17 Burst results for "Michael Stephen Smith"

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

15:17 min | 7 months ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"New York City attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and died New York City attorney and activist I did because pope Francis acknowledged the genocide is quote the first of the deplorable series of catastrophes of the past century made possible by twisted racial ideological or religious aims the dark in the minds of the tormentors even to the point of planning the annihilation of entire peoples yet our own United States has refused to formally recognize the first genocide of the twentieth century giving into I'm going pressure from Turkey to keep it out of our history books president Obama had promised to acknowledge it but not surprisingly he left office having broken that promise we are pleased to bring a lot of disorder special remember in the Armenian genocide presented to you by our own hi David ocean around the world April twenty fourth marks the observance of the Armenian genocide on that day in nineteen fifteen the interior minister of the Ottoman Empire ordered the arrest and hangings of Armenian intellectuals and community leaders in Constantinople it was the beginning of a systematic and well documented plan to eliminate the Armenians who were Christian and who had been under Ottoman rule and treated as second class citizens since the fifteenth century the unspeakable and gruesome nature of the killings beheadings of groups of babies dismemberment mass burnings mass drownings use of toxic gas lethal injections of morphine or injections with the blood of typhoid fever patients render oral histories especially difficult for survivors of the victims why did this happen despite being deemed inferior to Turkish Muslims the Armenian community had attained a prestigious position in the Ottoman Empire and the central authorities there grew apprehensive of their power and their longing for a homeland the concerted plan of deportation and extermination was affected in large part because World War one demanded the involvement and concern of potential allied countries as the writer Grigoris blocking and wrote the war provided the Turkish government quote their sole opportunity one unprecedented to exploit the chaos of war in order to carry out their extermination plan as they escape to several countries including the United States a number of Armenians came to New Britain Connecticut in eighteen ninety two to work in the factories of what was then known as the hardware capital of the world by nineteen forty nearly three thousand Armenians lived there in a tight knit community as you will hear from the stories of first generation Armenian survivors who continue to live in New Britain a shared history a shared identity emerges some learned about the massacres directly from their parents or family members while others were not told at all often surviving women were shamed to talk about what they had experienced because so many of them had been raped or forced into harems for others conjuring visual images of the atrocities was too painful to bear when parents did speak about the crimes they experienced or witnessed they often spoken Turkish or Syrian instead of English or Armenian so that their children couldn't understand most children of survivors say that the topic was a secret even for a bit meeting together to share memories in conversation R. Jenny Garabedian Arthur severity in Ruth Swisher Harry messa Dorian and rocks email Jenny ninety five fiercest and they still have knowledge this happened and it once Jennison as a nation how can they denied this I mean how can it be denied its half of the population was removed I don't like Turks per se because what they did to our but I do enjoy the culture why would I grow up hating the Turks if she didn't tell us stories well then we must have been told something that we hated the third Armenians had a lot of power a lot of control they were the merchants they were they were people who in essence were major drivers of the economy in the world in Turkey yeah I think they were threatened by the culture and and the genocide started nineteen fifteen April twenty four in Istanbul where they took all the the intelligentsia of the country and took them outside of the city and hang them the overlay was of course religious with Muslims and dear the first country to acknowledge Christianity as a national religion so yeah there's a there's a lot of history here with all of that the other thing that the Turks used to say where is your Jesus now where is he wisely saving you they they it was founded on the death marches my brother Ernest was killed in an automobile accident and his uncle came over to my house and said L. stand where is your god now and she cocked her ears and she said she'd listened to listen I don't want to hear that god gave them to me and god took him away how much more Christian could you be as you will hear from the stories of first generation Armenian survivors who continue to live in New Britain Connecticut our shared history shared identity emerges some learned about the massacres directly from their parents or family members while others were not told at all often surviving women were shamed to talk about what they had experienced because so many of them have been raped or forced into harems for others conjuring up visual images of the atrocities was too painful to bear when parents did speak about the crimes experienced or witnessed the frequently spoke in Turkish or Syrian instead of English or Armenian so that their children couldn't understand most children of survivors say that the subject was a secret even for a bit my mother did not keep secrets from us she's smoke about the church she hated the Turks she made us hate the Turks I remember as a teenager I wanted to send away for Tor Hyundai's picture in Hollywood and he was very handsome Turkish actor we were not allowed anyway but the ones who did keep it secret we're the ones who are ashamed of what happened and I know for a fact many of the older women older than my mother had gotten raped those are the ones in my opinion in this area we're the ones who kept it secret I grew up hearing like the others my mother didn't talk about it to me ever but I was a little girl and my mother was quite a bit older than I was she was older when I was born and so her friends would come over and they would sit and talk to each other the next thing you know they don't start crying and and I would cry too and my mother would turn to me and say why are you crying and I said because you're crying and not knowing why I was crying and just recently we found out that this one got raped that one got raped and this is why they couldn't talk about it now I don't know about the men why the men kept it secret but as far as the women yes you're right the men were too young but many of the women did get raped and those are the ones in my opinion that really kept it a secret and my mother told me many stories so she wasn't ashamed she didn't have that feeling of being ashamed in our house it was a secret and then you hear someone be talking about something and then is you approach they say bid you all along which means little boy that's me and everything is switching the Turkish and burning everybody and then you know of some Armenians that come visit from wives role and they said the living room they're all talking Turkey shows it was a forbidden thing to discuss I heard the stories as I listened I I really heard the stories and then the old country they always talked about the old country and I had no idea where it was when I was a little girl I thought the old country was like Tolland Conn I just had no idea but I always wanted to go there and then I felt terrible because I never had a grandmother or grandfather are in on a realigned or an uncle as children growing up with your friends would come to the house you know they would always speak Armenian but whenever they had an off color story to tell and you could always tells an off color story because the way they broke into laughter it was always called in Turkish or Assyrian and then they revert back to English so stories were really not designed for children here was for them but you can always tell by their laughter that something was going on you know that they didn't want us to know about in point of fact that's what they always do if there was something going on the dinner table and they didn't want to see what was going on they speak Assyrian or or Turkish to one of the shows that whole business of Peking Turkish and the the residual effects of the genocide were interesting kind of almost juxtaposed one against the other genocide has both physical and non physical aspects destroying the national culture of the press group and imposing that of the oppressor that was the theory of legal scholar Raphael Lemkin who coined the word genocide in nineteen forty three with the Turkish extermination of the Armenians in mind well genocide is defined as the organized destruction in whole or in part of a national ethnic racial or religious group Clinton rode the group need not be only physically exterminated to suffer genocide a racing up people's cultural identity through destruction of their language religion social and political institutions that too was genocide the Armenian genocide the very first of the twentieth century may be viewed in four distinct segments the first segment began with the deportation and killing of the two hundred fifty intellectuals second segment involved the conscription of approximately sixty thousand Armenian men into the general Turkish army they were later disarmed and killed by their Turkish counterparts the third segment comprised massacres deportations and death marches of women children and the elderly into the Syrian desert's hundreds of thousands were killed by Turkish soldiers gendarmes in Kurdish mobs others perish from famine epidemic diseases and exposure to the elements thousands of women and children were raped tens of thousands were forcibly converted to Islam the final segment of the genocide is still ongoing and consists of the denial by the Turkish and United States governments the genocide even occurred despite the body of documentation that exists Turkey has launched a well orchestrated and financed campaign of denial through inaccurate scholarship propaganda and extensive lobbying Turkey even has a law which forbids mention of the word genocide article three oh one in Turkey essentially makes genocide in a legal word to use the term it's a dial if you don't have the word it it doesn't exist genocide didn't exist and so what you're doing is an essence of saying if we don't recognize a word if we don't use the word then all mention all concept of genocide disappears so what can you call it massacres another hot the first Holocaust I mean a lot of ways you can define it they've chosen because it's genocide and it truly was genocide the issues are deep seated the the the complex with deep seated soundly religious it was control it was economic it was financial Armenians had a lot of power a lot of control the with the merchants they were they were people who in essence were major drivers of the economy and the world in in Turkey I did some research historical research as well a lot of what we have is factual information because I have the original documentation some of it is put together from here say and then trying to create a story and in those pieces that we don't know that I've created I hope two plus two becomes four not five but it's close it's close to the story and the story begins my father was born in nineteen oh three he always said he was born in nineteen oh five but when we look through the original documentation turns out he was baptized in nineteen oh three so therefore he could have been born in nineteen oh five likely it had to do with presenting himself as a younger person to be able to latch on to another member of the family to come to the United States as part of the of the visa process as a second generation Armenian I too have pieced together the fragments of stories from my family my grandfather was a medical student at a college in corporate he said he had to beg his older sister for the tuition and when he walked down the street people would point to him with all as the person who was going to college when the genocide started he enlisted or was drafted into the army he narrowly and with difficulty escaped and.

New York City attorney Michael Stephen Smith pope Francis
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:44 min | 8 months ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Not only threatening themselves but they're also threatening the rest of us when they go home to stay with I'm a new York city attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and died New York City attorney and activist good morning Michael how are you doing up north well it's stopped raining finally was biblical four days of its sons out I'm doing good I yesterday morning at seven thirty I drove through the rain to the supermarket fifteen miles away they have senior hour at seven thirty you should have seen the scene in the parking lot all these old people wearing bandannas it looks like they're on a collective burglary how are you doing Heidi I'm doing well Michael thanks for asking yeah you're in the epicenter of the pandemic yes and one of the things I wanted to mention in our first few minutes is that the centers for disease control and prevention has a new report out as of the time we're recording next I think we already knew this but they're saying definitively that persons who have chronic underlying conditions such as lung disease heart disease diabetes seem to be at higher risk of severe illness from coded nineteen these seventy eight percent of the patients with the virus in the United States who need admission to intensive care I had at least one underlying condition and sadly ninety four percent of those who died had an underlying condition so this is a first preliminary snapshot they base it on data from about seven thousand cases in the U. S. at about two hundred deaths and needs results are consistent with what they found in China in Italy so it's not really a surprise but it's good to have the hard back that leads me into what I wanted to say about older people in prison we did a show with Victor page on that here in New York state there are ten thousand two hundred thirty nine elderly people in prison and of course these people tend to have underlying conditions now living in a situation where the virus can spread through a prison like wildfire through a forest people can help governor Cuomo in New York is setting himself up as a presidential candidate and as a leader but he's done zero in releasing these people they are harmless these elderly people you should let him go you.

attorney Michael Stephen Smith burglary Heidi United States China Italy New York New York City lung disease Victor governor Cuomo
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:56 min | 11 months ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The daylong disorder we devote our entire show to a special interview with human rights attorney Michael tiger came out to California in the early sixties and he's never stop this is a great and stay with us I'm new York's city attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and die New York City attorney and activist the coach as we entered the new decade we look back at where we began legally speaking and where we're headed two thousand twenty began with president Donald Trump illegally and recklessly ordering the assassination of top Iranian general Sam's Alemany who's on a peace mission in a rock at the time he was killed by a U. S. drone although assassination had been secretly used by the US government since the formation of the C. I. A. in nineteen forty seven trump's predecessor Barack Obama began the a legal extrajudicial open assassination of people in what was called targeted killings this even included American citizens with regard to deportations the Obama administration set a record by deporting more than three million people trump is continued massive deportations but has also legally frustrated and prevented people fleeing political repression from seeking asylum in America separating children from families and caging them assess the continues even now the authorization for the use of military force was voted on shortly after nine eleven to justify the bombing an invasion of Afghanistan the a U. MF has since been used to legally to justify the presence of American troops in the Middle East it was recently renewed the patriot act has also been renewed allowing for massive U. S. government surveillance of American citizens in the illegal derogation of their Fourth Amendment right to privacy truth telling whistle blower Australian journalist Julian a song in the most important first amendment civil liberties case faces extradition from London to Virginia the issue was his right to be a journalist and our right to know if convicted he will go to prison for life destroying investigative journalism in areas the government deems quote national security the people's constitutional right to impeach a president is also in jeopardy the democratic party's attempt to remove Donald Trump from office is sure to fail because of trump and the Republicans refusal to honor the constitution and to allow for a fair trial in the Senate trump has appointed hundreds of reactionary judges to the federal trial and appellate benches a woman's right to control her own body decided in the landmark case roe V. Wade will be decided by the Supreme Court whose ranks have been bolstered by two additional reactionary judges course such and cabin all the separation of church and state and the separation of powers are also in jeopardy we're delighted to welcome back human rights attorney Michael tiger he is a veteran of nineteen sixties activism and has appeared many times before the US Supreme Court taught law at three schools and has written numerous books including the now classic law and the rise of capitalism and most recently mythologies of state and monopoly power Michael tiger welcome back to law and disorder thank you it's good to see you again Michael you're from California you're up there and you went to law school out there chase a blue gene just got elected to the office of district attorney in San Francisco he's now the main prosecutor in leasing office of three hundred people when he was sworn in two weeks ago Supreme Court justice Sonia Sotomayor spoke at the ceremony via a pre taped video we've got a transcript of that video and I'd like it if Heidi could read what justice Sotomayor had to say Taissa my court sessions resume next week so I'm unable to join your inauguration ceremony I sent you this message to tell you how much I admire you and to wish you well in your new endeavors a little over ten years ago I was visiting the public housing project where I grew up in the Bronx a film crew was following me around as I left the building which I'd lived I stood next to a young child about ten years old whose mother was looking down from one of the apartments above us the child asked me why all the people surrounding us were making such a fuss about me and I pause to think and finally said I grew up in this building where you live now and there are many people who think that kids like us can never become something important in life they think because we may be poor in money we are poor in spirit to you're not and I'm not that way we can make something of ourselves and my becoming the first Latina justice of the United States Supreme Court is proof that people like us have a chance in life okay Sir utorrent example that gives hope to so many it is uncommon for a former public defender to become a district attorney of a major city like San Francisco especially in district attorney who spent his childhood visiting parents incarcerated for committing serious felonies as you described it to me the difficulties you faced as a child including that you did not read until age nine are common among children of prisoners you have lived the state bar of anger shame and guilt that so many such children in the criminal.

Michael tiger California attorney
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

15:36 min | 1 year ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"I'm new York's city attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and dive New York City attorney and activist I did the coach three years ago on April twenty seventh two thousand sixteen swat teams in about seven hundred and my P. D. officers along with federal law enforcement rated the Eastchester gardens public housing project and nearby homes in the Bronx one hundred twenty people almost all young Latino men were arrested and indicted after the pre dawn raid prosecutors called it quote the largest gang take down in New York City history at the time we covered it on law and disorder preporuka the US attorney for the Southern District of New York then said the one hundred twenty were members of two violent rival street gangs that had quote wreaked havoc in the neighborhood for years and were responsible for at least eight murders the NYPD commissioner at the time bill Bratton said quote these gang members do not belong in our streets instead they belong exactly where they're going to federal prison for many years where they won't be surrounded by their bodies they won't be close to their families and they will no longer be free to terrorize the neighborhoods in which they grew up although the media covered the raids for a few days after over the past three years few journalists have actually followed up on the story a new report published prior to the raids third anniversary reveals troubling facts about the prosecution it also raises questions about due process the abuse of federal conspiracy charges and the criminalization of social relationships in communities of color joining us in the studio today is bey Powell a co author of the report and a professor at CUNY school of law Vester Howell studies gag policing practices and teaches criminal law criminal trial advocacy and lawyering skills professor bay Powell welcome to law and disorder thank you now you've done a lot of research about gangs let's briefly talk about gangs for a minute what are some of the biggest misconceptions about gangs the biggest mixed misconceptions about gangs are essentially based on the myth that we see in the media that they are highly organized at their shot callers that joining and quitting a gang involves definite acts of violence like initiation rite like initiation Dino and if you pay attention to the world around us you might say well if you have to shoot or slash someone every time you join a gang and we have thousands of gangs and hundreds of thousands of gang members where are all those victims crime is at all time lows so the mythology of organized gangs that are primarily violent is is just incorrect the number one reason kids join gangs as for that what they're not two top choices one is for belonging a sense of family and the other is for protection no often kids who are getting bullied will join click or a crew and that provides protection the number one reason people leave gangs is because of violence so you know gang membership is more about belonging hanging out maybe smoking weed maybe making rap videos but having a peer group like joining a fraternity at college but of course for the media adjust the name gangs has sort of cash shade that I guess makes good headlines absolutely and when I first started working on these issues when I first started looking into gang allegations I was concerned that that there was a reality there that I was missing because I'd focused on broken windows policing stop and frisk low level policing but what I learned was that the police across the country are certifying people as gang members based on appearances associations photographs no criminality is required much less any violence so and those listings secret so there's no challenging them well I was actually going to ask you do police departments keep a list or registries of so called suspected gang members are they keep registries of people that they say are certified gang members and associates and they are generally secret California requires notice but most of the police department's violate that rule according to California state audit New York the New York gang database has according to the NYPD about eighteen thousand names in them and ninety eight point nine percent of those are non white so we have massive gang database with criteria that does not require criminality and there's no judicial review notice to individuals so they the gang databases big black box includes whoever the police want to include analyst now if there's a routine traffic stop for example does the name of someone on the in the database come up if someone is stopped and the check is done unfortunately it does then my PD recently testified at that hearing the city hall and they confirmed that every patrol officer who's pulling up the name we'll see if someone's identified as a gang member and that makes every every interaction with an alleged gang member much more dangerous for that individual and and for the police because the police is sort of gets their dander up and may be more prone to react quickly or use violence I would imagine yeah absolutely and I've worked with a lot of affected communities and individuals who say I'm in in a gang database are very fearful of being stopped by police especially if they have children in the car and they do not purge these lists so you'll have forty and fifty year olds who are in gangs databases well you mentioned some figures in New York City do does law enforcement deem gangs a serious problem after all isn't a rate of overall violence down in the metropolitan area so this is an interesting story of what sociologists would calm what moral panic in two thousand twelve in September October two thousand twelve then police commissioner ray Kelly announced operation crew caught at that time he announced that cruise small groups of young black and brown men were the number one drivers of violent crime in New York this despite the fact that our crime rates are at all time lows why did he make that announcement at that point in time it's my belief and that because every mayoral candidate was running against stop and frisk because the class had just been certified in the in the stop and frisk class action case that the police knew the writing was on the wall we can't stop and frisk black and brown men with impunity we will now start surveilling them on social media will stop will stop start debriefing them about gang matters and talking to them about it but not call it stop and frisk so is it a big problem no I've made freedom of information law request about NYPD gangs stats which they keep as well as compstat and was finding that you know gang motivated crimes are minuscule compared to the overall gain problem no less than two percent of all crime in New York is getting motivated a slightly higher percent of of shootings and and homicides but it's still in the you know eighty five nine percent of of shootings in homes that are not getting motivated so let's go to the raids of two thousand sixteen in the east Chester gardens public housing project of the so called Bronx one twenty and the subject of your excellent report they did receive great media attention there were enormous number of police officers I understand about seven hundred of my P. D. as well so there were swat teams and some federal law enforcement president that accomplish the goal of drawing attention to that and perhaps deflecting it from what the police would say were curbs on their ability to do stop and frisk in unit would do law enforcement the way they had traditionally done it do you think that was in a way sacrificing the lives of over a hundred young men and their families and the community there just to prove a point absolutely unfortunately the bronze one twenty raids which involves seven hundred law enforcement eight T. F. F. B. I. homeland security and white PD swat teams helicopters pre dawn breaking down doors and then making whole families to crawl on the floor with armed officers in their home in riot gear that was unnecessary it was deeply traumatizing for the community and it was not justified by the actual charges an actual conduct alleged in the in the Bronx one twenty indictments now that's something that I did not know for sure at the time I suspected it because I'd studied what are gang allegations and I knew they didn't require criminality but I wasn't sure like was this a gang war that I was unaware of what is the violence that which was kind of represented at the initial press conferences saying these with the two violent gangs would turn this area into a war zone in the last three years I've looked at all the sentencing memorandum supply the agreements that transcripts and the actual allegations against the defendants and I found that half of them are not even alleged to be in the two so called violent crews half that's sixty that's dozens of individuals from this community two thirds of them not alleged to have engaged in any violence only eighteen percent of the defendants had a gun charge about five percent murder what we were doing with picking up you know twenty individuals nineteen of whom had nothing to do with the homicide in one of whom did and and wrapping them all into a big case they were to conclude team Lee denied bail and in very they were pre judged as guilty in violent and that really deprive them all of a fair trial guilt by association in fact absolutely were they originally charged with under the Rico act and if so can you briefly explain how that works right there were four charges one of them was a Rico conspiracy which is the racketeering influenced corrupt organisation act which originally was designed to get at informal associations like the mafia highly organized criminal enterprises that infiltrated the legitimate economy but that could theoretically run circles around federal prosecutors because of all the resources here were taking that same construct we can we can criminalize even the conduct of an informal association like a bunch of kids who foreman neighborhood clicker crew we can take that and that will be the criminal enterprise in the informal association and then we can charge everyone who's involved with that crew who advances it it's interesting anyway like you know Facebook posts in rap videos proclaiming what a great crew it is or how they'll you know kick your **** if you come to their neighborhood I'm sorry if I'm not like let's say than a radio so so they used a Rico which is for a sophisticated criminal enterprise against group of kids who lived in there in the public housing in in their moms houses and had no resources they all had a signed into counsel for indigent defendants there was no claim that they were that they had money in fact the minimal fine of one hundred dollars was imposed on just about every case I think one or two had two hundred dollar fine so it's the misuse of this very broad statute which has been mis use similarly across the country in other gang cases this is not a new mutation it's just pretty much the biggest that I'm aware of now I understand that with a Rico charge and I'm sure that most of the attorneys that were assigned to these young persons you know do a fine job but a Rico charge is difficult to take the through the courts so let's talk about where the charges reduced and how many people took please markets so as I mentioned there was a Rico charge or to narcotics charges one was a narcotics conspiracy in one and a fourth charge which was a gun charge a gun either in furtherance of the Rico conspiracy or a gun in furtherance of the narcotics case most of the defendants were required to plead guilty to one of those four charges there were three decline prosecutions of the one twenty two were allowed misdemeanor please but the rest took a plea to either Rico narcotics or the gun charge and the prosecutors seem to require the plea based on what they believe you did so if Benny Powell was one of the one twenty and they thought that I had possessed a gun and was selling narcotics they would require me to take the the gun enhancement and probably the narcotics charge in and get the minimum that the mandatory minimum of five years if I had not used the gone into seven years if I brand shouldn't ten if I discharged so they really were tailoring to what they thought the individuals had done but the really amazing thing was thirty five of them played to narcotics conspiracy involving just marijuana or we co predicate acts involving marijuana it's it's a little bit complicated but thirty five we're just marijuana thirty word just other drugs so the vast majority had no violence and played to the charge but got a relatively low sentence so you had twenty two time serve sentences which were still average of eleven months people were immediately held until they took the plea and then we also had about a dozen sentences that were less than two years so so there were quite a few low sentences and please that.

attorney Michael Stephen Smith new York P. D. three years eighty five nine percent one hundred dollars two hundred dollar eighteen percent eleven months five percent nine percent seven years two percent fifty year five years two years
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Away, exactly three years ago. But when all this came down, Michael Ratner said, it's cool, there's been a coup Daniel Ellsberg said, the same thing there has been, and we're not on the same democratic footing that we used to be on. And that's that's the situation we face. And in the introduction. I wrote about a couple of cases that are with talking about in terms of how lawyers on the left can advocate against what they've done. So clearly happy to talk about several of those cases, clearly, this is not just a memoir that's not just some by graphical sketches of former now going or present surviving. Radical attorneys, but it's an innocence, a political intervention in these would've often been referred to is increasingly dark times, Michael Smith. Talk about radical attorneys, and they're different conception of the law. You know, I looked went when a mind this morning and retrieve that, quote by the famed the French writer of the early late nineteenth early twentieth. Century toll France. He once said that the law in its majestic equality. Forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges to beg in the streets, and to steal to steal bread, clearly this. There's this notion, the mainstream notion of the neutrality of the law versus, of course, the role of the Justice system in upholding in safeguarding, the domino odor. Talk about that. That is the rule rule of law. It's often touted that if without the room of law, this would be the love the jungle. And but go into that a little bit because it runs as a theme through the book. Yes. Of the book, is that now an increasingly so the rule of law, and democracy, iron compatible with corporate capitalism, and the book was written to be both instructive inspirational in terms of those people who would like to challenge that the liberals view of the law is that set of rules that govern relations between people and between people and their government. And if it makes a mistake or there, that can be easily corrected in appellate court. William Cuzner, whom I write about in the book. He was, of course, the great trial lawyer of the sixties and seventies, he was Martin Luther King's lawyer and counselor had a different definition of law, counselor said, and I'm gonna I wrote this down like you did with Anatole France and gonna. Read to you what, what Bill consular said, the law is in fundamental essence, nothing more than a method of control created by socio economic system. Determined at all costs to perpetuate itself by all means necessary for as long as possible. Well, I read I read that quote to Michael Tigar who, who interview in the book Tigers, where the great constitutional lawyers in the country still practicing and tiger responded, well bills half. Right. But of course if you bad five hundred you could leave the league, and then he went on to explain what he meant about Bill being half, right? Because the government can't run the country solely by repression. You can't have six cops every street corner. I mean you could but it would be expensive, and unruly, and ultimately, impossible, you have to run things by the holiday, and any allergies is what you gotta when you read the Anatole, France, quote, because I know service lost both the equal punishing both rich and poor for sleeping under bridges. But in fact, it's not it. It's a, that's a myth. The myth that all men are Crea. Equal the myth that you'll find Justice in the courts. Clarence Darrow said, there's no such thing as Justice interactive court. But people internalize these mitts and it makes it much more economical and easy for the powers that be to run things. If they don't have to do it solely by repression. You're listening to Michael Smith author of lawyers for the left in the courts in the streets. And on the air, we'll be opening up the phone lines Ed a half past the hour. Few minutes from now of you want to join in the conversation. A comment a question for guest. They again call. Six eight two five six two thousand and one Michael, Stephen Smith, the book touches you wonderful book touches on various landmark cases, defended by whatever often, you know, sometimes for two peoples lawyers movement lawyers read, you know, the left of the judicial or court system, legal system, many of these cases, had a major societal impact in regard to democratic rights, and civil liberties, of course, in Bill Bill of rights protections. Of course, all under attack, or retrenchment today, give us some examples of some of those key things that were raised in the courts by some of the attorneys use survey here, Leonard wine, glass, or Leonard Budeina some of these because, of course we like. Tuck the minute ago about internalizing ideology, part of that, of course, is in notion that the protections, we have just kind of fell from the sky or came from the founding fathers. Yeah. They came from struggle justices a constant struggle constantly used to say, there are no green pastures every generation has its own fights to, to wage, and that's where our freedoms such as they are even diminishing in these dire times. But that's where they came from. Let me give you two examples of two of the cases that to the lawyers that I profile the book handled and the book is lawyers for the left, you can get it from or books are books dot com and let me talk about case that I think is relevant for today. It's a case Dhabi what we call the necessity defense, which is the decec- offense allow somebody to commit a crime. If in the commission of that crime, it prevents a larger -cribe wine glass, was called into a case up in western Massachusetts. The university of Massachusetts Amherst. By president Jimmy Carter's daughter. Amy Carter who was a student there. And she had organized with about thirty other students sit in at the administration building stop the CIA from recruiting on campus. And they successfully did that they were arrested for trespassing. They were tried and then wine glass came in and handle the defense. And the defense was in the sesame defense, he called Howard zinn, the great American historian to testify about the nature of the CIA, he called Ralph mcgehee rogue CIA agent who quit the organization after discovering what it was doing. Principally assassinating people in Vietnam. And he caught a number of other witnesses all to talk about the CIA, and he convinced a rural mostly farmers jury in western Massachusetts to acquit the defendants and the necessity defense, the reason I recalled that case is that defense is now being used by climb. Activists. And it was just they just successfully got a ruling from a judge in the state of Washington that they could use that to fence, when they, they stopped a an oil pipeline and committed a crime really of turning the valve off pipeline that was bringing tar sands oil down from Canada still THEO oil and they stopped it. And the judge said, okay, you can use the defense because what, what you're doing in the commission of a crime is creating an much worse crime in. That's the eco side, the pollution of our planet. So that was that was a case that I write about an introduction, another case that Leonard dean handled, and moon was the great constitutional litigator in the fifties, and sixties, and the seventies and boot dean, took a case for a socialist party called the Socialist Workers Party. Eighty and he I their behalf sued the FBI and the FBI was attempting under what Jaeger who the head of the F, B I developed it was called the Cohen, tell program counter challenges program. It was directed at the communist party was directed against black people in the civil rights movement, order to destroy them, and it was directed socialists and boot into the case in New York City. It was litigated for fifteen years and eight years were occupied in the discovery process, they got ten million documents the judge called boot up to the podium, and he said, Mr., you're not gonna believe what's in these documents and they went on to announce what was in them, and it turned out that even. Though, this is a small social organization, only three thousand members if you include their youth group, the FBI had inserted three hundred informers into the organization. They used thirteen hundred spies to spy on them. They wiretap their telephones they visited their landlords to try to get them evicted visited their employers to try to get them fired. They spread rumors amongst other groups on the left to try to get them isolated. They spread rumors inside of the organization have people oppose each other inside of your. They did everything they could to destroy a legal political party. So judge Thomas, Chris day after fifteen years of litigation, and this is a Republican judge. He wrote a decision where he said, two things one it's legal to be a socialist and to it's legal to be in a socialist organisation. The government could never prove that the organization or any of its members that anything illegal. The government took a position which it maintained throughout the litigation, and to this day, that they had a right to spy on social because they were socialists, even though they did nothing illegal. But that was a tremendous victory. Not only did they win a quarter of a million dollars that they got an injunction saying that the government cannot do what had been doing. And I think that's tremendously relevant today with the great growth of socialism. The popularity of, of social saiga's is really very widespread now and people should know about this case. No that the government has no business messing with us. Again. You're listening to Michael Stephen Smith author of layers for the left in the courts in the streets. And on the air, Michael, we do have a caller with the question or comment. His name is also Mike and he's now on the high, Mike. Hi. From Appleton, Wisconsin to and I came down to university yet thanking sixty eight and I got a education too. Yeah. My question was a John Lennon. I heard that case was extremely important terms. The legal profession and my comment was when nine eleven hit. It took the wind at my sales. I was in at formed a group called preserve our climate and after that it was just like. We knew we weren't going anywhere. So I'm sorry. You had a question about the John Lennon case. Yeah. Deport he tried to get begged US government tried to deport 'em and they were spying on him constantly. Thank you. Then he eventually won the case. Yeah. I think they try to deport him for smoking marijuana. Yeah. And use that then then it was a crime. Still is actually in New York. They tried to use that to deport him. It was only one that beat the United States on something. You know, I don't know the answer to that. But I wouldn't.

Bill Bill Michael Smith FBI CIA France Massachusetts Michael New York City Michael Ratner United States John Lennon Michael Tigar Daniel Ellsberg university of Massachusetts Am Anatole France Clarence Darrow writer Martin Luther King
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

14:32 min | 1 year ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Phone is Michael. Stephen Smith, Michael is an attorney former longtime board member at the center for constitutional rights and a longtime member of the national lawyers guild. He's written or edited various titles, including notebook of a sixties, lawyer, and unrepentant memoir, and selected writings lers. You'll like putting Uman rights. I the emerging police state by William kuntsler, which he ended in and shake Vara and the FBI with Michael Ratner. He's the co editor of imagine living in a socialist USA Smith has written articles for the New York state bar association. The journey. Capitalism nature and socialism against the current and socialism and democracy is co host of the weekly radio program law, and disorder broadcast from New York City's WBAI today, we're going to discuss Michael's recent book lawyers for the left in the courts in the streets and on the air, Michael Smith, you are on the air WR, t welcome. Hello. How are you nice to be on the show? I'm I've been looking forward to this ever since I cracked your book. Oh about a week or so ago. So let's jump right in Michael. First of all, tell us about yourself, some, some background a summary of your trajectory as left activists and attorney to in a sense, the Scituate this book. Well, I'm very happy to report that I'm from the great state of Wisconsin. I grew up in FOX point, which is a little Republican village on the lake north of Milwaukee in the fifties. And I luckily enough because I was pretty much a juvenile delinquent school. But in those days, I don't know what it's like now, but in those days, the university really had except anybody who applied as long as they were morally fit. And there was some question about that. But I finally got in a week before classes started. And I got a real education that I was fairly ignorant where I grew up, there was no library. There was a police station and fire station. And if you want to read a book you get on your bike, and you pedal, six blocks up to the strip mall, and there are some books in a wire, hanger up there that you can read or otherwise, it was hard to learn anything, but it was certainly not hard to learn stuff at the university of Wisconsin. Even though Madison isn't far away from where McCarthy was situated in Appleton it was light years away because it was a progressive university with. Stood the witch hunt of McCarthy. And when I got there, nineteen sixty I actually had four socialist professors, had a course called capitalism, socialism, by economists named Jack bar bash, but it was mostly about socialism. I had George MARCY Williams Williams was the greatest story in. He understood that the Cold War was really American aggression expansion, and he became twenty years later, when, when he was elected, the president of the American historical association, he his thought became pretty routine, but in those days he was really guard and I had like you Allen, I had the great to Harvey Goldberg that explained explains it. Now, Chaman my book, you know, years ago, friends of mine were able to put his lectures, which had been taped on CDs. I still listen to him. He's brilliant. Now you ever was. And, and he certainly influenced me, I think more than any other professor. And I know that you had them too, because I was at the meeting in Madison last summer when you were on that panel Alan talking about him. So, you know, you, you end up going to did you go to school here in Madison as well after a while, I wanted to live in New York, I had a girlfriend, whose parents were New York intellectuals when I was living in FOX point, and I couldn't wait to get out of there, and I use the opportunity when I graduated from undergraduate school to get into NYU law school, but my parents ran out of money so I didn't last a year, and I was very disappointed in losing my told. New York I went back to Madison but it turned out university. Wisconsin last was great place to be certainly a much superior to NYU where the students read the Wall Street Journal, and they had their shoes. Polished by black guys on the sidewalk in front of the law school carried unbrellas. I was one of the two radicals in the law school. The other guy was found revest. Yes. Michigan. So I was pretty isolated why you got back to Wisconsin. The antiwar was, was starting to crank up and it was terrific place. And I was able to graduate from university law school, nineteen sixty seven so, so you come out of Madison and law school, and so on radicalized by the environment here by what was going on the war, and the civil rights movement, and so on, and you become a what was often called at the time, a people's lawyer tuck about a just a little bit more about that, that, that is the lawyers guild in eventually, the committee for constitutional rights that you become involved with, well, those days in the mid sixties, you had to go into the military, unless you had a drafter ferment, and I wasn't interested in going to Vietnam is anything. I was on the side of the Vietnamese. So. So I joined what was called the domestic peace corps, and I had a choice of going to either Chicago or Detroit, and Chicago. Lenny, Bruce Chicago is so corrupt. It was thrilling. So I knew that Chicago would not be a place where you could get done, and I opted for Detroit. So in the fall of nineteen sixty seven I was in Detroit working for community legal services, our job. There were ten of us in our job was to represent community organizations in the inner city in the ghetto of Detroit. And I did that until I was no longer eligible for the draft. And then I opened up a law firm. There were seven of us and we bought an old house, right near the GM building in downtown Detroit. And we fixed the house up mitt into an office and for years. We represented the movement in Detroit. Lieutenant Dennis Mullany of the red squadron, Detroit. We got our we did a foia request information. Question. We got our secret files they used to spy on our law firm, and he said there wasn't an war, feminist or moving group or group or underground newspaper in the city of Detroit that wasn't represented by my firm. So I spent several years doing that. And I then moved on to New York where I became active in at the center for kasha so rights in the lawyers guild, as you mentioned talking about give our listeners. Please a brief sketch of this book lawyers for the left. Describe what it is. Well, it's interviews with and essays by me of Twenty-three significant lawyers. Lawyers for my generation sixties radicals and lawyers from my parents generation the Genesis of the book came out of my radio show on disorder and law disorder came out of nine eleven I lived right across the street from the World Trade Center on nine eleven if the building would have fallen on its side, rather than straight down would have fallen on my apartment. So I was very much affected by it. The building was covered in four inches of dark ash. It was darkened twice after the second building fell. We didn't know what to do my wife and I were living there with a sixteen pound cat named MO and my talking parrot, Charlie Parker. And it was really we weren't portable. We couldn't get out of there. The top. Came through. Right. And said you have to evacuate, but we really couldn't go anywhere because of the animals so we stayed overnight. But then they came back the next day, and they said, you really have to get out of here. So we left most for day, and we put shyly in his cage, and we started walking up to the village to stay with Michael Ratner and his wife and all the way Charlie was saying from his cage. It's okay. It's okay, but as you know, it wasn't okay and because it wasn't okay. We got the idea of starting the radio show. We had a segment of the radio show called lawyers, you'll like and the half the book, our interviews that have been transcribed and edited down of these various lawyers, who we interviewed under the lawyers. You're like part of the show. The other half are says that I wrote about significant lawyers like Bill consular Conrad, Lynn, Bruce. Right. And I wrote an introduction. About the challenges that are facing lawyers for the left and then I wrote an appendix about what law. My look like if we got rid of capitalism. Much. Give us a little a little taste of that the intro or whatever. Well, let me talk about the challenges we face. Sure. Sure. And this is what I write about introduction after nine eleven. The first thing the government did was passed the Patriot Act as you know, it was the three hundred and forty page active. I'll reactionary laws that they'd been saving up for years. It sailed through congress. Most people never even read it, and the Patriot Act is designed to create a massive police spine surveillance state for example last week. I went to the cardiologists and I had tests on my heart, and then I drove home through the Brooklyn battery tunnel, the Brooklyn battery tunnel has face recognition cameras. So as soon as I drove through that tunnel, they knew who I was, and then under the Patriot Act that can get your government records that can get your medical records. They can get your library records. They get your telephone calls now every time you pick up a cell phone. They know who you're calling. Where you're calling from every stroke on your computer is is recorded. They know who you're writing. There's, there's been a tremendous step backwards in our democratic society after nine eleven. And the Patriot Act was was passed, there were several things that happened that I that I wanted to talk about the national defense authorization act was passed that allows for the army to pick up anybody in the United States, including citizen, and apprehend them and detain them forever. So that act was challenged by gnome Chomsky, and Chris hedges who went to court last year in front of very courageous judge Katherine Forrest here in New York City and check sports found in their favor that the army should not be allowed to pick up detained forever any American citizen. So the government immediately said they wanted to appeal and the plane of said they would cross appeal, but before that they went down to Washington, and the lawyers met with Nancy Pelosi, and they said, we will give up our appeal if you'll take the reference to American citizens. Out of this act and Pelosi wouldn't do it. There's another thing that's particularly scary. And that's the case that we have to central constitutional rights brought on behalf of the father of this radical Muslim cleric named ala walkie. Allah walkie was put on a hit list, by the United States, and it was public knowledge that they were going to assassinate him. So his father retained us at the center to straddle lawsuit to prevent the murder of his son, who is an American citizen, born in New Mexico, and we lost a lot of we were thrown out of court for lack of standing they said, we, we had no ability to bring lawsuit to begin with. That's the same thing they threw out, Chomsky and hedges on. And we were thrown out of court next week. The American government assassinated American citizen, Allah, walkie and two weeks later killed by a drone his sixteen year old son and the last thing I wanted to mention about. About the disappearance of democracy. And our country is the citizens United case, which I'm sure your listeners are aware of the citizens, United case decided by judge. Robert six years ago Roberts was the guy you'll recall that said that his position as a supreme court judge was not to make the law, but just call balls and strikes. You'll be s the decision he wrote give citizenship to corporations gives them people would so that corporations has people now allowed to give as much money as they want to, to various political parties. And that's what's been the source of the development of that right wing in this country. And you we of course, know that, that corporations are not people, I'll believe a corporation person. The dad gets a colonoscopy, it's a legal fiction, but those things the Patriot Act national. Offensive authorization act. The outta walkie assassination citizens United all added up to what Michael Ratner my co host at the radio show that we do in their former president of the center for Kostunica rights, Michael passed.

Detroit Michael Michael Ratner New York City New York Madison Wisconsin Chicago FOX point attorney McCarthy Michael Smith Charlie Parker president university of Wisconsin American government bar association
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

14:23 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"We'll also speak with author and attorney Angela Davis. Talk to her about the power of prosecutors. Most of whom are what? New York City attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and New York City attorney and activist Heidi book ocean. In a society in which entrenched, racism persists is it possible? For white activists to meaningfully engage in antiracist movements like the movement for black lives longtime, peace activist educator and author. Matt Meyer examined that question in his new book, white lives matter most and other quote little white lies as we honor the life and legacy of the Reverend Dr Martin Luther King junior. We talked today with Matt Meyer, whom Cornell west says, quote, this legendary freedom fighter brings together. The best of the peace movement and the best of the anti-racism movement, Matt Meyer, welcome back to law and disorder. Always a pleasure to be here. Congratulations on your latest publication of the book is called white lives matter most with a very small subtitled, it says and other. Little white lies. I've heard tell that this is the kind of book one cannot read on the New York subway. Well, yeah. One one review said he really liked the content but having a book that that screams out white lives matter most is not the best or safest thing to have here here in the Big Apple I've been saying everywhere, I go this is not an aspirational title. This is actually a provocative title. That's trying to be a descriptive history of what the US has been not what we wanted to be. We are joined in our studio today by our friend and colleague Mitty Owens who along with you mad is on the board of the J, musty institute. Maybe you've recently read the book. Well, Matt I think it's wonderful to put this out there. I'm most curious how it's being received by your white colleagues in the movement where enough easy responses. We're where's the greatest pushback, and maybe even subtle tension. Well, I. Well, I think I it's a complicated moment I in US history. I think it's a complicated moment to look at density and identity politics. So I think there are two answers to that. There are two areas of pushback, especially from white activists and white organizers one is sort of a. Oh, yeah. That's important. But it's not us. And I think that's part of the issue. You know? Dennis Brutus, and old colleague and close friend, South African poet went back home a few years after the end of political apartheid a few years after nine hundred ninety four and he said, you know, Matt the strangest thing I spoke to lots and lots of white people throughout South Africa. And none of them ever supported apart date. It's it's extremely they all against it. I don't know how lasted so long. And I think that's one of the pushbacks from certain colleagues within the US left and within the progressive movement white folks who say, well, this is all good, and well, but we've been doing anti racist work for X number of years and we've been doing anti racist work in this way. And in that way. And there's no question that there are some emerging and new organizations, and there is good work going on. But I think part of what we tried to say in this book part of what I try to say in the message that several of us are trying to put out through this work. Is it's not just about anti-racist action. It's about an analysis and an understanding of the empire at this moment an empire in decline, then in addition to having racist policies also is deeply colonial and its relationship to black folk and its relationship, obviously to Puerto Ricans and Mexican people chicanos it's an empire that looks at colonizing peoples nations and cultures and that looking beyond simply an anti-racist. But to an anti-imperialist analysis is necessary. We're going to broadcast interview with you on Martin Luther King day. And I wanted to ask you what's the connection between what organizing king was doing fifty one years ago and black lives matter movement. Well, I wanna save beyond even the movement for black lives. The key. I think of kings last major campaign, the poor people's campaign is that it was a campaign that understood the need for the leadership of groups like southern Christian leadership conference, the need for the leadership from the south from black led organizations and and organizing, but also the need to cross all racial. Lines the need for a class analysis that looks at what poor and working people had to unite around. And that's that's a connection that still hasn't been done that still needs to be done today. And in fact, though, this is in many ways spotlighted as king's last great unfinished campaign king's own analysis around race in class was there years and years before nineteen sixty eight and so we have some important radical routes king and our own struggles to get back to. And Matt are you hopeful about sort of the particularly some of the young organizers of today in terms of making really recognizing that intersection -ality, you know, some of the groups that musty has aging must foundation has funded have been groups among Arab American youth youth of color, and various groups and gay lesbian groups, and they seem to really be very impressive in making some of these connections. It seems like maybe there's a new day at people really recognizing that solidarity and doing the work. I'm wondering what your impression is of those linkages being made. Well, I have to say I am and this is very difficult for me to say in general and on the air. I am less optimistic than I used to be. I'm very worried about this moment. Yes. Everything you said Midi is correct. There are more organizations. There are more groups and grouplets springing up mainly I think, yes. From within oppressed communities and nations and groups so in that sense. There's reason for some hope on the other hand, I am less optimistic about so-called white America. I have to think when I think about king also about one of the young leaders of the time a Stokely Carmichael, the student on violent coordinating committee later to rename himself Kwami Turay, and you know, we talk about sixty seven sixty eight and the Atlanta project of snick and the gauntlet that that they threw down for white folk not to leave the movement and not to leave the organizations that were working together hand in hand, but to to focus deeply on work within the white community work against racism against colonialism against the evils of US society. And this actually, you know, speak. To an earlier book of mine that was co edited with Mandy Carter and Elizabeth petita Martinez, which was titled we have not been moved. And that title comes from a sad and worrisome analysis that that gauntlet thrown down in sixty six and sixty seven sixty eight for white folk to pick up the work has not moved very far in these fifty plus years one thing though, that is change for the better is this one of the facts of king's life that isn't that? Well, known is that indeed he was a socialist was a a democratic socialist and the kind of program check, it was advocating are the kind of programs we need then. And now, and I think that that understanding openness to socialize is now is much better than it was fifty years ago when you agree. I think there are waves. So certainly some socialist organizations have membership numbers that are better than they were fifty years ago. But you know, king was close to many figures in socialist movements and communist movements, but first and foremost, he was a preacher. He was a transcendental thinker and as a whole I do feel like in terms of movements. We were better fifty years ago. I don't think it was a special thing about organizers who had greater perceptions. I don't think it was a thing about a special moment of the sixties. But I think we have had a hard time tying together. Some of those good ideas that you're correctly talking about Michael and making them into actual movements. Yeah. I matter just pick up on a couple of thoughts. The I think about how king himself admonished the white community in his final book. Where do we go from here and not addressing really forthrightly, white racism, and it's assumption of of of privilege, and entitlement, and that sort of voice of conscience pushing us to constantly reflect go deeper and build up solidarity. We truly need that. I think of Reverend William barber someone who is picking up that mantle are there some other individuals. Although I know, of course, this goes beyond individuals or other particular lights movements individuals that you see is really pushing this and hopefully this book is one of those lights. Wow. This is thank you for that compliment. And this is not a scripted piece. Even though many you and I do work together with the AJ, musty institute. That question is one. I almost was in my mind thing who I I hope someone asks me about that. Because as. Much as I've worked with an and fellowship of reconciliation, which I'm the national co chair of you know, played a role with the Reverend Dr William Barbara and Reverend Liz THEO Harris in the poor people's campaign a national call from our revival. Another name another leading light and another organizational space, which I think is deeply authentic and deeply important is the work coming out of Ferguson, and that's been developing and deepening in Ferguson over the last years the truth telling project is in organization to look at because their understanding that the need to put the truth of what society is about on the table before social change can occur. And specifically one of the founders of that group, David raglan, who's a close colleague is a co author. He's actually the lead co author of two of the articles featured in this book, he's also a leading reparations activists. He's abide and senior scholar. He's one of the staff people of the fellowship of reconciliation. So I'd say David raglan and the truth telling project fit that question you asked rather? Perfectly. Matt we all love the title of your book, white lives matter most and other little white lies. And I wanted to ask you tell us about some of the other little white lies, please, by the way. Since this is radio. We have to say the word little is in quotes just to be clear about that. Well, I think a close friend of mine who who is known. I think too many of the listeners Lauren disorder political prisoner. David Gilbert, talks about the wink, he talks about growing up in white society that in some ways when he heard about democracy, and he heard about the land of the free and the home of the brave what he didn't get as a young man growing up with liberal parents in Massachusetts that there was a wink at the end of that that meant for us for us not for everyone. And I think that's in some ways one of the quote, Lil actually, very very big fundamental lies about what the US is. And isn't any other little white lies, many others? But you tell me we don't have enough time for all of them on the show. That's one of the problems with politics in this country. Well, we are indeed running out of time. I wanted to tell our listeners that this book is published by pm press. I it has a foreword by Sonia Sanchez. It's a small book, but big in ideas, and we know that our listeners will really enjoy this. Well, thanks to all of you. A thanks again to David raglan, the lead author of two of the chapters of the book, thanks to professor, Anna. Lopez of Otis college who is lead author of another chapter. And of course, it would have been impossible to conceive of this work without the great Sonia. Sanchez who not only contributed to the forward, but also has been one of the inspiring figures for all of us as people like Sonia who understand how to build movements had to connect peoples had to work for Justice with peace that I think continues to inspire. Fire me and should inspire all of us. Matt by the way, is current national co chair of the fellowship of reconciliation and former chair of the war resisters league. He's on AJ, musty board of directors and author of several books and Matt's latest book is published by pm press. Be sure to.

Matt Meyer Dr Martin Luther King US David raglan New York City Michael Stephen Smith Sonia Sanchez attorney Cornell Angela Davis pm press Dennis Brutus Mitty Owens Heidi Puerto Ricans Stokely Carmichael America Lopez Ferguson
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

13:09 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Since nine eleven our democracy. However restricted at the time has been even further shrunk by the growth of the national security state, and the all knowing surveillance apparatus that has been set up. Moreover, the president as the head of the executive branch of the government has gathered unto himself an unprecedented amount of power over the judicial and legislative branches of our government. Michael Tigar is emeritus professor of law at Duke University. And at the Washington college of law. He's been a lawyer working on social change issues since the nineteen sixties. He's argued numerous cases in the United States Supreme court in many circuit courts of appeal. His books include law and the rise of capitalism. Fighting injustice and the forthcoming mythologies of the state and monopoly power, Michael Tigar? It's a great pleasure for Jim. And I to welcome you to law and disorder. Well, thank you very much. It's great to be here. I wanna start off by asking you a question. What is law Martin Luther King's courageous attorney Bill counselor was given an award by the New York state association of criminal defense attorneys back in one thousand nine hundred ninety four as was his classmate at Columbia, federal judge, Jack Weinstein and concert spoke. I accepted the award on behalf of his clients. And then he said what he thought the judge believed what the law was and customer said he thought that the judge thought that law was the considered responsive a civilized society to the problem of reaching a reason and intelligent conclusion to disputes between the state and its citizens or between the citizens themselves, and that's the liberals view of the law and Custer said, but my view was different. And he told the audience that he thought that the law was in funding. Mental essence is nothing. More than a method of social control created by socio economic system determined at all costs to perpetuate itself by all and any means necessary for as long as possible. You share this view, always half. Right. But you can bet five hundred or still lead the league. Of course, the law is a system of rules in my book law and the rise of capitalism. I talked about legal ideology, which is erect is a superstructure on a system of social relations, and is designed to protect and preserve that system social relations. But then the next question is how do they do it? They can have cops on every corner, and they can have repressive regimes, and they can crush you. Or they can write something like the constitution and the Bill of rights, which is a Senate promises, the regime makes to the people about how there's going to be freedom and Justice and so on and just you wait and see don't make too much trouble. Because we you're you're so-called rights are protected, and what's happened is of course, that the set of mythologies grow up. We have a department that calls itself Justice when we know exactly what the hell is doing. We have inadequate legal services. So people are pleading guilty being hustled off to prison. But when you get a jury trial when you get an article three judge like judge Weinstein who really cares about things. It's still possible to win these victories, and you know of all people in the world at that stage of his career Bill knew that because he spent his career is one of the most from medieval advocates of the United States of America defending people keeping them out of jail and all the rest of it. And you know, what if he really in his heart-to-heart thought that that was complete bullshit? I don't think he wasted his time. Now, then with judge Weinstein, it's nice to be able to characterize your opponents position as he does with Weinstein Weinstein was not only very smart. But you know, he was clever, and we took to him as a matter of fact in nineteen seventy-one many thousands of young men had gone outside the United States to escape the draft. And yet. When we looked at their selective service files. It turned out that we're never going to be drafted anyway. Because if they'd had good warriors, they wouldn't have been called. They were eligible for deferment or whatever. So we propose to Weinstein why don't you resurrect? All these selective service files and start deciding these cases of these young men have been indicted for draft refusal of left the country. And why don't you said, okay. I'll do that. And it was the second circuit kind of didn't agree. But this was one of the pressures that led them to the embassy for the draft refusers. So I don't agree with judge Weinstein all the time. But he understands what article three judge can do because he says, hey, look, I'm not doing radical. I'm just making sure the regime keeps its promises to the people. Speaking of of judges, though, you had been editor in chief of your law review at the university of California, and that's an entree into some some good jobs as some great clerk ships. And you in fact, became a clerk to Justice. William Brennan nights States Supreme Court. But you only lasted a week. What happened I actually lasted less than a week? I wanna be I wanna be nice John Brennan pointed me as his clerk at the end of my second year in law school to take up the job when I graduate. The word got out and all hell broke loose James Kilpatrick of the Richmond news leader robot on editorial called the lady and the tiger a member of the house committee on un-american activities attacked the court Ramsey Clark. Got the FBI involved in providing information to Brennan about my so called political background. And at that time. Ronald Reagan was running for governor of California. Brennan walks into chambers. One day and looks at his law clerk from the previous term Owen fish. He's ashen. He says the chief told me the fire tiger that's warrant warns theory was that that this guy could lead maybe Ronald Reagan would become governor California, which by the way, he was going to get he'd been found in a motel with a male chicken. Yes. So Brennan got upset and we had a meeting I flew back to Washington, we talked about it. And he told me some of the things that FBI reports have been sent to him much of which was I took the position that I was not gonna make a public statement about my politics, and I wouldn't authorize him to make one either does we're not going to be sanitizing me. I would disclose to him anything that he wanted and he accepted that idea. I got back to Washington. And he changed his mind, and he withdrew the invitation to be his bird, and there it was I got a job with other Bennett Williams. It was unusual. I argued a c one too. I guess I'd argued three cases up there by nineteen seventy seven and Brennan wrote to me and asked me to come and have lunch with them. And I did and his first thing I was running with you much trouble. I had gotten Byron white to be the fifth vote for you in that Gilbard case. And and we talk back and forth. And we started to beat every once in a while. I worked with him on some speeches. He wanted to make we talked. He then wrote to me and apologized. Finally apologized. You said I overreacted I'm sorry. The only thing that helps me live with myself is that we have become good friends. And it's amazing. The last time I ever saw him was in chambers. And we're walking out of his chambers into his office. He grabbed me by the arm, and he said have I did any good up here? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Which goes back to Michael Stephen Smith first question. Right. Have I done any good up your ads? So yes, that is that is the Brennan story. All right. The bright side is that as you know, became famous as the guy that was appointed to the supreme court clerk, but never had to read any cert petition. That's the work. But it was on your resume. Sort of Michael in Europe bookl- on the rise of capitalism, you propose what you call an insurgent role for lawyers talk about what this means, please. I I use the term jurisprudence of insurgency, and that is the same thing with which we started today. There are open spaces in the law. There are promises the regime has made to the people that it feels obliged to keep and so what Bill did for all those years. And what I hope you know, what a bunch of other of us do is we represent people and call on the state to keep those promises. But as time goes by it becomes clear that the state is not keeping these promises that pandemic racism still dominates events that we can manage to get some personal White House and systematically commits a series of crimes, and and so far at least is not accountable for them. And so on and that is the. Point at which the lawyer has to say to the clients because it's all about the clients as you pointed out with your first question. I'm sorry that the struggle. We're doing we will keep on with. But I really not going to over promise about what is going to happen. That's the jurisprudence of insurgency when I was in South Africa and eighty eight eighty nine you could see that the African National Congress conducted a two part struggled. It had many many lawyers who showed up and represented ANC members and sympathizers and at the same time. It had an armed struggle that went on over the years, and the interesting things I noticed long answer one thousand nine hundred nine I'm sitting with duller, Omar who was Mandela's lawyer later became minister of Justice, and we were over there Ken Brown. Jim Ferguson might training young lawyers. And he said tomorrow I wanted to teach these lers out across jam and cops. I said, okay, I can do that. And you know, I mean a demonstration she should because what we're gonna do this summer. We have a new organization we're gonna have weighed in sit ins walk ins. And so on none people of color majority in this country. We're gonna bring the place to a halt and nobody's gonna plead guilty. They're all gonna be mass arrests. And we're going to cross examine every cop. We're gonna try every case and Mandela's coming out. And I said Thala I've seen the dogs are seen a guns. I've seen the whole thing. He said nice. He's coming up. We're gonna we're gonna just show our power in this way and bring the system to all. And as you know, Mandela got out. He was right. He was he was he was right. And that is, but that's the sort of interplay of an understanding of the laws of motion of a social system and its legal ideology and the prospect of change the law student came to you today asked you for some counseling said look professor tiger. I understand Karl Marx studied law Castro. Both. Lawyers for short time. But then they joined socialists activist organizations. I'm wondering what I should do. I'm a socialist as a young law student here. And should I be getting out of law school and getting into one of these socialists organizations, or should I stick it out and law school practice law? I mean, I feel now conflicted. Well, the first thing that I would say as you wanna learn your craft that is to say straw. Learn what they got for you because you'll never be able to replicate that experience you've got clinical legal education opportunities actually to learn how to relate with clients and to deal with their concerns because it tells you something as I wrote in a play once at a character. So you lawyers. Imagine you stand at the center of all the events by which the world has moved. But which of course is not true. You stand where you stand when you stand because some client is a victim of injustice, but that's the definition of a trial lawyers of massive, blah, blah, Vigo suspended orgasm, insecurity. But what I would tell this lawyer is well, you got some options. One thing is you could be a professor and write books and be influential you could sort of emulate the young Karl Marx whose iconic essays on the law relating to the theft to would the property norm still resonate or you could be a trial lawyer. Because you might think the laws bulletin in. Maybe it is. But when some client calls you from the Jalen sues could you come down and get me out that puts the obligations only get that job done. And maybe try that case to a jury that might be a political activism. Great importance. Learn how you can do is you can become involved in human rights, litigation. That's right because they're still doing it now and at the risk of wasting your time, I'll tell you a story forty years ago, Orlando let Aaron Ronni Moffitt were assassinated in Washington DC..

Weinstein Weinstein John Brennan United States Washington college of law Michael Tigar Jim Ferguson FBI Washington DC Mandela Bill Karl Marx professor of law law clerk professor Ronald Reagan Martin Luther King California Washington Duke University
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Changed since nine eleven. We'll consider the issue of whether a public access TV channel run by a private nonprofit subject to the first amendment. This is a threat to community video. There are six major corporations that run the major media trying to change that from the ground up. Let's see what happens stay with us. New York City attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and New York City attorney and activist Heidi Kochan. The American offshore prison camp in Guantanamo. Cuba is still operating after the attacks on September eleventh two thousand and one it was set up as a place where neither American nor international law would apply, and we're prisoners could be brought tortured detained forever and never charged with a crime ten years ago. Former President Obama promised to close the prison when he ran for office. It remains up and running to this day Muhammadu Salah he spent fourteen years of his life there. He was an electrical engineer from Mauritania in Africa and educated in Germany. He was thirty two years old when he was apprehended in his home taken to Jordan where he was tortured to Afghanistan and then to Guantanamo and sixteen years later at age forty eight he was finally released he walked out of Guantanamo Bay prison in Togo of two thousand and sixteen without ever being charged with a crime. And returned to his native Mauritania. While in prison in two thousand and five he wrote a memoir in English one of his four languages. His attorney Nancy Hollander had asked him to do it. And she finally got declassified in two thousand twelve but what's every reductions was made into a book, titled Guantanamo diary and published in two thousand fifteen and became an international bestseller in it. He describes how he was tortured in ways personally approved by then Defense Secretary, Donald Rumsfeld, torture is a criminal act under both US and international law as many no Rumsfeld has never been prosecuted. We're joined today by Muhammadu Salai from his native country in Mauritania where he's a writer and also his attorney Nancy Hollander Nancy's criminal defense. Attorney a former president of the national association of criminal defense, lawyers and a partner in the New Mexico law firm of Friedman, Boyd Hollander, Goldberger rice and ward. Muhammadu and Nancy welcome to law and disorder in your case. Nancy, welcome back. Thank you for having me on law and disorder again. I so appreciate it. And I appreciate your having Mohammed Salah he on the show because I think it's crucial that people hear from him, especially and know that he's not forgotten and that we not forget about Guantanamo and the people who are still there. Muhammadu welcome to law in disorder. Thank you for having me. Muhammadu tell us how did you fit the profile of a terrorist? Eight. One day. And he told me. Like. A dog. And then that was like. So. Me. Because. I expect him. And then my English was. I was not. This quick. What? Because he. I would. I was a hit. I studied it. I had. Interest. Speaking. Attention of many false. Phone call. From my kid with. L A L peace. Father was then. Money. On it. Authorities. Own investigate and came back. As and then we cannot tell him not even question him. That was the trigger. Myself was to be in custody. Patiently waited on to get Mueller. And it can do different places when you were kidnapped. Do you mind telling us a few of the details of how that transpired? And what you were feeling. United states. Fortunately in my government. Away from Canada. A good place. Doc. Trendy. To me back. Call. Own. Because. My mother was sick..

Nancy Hollander Nancy Muhammadu Muhammadu Salah Mauritania Jordan Nancy Hollander Guantanamo Attorney New York City Muhammadu Salai Donald Rumsfeld Cuba Guantanamo Bay United states President Goldberger rice attorney Obama Heidi Kochan
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

15:35 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Mrs of how the United States became engaged in perpetual war. Bruce, Franklin has written terrific book called crash course. We'll give you the answer. A crash course from the good war to the forever war. Stay with us. New York City attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and dime. New York City attorney and activist Hidehiko precaution. US? Army ranger turned conscientious objector Rory fanning recently wrote this in the guardian newspaper. Sunday. November eleven we celebrated Veterans Day it used to be called Armistice Day and was a celebration of peace after the slaughter of World War One. Now, it's called Veterans Day. The United States has six hundred sixty eight military bases around the globe. United States is conducted military operations and two thirds of the world's countries since September eleven two thousand and one it has spent three quarters of a trillion dollars each year and its military more than the next thirteen countries combined. The US has taken hundreds of thousands of lives around the world these past fourteen years and shows no signs of slowing down. Our guest today is h Bruce Franklin, Bruce Franklin is a former air force navigator and intelligence officer, a progressive activists and the John cotton Dana, professor of English and American studies emeritus at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey. He's the author or editor of nineteen books and has received lifetime achievement awards from the American studies association and other major academic organizations. Bruce, Franklin's nice to see you. Welcome back to low on disorder. Thank you, Michael. Thank you, Heidi. Bruce. You've just written what? Daniel Ellsberg calls a terrific book. And we agree. Tell us how you came to the title. Okay. Well, that's a long. So here we are with a dysfunctional government a educational system, which is falling apart at the squeezed will health delivery system, destroying our environment. Our infrastructure is falling apart. And the thing that were financing as though there's never any limit is so called the fence making war here, we are fighting so many wars that if you know, if if all the listeners started being well, how many wars already fighting worry fighting everyone would come up with a different number. Nobody knows. If you're in a maze and your at as really bad place. You wanna get out you got to figure out what what was the plaza that led you into this. So what the American people need is a crash course in the history that led to the present situation. So that's that's part of. It's also though we're on a crash course and then try to figure out. Okay. How to really communicate this to people? You could do history right history right now. It just it just kinda goes past everybody. So it occurred to me that what I really need is to go through this using my consciousness my experience, and the changes that that took place for for me. So what we end up with is. A is a crash course in the history, and people will not get this history from any other source pieces of it here and there so there's not all regional but parts of it. You cannot get any any place else. So this is part of decades of historical scholarship, and many more decades of activism and life experience. I'm coming at this as somebody who was a rabid anticommunist. So I know I know how people who don't agree with what I think. Now think. So so then the crash course goes all the way back. My first real memory of encounters with history was nineteen thirty nine the world's fair. And so went there and had the privilege. We want to call. It of seeing the great future that American corporations going to give us, and this has just been there in my mind is influence a lot of my work. But then I grow up in World War Two typical World War Two. Boy, Bruce, you're eighty four years old. And you remember World War Two. And it's been called are good war. What was good about it? And what was bad about it? Well, the good was what was supposedly fighting you were fighting ultra militarism fascism. What was bad about? It was we lost the war. What did we lose the war? We lost the war to the fourth is that we thought we were fighting. This is not an eccentric opinion to great novels. I came out of that war one by Joseph Heller, who is a navigator Bombardier catch twenty two and the other one by someone who is on the ground during the firebombing me Dresden slaughterhouse five both of them. Come to the same conclusion the fascist won that war. Thing that sealed it or the acts that may as win the war finally those at the acts that made us lose the war. Those are the the bombs that would drop on a Nagasaki on August six and August nine of forty five. Let's go under that. I wanted to ask you about that. Because that's something that I've been concerned about since I got politically conscious myself story was that the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima to end the war to save lives. Of course, I always wondered why they dropped a second one on Nagasaki. But in any case that was the story. And I remember I used to work for the episcopal church. And I asked the head of the organization that I worked for who was an episcopal priest who had been in the navy in the second World War. I asked him if he supported the dropping of the atomic bomb, and he said, yes, I did because it was dropped to save lives. And I had read. Gary I'll per was his book time diplomacy. I as I imagine you have you have your own. Thanks to my question to you. Bruce Franklin is why was the bomb? In fact, two bombs dropped on Japan in nineteen forty five. That's a bigger question than you may think. Okay. So let's go back to the first thing. The really simple question is did the bombs and the war was a necessity dropped the bombs to end the war. Well, the fact is that the Japanese were trying to surrender. That's debatable. What people don't know? Is that the American people knew that that is in the book, I've got the evidence I've got I've got the newspaper articles that were published that they were trying to surrender. So. Think about it. The invasion wasn't of Japan wasn't planned until the following spring. Maybe February or March of forty six would have been possible for president Truman actually to have American troops invading Japan with casualties up clearly in the hundreds of thousands. When the American people knew that the Japanese were trying to surrender. I have all kinds of documentation of this. The original proposal was the emperor was going to be allowed to be kept. And then they they changed. The proposal after the bomb was tested. Knowing that the Japanese would not ever accept the unconditional surrender which they didn't. They didn't accept unconv- digital surrender. They got to keep the emperor which they clinic could have had the say exactly same settlement. What forced the Japanese to accept something. They weren't prepared to yourself was not the nuclear bombs, and again, we have we have the documentary Edmonds the bombs were not affecting their decision making. I mean, the lunatics they were holding out the ultimate militarist lunar tricks in the middle of of this debate. A message that comes in and informs him about the Nagasaki bombing. They didn't care. It didn't enter their discussion. They said they thanked him for the information. He bowed and left and that was it. We have the Cranston script. What decided them to go with the terms will often was the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. And the biggest land battles of the Pacific theater were fought by the Soviet Union against the main forest. Japanese armies on the on the mainland China. And then of course, we were told that the Japanese would never surrender hundreds literally hundreds of Japanese generals surrendered and they didn't surrender like a token thing. This major battle huge battle this. There's the Soviets lost thirty thousand men killed in this. But they completely crushed the Japanese the Japanese army, and so we again, we have. The transcript they decided we ha- we have to surrender. Because if we don't the Russians are going to enter northern Japan that brings me back to where we started when you say the forces of fascism, actually, won the war. And I wanted you to elaborate on that we had the firebombing of Dresden we had the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki what forces of fascism prevailed after nineteen forty five. What are we talking about here? The militarization of our economy, our politics and central to that our culture, and this is where I want to get back to my experience growing up as a kid during the war patriotic American boy, all excited about this war know, filled with this fervor like the other boys making model airplanes. And so on. The culture of that. Which I am merged with the American people emerged with. One way to look at that is. You were drunk with victory. And we believe in the military might. My experience was. August fourteenth nine hundred forty five VJ day. I'm in the back of a pickup truck crammed with other kids, and there's an impromptu motorcade in our neighborhood in Brooklyn and everybody. Are pouring out of their homes out in the streets cheering dancing, waving American flags. And we kids in the truck with screaming peace peace, the war is over. And we all believed not as the kiss everybody all believe. Okay. This is it. We're going to live on a on a peaceful pilot and in a peaceful nation. We had we had no enemies there were no threats. Now, there was another threat. We have we have to understand what happened when we drop the drop those bombs sixty nine of the nuclear scientists sent a petition to the president would never reach him because left Leslie stopped it saying don't use this weapon because if you use this weapon eventually the cities of the United States will be threatened by this weapon. So here, we are homo sapiens. The most intelligent species on the planet. We are. So smart so intelligent that we figured out how to exterminate ourselves. And now we figured out how to do it built. But built it and that, and that's what happened when we dropped the when we drop those two bombs why? Michael US the question why that's a very complicated question because Truman thought that what he was doing was ending war for all time. He had read he had read in science fiction in which American presidents had used nuclear weapons to being perpetual peace. That's what he thought he was doing. So so so here so here we are. Then of course, how did it happen? Wars. The Korean war. The Vietnam war the Cold War all started right at right at the same time within a few days of each other of August fourteen. Why of all the enemies of public? Liberty is war? According to our founding father, James Madison is war the most to be dreaded from war. We get taxes. We get power in the hands of the people who can make the war. You know, we what we succeeded in doing was Nola fighing, some of the most important parts of the constitution has real. Yeah. Everybody. Everybody listening to this knows this. The last time we declare war was in early December. Nine hundred forty one. And now the president can make war whenever he chooses. Congress has no has no say in it at all despite the legislation passed. Seventy five during the Cold War with the USSR the union of Soviet socialist republics that was the name of the USSR you're in the United States Air Force. You were in a strategic air command. You were a navigator and intelligence officer. What did you believe you're accomplish in doing this? Okay. Well, understand that you have to figure out what what happened what happened to our consciousness. So during World War Two will watching movies and seeing the heroism of the Soviet people..

Bruce Franklin United States Nagasaki Michael Stephen Smith president Japan Dresden New York City Hiroshima officer Soviet Union New Jersey Daniel Ellsberg attorney American studies association
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

15:01 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"New York City attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and dime. New York City attorney and activist Heidi. Gauchan? Four years ago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke shot seventeen year old Lequan McDonald's sixteen times in the back on October fifth. He was found guilty of second degree murder and sixteen counts of aggravated battery by Chicago jury. This was the first time in fifty years. The Chicago police officer has been found guilty of murdering somebody while on duty nationally there have been no convictions in the murders of Everett garner, Michael Brown or Trayvon Martin. The McDonald murder was covered up beginning with police who were on the job with Van Dyke to commanding officers of the Chicago police department and all the way up to the office of mayor Rahm Emanuel. Key to this conviction was video footage taken by police car. Dash camera. The video was suppressed by the police and the mayor for three years, and it was only revealed after a massive campaign by several Chicago grassroots organizations from two thousand eleven to two thousand sixteen three hundred seventy one million dollars has been spent by the government of Chicago on police misconduct cases, forty percent of the city's budget goes to the police department here to talk with us about the situation in Chicago is returning guest. Attorney Flint Taylor. Taylor is a partner in the renowned Chicago law firm the people's law office, he has been litigating police abuse cases for nearly fifty years starting with his victory in the Fred Hampton case where the FBI and the Chicago police department admitted they assassinated Black Panther party leader. Fred Hampton, Flint Taylor. Welcome back to law and disorder. It's great to be back. Heidi? Well, the Jason Van Dyke. Verdict was really a big deal. Wasn't it? It was and is and will be here in Chicago. And nationally, can you tell us about the cover up starting with the police officers who accompanied Van Dyke how high up did this go. Well, the cover up or Dakota silence. It wasn't unusual. When you look at it or analyze it. What was unusual was that? There was a videotape that showed what actually happened, and we all have seen it or most people have seen it by now that they want and killing of Kwan McDonald was right there for all to see wants to video came out. But before it came out to police officers, the partner, and and the others involved went about their code of silence business in justifying the shooting by making Liquan, the aggressor and all of that kind. Of standard lie. What happened? However was that the videotape expose that line when it came out and it video tape didn't come out for some time. So that cover up went on not only at the level of the street. But also in terms of the supervisors all the way up the chain of command in the police department. And the corporation counsel the lawyer's office. And we think the mayor himself knew of the video as well. And they moved to settle the civil case that really hadn't even been filed yet with the family because they knew that the videotape would come out, and this was a course in the run-up to the two thousand and fifteen mayoral election in which Rahm Emanuel was facing a serious challenge from progressive candidate true, we got so that video the settlement happened right before they mayo runoff and also it happened the same day that reparations were approved for this arrivers of police torture. So it really was a political storm in a sense because Rome had a curried favour and the African American. Immunity by the agreeing to the reparations, but on the other hand was sitting or his people were sitting on this explosive video now, let's talk about standard procedure terms of releasing video. I've always been curious when I see police video shown on TV, for example in the case of excessive use of force there on the body Cam. And then what happens to the actual video? Is there a possibility that the police could alter it in any way? Well, it's interesting that before here in Chicago before Liquan McDonald case or the there was no standard procedure. And now they have to post videos on the police accountability investigative website at certain at the. Earliest possible time their various wage that videos can be not altered not taken. I think what you see very often and particularly in the earlier stages of body camps. It would they would not be working. The batteries would be put in backwards. A batteries would not be in the cameras that kind of thing we had a police and have a police shooting case very sad case where where the police shot and killed a a mentally disturbed woman on the north side of Chicago. And there was a police camera. You know, a security camera right above where the bench where she was shot. But that wasn't working that night dad is the more frequent thing you see that the body Cam wasn't working and also with regard to the release the various places in Japan and USA is have different. Procedures are or regulations are the lack thereof in terms of the release of the of the video and does the officer have to actually turn on the Cam. Or is it automatically on? I think that also depends. I know in Milwaukee, we have a case where a man died in the back of a police car. And it's a it's a well-known case up there called the Derrick Williams was the the man young man who died it's a terrible video and he's squirming around. You can't breathe and he's saying he can't breathe I can't breathe and the cops the detectives. And and and cops are saying you're faking it you just want to go. You just want to go to the hospital rather than to jail. And so for minutes, literally, eight minutes, he is on video writhing as he dies that. Video. The the computer that the police who were sitting in the front seat of the auto that in which the man was in the back had a button if you push the button, you could see what was going on in the back. If you didn't push the button, you would be on the computer would be doing regular police business and these officers claimed they didn't even bother to push the button to see the man riding in the back of the police car for some six or eight minutes, it's a horrendous case, but in that instance, the video went on when they put him in the car, but the audio did not go on for thirty seconds after and so there's various technicalities in terms of when the video goes on when the audio goes on how it's controlled. They're not controlled how it stored how it's released. It's a it's a very in to circumstances. I've been involved in here. In Chicago in Milwaukee. There are their various technicalities or procedures that that apply in this particular case and the verdict. It's the first time in fifty years that if Chicago police officer has been found guilty of murdering someone while on duty were you afraid it might not result in guilty verdict. I had just finished an article for truth out looking at the history of police violence in Chicago through the lens of two of the most important cases that being the murder of Fred Hampton, Mark Clark. The Black Panther leaders in nineteen sixty nine and also the John Birch torture scandal, a police, torture that that went on for twenty years here in the birds case, he was ultimately indicted for -struction of Justice and perjury in two thousand eight and tried in two thousand and ten before a almost exclusively white jury as in the Burj case in the Van Dyke case, we we were of course, nervous and worried that a predominantly white jury would be swayed by the racist defense that was put on by fraternal order of police lawyers. But the. Juries in both instances were able to put aside those pleased to to the base instincts, and to be swayed by the enormity of the crime that was being presented to them and convicted in the case of Burj in two thousand and ten him for perjury and obstruction of Justice and here for of course, second degree murder and sixteen counts of aggravated battery Flint are co hosts Michael Smith can't be with us today. But he wanted to ask you do. You think the evidence showed that Van Dyke was guilty of first degree murder? Well, that's an interesting question. You would probably get different answers from different lawyers and and people from the community. I think it's important to note that by and large the activists that that fought so hard for this trial, and for a verdict of guilty and people in the African community African American community by and large were shit. Not only satisfied by the verdict. But felt that in the fact that he not only was found guilty of second degree murder and of all the counts for each bullet that he fired was a modicum of Justice. You could say looking at the case and comparing it to a regular murder case where the defendant was not a police officer that a regular citizen would probably have been convicted of first degree murder without without much question. But we because it's such a higher standard, both politically socially and legally for a police officer who commits the same kind of misconduct or violence that that an individual citizen might commit that second degree murder, given the defense that leads to it. And that is it was unreal. Reasonable for him to have shoveled quantum McDonald's sixteen time, but he times, but he had a reasonable belief was an unwritten me an unreasonable belief, but he believed it that that led to to second degree rather than to. I agree. Michael Smith, also found a quote from James Baldwin who wrote that quote, the police are simply the hired enemies of black people there present to keep us in our place and to protect white business interests, and they have no other function. And since they know they are hated they're always afraid one cannot possibly arrive at a more. Sure fire formula for cruelty now black lives matter has proposed community control over the police department is that even viable, and what might that look like, well, I have to commend Michael Smith. He's always goes right to the heart of issues. And that certainly is a wonderful quote that he is has put forward here. And I think it's an accurate quoque in terms of the realities some six fifty years after James Baldwin wrote it black lives matter doesn't simply seek can they do seek community control over police, but in, but they really are ultimately calling for the abolishment of police like the movement that calls for the polish boschman of prisons, and you can see here in Chicago. Some of the approaches that they're taking the movement for black lives is taking here in the battle that they're leading against the police academy. They mayor the outgoing now mayor Emanuel wants to have a ninety five million dollar police academy. Now, some reformers would say. Say that's a good idea. Because what we need here is better training for the police now, of course, Baldwin would disagree with that. I think that a lot of people that have been involved in the fight for, you know, for Justice with regard to police violence would would be very skeptical at that would be a meaningful reform. And so what the movement for black lives has done is oppose the cop academy and opposed. It by saying that ninety five million dollars should go to the heart of the problems that we have here that is such things as closing mental health clinics, poverty education that those are the kinds of issues that really underlie the problems in in the African American and other communities of color and poor community..

Chicago Chicago police department officer Van Dyke police academy second degree murder mayor Emanuel murder Michael Stephen Smith Jason Van Dyke Fred Hampton first degree murder attorney Kwan McDonald Heidi New York City Cam Milwaukee McDonald
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Joins us to discuss the decision by three justices held that outdoor food sharing is expressive conduct protected by the first amendment, author an attorney Greg Lukianov discusses his new book, the coddling of the American mind, he asserts that were setting up an entire generation for failure. Albeit with good intentions. Stay with us. I'm New York City attorney author Michael Stephen Smith and New York City attorney and activist Heidi precaution. In a remarkable victory for free speech in late August, three eleventh, circuit judges held that the Fort Lauderdale food not bombs weekly outdoor food sharing is expressive conduct. As such. It is protected by the first amendment. The Florida group is affiliated with the international organization food, not bombs, and engages in peaceful political direct action it conducts weekly food sharing events said strana him park in downtown Fort Lauderdale distributing vegetarian or vegan food free of charge in the decision. The three justices wrote a food not bombs that quote, the message is that society can end hunger, and poverty, if we redirect our collective resources from the military and war, and that food is a human right, not a privilege, which society has responsibility to provide for all providing food in a visible public space and sharing meals with others is an act of political solidarity meant to convey, the organization's message. The justices disagreed with the lower court's ruling that food sharing events are not expressive conduct because he act. Defeating is not inherently communicative a food not bombs quote intended, unique and particularized message food up arms was founded in the early eighties by Keith mckenry and seven friends in Cambridge Massachusetts. Now, nearly forty years old and going strong food not bombs has hundreds of a Thomas chapters around the world. Keith McHenry tells us how he got the original idea. There.

attorney New York City Keith McHenry Fort Lauderdale Greg Lukianov Heidi precaution Keith mckenry Michael Stephen Smith Florida Thomas Cambridge Massachusetts forty years
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"New York City attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and New York City attorney and activist Heidi koshen, former United States president. Jimmy Carter has pointedly observed that the United States is not a democracy. It's an oligarchy that is country ruled by handful of rich people the one percent at the expense of the vast majority. The ninety nine percent that famous description we got from the occupy movement, the political ideological mechanism for keeping this state of affairs is the two party system in the USA, which is in reality as independent presidential candidate. Ralph Nader has written. It's really a one party of big business with two wings, the Republicans, and the Democrats, although the two party system was not mentioned in our constitution state laws. Make it extraordinarily difficult for third independent party to get on the ballot. Their ideas received little media exposure. Sure, reinforcing their exclusion this lack in the political process. Even as we are witnessing a radicalization, especially among young people has led to a discussion on the left among socialists, democratic socialists, and progressives in general about how to move forward. The main question is being debated is do we support socialist who run on the Democratic Party ticket or do we stay independent of the Democratic Party? Or do we work both inside and outside of the Democratic Party? We speak today with Howie Hawkins. Here's a retired Teamster from Syracuse, New York and the green party candidate for New York's governor he previously ran as a green party gubernatorial candidate in both two thousand and ten and two thousand fourteen during these campaigns. He received five percent of the vote. He's the author of the recent article the case for an independent left party from the bottom up. It was published in black agenda report. Howie Hawkins welcome to law and disorder. Thanks good. To be here. How a year on the ballot is the green party candidate for governor of the state of New York. How did you get on the ballot or the green party had a convention and nominated me, and the reason we could do that without petitioning is that we got over fifty thousand votes in twenty ten and again in twenty fourteen which gives us a ballot line, fill the way the election law works is if you have about a line twenty five percent or more of the delegates to your state committee or convention watch you on the ballots, you're on. And if there's more than one candidate, there's a primary in my case, it was unanimous, and nobody petitioned the primary me. So I was the first candidate on the ballot certified on the ballot in New York for governor this year, what are the obstacles both legal and political for an independent party? Like the green party forgetting on the ballot. Not just. To New York, but across the other forty nine states willing, every state is different. Every state has its own laws, and some are very hard to get on about it like Oklahoma, Georgia until recently, North Carolina. But the greens won a lawsuit and got the petitioning requirements reduced that's really the tough barrier. The very high petitioning requirements, some states are easy in Vermont, and Florida and Mississippi you just have to have a minimal level of organization and most are in the middle. New York is among those in our case, it's fifty thousand votes for governor in most states where they have a voting threshold. It's any statewide office, including the presidential vote. But in New York is just the vote for governor every four years. And some states you can have a certain number of people enrolled in the party and you get on. But usually it's a vote total in the different states. So for us. It was building up enough of a voter base to get over fifty thousand votes, which I think we have pretty securely are we pretty much had a floor of four hundred thousand votes for the last four years for our candidates for statewide office. So that's why we're on the ballot. That's quite a chievements. Ralph Nader complained that when he tried to get on the ballot as an independent the Democratic Party would challenge the signatures on its petitions, and he'd have to spend a lot of money that they would otherwise used for the campaign just to defend in these lawsuits..

New York Democratic Party United States New York City Howie Hawkins Ralph Nader Jimmy Carter attorney Heidi koshen Michael Stephen Smith president greens Oklahoma Syracuse North Carolina Vermont Mississippi Georgia
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"We bring you a special examination of the sexual violence epidemic uncover within the Catholic church survivor. Peter is Lee and attorney panels. Join us for the entire hour. Stay with us. New York City attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and New York City attorney and activist Heidi book ocean. How does the Catholic church evaluate cases of pedophilia committed by priests? This is the first question in the pamphlet, titled pedophilia in the priesthood by Monsignore Raffaello Martinelli the answer. Reads in part, these crimes of pedophilia have been labeled as a crime against the most week or horrendous sin in the eyes of God a crime that damages the church's credibility. The most severe condemnation a source of clear and unequivocal blame is found in the words of Jesus when identifying himself with the little ones affirms in the synoptic gospels and whoever receives one child such as this in. My name receives me whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin. It would be better for him to have a great millstone hung around his neck and to be drowned in the depths of the sea. In August, two thousand eighteen it came to light that for over seventy years, Roman Catholic, bishops and other church officials in Pennsylvania covered up child sexual abuse by more than three hundred priests. An attorney general report says that day dissuaded victims from reporting the abuse, and they convinced police not to investigate it. The report initiated by attorney general Josh Shapiro is the widest inquiry by US government agency into Catholic church sexual abuse and violence directed at children found more than a thousand identifiable victims. But says there are likely thousands more whose records have been lost or who were too afraid to come forward. It says the cover up by senior church officials reached at times up to the Vatican today online disorder. We bring you a special examination of the continuing revelations into the extent of sexual abuse of children by Catholic priests and the cover-ups of this abuse by church officials. Our guests are Pam spy's. And Peter is Louie Pam is an attorney with the center for constitutional rights in New York. She has worked closely with snap. The survivors network of those abused by priests since two thousand eleven with the filing of a complaint at the international criminal court the complaint called for an investigation and prosecution of high level Vatican officials, including then Pope Benedict for the widespread and systematic rape and sexual violence within the Catholic church. Peter is Lee is a founding member of end clergy abuse, a new global organization launched in Geneva in June, it consists of survivor leaders and human rights activists from five continents and twenty eight countries. Peter wrote a two thousand three snap white paper to the department of Justice calling for federal intervention into the matter of clergy sexual.

attorney Catholic church Peter Monsignore Raffaello Martinell New York City Lee Louie Pam Pam spy Josh Shapiro US Pope Benedict Michael Stephen Smith rape Geneva Heidi Pennsylvania New York founding member
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"New York City attorney and author Michael Stephen Smith and New York City attorney and, activist Heidi book ocean. For decades Wisconsin was known as, a laboratory of democracy the birthplace of labor. And, environmental movements and home Wisconsin idea with championed expertise in the service of the public good, all this has changed under Republican governor Scott Walker the Republican state legislature and the Republican. Controlled Wisconsin supreme court there are two themes central to Walker success he turned. Public opinion against well-meaning public servants through. Absurd characters and trumpeted that far and wide through the almost limitless, financial backing of right-wing zealots. Like the coke brothers he also divided the labor movement conquering it split in some, workers from others I he broke the public sector unions and then over a week Opposition passed a right to work law. Crippling the private, sector unions huge amounts of dark, money gerrymandering legislative districts voter suppression and voter ID laws made all this possible over, time big money wrote legislation which was enacted, into law eventually Donald Trump won Wisconsin's, electoral votes making him the president we speak today with journalist Dan Kaufman. It. Wisconsin native and the author of the, fall of, Wisconsin the conservative conquest of I progressive bashing, and the future. Of American politics through the microcosm of one. St. Jane Mayer has written Dan Kaufman does a masterful job explaining what happened to America and why Dan welcome to law and disorder thank you, thank you for having. Me in your book the follower, -sconsin you write about how -sconsin once was. And, both you and I grew up in Wisconsin let's first talk About what. It was like when we were growing up, and then talk about why it had that great reputation and what. It's like now for people who are. Living there now You know I think for a lot of us who grew up there it was a really. Exceptional place to live and I grew up in Madison my father worked at the university and a lot of things that we were unaware of that came from this incredible history this progressive history that was catalyzed by Robert LeFevre fighting followed and. Others We were beneficiaries up particularly the university. But also the state's incredible, environmental tradition which preserved lot of land and resources for the citizens of the state and also the spirit of that the government was, for the citizens there. Was a really strong connection between citizen and Representative that endured from, this early history and this history kind of began in. The late nineteenth century early twentieth century that. Was its high point but it kept echoing down through the generations and even if we weren't aware of it as much. As we, maybe should have been we benefited from it and I think, a lot of us felt like it wasn't, perfect but it was very good. And the schools were good there was just a lot of civil society I guess I would say kind of robust civil. Society that was active in their government and made it a good place What was. Known as the Wisconsin idea people particularly, people at the university but people in the civil service would be at the service of the people of Wisconsin. And they were I think most significantly and we're going to talk. About this in a moment governor Scott Walker whose with the aid of some nefarious forces. Has just mantle all of this he even tried to remove the notion of. The Wisconsin idea out of, the literature that's right yes Wisconsin idea was this connection between the state government and the university and the idea was that the university, should work to benefit. All of the citizens of the state that the boundaries of the, university where the boundaries of the state so they would. Have incredible programs training farmers and agricultural practices. But also in devising legislation for example the first worker's compensation Bill was written by professor at the UW named John Commons And it. Was the first one in the, country? And became the model for states across the country and, these kinds of pragmatic but idealistic things to make life better for citizens before that if. A worker was killed on the, job the company wouldn't have to do anything and there would be a widow and her family destitute you, know maybe, they would..

Wisconsin Scott Walker Dan Kaufman New York City Donald Trump attorney Michael Stephen Smith Heidi Jane Mayer Madison John Commons Robert LeFevre Representative UW Bill America president professor
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"New york city attorney and author michael stephen smith and new york city attorney and activist heidi book ocean last week the united states of america became the first country to voluntarily quit the united nations fortyseven member main human rights body primarily over washington's claim that the human rights council is biased against israel this was the trump administration's latest snub of the international community the human rights council is tasked with spotlighting and approving investigations of suspected rights abuses never has a member dropped out voluntarily diplomats and activists say that the us ambassador nikki haley was the driving force behind the decision efforts by the united nations ambassador haley to end or water down the routine scrutiny of israel has failed in recent months at the united nations general assembly in new york city the human rights council addresses and array of concerns including discrimination freedom of expression the rights of women lgbt people and people with disabilities haley declared that quote we are withdrawing from the united nations human rights council an organization which is not worthy of its name we speak today with phyllis bennis she is a fellow of the institute for policy studies in washington dc where she works on antiwar us foreign policy and palestinian rights issues she has worked as an informal adviser to several key unco officials and palestinian issues her books include calling the shots washington dominates today's u n as well as understanding the palestinian israeli conflict phyllis us welcome back to law and disorder great to be with you it's really nice to have you back phyllis on june eighteenth the united states became the first nation to ever voluntarily pull out of the united nations human rights council what's the significance of this well if we look at it from the vantage point of the united nations human rights council oh and say what's it gonna mean it's going to make things easier to some degree for the diplomats on the council who won't have to deal with the constant haranguing us officials it will change much of what the council does and doesn't do there's no veto on the council so the us wasn't able to officially stop the actions of the council but i think if we look at it from vantage point of what this says about the the trump administration and the trajectory of the us role in the world it is very dangerous in that symbolic sense not because the us was a supporter of human rights and it's lost as some were claiming means that the human rights council won't be able to fight for human rights the us wasn't impediment not an advantage to the fight for human rights in the council but it does take one more step like pulling out of the iran nuclear deal like pulling out of the paris climate accord like ending the moves towards normalization of that had slowly begun to take shape all of these are pieces of evidence there proof of this pulling out of multilateral ism pulling out of diplomacy at the end of the day so in that sense it's a very serious very dangerous moment the day before the american pull out the human rights council outgoing president zied rod alhussein spoke warning against what he called the rise of chauvinistic nationalism he specifically condemned the trump administration's immigration policy calling it government sanctioned child abuse and he condemned the united states support of the war against yemen do you think that the us is viewed by other nations as being hypocritical oh i think hypocritical is the polite term for what other nations are thinking about the us these days but certainly high commissioner for human rights prince aide who's actually ironically enough a jordanian prince but has been very grave very outspoken and very willing to take on the us in in these essentially rhetorical battles in the context of the human rights council and it's been very important not all people in that position have always been willing to do that i think that there is an understanding in the rest of.

attorney New york michael stephen smith heidi
"michael stephen smith" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"michael stephen smith" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"So i mean has is in with us as he is often during the basketball playoffs we love having him around we love having having him around as opinion as a as a punching bag you've become that for the network you're like is a mean the networks greatest troll or to the network who is the greatest troll at the network put it on the poll gear amine or stu gods just the two of what else is on the list who's the third assure in troll and he has yet this is like nineteen eighty five lakers stuff this is a hell of a finals we're going to get here do we have a third place troll espn is there such a thing regardless it depends i mean see depends i think the way me and stu gods approach things is different from versus michael stephen smith troll right so michael will cain a troll i don't know there's more sincerity coming out of those guys than definitely over here the nfl news it never stopped what happened forgive me for this please i mean don't curse away with your mouth wording on television away that everyone can tell the word you shoot the news never stops and the seahawks have signed former washington redskin quarterback stephen morris cowboys are expected to release wide receiver dez bryant finally guys farts smell worse when you need to make a poopie how about that i seriously it's pretty clear now stephen morris to the seahawks the writing is on the wall for colin capita unbeliev you have a guy who was a play away from winning a super bowl another play away making it back to the super bowl the seahawks don't want him because he won't say what is going to do with the national anthem and therefore they signed a guy stephen morris what a joke at p carol should be ashamed of himself.

espn seahawks stephen morris basketball lakers michael stephen smith cain nfl washington dez bryant