18 Burst results for "Michael Stars"

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

02:37 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"Then then the process for small group was like us like recon forward observer with us a forward observer is usually usually an officer and usually somebody who has been trained to call in our tillery of our pass. Lieutenant lieutenant keck had had chosen for the forward observer for recon a guy that he saw from our mortar platoon. Who was very smart. Very very good at Channeling the mortars and he was also this big guide but he had been a football player in high school and the nineteen year old kid. Ruben concerto and ruben of was calling started calling immediately when the firefight started he started calling in artillery. And what you do with artillery once you know where you are you sort of called at a distance usually seven hundred and fifty meters away. And then you sort of walk the artillery in the charges chase the enemy or or pin the enemy down and helicopter. Gunships were also called and a our lieutenant. Apparently the new lieutenant either panicked or didn't trust this kid calling in the artillery so he grabbed the handset away from ruben and a started calling in the artillery and All i remember is the the this the the worst of the artillery coming down huge explosion and then a the trap hitting the bamboo all around clock clock clock and I remember somebody yelling. Everybody okay and people said yeah. We're okay and then the loop. Lieutenant gave a repeat which is in order to do exactly to the to the artillery to give the exact same number of shelves and the exact same location tune in next week for volume two..

next week ruben nineteen year old Ruben concerto seven hundred and fifty meters two volume
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

04:26 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"For anybody that was out field in the area in the operations air and so recons job was to go out and try to find the enemy and the idea. Was that if we'd find the enemy that we call it back in in the they bring out one of the line companies to handle situation. Quite often of that didn't happen. Quick enough and a recon got a reputation for being this ho group who can handle their own against and so we were involved in a lot of lot of firefights and we were sometimes quite often. Outnumbered but That's who we were and so at the beginning of march we hadn't had combat for for quite a while. I think february Or something was last time. We had a firefight and We we were of put on this new base and and then told to move out into the jungle and Search for things and so we have been moving. And i think on the on the fifth of march are lieutenant are lieutenant keck. Walked into a we. Were we adjust resupplied out in the field in which helicopters brought up food and stuff and we were marching up this hill. When you're resupplied. You're carrying about an eighty pound rucksack With all your food water carried about nine courts water with us and As we going up the hill are lieutenant walked into a pongy steak at a pongy. Stay for those. That don't know what it is. It's a piece of sharpened. Bamboo usually dipped in manure or something and then stuck in the ground at an angle. Angling up and you can't see it because the jungle is covered with bamboo leaves. So when you're quickly unless you're looking for you really can't see it and the enemy we'd use his very effectively by just having some guy watching a soldiers moving into an area with pongy steaks and all eight do a weapon. The air and everybody is automatically hits the ground of course and you could hit the ground. Jam pudgy sticks into your body. Well in this case of the lieutenant just walked into it and he called a halt we looked and then he everybody started looking around and they were everywhere. A sticks were everywhere. So we were. We knew we were in an area that had enemy. So our our lieutenant was medevac out. Because he had this pongy stake in his leg a couple of inches and who is probably going to get infected so he was airlifted out. And then another lieutenant was sent out to be with us and Then we kept moving and we were a. I remember on the six being very thick the area we knew we were told that there was a that the enemy was looking for us as well as a we looking for them and so we didn't So we i remember that night being very kind of frightening Nobody everybody's stayed on guard pretty much all night. And then the next day we set out and it was about three o'clock in the afternoon when our point man walked in to what we believe was the bunker complex and was opened up on by two thirty caliber machine guts. Animal machine guns and so we were involved in very heavy firefight and immediately call that in.

february fifth of march next day six beginning of march one eight about nine courts water two thirty caliber machine about three o'clock in the aft about an eighty pound rucksack couple of inches
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

04:27 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"I i'm gonna i'm gonna date this this interview a little bit so that you know the the interview Anyone out there is actually going to hear this but this is actually tomorrow. March seventeenth is tomorrow. I'd like you to talk a little bit about what happened on that. Date and Really the events of the or the the kind of because this is. This is a a an incredible story. I was i really want to hear it from your perspective. Yeah yeah as. I said the pre interview every time we get to this time of the year I just i just stop and pause and and remember the men. I was with that day and for all of us for all of us who experienced those from basically the sixth of march through the eighth march It was it was something that i'll never forget. It was probably the most impactful moment of my entire life. And that's that's including remembering the birth of both my children but It maybe putting context for everyone. The the i was in a reconnaissance platoon and this was set up by the the cab in how they operated they would have a four line companies alpha bravo charlie delta which line companies had hundred fifty minutes. And they were. They were sent out there. They operated pretty traditionally even though they would Era salt into a landing zone but then they would move out and they would move through the jungle or whatever as a major combat force of the echo. Company was divided into a mortar platoon. And a recon platoons. So there were twenty to twenty five guys in in the recon platoon and our job was to find the enemy and so they would send us out from fire bases and one of the things that the caveat also done is created these forward support base stabers. Small little bases That that were not very large at all of the the they would drop. Fifteen thousand pound bombs called daisy cutters in the middle of the jungle. Usually on a hill and it would the the daisy cutter would explode above ground and then would just level everything flat soon critical and then they would fly in bulldozers and in a matter of a day or two would create this base the small pace which included usually about six one five howitzer cannons in support and then and then would have a communications place and it will place that helicopters could land in transporting troops back and forth so usually one of the line companies would be in resident at that base and they'd take turns but echo was echo recon was usually out in the jungle and so they would they would have these fire support bases of of and they would usually not be emplaced for more than a couple of weeks when they moved to another location because they have learned from previous envy a strategy which was to overrun small base and so they didn't want to be somewhere long enough but they could be overrun but these bases sort of overlap. Each other their area of their tactical area in area operation sort of overlapped each other's so they could provide a support with the artillery..

twenty tomorrow March seventeenth two both a day Fifteen thousand pound bombs sixth of march twenty five guys one hundred fifty minutes echo recon eighth march echo five howitzer Each weeks four line about six one things
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

02:45 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"What goes in specifically to your job because as you get trained in vietnam As air cav what goes into that. Mls that you can share with the listeners and our listeners. Well the air cab for those people that don't know what is called air cow. It was the first cavalry air mobile at the first cav goes all the way back to to the wild west. I mean custer was part of the seventh cav. I mean the cavalry was basically a horse troops and so the first cab was broken into two parts. One was a of tanks and abc's ground ground horses basically ground transportation and the other part of it. air cav the air cab. The first cavalry air-mobile was helicopters. And this was used hueys. Yeah it was unique. Hueys than the support ships. The cobra gunships the little loach's which were the observation helicopters but it was. It was all tied to this new way of fighting that was developed by the cab and was adopted by the army where you could send in small groups of men into areas very quickly a mobile strike forces today. We talk about the but they were. That's basically what we what we were and the companies were set. You can move around very quickly. Instead of a traditional army of moving forward and across a line and keep moving forward in this case we could bounce very quickly from one place to the other so the the training of that was learning how to get on and off helicopters quickly And then they a trained us in repelling of so which was the scariest thing for me. 'cause they take you up this thirty foot tower for your the put you in harnessed. They'd taking up the thirty tower. They tell you to hang onto a rope and then they push you off your sliding down this rope a thirty feet which is really scary and then when you actually have to do it with a helicopter that's even scarier of but that was part of the cavs doing in combat assault If.

vietnam seventh cav thirty feet first cab first cav two parts One first cavalry today thirty tower thirty foot tower one cavs
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

03:46 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"So i did. And but i looked at other mo s.'s of. You know. I thought about being a medic. Even though i don't particularly like surgery. But i thought that was something like do that would keep me away from actually fighting and and having to to To kill people ran and But i was a lucky for that either. Shaving cream got put in an artillery unit. But when shortly before the they announced all emma's for everybody in the and basic And where we would go for advanced training. they they. The one of the sergeants who kind of jerk said you know you college graduates. You're all were not going to. The army's always training on you. You're good for cannon fodder so you're you're now injury good lord that's what's fascinating but ait is you get to a it and everybody else is getting dispersed right and you end up going right next door..

one of the sergeants
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

04:40 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"Of in the cascades. There's a retreat center. A religious retreat center up in the mountains called holden village at its off lake lan which is fifty six mile long lake. And it's totally isolated. And so i spent my summer there. And so i loved. I loved washington state for many reasons. But when you're on a train and through three days you're thinking about what's to come. It was i was. I was pretty devastated on. Side got to tacoma washington where fort lewis is located parkland washington and and the ad it was it was it was scary and i think i was more afraid. I think of boot camp. That i was a of going to vietnam. That sounds strange. But i i just all these horror stories you hear about boot camp and And so i i was. I was really dreading now. did you find. It was a mixture of a lot of people a lot to be said mostly from from the midwest originally Find 'cause there's always some humor right than initial shock gets you. But you're you're being volunteer told to to go do this and Among other people who are in the same same boat use him situation Did you find humor in that. That you find other other other guys who were of the same of the same mind. Yeah you always thank you very early on connect with people that are like minded. If you're in a situation like this where you're throwing in a barracks and and so you you you know for all the brutality of the beginning of boat. A boot camp. Where you're where. You're where you're really tied to of to doing all the menial stuff from from scraping the the wax off the floor with a razor blade to a standing out in the rain to all this stuff. That's all the physical training that you do but you you connect with people that are like minded and so that that was kind of a solace for me because i found people were other colleagues college graduates that i could communicate with But there were a lot of lot of humorous things that happened. I was i was assigned to this guy from nebraska. Who had a real problem doing anything right. He was the perennial screw up in the in the and and she's always one he had like he would break his anytime he'd get a pair of glasses they'd be broken by the next day i made it was just constantly and and so i was assigned by the platoon sergeant to to sort of be his marching coach side. The i had the march next to him and just try to get him to march in. Step going your life. No your other loft your left. The trust of his his nickname was shaving cream. Because in in in the brutality of this kind of environment someone convinced him that shaving cream was just like a woman and and that really resonated with him so late at night you hear him with a a shaving cream was that is that is that is not what i i thought it was like shaving accident. That is fantastic. Oh my gosh. That's still funny. A magic of boot camp. The magic.

washington vietnam nebraska tacoma fifty six mile holden village three days next day parkland washington fort lewis glasses pair
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

03:45 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"Was about. They'll actually went up it sort of like sort of subtle protest And that's a so you get you get this draft notice and at the time You said you were you. Were engaged to your girlfriend. And i'm thinking you know you're you're going through all this and you know you're in minnesota you're right next to the border there so the thought had to cross your mind right. Yeah yeah so when. I got drafted. I went to my local county seat and then got on a bus and the bus took minneapolis To the office. I think where a swore me in and they were. They were doing a weird thing too. They were doing. They were counting off. They were going one two three marine one two three worried and so they were. Every third person was marine rather than being in the army. And so i. luckily. I didn't get chosen. Be a marine. No offense to marines..

minnesota minneapolis two three third person one
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

05:07 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"Martin luther king and bobby kennedy are both assassinated You've got all these movements and this this this transition happening in the united states that is that really shaped into what it is now an and helped us get to a point where we're talking about things like this and what i find so fascinating about you and matt matt and i were talking about this. Earlier is the fact that as an actor as a performer. You have to get emotionally available with yourself. You have to get on a deep rooted issue. You have to be available to be an advocate for anybody for any character. You might take on yet to their biggest advocate and so it really opens your eyes to diversity and to all these different walks of life. But i just wonder like what was going through your mind. When you think you're in the clear you start teaching and then you get the draft notice. What let hits you at that moment but it was. It was devastating. It was. I remember it very clearly. Getting this. a letter wasn't mailed to me was mailed to lie mother and my mom called me and and said you need to come and pick up this letter. It's from the the the local draft board the county draft board sort of knew what it was and and of course it. It's this. it's this letter that starts held greetings of graduations. You've been chosen. And so then i kind of panicked and i you know i want a teaching signed this contract. How can they do this to me. And then i. I read about an did some research and found out. You can do an appeal so i appealed it a with the support of the superintendent away school district and so i appealed to january. You could do a couple of months. Appeal so appealed to january. Got another draft notice in january at again appealed to the end of the year and then of towards the end of the year..

january bobby kennedy Martin luther king both matt matt united states draft board lie
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

04:39 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"Now. It's it adds up so by the time. I was a senior in college and i. It's kind of interesting just acting wise in my freshman year applied bottom in a midsummer night's dream and my senior year. I played a tricky on in taming of the true. And that have that that sort of as a tracking a thing. As but by the time. I was a senior i was. I was really rather scared about what was going to happen to me. Because i knew that i to us student of a deferment up at the end of the school year. So there was this mad scramble for a lot of us in my class and a number of people said this in the pre interviews. Well a number of people including me up put in applications for seminary because of being a minister was one of the ways that at that time you could be exempted from service. So i had number of my friends who became ministers and several stayed to to be ministers. I had a couple of my friends go to canada. One of whom never came back on and so he became a canadian citizen and lives there. i had another of classmate who was the first person to receive of of a conscientious objector. Status for non religious reasons An ira member being in vietnam and seeing his picture on the front of the stars and stripes standing on the steps of the supreme court of the united states were his case had gone. And he got this non unreligious Conscientious objector status. Which was really bizarre thing. If you're in vietnam and you see a friend of yours anyway so there. There were a lot of different choices of people. Would you know there all kinds of ways to stay out of the draft. You know from pretending you're gay at that point to trying to get married and have a family quickly due to Hurting yourself on purpose ob so as to see mentally mentally incapable or unstable right. Yeah or sometimes physically. I mean people would would do horrible things to their body to to try to get out of the draft. And so my my route of when i was a senior was to to i apply for seminar seminar and i think i was was pretty far along in the procedure but i. I wasn't really sure that i really wanted to do this. And and i also applied for teaching jobs because i had had a got educational -education degree and ultimately when i went to college. That's what i thought. I was going to become anyway. A high school teacher because like that And so i. I applied for teaching positions and there a small town that was sort of a poverty area of town. Because i had heard that if you're teaching in a poverty area town chances are you'd be exempt because it was thought to be a need and so i got this teaching job at a little town called lake minnesota and a and i thought i thought i was in the clear and you started. This is this is fascinating too and this should be part of your movie year. Your bio pic. You start you. Start each start. Teaching september first and you got your draft notice september sixteenth..

vietnam september sixteenth canada lake minnesota One first person night each start september first one of the canadian ira united states
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

03:34 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"You would end and you you learn your lines in the first week right you went in there and just like you experience. A lot of i and people are like calm guy calmed pace yourself. You know run out. The director was concerned because he had never had he had never at is a small town high school. He had never had somebody who really took to this stuff. The way i did. And and so i really owe a lot to him up for casting me because it really wants. I heard the first laughter from being on stage that first audience reaction that i was hooked and that that really changed my life. Feed your soul. It really does. That's a it's so it's crazy. 'cause we had a i we talked about this when we first spoke During the initial interview and you you had a very similar story. Where would i played. Captain von trapp By software year had to kiss maria. Obviously and this little you know very nubile young men have no nothing about the world and how it works and our director straight upsets like that was awful. We did our first kiss on stage in june. That was really bad. You guys need to work on that. So she became my girlfriend shortly vegetables for year. Yours yeah but if you had a very similar similar experience right. Yeah i As i said in our pre interview the very first time i ever kissed a girl was on stage. And and i was scared to death. I practice by kissing. I was just really scared to end the girl. The girl didn't become my girlfriend and we sort of were at odds all the way through this this this process but it but it but it was. It was that that that initial beginning of of my career i. It's always a good place to know where you're coming from. Because like i look back at the beginning of my theater career and there's like a lot of firsts that i can point to that i don't really know what caused me to end up on this path but like i say oh it might have been my you know this first time i was doing a play for school and in like first grade or it could be you know that the show that i did with like a future teacher that i was going to have and where i played. Tiny tim So it's it's cool to know that kind of that history in a way I'm i'm curious though. Because you know this. It looks like from from here. You really only had jude. Did you only have one other family member in the military. Your brother or other people other people in your by my brother is ten years older than i am. And so he It was a situation where he was getting into trouble of and my parents said you really need to go into the military. So that's how he got. The military it was it was during the cold war..

maria june first laughter first time first grade first first kiss ten years older first audience firsts Captain von trapp first week one other cold war
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

05:58 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"And as part of this history class. I require each student to write an extensive research paper. Basically a dramaturgical paper on shakespeare in production. And that's where she got started and really really liked it. And she's a good writer and an excellent researcher and so then of when the opportunity came for a summer internship as dramaturge and she applied for and got it and i was heard visor for that process. She does a fantastic job so whatever you taught her she is. She is utilizing it to the best her ability And it's it's really been helpful in what we do here. I mean if you could see the amount of notes that we have only on unjust you yourself and like the world events that happen around your your time here you'd be. I'd bet you'd be pretty impressed. She she we. Don't shout out. Ruth as as much i think as we should on this this show for all the listeners. Out there she really just takes extensive notes and Creates quite a an amazing Amount or like kind of breadth of knowledge that we can utilize in our pot nests in our interviews so now shout out to shout out to ruth here. Thank you for all that you do. And then also thanks. Michael for for teaching her. What what you know because we way we would probably be pretty lost without it but but onto you kind of you yourself. So you actually. You mentioned shakespeare Before the military before everything like back back in the day Were you interested in theater as well or when did you start. When did you get into theater because this is you know this is a world that both myself and brocker part of so i can. I can spend a little bit of time here before we move into the military. But when did you or yeah. We can hurt out. Shakespeare things at i really i grew. I grew up on a farm in minnesota and of and i. There weren't a lot of kids in the neighborhood. I went to a one room. Schoolhouse that only add thirteen kids in the whole school. So unlike A lot of kids growing up where you've got a little league the team you playful or or other friends that come over regularly i had to create my own entertainment quite often on so i i sort of did this by by making up stories making plays you know like most kids i played cowboys and indians or or or medieval knights or or whatever it was a we had this wonderful. Hey barn that was built in the nineteenth century which had these rough a hand hume a- beams and had had ropes for police and things. And so i could make that that hay barn into a pirate ship but i was just gonna say pirates roy castle whatever i wanted a and and so i i i would create these stories than i do with my little sister..

Michael minnesota nineteenth century thirteen kids Ruth Shakespeare one room each student both ruth indians shakespeare roy castle
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"Podcasts. Michael art and we're just laugh at about this a second but you gotta give us take too. So what do you tell your students about your name because it's spelling it's the meaning behind all all names that that's the most important right. I often say to my students. I named michael means like god by middle lane. Jon means god is. Love aren't my last. Name is a contraction that negates all proceeds precedes it. Humbles you a little bit right there you go. I mean. I'm sure your students take to that pretty pretty quickly And what's cool about this too Michael is Our researcher who does of remarkable job. She's she's just a workhorse does so much behind the scenes for us She was one students. Earning kind kinda how. how How this came to be and how you got kinda plugged up with With the with the podcast well ruth. Smitherman was my student. A couple of years ago She was a theater major of after being a biology major. She transferred into department and was an actor of wonderful improv person but also did Dramaturge which is basically theatrical research on plays than she worked. I'm also the artistic director of of a professional theater. Company called kingsman shakespeare company and I hired ruth to be the drama turn for the company one summer where she did research on on the place that we produced so i've worked with her very closely over a number of years and she recommended this podcast to me and dustin task. I been listening and enjoying it and thinking about my own experiences. That's about so you're your listener as well. I didn't know that part. Yes yes wow well. That's great to have. Yeah the puts the pressure on a little bit. How this how this runs which is i. It's always great to have both people who were fresh and brand new to this but also people who know kind of what were what we do here so. I'm glad i'm glad that you're listener. I would be glad if you weren't as well but It's it's it just it makes it so we were on our toes a little bit more and i liked that so i'm glad it's cool to hear that you know ruth started Dramaturge e with. I guess she started with you because she's Currently are dramaturge in a way. We're doing our research. So i know she. She's doing a fantastic job. So i'm assuming a did you say did you teach her how to do dramaturge as well or were you. Well it started chez. She took i. I teach theater history class..

Michael michael Jon Smitherman ruth both people couple of years ago one students kingsman shakespeare of years one summer
"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

The Foxhole Podcast

03:36 min | 6 months ago

"michael stars" Discussed on The Foxhole Podcast

"Like talking to him in the pre interview a little bit Yeah it sits. He's got just story after story. Like like dominican irish saying earlier. It's it kids. Life could be a movie very easily. But you got your drafty so the draft. Yeah the reason. We don't have that thing we talked about. So this is weird. 'cause you know when we talked about earlier like oh. You're getting your drafty sitting there. It was like our first. Drafty was dad. Is like a second my yeah. We did get a draft in the past. Yeah it's been so long it's been so such a long time since we've had a draughty like you know that was one of our. That was. yeah. That wasn't like second or third interview and i didn't have. I didn't have a lot of questions for drafty that i could refer. Because i like to refer back to previous previous conversations with other people and their have other been been other people who have been For the draft but then decided to join in stay so vietnam era. Yep so that's it's kind of like a you know it's a weird question because a lot of people during that time ended up doing that. Which was like you know instead of Instead of being presented this. I kind of ultimatum of like either. You're going to. It's really being presented this ultimatum of either going to join the military or we're going to force you to join the military we're going to force you into military. I would love if. I don't know if this ever happened. And you know maybe they don't wanna talk about it but if there is ever a person out there that tried to dodge the draft and then ended up being drafted anyway. That would be a person. I would love love to have a conversation with just because yeah i know that they see this through an entirely different perspective but this is also an interesting thing because i believe that in just this is from my conversations with people from different countries specifically like germany in israel. I believe that a mandatory service of like two years would be beneficial to them are. Yeah but it's also very difficult to present that exact snack yes. There are no what what programs i did. A whole I did a whole a essay on like a Like an english class like a comprehensive english class basically. And i did a might my basically my. My essay was about selective service and making it somewhat met some sort of two year commitment making it mandatory whether it be peace corps or some service organization that you can because not everybody's meant to be in the military right like not every time but it does do in other countries that have that model. It does really present this. You know it's a very diverse. But i feel like people have you know they just have more appreciation for you know what they have afterwards. You know after doing that and seeing things on the other side. I think that's a big divide in our country right now. We just don't know how the other half lives and Yeah we could talk about this forever but yeah that's good stuff.

two year two years israel second germany first one third interview dominican english corps irish vietnam
"michael stars" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"michael stars" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"More about how that's working and how it came about well. Gloria is a Michael Star's lover and has been for many years and when I first met her about seven years ago, she was so excited when she got my card and I was excited to meet her and I was laughing, it's t shirt. It's kind of funny I think Rebecca you probably feel the same team and somebody meets you bad handbag my God you Rebecca and it's and it's fun and it's exciting where. We. So I sit on the Monday shipboard she founded and we sit on boards the era coalition Together. And a call to man and we've been talking for the last year we wanted to collaborate together. So in December we decided we really wanted to work on registering women about and for us women of Color and grassroots led organizations were the primarily in our mindset of where we wanted to go and what we funded. So, we came up with his plan. We found the three organizations, which is black voters matter voter Latino and March on, and we have this whole campaign. We put together a little embroidered Gloria with her aviator glasses and the word vote on t shirts we created scrunch she's. Turned into masks. And the two of US taped on March thirteenth in New York City. We were only high fiving like air fiving and. the the three women founders of the organizations did not flying because it was at that point, there were shut down the city. So we did this video for the day Howard through it and when back to our homes, and then we really do anything I mean the epidemic hits and Democrat hit. So we waited and then George Floyd and this whole rising came about and we waited and we decided in summer it was the time people were aware people wanted to know people wanted to vote. And we felt very strongly that this is the perfect time to do it in July. So what's great about our campaigns as it's my friends, my net were or his friends. Activists Politicians influencers are wanting to do it because they want to make a difference and it's being inclusive. It's not just about what I want is Michael. Stars and promoting my grand it's about promoting these women and making a difference. I love it I. You know you're clearly your passion for Women Your Passion for equality and those who need a ladder Senate down to them supersedes I think if I might say you know you're. T shirts seem to be and clothing seem to be fuelling this passionate in war and I feel like that. So synergistic with my brand, which if I spend more time helping out others, I feel much more satisfied about my life. So. There's two questions that I love to ask all my gats maybe you've lifted maybe you don't know. But I would love to know something we might be surprised to know about you some people like bearing stories or hobbies or just like things that you decide what I would never think that she plays her solitaire. And then the second question being you know either advice that you have hard one learns yourself and WanNa pass onto another woman listening or something that someone gave you that has been really valuable that you wanna pass on. Okay. So I guess the surprise would be people probably don't know I dropped out of college that my parents freaked out, but it was a wasn't mentioned her. Being in school I wasn't meant to be a doctor, an attorney or a lawyer. I knew there was something else out there and so I spent five years traveling around the world working my way around the world and ended up in India. And I got involved in the clothing company. So that's probably surprising but most people because they've probably thought take the traditional route. Which I didn't. and. I just feel like people should know you can really run your company. From a standpoint of. Compassion kindness integrity, you can be successful doing. When I first started in the industry I was primarily by white man and I couldn't get anywhere and I hit a site my way up and I became an entrepreneur because I couldn't get a job in that regular. Place, where I needed to go where I wanted to achieve and become a vice president somewhere. And one of my. One of the jobs was he was working in he was doing something illegally the owner and I was a whistle blower. And I realized I needed to do that because otherwise I would have been the person that didn't have the integrity. And so I quit the job and I started my company. So people should remember that and if you can't get that seat at the table, you just have to go and get your seat ambitiously, build it yourself and don't be don't be scared to do. I love it I. Feel like we could train now it's all day long because I didn't go to college there. No. Now I didn't I you know my parents said if you wanna go that's fine. You know you'll have to pay for it and I went on one college tour and then I was like this doesn't feel right me I gotta go to New York and I gotta start working I totally. Yeah we do have a lot in common. Well, we need to have that time together that we kept saying trying to do for a year. Where it was a pleasure. Thank you. So can thank you for dealing with our tax person, but I think we broke it so. I. Hope. So thank you so much. Rebecca was really wonderful speaking to you. That was the sandler non superwoman to find out more about her work. She's doing had the Michael starts and check out what the foundation is up to with regards to investing women and so.

Michael Star Rebecca Gloria WanNa Senate George Floyd US New York City India Howard sandler vice president attorney New York
"michael stars" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"michael stars" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"High, everybody I wanNA tell you a little bit about the platform. I used to distribute this podcast. It's called anchor. It is the easiest way to make a podcast and gives you everything you need in one place for free, which is what you can use. From your phone or your computer, and it allows you to record edit your podcast. So it sounds great. They're also distribute your podcast for us who can be heard anywhere on spotify apple podcast, Google podcasts, and so many more. And then guess what you can make money with no minimum listenership, which I can tell you is a game changer. So download the anger APP or go to Anchor Dot FM to get started. On spotify, you can listen to all your favorite artists and podcasts in one piece for free. You don't even need a premium account. spotify has a huge catalog of podcasts on every topic including the one you're listening to right now. On spotify you can follow your favorite podcasts. So you never miss an episode if you haven't done. So already be sure to download the spotify APP search for your podcasts on spotify or browse products in the your library tap. Also make sure to follow me. You never miss an episode of superwomen and thanks for listening. I wanted to touch on. You know you've been doing some incredible work with your grants I know you've been giving donations and grants out once. A. Month since covid started, will you talk to me about that? Sure. So Michael and I co founded our foundation fifteen years ago, we wanted to support organizations that push for gender equality and education. We WanNA chips focus on organizations that that related customers would could be late you. So we funded millions of dollars, a lot of different organizations, a lot of grassroots organizations, and so it's been something we've been doing, and when Kobe I said, we have to do something positive, and since we do look for grassroots organizations, the ones that aren't really in the news and for people to know about we went to organizations I kinda knew about when we created ten thousand dollar grants every months. And March we were I heard about the restaurant workers, they all were getting furlough, and so this gave them grant money. And April because we've been involved for years with gender-based violence work and working with survivors wasn't organization called free from that empowered domestic survivors and We know that's really a problem right now. So many people staying home. and. We support a justice for migrant women that supports term workers at risk and were without adequate P., e. and healthcare. And then I met this wonderful man named beverly. William. Barber who was working on the poor people's campaign that addresses underlying issues of equality. And so every month we continue to do things that we'll be joined. So until under the urine on is what I really love about. This is the community of people that work as influences for Michael Stars that you know, I, don't painting influencers, people that lever random rejoining that are excited about it, and the community of my consumers are so excited and they get you learn. So realized me Michael Stars isn't just a brand to sell and profit. It's about building information for people and Promoting social justice and the end equality and equity for all of us. So I mean I see all the time I get a little. On instagram, some of the influencers are so excited about the fact that we do this kind of work and then I have people saying, what what are you reading? So I think that we're definitely having an impact important for us to have that mission is important for any young entrepreneur any young company to have that mission to know what you want to believe them to know you believe in south specific cigarette, what it is, and then work around your customers want to know that you're doing something. They totally no. You WanNa do something and I love that you've been so furlan profit and you don't have to give me exact numbers but I think one of the things that so many companies struggle with is. You know margin right. So people WANNA give back they wanna do something but did you build a healthy margin into your into your production and sales that you could do that or how did you structure that because it can be overwhelming for people who know how to do it? We didn't we worked on margins that were fairly healthy contemporary margins, but we didn't do a lot of business with big department stores that require you to really work with much bigger margins and then. We did well, and so we were the type of people. We kept our officers small. We didn't drive fancy cars and by Super Expensive House, and so we if she's save money and so we could put it back in and when we started, we didn't put a lot of money into the foundation. We did what we could and as we build up that Sokol, money were able to give more more. But like for instance, the masks everybody is suing I buy one give. By three we give to and I said you know what? I'm just giving masks and then I'm gonNA sell masks and make a profit on my masks and my my wholesale might department store on the small stores that sell Japan also, and then it can give away thousands of masks and that's what we should do we. It's okay to make a profit, but it's even better to to get away. So yeah, you. Just have to figure out how much you can afford to give, and if it's a little, it's a little and it's still great. You don't have to give away a million dollars for it to be important to them. Yeah. So I'd love to hear you know, do you have a value set of how you live your life for a guiding sort of been of rules now, I've always worn my values on my sleeve. And might lend I never thought of social impact businesses CEPA things in all ways the sang no, we always wanted to make people happy which I think going back to thinking about the t shirt or a piece of clothing emits people happy used to feel guilty about clothing. But what I try to do I have this trinity. So it's my business is the philanthropy of what I give away, and that's also part by activism and then my investment portfolio. So about three years ago I knew that what I was investing in my neutral funds were filled with companies that probably didn't get my values, but I didn't know what to do. So I said carefully looking at that and I. Had Somebody helped me and we went to every mutual fund every company and saw what they really were about and what they supported and funded, and we pulled out of anything that didn't fit with what I felt to be who I was and my values. So now I'm totally into social responsible investing gender. Lens Investing Racial Women of Color focused and I'm so proud that I actually look at what I do. And know that I'm making a difference in every aspect of my life, not just my business and not just philanthropy and just want people to remember that the stock market is a tricky place and you WanNa make sure that your values are in your investments are not. SMART. It's it's so easy to just pick up your money with the financial adviser and hope they get it. Right you're right. You have to be so much more responsible than that. Hey, Rebecca I you know country should find an. Accenture name think accenture Oh this accenture, do you know that they that is tired him to do work for them so Well that means it's kids in the border rank. Rank, it is very difficult to keep up with the to let me. Turn around there. Somebody else that's doing something valve with somebody or valve with ours and Things that just I don't agree with and it's really hard to keep up with this. I have really align impacts, Jennifer canning. She's really shootings novel. What mass for the company? What are you excited I? Know you touch Gloria, Steinem do you WanNa talk.

spotify Michael Stars accenture instagram Google Japan Kobe Jennifer canning Barber beverly Sokol Rebecca I Gloria Steinem
"michael stars" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"michael stars" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"And what was that period like? that. was really the biggest challenge for me. Michael had gotten sick. He had cancer and solely over a period of time. I. Started taking over more of the day to day in the company but we didn't really telling me about what was happening. So after he passed away, I actually had a ton of skeptics in the company. I'M NOT GONNA say they were primarily men but I will that I didn't think about breaking down the walls and the silos and trading routine environment. Now, I had worked in a lot of different jobs in my career and I had a lot of different careers. So really knew what I would have wanted in a boss and then accompany. So I took those. Experiences and frame him around what I thought would work for us and I said come on let's just try it. Let's break down the silos. See what happens him those morning huddles those two minute meetings and chuck about what you're doing for the day and get yourself sub setup for. So at the end of the a months somebody came into my office and said I have to admit I was such a nice air bud you're totally right. So we've been continuing to break down the walls I'm now that conduit between every single department I feel like I'm. C. O. C. O. CEO doing running everything. But in a way, it's really good right now because I know everything that's happening every area I know what's happening in marketing and I know that e COM shop and how they dress should look and then go to the design team and they're working out of sitting. And realizing that they've got a little bit differently I can go to production and make sure that seems your happening on that side too. So it's actually been really great, and that's all because of all the experiences I had working in a lot of different companies. So I wouldn't be a Naysayer and say go on your own and not given experience. It's nice to have around. Yeah. Do you feel like having all those? You since Kobe I've had more hats and I ever imagined it. You just named a bunch. How do you stay sane having all those jobs or do you have? Any. Adverse tips for? multitasking. I think you have to run with it and just know how lucky you are to have this opportunity. And I have to admit I don't have kids now and. I live by myself with my my dog and I don't have what other women are going to, and probably a lot of women listened stockists have kids and a husband that's working and trying to do everything and spite of the fact that everything should be slick fifty fifty is you'd miss half to push yourself to keep doing it and I I also look at myself in real. So lucky I am to be worm at. And don't take anything for granted. And just keep pushing the envelope. I do have to say I am addicted spider solitaire. So.

Michael CEO Kobe C. O. C. O.
"michael stars" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"michael stars" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"Superwoman. This is Rebecca today's guest Zan Learner the founder of Michael Stars she started this company with her late husband Michael so many years ago. But what is more incredible is her philanthropic parts the amount of give back she does. How? She Invest Women and how she took. Some things that was a passionate. This is. Suzanne on. Super. Well. Thank you so much Suzanne for joining me today. I would love for you to start with a little bit of a back story. You know when I first got my first Michael Stars Shirt I just. Assumed it was a man and was so happy to learn it. Was You. So I love you to Kinda give me your history and how you how you started the brandon and then we'll guide in. Sure. You know it is also a mom. So my husband's name was Michael, and we kind of organizes together. And from the beginning I was a sales rep in their clothing industry had few showers around the country and is very cute. Guy Walked in one day with the South African accent. With screen printed t shirts and it was Michael and within two weeks we were dating Haarder's so I recommend anybody asked the guy out on a date if you want to get give somebody interested. So that's of how we started and we realized we were very much alike because we cared about equality we care about making a difference to people and we were both very much entrepeneurship. So I was running sales and merchandising and marketing and Michael Caine around the company. So we had equality there even in the company. Wow and how many years ago was this this is in nineteen, eighty, six. Oh my gosh. So. What was that experience like when you first launch I mean business I talk about business being so incredibly different only fifteen years ago but we're talking with you know almost twenty five back into the math correctly maybe thirty years ago. What was it like launching? I'm assuming you didn't do the do now have to raise them VC money to start my company. At love to hear that journey. No not at all we had a great idea and Michael second mortgage to home. So there was no VC VC money out there there were no banks that lend money to somebody who can chance much the background. He had had a successful business before in the fashion industry and I had a pretty good a wrapping business. And at the time, you know people love new ideas. New Products were willing to give people. A chance is much tougher. Now, you have to have all the marketing the Tom the money back in Europe and We just kind of went out the door and I showed it to my clients and my customers and they got excited I mean our first season. We saw Bernie's Theater Fred Segal remain. Dale's we kind of shot up really quickly. So it was really fun but after two years, it wasn't so exciting anymore we. So what are we going to do next? So we came up with the idea of garment Daij t shirts, which we had already been doing with Spring Press. So I already had a connection with a really wonderful American factory Pennsylvania and we I did a thirty color colored I mean I I could've done forty choas. If somebody asked me am was how we started and that's what we can that one size which is easy at the time and it was a ridden and again it it took off. So there's been a lot of cycles and our career where. You kind of like go have the ups and downs. You have ray products in you know I'm sure what that's like. You have great season and then the next season might be tougher. And we've gone through a lottery incarnations to last the length we have and I. Think it's because I really do understand what the woman wants to wear a really do get her tastes level. So then we came up with these garment I t shirts and then our shine t shirt, which is probably the first t show you lot. And we've been able to remain consistent and have a loyal following I. Love that you know you touched upon the fact that you are great at sales and I feel like people so many people have great products and then it comes to them talking about themselves and their line and they falter. So what do you think magic ingredient has been that made use such than seller because to get into Barney's all stores you named For season as like everyone's dream and then I never got into parties despite you know how however many meetings I have with them. So what what do you think? is outside of the secret sauce of being you your uniqueness passion I. Think you know Rebecca you've got that and the people that do are believed and I think times were different onto they were willing to take on smaller people times very, very different for us. So we were lucky to get on the door. I. Think it was different. It was unique. It was something they didn't see before. And we told the story about it and it could be been Michael I together as the duo that just had that type of personality. He was the same like me you're enthusiastic and warm, and we had integrity and we believed in our products beliefs a big part of it. If you don't believe in what you're doing, you're not gonNA convince anybody else. Totally I think it all starts that that can do that. You have internally and then people can feel that. So honored you keep the business rush because you said, you know after two years you got boards you came up with your next product that how do you feel like you keep things fresh even right now? No Times so interesting now. after the recession ten years ago we re framed the company instead of just t shirts we wanted to sportswear. And we did sweaters and outerwear accessories and vetted welfare us so that we expanded our product range. And now it's interesting because of covid and what people really want. We've actually reduced the number styles we've reduced the amount of products that we have in our grand were doing more casual and the it's made things a little bit easier than this new strategy of what do we do next And we this has happened. I think along the way keeps happening. You do have to constantly reinvent yourself and say every five years you've got to think about what you're going to be your next plan down the road and we just somehow another come up with it like I. I have this idea what people really want to wear and our business. Is actually incredible and we are up one hundred percent in our business this here in our economies and our specialty stores that are slowly coming back. They're excited about the product and realized that they get great quality were totally untrendy but we're not trendy or they can purchase something and intrigue us. Now they'll pull out of their claws at still find it available. Color or body shade and said that they're going to continue to run aware. So just at reinvention and I think anybody that has a product and as an entrepreneur and with a great idea, they've got to think of that next product down the road. Totally. Yet one hundred percent you can't. You can't sit back I used to think. You know all when we achieve. Is. I'll be able to put my feet up and just daydream. Possible. And you know Michael used to be like that I mean after this screen printed t shirts he's like I said Michael Nobody wants them anymore you said what I Love Them Nobody wants them anymore so I ought to convince him to do something else. So it's I think within your own company you have naysayers that don't believe you can do it or don't think you need it and and you have to have that conviction to convince them before it even goes. Butler. Oh for sure. How have you sort of evolved the company without Michael? and.

Michael Michael Stars Michael Caine Suzanne Rebecca Michael Nobody founder Guy Walked Europe Spring Press Haarder Pennsylvania Dale Butler Barney Tom Bernie Fred Segal
Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

NBC Meet the Press

05:21 min | 1 year ago

Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

"We hit five million US cases yesterday for some perspective. The first nineteen case in the United States is believed to have occurred on February six. We hit one million cases on April Twenty, eight, eighty, two days later. It then took just forty three days to hit the two million mark on June tenth. We hit the three million mark on July seven that was twenty seven days later then just sixteen days later we rich four million US cases and July twenty third and again it took us just sixteen days to hit this five million reported case number right here in the United States joining me now is Dr Tom ingles beans, the director of the Center for Security of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Dr Ingles. Be Welcome back to meet the press. WanNa get a little big picture here. You know last week you were you put out a lengthy list of ten recommendations. You guys didn't call it a reset, but sort of like how do we get control of this virus? Now another one of your sort of colleagues in the larger sense Michael Star home is an op Ed. He's basically calling for a reset of some sort New York Times today editorial page calling this. It feels though as public health officials are all calling for some sort of reset. Partial. lockdowns things like this and yet we are not having that conversation at all on the political side of things. Are, are we doomed to sort of live with this virus now if we're not GONNA at all look at your recommendations I DON'T THINK WE'RE DOOMED To this fate I? Think we we know what to do. Other countries have done it. I think the purpose of these resetting reports these for a kind of a reestablishment of the basics. Is that we know that another country's universal masking fiscal, distancing, avoiding large gatherings. Those kinds of things have worked. If we look at countries like Italy and Spain and France, they have a total of about seven or eight deaths today and we have thousand, but it's not magic what they did. We know what they did. So I think if we act together in national unison, we can get there and that's what the purpose of these many of these reports are I want to bring up the issue of masks there've been some people that said if we had ninety five percent compliance unmask wearing, we could get rid of we could sort of get this fires under control. Is that unrealistic and we do need to do more than just mandating masks Do. Not, alone. Not by themselves or alone the solution, but they are a critical part of it. We know that physical distancing makes a big difference. We know that large gatherings are places where super spreading events occur and people have the opportunity or the virus has the opportunity to get around quickly and for. Many people at once. So we have to do a number of things together in terms of you know simple things like diagnostic testing results coming back much more quickly. It's it's unacceptable for the country to have to have testing comeback a week or even two weeks later it's not useful at that point there's no point even doing the test. So a number of that we have to do, but they're not they're not complicated they may be hard, but we have to do them kind of in unison. And all of those, they're not hard except when you when the word politics gets involved, it makes everything a little bit harder and I wanNa keep you out of the political space here. Let me ask you a question about that scenes and to sort of set expectations doctor Fauci implied that the first vaccine that we get, he hopes it's seventy five percent effective. The FDA has said they will approve any vaccine that's at least fifty percent effective. Can you explain to the public what that means what it means and what it doesn't mean and what our expectations should be for the first vaccine Well, we know that many of the vaccines that we use are not perfect. They don't prevent every case of disease but if they prevent a substantial portion of disease than that can help us get to a point where most of us are protected, the disease can spread quickly between people anymore a concept that is called her immunity. Herd immunity doesn't mean we will won't disease anymore. It means it's not gonNA efficiently as efficiently spread in an epidemic form. and. Is there a percentage figure in your mind that you think will sort of give us a huge? Huge step in the right direction is at a vaccine that is at seventy five percent or does fifty percent do you fear that could be a false sense of hope. I think we would take fifty percent because it's fifty percent is a lot better than what we have. Now we've we've no tools to no no vaccine tools or medicine tools that we can use to slow this down. So fifty percent would be would be far better than what we have. Now of course I think we all want something that is seventy, five, eighty, five. Ninety percent effective. But we'll have to see what we get and I think for the amount of time has passed since the beginning of this pandemic to have a vaccine that's even fifty percent effective in in the coming months or the beginning of twenty twenty, one would be phenomenal. But again, we hope it's better but fifty percent would be better than what we have now. Tom ingles be from Johns, Hopkins One of our experts that we have on here regularly, really appreciate you coming on and sharing your expertise with us. Sir.

United States Dr Tom Ingles Twenty Twenty Dr Ingles Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Tom Ingles New York Times Director Michael Star Center For Security Doctor Fauci Johns FDA Italy Spain France