defending the monarchy, one of its core missions, response to the students this afternoon. All right. Reporter Michael Sullivan in Bangkok. Thank you so much. You're welcome.

Bangkok Michael Sullivan Prime Minister Reporter Democracy Monument Germany Rachel
"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 5 months ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And other security personnel to maintain order over the weekend. For NPR News. I'm Michael Sullivan in Bangkok. Well, before we go. We have an update on this hurricane season, which is already one for the record books. There's now a storm named Alfa and this is just the second time the Greek alphabet has been used for storm names. Megan Borowski is a meteorologist with the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network. And Megan. There is so much going on right now. Tell us about Alfa. Oh, my goodness. So much going on today, Tania, we had Alfa form just a little while ago off the coast of Portugal. Technically, it is a sub tropical storm. It's in the sub tropical latitudes and has a little less symmetry than a typical tropical system and that's expected to move. To the Northeast and expect impact Portugal over the next couple of days and Spain just heavy rainfall in that area. Also today, we have tropical storm Wilfred forms in the eastern Atlantic Ocean that is also expected to track westward. Through the central Atlantic. Not expected to impact landed, although yeah, there's several how we're Sally. Even in this moment now, we were just talking about Sally a few days ago. I know, right? It was a hurricane a few days ago. Now we just have the remnants of Sally right now exiting the mid Atlantic Coast, impacting the Delmarva Peninsula with some rainfall, but that'll quickly move off shore in the next couple of hours or so, Tanya. So much to watch here. Alfa will not be a threat to the U. S. But it is still moving along the North making Brodsky is a meteorologist with the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network..

Sally Alfa Florida Public Radio Emergency Megan Borowski Portugal Atlantic Coast Michael Sullivan Atlantic Ocean NPR News Bangkok Delmarva Peninsula Northeast Tania Brodsky Spain Tanya
Tribunal spokesperson says the Khmer Rouge’s chief jailer, convicted of war crimes, has died in a Cambodian hospital

All Of It

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

Tribunal spokesperson says the Khmer Rouge’s chief jailer, convicted of war crimes, has died in a Cambodian hospital

"Who ran in infamous prison for the regime, has died in the Cambodian capital Michael Sullivan as this story 77 year old King Yukio, better known as Comrade Doy. Died early Wednesday morning and Tompkins compare Soviet Friendship Hospital He'd been sick for years. In 2010, a joint compare U. N tribunal found him guilty of mass murder, torture and crimes against humanity linked to us time as commandant of the notorious Tool slang prison. Where an estimated 14,000 people died in a prison. Few left alive. The tribunal sentenced to life in prison, The former schoolteacher, was the first high ranking member of the Khmer Rouge to face trial. At least 1.7 million people were either executed or died from torture, starvation or overwork. Under Camaro. Rouge rule from 1975 to 1979 for NPR

Comrade Doy Tompkins Khmer Rouge Soviet Friendship Hospital King Yukio Michael Sullivan NPR Murder U. N
Duch, Prison Chief Who Slaughtered for the Khmer Rouge, Is Dead at 77

Forum

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

Duch, Prison Chief Who Slaughtered for the Khmer Rouge, Is Dead at 77

"Rouge commander who ran in infamous prison for the regime has died in the Cambodian capital. Michael Sullivan has this story 77 year old King Yukio, Better known as Comrade Doi died early Wednesday morning and phenomenons Compare Soviet Friendship Hospital. He'd been sick for years. In 2010, a joint compare U. N tribunal found him guilty of mass murder, torture and crimes against humanity linked to US time is commandant of the notorious Tool slang Prison. Where an estimated 14,000 people died in a prison. Few left alive. The tribunal sentenced to life in prison. A former schoolteacher, was the first high ranking member of the Khmer Rouge to face trial. At least 1.7 million people were either executed or died from torture, starvation or overwork under Camaro Rouge rule from 1975 to 1979. For NPR News on Michael Sullivan in Chiang Rai. Thailand again on

Comrade Doi Michael Sullivan Khmer Rouge Rouge Soviet Friendship Hospital King Yukio Chiang Rai Commander Npr News United States Thailand Murder U. N
The Philippines Becomes Coronavirus Hot Spot In Southeast Asia

All Things Considered

03:46 min | 7 months ago

The Philippines Becomes Coronavirus Hot Spot In Southeast Asia

"Philippines has over taken in Tunisia as Southeast Asia's Corona virus hot spot even though Indonesia has twice as many people. The Philippines now has more than 136,000 confirmed cases of covert 19 and critics say no coherent strategy for defeating the virus, Michael Sullivan reports. Like other countries in the region, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, For example, the Philippines recorded its first covert case back in January. Those neighbors acted swiftly. They started locking down when they had a few 100 cases and the timeliness of the response was key to the success of Vietnam, Korea and Taiwan University of the Philippines. Covert researcher Ranjeet Rai. They decided to do something significant when they only had relatively few cases, and they were successful with racing and with the isolation very different from the Philippines, where we already had a case in January, and we decided not to do anything about it until March, and it wasn't just the Philippines lock down. That was late health workers say, Dr Tony Luchon. Is a former advisor to the government's covert task force. They started Lee with the AH building up of the health system capacities in terms of testing isolation. And quantum tracing. We wasted so much time about two months instead of trying to build up our infrastructure's adequate testing and contact tracing are still a huge problem, but the lock down that went into effect in March 1 of the longest and most severe in Southeast Asia. Did help reduce the number of new cases until it was lifted in June, when cases started to skyrocket. Over the weekend, the country's medical front liners issued an urgent virtual plea to President Rodrigo did to reimpose the lock down to allow them to regroup. Medical Association president Dr Jose Santiago Jr. Our health care system has bean overlong our head workers are burned out would seemingly endless number of patients trooping to our hospitals for emergency care and ambition. We're waging a losing battle against carbon 19 President Duterte. His initial response was less than empathetic, accusing the health workers of inciting a revolution against his government. You will give me the free ticket. The state's a counterrevolution. How I wish you would do it. The next day, he retreated and ordered a new 15 day locked down. But it's not a stringent is the first public transportation has been stopped. But businesses and retail outlets Khun operated half capacity in an effort to both halt the spread of the virus and allow some economic activity in the country that's now slipped into recession. But critics say this 15 day locked down light won't stop the spread of the virus. If it goes only 15 days, it will start increasing again. And the problem is that our health Care is now a full capacity. We have two cities in Metro Manila, which are at 100% occupancy. So that's a real problem. That's University of the Philippines. Professor Ghetto divvied who's been modelling the spread of the virus, along with his colleague, grungy dry. If we don't manage this this month, we don't take the opportunity to extend the music. You That small window opening lives and livelihoods would suffer at the disruption will become greater and my sense if we prematurely opened, it could be catastrophic for us. But he acknowledges extending the log down will be a tough sell for both the politically powerful business community and the everyday Filipino who's going to suffer because of these extended lockdowns. For NPR news. I'm Michael Sullivan in Ching, right?

Philippines Southeast Asia Michael Sullivan South Korea Vietnam President Trump University Of The Philippines Dr Tony Luchon President Rodrigo Tunisia Indonesia Metro Manila NPR Taiwan University Dr Jose Santiago Jr Ranjeet Rai Taiwan Medical Association
Malaysia court sentences ex-Prime Minister Najib Razak to serve up to 12 years in jail for crimes linked to 1MDB scandal

Morning Edition

02:12 min | 7 months ago

Malaysia court sentences ex-Prime Minister Najib Razak to serve up to 12 years in jail for crimes linked to 1MDB scandal

"Court has found former Prime Minister Najib Razak guilty. He's been sentenced to 12 years in prison. This was in his first corruption trial connected To the plundering of the so called one Mdb State Investment fund. This is part of one of the largest most far reaching financial scandals in history involved at least 10 countries, including the United States, Michael Sullivan reports. Things could have gone a lot better for Najeeb today, the judge finding him guilty on all seven counts of abuse of power, criminal breach of trust and three counts of money laundering in a trial widely seen as a test of Malaysia's commitment to the rule of law. I think it's a good day for Malaysia. Bridget Welsh is a research associate with the University of Nottingham. And an expert on Malaysian politics. Speaking from the capital, Kuala Lumpur, This decision actually re affirms that the rule of law is working. The judge was very careful and laying out his decision, and I think that there was set the sense that the decision move forward in a very uncertain political environment and the judiciary. At least this has ruled the day and with that there has been a sense of justice. Now Jeeves Fall from Grace has been swift just two years ago. Then Prime Minister. Najib's party was dealt a shocking defeat in the general election, in part because of the public's discussed with one MDB scandal, which saw billions siphoned off from the government investment fund into individual bank accounts, including prosecutors say Najib's The Jeep has maintained his innocence and said on Facebook last night that he was misled by others and that the charges against him are political in nature. It's going to be a long process of appeals and their two more paces, and it may be a number of years, but you know he will basically not be allowed to contest the election. During this process, and that's important, Brigitte Wolf says, and helps Malaysia's current prime minister Modena seen who heads a shaky coalition that includes Najib's party. She says Mujahideen will gain the most from today's rulings because he will be seen as putting the country before politics malicious restoring its reputation internationally, and it used to be in the top 10 countries for corruption. Now this makes it stand tall, and I think that is that really serves Malaysia well for NPR

Prime Minister Najib Razak Malaysia Prime Minister Brigitte Wolf Kuala Lumpur Michael Sullivan Najeeb United States Bridget Welsh University Of Nottingham Mujahideen Facebook Research Associate NPR
Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

Morning Edition

03:57 min | 9 months ago

Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

"As hard as it can be for most people to maintain social distance consider how much harder it is for refugees packed into makeshift camps that is the reality for one a million Muslim minority rocking guy who fled Myanmar their camps are in neighboring Bangladesh and those camps recorded their first confirmed deaths from covert on June first Michael Sullivan reports two weeks ago Bangladesh declared parts of the Cox's bazaar district where the camps are located a red zone and climb to lock down on those areas as the virus spread I think everybody is very concerned that the numbers are going to increase significantly Louise Donovan is spokesperson for the U. N. H. C. R. in Cox's bazaar if you look at Bangladesh's Utica Cox's bazaar the numbers are increasing very rapidly and we're concerned that the same thing will happen in the camps camps that have some of the highest population density in the world Rahm das runs the roving the relief effort in Cox's bazaar for the NGO care international it is four times the density Arafat New York City eight times the density of Wuhan city about how activities but here you are at and that he says make social distancing in the camps almost impossible your contact the people inside the house thirty four hours they have to go out for food they had to go to the community Charlotte they have to go to the house that does though it thank you photo make sure that all the a million people followed the thunder one million people aid groups are struggling to finish twelve new clinics for COPD patients with a total of nineteen hundred beds by the end of June Robert look what does food for the hungry opened the first a few weeks ago we are using it as a crime I think casting top style because of the need on the ground we had to modify each better faster and to ensure that we are responding to that I did to needs which is called his clinic has fifty beds for isolation and treatment of moderate to severe cases another clinic outside the camp has one hundred and fifty more but critical cases the require intensive care and ventilators we'll have to go to the government hospital in Cox's bazaar and that worries him the number of beds in Cork's Bastos de limited as I talk now I told you there any beds that are blind right now with that being said all I did accident dropping their question Keysight Torah the number of cases another concern Rohingya in the camps are reluctant to come forward for testing and instead self medicating with help from makeshift pharmacies inside the camps so Tom Raheem ola runs one after another not that excited again about it do you fear he's the go to the clinic the doctors will send them to a different team not just them but their whole families so they come here in the state yes me Dara is arriving activist who works for an international aid group to build awareness in the camps my name and the lamb are bad I hope they will guide you right now some deep blue sea yeah I'm afraid to go to the cleaning because they have heard there will be Q. we told them no and explain what isolation and quarantine are and we told them if there are C. will get treatment and Judy are better then they will go home but people are still suspicious the Bangladesh government's ban on internet in the camps isn't helping people get information either and then there's the rainy season which brings a slew of illnesses that present much is cobra does with costs eighty bones and fevers that leads people to self medicate for those elements instead of getting tested combine that with the fear factor and it's little wonder that some aid workers worry the number of cases in the camps is far greater than what's being reported so far

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Action that has to be taken against on for NPR news I'm Michael Sullivan in Bangkok and this is NPR news and this is KQED public radio good morning from London I'm planning to do see with BBC topline and a few stories about international migration the U. N. says there are no one hundred and sixty four million migrant workers in the world and dealing with them has become a key challenge for many governments in Spain many migrant struggle to work legally some sell goods and tourist markets the BBC spoke with this local seller was unhappy about the competition in these markets I'm selling that as for the rails at the big girls shoes from Spain of course we have silly with ice and then we have pain a lot of bags and everything and what about any other male cat well the other Medicaid these guys of saving pictures from football games someplace is everything they can find it in a big a shop from Chinese people but other countries have a problem with the lack of migrants last year Japan began a program to allow up to three hundred and forty thousand temporary workers into the country the plan was not without controversy the previous economic migrants to Japan tell stories of not being paid until after they've worked for years if a soul but as the B. B. C.'s and Butler learned in Tokyo the country needs workers I think maybe roaring plus.

Michael Sullivan Bangkok London U. N. BBC Spain Japan B. C. Butler Tokyo NPR KQED football
"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's tuesday. So tonight at city arts and lectures at eight next time on city arts and lectures, Jonathan Franzen well known for his novels, the corrections and freedom Franson will read from his new collection. The end of the end of the earth, the essays consider climate change Franson birding, and the underpinnings of family and friendship. That's next time on city arts and lectures here on cake. That begins at eight o'clock this evening. There's a rebroadcast early Wednesday at two AM. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm Audie Cornish. Authorities in Thailand say a young Saudi woman who face deportation can stay for now. Eighteen year old was detained on Saturday while trying to get to Australia where she planned to seek asylum. She said her family was abusive and that she feared being harmed or even killed if forced to go back to Saudi Arabia. Michael Sullivan reports from Bangkok it was touch and go this morning for RAF Muhammed Okinawan who began the day wondering if she would be deported back to Kuwait and on the Saudi Arabia her home after authorities told her she'd be on the eleven fifteen AM Kuwait air flight, she hunkered down in the transit hotel room. Barricading the door furiously sending out tweets about her plight, including this defiant. One also posted by Human Rights Watch. I'm not leaving my until I see you an edge. To asylum. She got Hafer wish the flight left without her and in the early evening United Nations. Refugee officials were finally allowed into meet with her and take her from the airport under their care, the asylum requests, we'll take more time. And even though the Thai government appears to have given in to international pressure. Not to force her to return. Let's see how it plays out. I mean, ultimately actions speak louder than words, Phil Robertson is the Bangkok-based deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch. He says it's too early to celebrate given Thailand's mixed record when it comes to asylum seekers since the military seized power in two thousand fourteen we have had cases where Chinese who were supposed to resettle to.

Audie Cornish Saudi Arabia Jonathan Franzen Thailand Ari Shapiro Kuwait Phil Robertson NPR RAF Muhammed Okinawan Australia Bangkok Michael Sullivan Hafer Thai government United Nations deputy Asia director Eighteen year
"michael sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Around this city around the state around this country. The alleged shooter who killed eleven people at the tree of life. Synagogue is expected to appear in federal court on Monday afternoon for NPR news. I'm Lucy Perkins in Pittsburgh, Caesar's, say August also due in federal court this afternoon, but in Miami, the fifty six year old Florida man is suspected of mailing at least fourteen pipebombs two prominent Democrats police records show he's had numerous arrest over the years, including domestic violence theft and threatening to bomb a utility company say could be sentenced to as long as fifty years in prison. If convicted of all charges officials say they were able to track them down through DNA and a fingerprint on the packages, an emergency. Hearing is scheduled in federal court today over how Georgia confirms voter eligibility. Johnny Kauffman of member station W A B E reports the defendant in the case is Georgia's top election official Brian camp. He's also a Republican running for governor civil rights groups are suing over a few. Thousand voter registrations. They've been held up because the US citizenship of the applicants can be verified and other government databases. These people can still vote if they're citizens, but they have to show proof at the polls. The civil rights groups want the judge to order more election workers eligible to check those documents speeding things up and addressing any confusion. Kemp's office has said it's too close to the election to make changes to the process for NPR news, I'm Johnny Kauffman in Atlanta. An Indonesian passenger plane crashed in the sea today. Officials say there were one hundred eighty nine people on board, including about twenty Indonesian officials who had attended a conference in Jakarta. Their fate is not yet known. Michael Sullivan has been following the story from Thailand the plane was relatively new a Boeing seven thirty seven th authorities say communication with the plane was lost shortly after takeoff from Jakarta at six twenty this morning local time, a spokesman for Indonesia's disaster agency posted pictures on Twitter of debris collected by search. And rescue vessels, including parts of the fuselage. It's not known what caused the crash. Michael Sullivan reporting from Thailand, this is NPR news from Washington. This is WNYC in New York. I'm Richard Hake. Good morning eight. Oh, four fifty degrees. Clouds right now, we could see a shower, but we do expect partly sunny skies later today with a high near fifty five degrees state and local police are patrolling houses of worship in New York. After of that shooter killed eleven people at a Pittsburgh synagogue over the weekend. Mayor de Blasios says more work needs to be done to ensure people's safety at a synagogue on the upper east side on Saturday. He the Blasios push back on the president's assertion that the outcome would have been different. If an armed guard have been inside the Pittsburg temple. We should never suggest that a house of worship has to have an armed guard for people to be able to go about their religious observance. That's not America governor Cuomo and the NYPD say there have been no specific threats made two houses of worship in New York. Meanwhile, locals are gathering in solidarity more than one thousand people attended a service in a call to action at a New Jersey synagogue yesterday in response to the shooting. WNYC's Nancy Solomon reports the crowd erupted in applause when governor Phil Murphy called for more gun control, the biggest reaction came. When rabbi Clifford Cohen, President Trump responsible for the rise in antisemitic violence..

Mayor de Blasios New York Johnny Kauffman WNYC NPR Jakarta Michael Sullivan Pittsburgh Thailand Georgia New Jersey synagogue Brian camp Lucy Perkins Democrats president US
"michael sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Government's order in january to shut it down when she first returned to the philippines in nineteen eightysix after the fall of the dictator ferdinand marcos russia says for the longest time she couldn't understand our friends explained away decades of dictatorship she does now they were right i didn't understand until i lived through it now right now i truly understand how power money and fear can work together to transform a democracy into a dictatorship in cambodia says phil robertson deputy asia director for human rights watch prime minister hun sen is already there with hansson that try perfecta money power and fear is what makes his government work he is controlling the political situation with fear and he's shutting down critical voices like the pump and post and the cambodia daily which he hounded from the country late last year in neighboring thailand and myanmar the problem is less obvious robertson says but what we see is a effort by these authoritarians to try to squelch critical voices they have gone after radio tv independent newspapers and magazines wherever they can one bright spot robertson says malaysia where newly elected prime minister matere mohammed has vowed to scrap the fake news bill has predecessor ram through just before the election for npr news i'm michael sullivan in manila this is npr news it's morning edition on wnyc in new york i'm richard hake good morning it's seven forty one sixty one degrees right now in new york city expect a mostly sunny day today with a high near.

manila richard hake npr matere mohammed myanmar prime minister phil robertson new york wnyc philippines michael sullivan thailand hansson hun sen director cambodia ferdinand marcos russia seven forty one sixty one degr
"michael sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The values the policy priorities of the president of the united states the work of the state department goes on now it says department officials are preparing for a possible meeting between president trump and north korea's leader kim jong un she says the department can offer logistical and policy support as well as translation services michelle kellerman npr news the state department defense secretary jim mattis is accusing iran of meddling in iraq's parliamentary election the may vote will determine if prime minister haider body will win another four year term he says the us has worrisome evidence that iraq is spending money to sway votes he didn't say in which direction vietnam today marked the fiftieth anniversary of the massacre where us soldiers had killed more than five hundred people michael sullivan reports the ceremony was held at the site that's now a memorial to the victims many of them elderly men women children killed fifty years ago today by us soldiers who were sent on a mission to confront the viet cong found none and turn their weapons on the villagers instead the ceremony was attended by survivors their families and a collection of us vietnam war veterans among others some of the vietnamese spoke of overcoming their pain in a spirit of forgiveness some of the americans expressed what one called remorse regret and sorrow for what took place in and around me lie for npr news i'm michael sullivan royat thailand us officials are investigating the crash of military cop copper in western iraq yesterday officials say there were seven people on board and.

npr michael sullivan prime minister michelle kellerman kim jong iraq president vietnam haider body iran jim mattis north korea united states fifty years four year
"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The price of a still sluggish recovery and the influx of six hundred thousand migrants in the last four years the single biggest votegetter with thirty one percent was the upstart fivestar movement created on an anti establishment throw the bums out platform the farright league campaign with vera ntly anti immigrant and sometimes racist slogans several analysts described the situation as ungovernable and it will be weeks before it's known whether the rival winners can form a viable government so lupul jolie npr news rome you're listening to npr a us aircraft carrier is in vietnam it's the first such visit since the end of the vietnam war as michael sullivan reports the arrival of the carl vinson comes at a time of heightened tensions involving the us vietnam and china china's aggressive territorial expansion in the south china sea as both the us and vietnam worried one reason vietnam's government has allowed the us nuclearpowered carriers visit one of the largest and most heavily armed ships in the us fleet says longtime vietnam analyst karl fare at the university of new south wales cambre it was a us initiative to request the carrier visit and vietnam has taken a deep breath and decided that is worth the risk to bring an american curie there because of china's unrelenting militarization while ended on us sailors will visit an orphanage and a center for victims of the the fully and agent orange for npr news i'm michael sullivan in chiang rai the best in films have been honored at the ninety th academy awards the best picture was the film the shape of water and it's director guillermo del toro won best director the best actor was gary oldman for darkest hour best.

chiang rai gary oldman academy awards south wales university of new analyst npr director guillermo del toro karl fare vietnam china us carl vinson michael sullivan thirty one percent four years
"michael sullivan" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington i'm door rahm accord in myanmar's extending the detention of two journalists from the reuters news agency for two more weeks michael sullivan reports from neighboring thailand the two are suspected of violating the country's official secrets act it was the first public appearance for wall loan and charles who since their arrest on december twelve it was also the first time they were allowed to meet with their families and their lawyer since their arrest wall loan told reporters the pair of not been mistreated in detention and insisted they had done nothing wrong the two men had worked on reuters coverage of the myanmar military crackdown on the moslem minority rope kinga that began in late august after a series of attacks by roh in good militants on myanmar security posts the military's brutal retaliation has led more than six hundred and fifty thousand roe and get to flee to neighboring bangladesh the two reuters journalists face up to fourteen years in prison for npr news i'm mike sullivan in chiang rai russian president vladimir putin personally submitted the paperwork to register as a candidate in russia's march presidential election npr's lucy and kim reports putin's archrival was rejected as a candidate two days ago the clutter of camera shutters life president putin showed up at the central election commission in moscow to hand over a pile of documents supporters of the president chosen as their candidate on tuesday but the kremlin said putin was too busy to attend his own nomination on sunday opposition leader relaxing of only went through the same procedure only the next day the election commission said he was ineligible to run because of a prior conviction for embezzlement the who has spent the past you're building a nationwide campaign network argued with the head of the election commission and said his criminal record was fabricated to prevent his candidacy he's now telling supporters to boycott the election and participate in nationwide protests next month the kremlin says calls for a boycott may be illegal losing kim npr news moscow virginia election officials are postponing.

rahm virginia kim npr lucy presidential election chiang rai npr bangladesh charles official thailand michael sullivan reuters washington embezzlement kremlin president moscow russia vladimir putin mike sullivan roh military crackdown news agency myanmar fourteen years two days
"michael sullivan" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on NPR News Now

"For most see della julia zone becora by me no debate let me little child of bethlehem we ask that your crying yet to shake us from our indifference and open our eyes to those who are suffering both france's heard through a bbc interpreter defended migrants comparing them to mary and joseph finding no place to stay in bethlehem france's also told the thousands of people gathered that faith demands that foreigners be welcome thousands of people have gathered in rome this morning to hear the pope give his annual christmas blessing a message from the central balcony at saint peter's basilica me on mars military has been invited to participate in an annual us tie led military exercise next year as michael sullivan reports from thailand the invitation comes despite allegations of ethnic cleansing and the recent detention of two writers reporters cobra gold involves thousands of military personnel from the us thailand and other asian countries nbn maher we'll be among those countries again this year in an observer role according to the pentagon lieutenant colonel christopher logan told the reuters news agency that thailand had invited me unmarred to take part in the humanitarian assistance and disaster relief portion of the exercise a senior thai officer confirmed the invitation to reuters despite the myanmar military's crackdown on muslim minority row inga that's led more than six hundred and fifty thousand to flee to neighboring bangladesh in what the us on the un is called ethnic cleansing that is politics we are soldiers this is a military exercise the thai officer explained man mars military hasn't said whether it will attend for npr news i'm michael sullivan in chiang rai thailand military veterans are calling on congress to pass permanent legislation allowing some immigrants who are in the us illegally to enlist in the armed forces and be hers windsor johnston reports the push comes as the trump administration seeks to in the obama era program known as daca the difference.

congress obama windsor johnston chiang rai npr myanmar thailand saint peter's basilica joseph mary bbc france michael sullivan bangladesh reuters officer news agency colonel christopher logan pentagon us christmas rome
"michael sullivan" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on NPR News Now

"The threat of international terrorism as michael sullivan reports from manila his comments came before the territory's much anticipated bilateral meeting with president trump terrorism and violent extremism endangered the peace stability and security of our region to do said in his opening remarks he added that piracy and armed robbery also disrupt these stability of both regional and global commerce twotoed it made no mention of territorial disputes in the south china sea china's aggressive territorial expansion in the disputed waters has been challenged by several southeast asian nations but twotiered has been reluctant to criticise china since being elected hoping a conciliatory approach will yield extensive economic assistance from beijing for npr news i'm michael sullivan in manila the us is expected to promote the wider use of fossil fuels today as delegates made for the second week of the un climate conference in the german city of bonn members of the trump administration will tell the gathering that technology to reduce the environmental impact of burning coal what's known as clean coal must be part of the solution to global warming met mcgrath of the bbc has more their presence could promote socalled clean coal as divided delegates would many angered by what they see as a brazen attempt to sell fossil fuel technologies to emerging nations others the more hopeful saying the broadening the un talks to include the b u s coal corporations might allow president trump the wriggle room to stay in the paris climate pact that abc's matt mcgrath a powerful earthquake struck along the border between iran and iraq yesterday officials say at least three hundred twenty eight people died and twenty five hundred others were injured the us geological survey says the quake.

matt mcgrath iraq iran paris un bonn npr beijing armed robbery manila abc president bbc global warming clean coal us michael sullivan china
"michael sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm michelle martin we'll also hear about the secret offshore accounts revealed by the paradise papers and if you about why this matters we're talking about billions and billions of dollars parked offshore that would otherwise be taxed in the us and other countries in that affects all the bills and a look ahead to the latin grammy awards this week with a taste of what's hot spa but first this news live from npr news in washington on janine herbs the philippines is the last stop on president trump's twelve day asian tour where he will attend the summit of the association of southeast asian nations but as michael sullivan reports from manila his interaction with president taye is attracting attention the most anticipated meeting will be that of president trump and the firebrand philippines president rodrigo duterte a chance to the reset button on ending alliance under strain recently due to the philippines pivot toward china and to taste distrust of the us the falmouth leaders relationship with former president obama couldn't have been worse do tipped a famously swearing at obama ahead of last year's osceun summit for his alleged criticism of detainees controversial war on drugs which human rights groups says claimed some thirteen thousand lives president trump is not expected to address the drug war used instead the two men are likely to focus mutual security concerns in the south china sea and north korea for npr news i'm michael sullivan in manila.

reset button human rights president npr michael sullivan north korea obama china philippines michelle martin rodrigo duterte taye manila trump washington latin grammy awards us twelve day
"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On earth stick around live from npr news in washington on giles snyder president trump has arrived in the philippines said last stop on his fivenation asia trip trampled tend the summit of the association of southeast asian nations and in east asia summit reporter michael sullivan said manila says much of the focuses on trump's meeting with philippine president rodrico to territory toomey mccurry leaders with short fuses one of them at the end of a long trip the other very quickly when it comes to criticism of his war on drugs but president trump probably won't go there and they've already said they like each other look for them to hit the reset button on the longstanding us philippine alliance it's been strained by detect as recent drift towards china president trump is in the philippines from vietnam or china these president xi jinping has started a state visit of his own following the asia pacific economic summit and to mang trump offered to mediate the dispute over the south china sea vietnam china and four other regional governments claim all or parts of the south china sea president trump says trade with a dominant focus what he met with vietnam's president npr scott horsely report's at trump also presided over the signing of several commercial trade deals standing in front of a bust of ho chee men trump and his vietnamese counterpart looked on as business leaders signed deals involving aircraft engines commercial trucks and liquid natural gas in one of his first acts as president trump's scuttled an agreement designed to lower trade barriers in vietnam and ten other asiapacific countries but trump says he's still interested in pursuing what he calls fair and reciprocal trade we just had a great discussion about american goods and services coming in divvy at now twoway trade trump says he's confident that with a growing middle class vietnam will be a valuable market for american farm products energy and financial services scott horsely npr news hanoi before he left vietnam.

scott horsely financial services mang trump asia toomey mccurry reporter president giles snyder npr natural gas washington vietnam china xi jinping reset button manila michael sullivan philippines trump
"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Treatment facilities ground saturation and mudslides have also destabilized roads and bridges at 800 is the fime official in charge of what the legal after maria we had 19 bridges affected are brophy item oh big bridge as of yesterday we have thirty two the rain has also caused misery for the many thousands whose roots were damaged during the storm it reinforced npr news sunkwon port political the united nations says the number of ruhengeri hangar muslim refugees who fled me mr for neighboring bangladesh has now topped five hundred eighty thousand injured over seven weeks michael sullivan has more the united nations high commissioner for refugees as another ten to fifteen thousand people are now stranded just inside bangladesh but unable to move farther perched precariously on levies between paddy fields as they try to figure out how to make it to the makeshift camps set up on the bank assad dramatic drone video from you and hcr on monday shows a line of people more than a mile long trudging towards safety reports over the weekend spoke of thousands more massing on the myanmar side waiting to cross the associated press reports many of the new arrivals say they fled when they're villa asia's were set on fire some told the ap that bangladesh border guards were keeping them for moving toward the camps on the bangladesh side for npr news i'm michael sullivan in chiang rai the dow is up twenty eight points at twenty two thousand nine hundred eighty five in briefly rose above twenty three thousand this morning this this is npr news from washington from kqed news in san francisco i'm brian watt a wild fire in the santa cruz mountains has destroyed four buildings and injured five firefighters two hundred fifty people are battling the bear fire that his burned two hundred fifty acres in an area between bolger creek in lexington reservoir cal fire spokesman rob sherman says it's been difficult to fight a torching single torching of trees steve terrain and his heart access trying to get into this thing sherman says battling the fire from the sky has been hard as well we would like to have a lot more aircraft on it but because of the safety issues because of smokers down as her down into it the fire is five percent contained it's threatening around one hundred fifty homes meantime the.

san francisco lexington reservoir kqed npr bangladesh myanmar assad rob sherman bolger creek santa cruz mountains brian watt official washington chiang rai michael sullivan ap villa asia commissioner united nations maria two hundred fifty acres five percent seven weeks
"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of involvement in the smuggling and drug trades even more important bangladesh doesn't want its own islamist extremists some with ties to transnational terror groups exploiting the new arrivals one of my did she is now is that a lot of these groups with ties i'm going to kick off recruits from those communities southeast asia's security analyst elliott brennan ninety not tighten into me another titan mbeki different theaters and as a result we have a general retreatment audio as as the situation deteriorates in in can't sense april become more desperate in the meantime religious hardliners in muslimmajority bangladesh are stirring the pot some calling to arm the rowing of others even talking about war with their buddhistmajority neighbor creating more political problems for a government that says in now plans to move all the raw anger to a new mega care incorporating most of the existing informal ones but the immediate concern today is just providing enough food water and sanitation for the new arrivals how they are treated once that sorted is another matter and bangladesh remains the only country that's taken the royingya in no others have offered to share that burden for and the our news on michael sullivan in cox's bazar this is morning edition from npr news i'm david greene and i may till martin ooh ooh it's ten and a half now before the hour of 8 o'clock let's get you back the ted stevens desk for more about our commute this morning and in pittsburgh the chp is going to run a traffic break westbound highway four after railroad avenue to clear a two vehicle recco from the center divide over to the right hand shoulder slow traffic starting a railroad avenue it continues over the willow past gray anelka glen day to carcrash blocking.

asia elliott brennan michael sullivan cox david greene analyst npr ted stevens pittsburgh
"michael sullivan" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on NPR News Now

"It worked so hard to give which again need lose everything alice's replace of as thank god for mother's day president trump paid a second visit the texas on saturday saying he's happy with the way the government has been responding to the disaster more than four hundred forty thousand people of now registered for emergency assistance from the federal emergency management agency a total of seventy five houston schools were heavily damaged by the flooding and that may be months before they're ready to reopen in the meantime around twelve thousand students will have to attend classes elsewhere the united nations says tens of thousands of people have fled a wave of violence in western me on maher heading to neighbouring bangladesh as michael sullivan reports from kuala lumpur malaysia the number of people leaving is showing no sign of letting up a spokesperson for the united nations high commissioner for refugees says roughly sixty thousand people have crossed into bangladesh in the past week fleeing violence that began on august 25th when roh hanged insurgents attacked government security posts in western recording state men mars military responded with what it calls clearance operations against throwing up and says at least four hundred people mostly insurgents have been killed human rights groups and ruhango who fled say security forces have torched villages and killed many civilians in the process the row hinga or a muslim minority in predominantly buddhist myanmar which doesn't even recognize the estimated one point one million ruhango who lived there as citizens for npr news i'm michael sullivan in kuala lumpur you're listening to npr news in washington.

trump texas united nations united nations bangladesh michael sullivan kuala lumpur washington president houston maher commissioner human rights npr
"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"michael sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Off saying it cost two hundred thousand dollars to tear down a statue jim kaine npr news in the philippines the military says it is gaining ground on islamist militants occupying parts of marawi city in the south of the country michael sullivan reports fighting between government forces and the militants left more than ninety people dead a military spokesman in manila told the associated press that only a small area of marawi city is controlled by the militants six days after fighting broke out when the military tried to raid the suspected hideout of a top islamic state linked commander but the killing continues on sunday eight men civilians were executed by the militants on the outskirts of the city authorities said the bodies of four men three women and a child were recovered from a road near mindanao state university president rodrigo duterte has cancelled a planned visit to japan this week to deal with the situation on the island duties from the southern mindanao city of davao for npr news i'm michael sullivan in mindanao this is npr news an investigation is underway into a deadly accident over the weekend involving a navy parachutists tearing fleet week demonstration over the hudson river the military says the parachutists who is a member of the navy seal team known as leapfrogs his parachute malfunctioned shortly after noon near new jersey's liberty state park yesterday was rescued from the water and was later pronounced dead the victim's identity was withheld pending notification of next of kin us german relations are not with a used to be german chancellor angela merkel said after the g seven summit that quote the times in which we can fully count on others are somewhat over as i have experience experienced the past few days end quote merkel in other european leaders were unable to secure commitment from president trump that the us will remain a part of the paris climate accord british airways passengers are facing a third day of delays and cancellations following an it failure here's will a marks british airways onyx cruised home costumes late sunday night in the farm was bumped operating quote man full operation among gop.

angela merkel paris chancellor npr npr japan president marawi jim kaine gop us philippines liberty state park new jersey hudson river mindanao michael sullivan davao rodrigo duterte commander manila islamist militants two hundred thousand dollars six days