20 Episode results for "Michael Palin"

Michael Palin

How I Found My Voice

58:11 min | 1 year ago

Michael Palin

"Season of how I found my voice is sponsored by the out an innovative premium car rentals service powered by Jaguar Landrover if you live in London like me and want to get out hello I'm far just sat and I'm the producer of how I found my voice apart cost by intelligence squared we hope you enjoyed this absurd but just before the main event I wanted to let you know that this download the APP today now let's go to this week's episode easing Land Rover Discovery Sport they have a whole range of premium vehicles to choose from including the Range Rover Sport and the electric Jaguar I pace in every king my father didn't have a great deal of money though he he probably feels he should have done because he's Cambridge educated but fell foul of the Great Depression Hello and welcome to how I found my voice a podcast from intelligence squared. I'm Samir Ahmed and I'm going behind the caters if you enjoy this episode De Rate Interviews on Apple podcasts with me is one of Britain's definitely best loved Comic Actors Writers untravelled Sir Michael Palin is as well known for his travelogues and his book starting with around the world in eighty days and most recently his trip to North Korea as he is for his work as a comedy actor and a writer Anita dramatic actor in things such as Monty python many comedy shows and films including the life of you get unlimited mileage additional drivers fully comprehensive insurance and even the congestion and dot charging pleaded said if you're a Londoner who wants to rent a kind style liberty persona to find out what influences shaped their success how did politicians artists writers and performers grow up to become such great and unique commune the first time I ever stood up in in public and did commodores the Oxford University Psychological Society Christmas party Geeky God baby back to childhood born in one thousand nine hundred forty three in Sheffield and your father was an engineer your home was it life was fairly quiet and he's an engineer couldn't find work in the south ended up in Holland than Leeds Sheffield in a very big rented house on the Western side of Sheffield I love reading I had a very vivid imagination I loved sort of living in my own little world but always had good friends around sometimes strongly this quite the opposite but in order to get rid of the mess people have got to go through the mess we are in deep shit moment Dan Brazil a private function the death of Stalin and a recent ITBS of Vanity Fair. Thank you so much the coming in Michael it comfy share hours of booking when you're done the COBB also be picked up from your chosen location my colleague recently is the service I loved how easy it was he went on a last minute we can trip to Brighton school any Reading Finding Okapis of National Geographic magazine and being absolutely fascinated by far of mountain ranges and it was always cold I remember that he was not good at some heating replace so there was himself my mother and my sister who was nine years older than me who I can remember sort of growing up with very early on but it was quite a distance between us and she was soon after it's not magic at the end of this country I feel very around thing but that was that Pacific Palin family and what we like is a boy I was quite quite shy in some ways it is asked him because we did our half hour an absolute silence but at the end someone came up shook hands warm said that was very interesting seeing world and creating a bigger world in your own environment but also when you talked about the fantasy world you'd like to escape to that particular books or films I'm sometimes it's just one of those things I would like vay off and just together from my bike and make my own little journey I used to be Faslane River how's your mazing wave makes me suppose you didn't go straight into the traveling but actually did the acting I for bike rides which I I was a great fan of railways and trains so we turn the bike the bike journey into a railway journey set in places by the side of the I found the friends took over my life and I want to just to be on my head doing my thing how did they take care of a well they would want to see me more often than I wanted to see things well I read lean blatant books to start with US I think most people of my generation would have done then I very keen on on biggles books 'cause because there's always set somewhat exotic ago be desert oh the him or someone like that and I just remember enjoying geography most of all ordinal that so you could sad but I think it was just exploring can affect certain freedoms well it's two things one is the traveler in the I didn't volunteer for many of the school plays may be my father's Influence there because he was very wary of my becoming an actor ah way of looking at the world through human and seeing sort of things that make you laugh robin cry is must be there good word well no I mean I I love talking to people I love sharing my experiences but there are certain things where I failure early on I didn't know whether it's genetic or anything like that but I remember seeing a- announcer so I feel I want to be crossed questioned and come up with something that he's Glib and all that but I do think that it at school you were acting to improvise ations in the milk crew yes I did because I was sort of shy about doing formal acting toilet rolls now that's all I can tell you you can get the gist of it to be rushed to him halfway through the ceremony following that people still be fairly good stead interesting I want to ask a bit more about your father had a serious stomach and I should say here I'm involved in the charity action for stabbing might sister tried to become an actor worked out my father wanted his children to earn some money in that go down the path of show Biz other than I've enjoyed observing the world rather than being observed myself some someone wrote wants an interview was up spot on like being scrutinized in which you're the patron and like so many other parents my child my family had life transforming therapy at the Michael Palin Centre in London which but as much rather talent print attorney people I could tell stories quite well and yes they used to be I remember in nineteen fifty three on a comedian in a way or do you think they're made because he had this innate instinct to me I really don't know I think it's a way of looking at the world are whistle being an observer the challenge who came to see your patients in your comedy Yes yes I was I was seeing somebody who can make people laugh I think you know you realized that I simply Lozada didn't want him to stop rather have a father who didn't stop I think looking back the at the coronation I did it also Ted Minute improvisations about the coronation. What kind of improvisation well it's a bit embarrassing I felt the time an embarrassment about my father stamina and I knew this was wrong when friends would come home from school who didn't know him the milk room so I can remember doing that can even remember so to some of the things he said I know you're older now but no I can't actually I wish I could remember the red in Brooklyn was like that and I would do is sorta commentary what was going on at the coronation and those who wanted to come came and we got loyal gathering yes it wasn't I'm stop on that would be lead station and then the Newcastle Station will be electroshocks further up the hill matching 'cause I went into Hanin Way to a peaceful that it influenced him a great deal I think it made him slightly more contancts than normal people who could talk fluently therefore was Turned down for work I'm not I don't know of this but I'm sure it was sort of that and leverrier sort of pressures at school that I generally tended to solve them by finding a friend laughing about the ban by going home and saying I can't stand this any longer the experiences stammer for the first time they'd sort of be embarrassed I be would always felt well rather defensive or my father the treatment of it my to find it very funny I mean because I think cleese managed to get together a wonderful gallery of characters to fly off the handle which he did every now and then I I think he was very funny man you've probably found it very difficult to tell jokes because if you don't have hotel which Hotel Cup go ahead with the stammering center is an an has been tremendously rewarding experience and yet moments I just think if my father being around fluids he can't really started Jack Now you get to the end of it little things like that I think probably in his work he went for interviews was not able to perhaps convinced have to treat it a bit for laughs the characters tormented by the Kevin Character it's very difficult to watch now in many ways and I wonder how you feel looking back at at film and if your name and your support can you tell me what effect your father's stammer had on you and why it's so important to you to campaign around the issue that center treats the whole family I found it transformative and I have to express my gratitude to you in charity for the support that you've given my family makes it was never discussed we I never asked him why do you stammer how do you feel about stemming limited call this so my later work for those dominic central that was away it was sort of you know it's the being caught short in the middle of the carbonation seventy which of course that you put out it's just the opposite to the truth that they were not intelligent people completely opposite to the truth so my involvement later in didn't trying to help the stammering let's talk about the act of of writing you've been keeping a diary since week course it's a little awkward to to be able to sort of explain there's lots of humor including the fact that there is somebody who has the information everybody wants and he has a stem have you tried to make it up to him and make some sense of all the things I felt most unjust about the way standards will look at the people had very little to say that's why these folks ooh that sort of thing this is me this is what I really am I'm not sure it was as clear as that but I think that certain aspect of of diary keeping the film and the work I'm doing the stammering center but I think they I think they understood it I think that they could see the two different things as one way is a way of finding out why even if it's a comedy film can pile characterize playing he's not a nice man you know say door he's a very unpleasant character lose I like lists because train spotter Soroti things down was something I enjoyed wonder actually and I'm not rethought of this before whether I can remember from whenever I I lead right I I like to keep notebooks I would I would create books about my favorite football so don't worry don't worry do you know where they've gone fine fine where the hotel which I used to feel uncomfortable about their arguments as you say it's has an affect the whole family which is why the support of action starring children in the treatment cool oh how long sorry sorry when I talk now about stammering and all that go I was recently down stammering center to some teenagers who've been there on a two I still keep it well what's really interesting and you give advice on your website about Derek keeping is to not be afraid to just write down what you did that day uh-huh in humor which define how he was replaced French the comfy chair to someone says Putin the comfy chair coach Aaron terrific stink because if nothing else is an incredible aide-memoire when you come to be looking back on a career like yours but I was also fascinated that when you began keeping a proper diary again it was you take up the diarrhea again later when you were older well the obvious thing is I enjoyed writing from to have that sort of treatment how different life might have been for him and for me and for my mother who Pete Wentz we got very cross down then he used to be L. dollars off and you had some schoolboy diaries from your days in Sheffield Charter seen you kind of read from on on website what made you keep them and what made wonder there's one film fish called Wanda in which he played a character with the stomach it was made in the eighties and in a way it does seem a very long time ago and it was about killing and but in the end he has the least all people's bad debt gets his revenge by running ever Kevin Kline and it was such an actor will successful active will actually gave up just like that and and just having him on my knee and then having to get cigarettes out of my mouth give him a couple I thought this is ridiculous they're incompatible fatherhood and smoke nineteen sixty nine when you were twenty six nearly twenty six you just had a baby with your wife it didn't seem an obvious time to have the time to write a Daria I'm interested that you did the two writing and writing jar is sort of somehow to define my own identity away from my parents away from school ought to gain then missed the key thing which is I gave up smoking in April nineteen sixty-nine I had a little son Tom Kick so I gave up smoking and that'd be very much a part of my life for you know seven or eight ten years possibly we saw the complicated Bernard shore play cool the apple cart and is playing one of the two sectors at the beginning who talk a lot but is it's it's not it's not easy the people stamina the other is is that I took the role because I don't feel establish should not be in who should be put in a corner and not even a totally ignored maybe feel hey I've got this new enabled willpower McRae's it for so I thought well diaries which as as you say kept at school maybe now's the time to start keeping the buildings around all that sort of thing and I was very much aware of keeping a narrative of my life thinking about myself why am I doing this and where am I senior school did you want to be an actor I wanted to act being an actor was obviously going to produce a great class outdoing joining these guys or much older than me and doing two or three straight plays did you work you do comedy drama but you're acting at prep school shrewsbury didn't she goes in Sheffield right yes in in a steamer so but it is no awkwardness is there that's part of the reason I became so interesting Dari and I'm quite coincidentally an extraordinary it was about two weeks before we had our first monty python knitting so something he was some sorry party of a narrative that is you so if you can write it down all right as much as you can and then you keep that narrative in your in your head worth my fault if I said this I want to be I want to learn how to act wanted to go to acting school that sort of thing so I read it surreptitiously and I did act cooperative drama festival on Best Perf Gent and Doreen Barrack who's the other prisoner with me we have a slight Romantics I love playing other people it was part of my imagination I love being someone else you know it's like us going for a walk dramatize where I was and mythology because of all the talent that was there at the same time what was it like being at Oxford Terry Jones yes yeah I you know wasn't a moment wasted and I think that's what Dr Keeping us all about is just really saying you know every moment is part of a store assurance be my public school but only in things that he probably wouldn't have seen and he did one actually one play he did come along to see but I do remember there was another one called exit for seven which is all about political prisoners gang out to be shot thumping edisons of humor we enjoyed Pete Peter sellars the goons and he said look let's put our why don't we ride on follow and if he fell asleep minutes and so he didn't realize quite how larger party calls by the end of the play so there was that feeling I wanted I loved acting a year and then you went to raise new college Oxford to read modern history modern history that time has entered common Russian department met Somebody there who's a keen amateur actor in the lot of amateur amateur dramatics in South Yorkshire from all of Yorkshire and I found I coming from Sheffield whilst you know I didn't know what a pizza wells in and he sort of educated me away and he he it was we I would just telling Chelu we can make money out of it and off you went and got me got our first booking system I ever stood up in in public connection she won best perf a lady I think so there so we'll doing serious acting for you stuff down let's create our own comedy half hour and we can go make money at a university parties balls Moore's I never I never countenanced all nine my my hand thought that and then they're they will ready to be published later can we talk a bit about how you got into acting then because there is a dramatic range in you and I see he can do commodores at the Oxford University Psychological Society Christmas party the Geeky got which was it seemed to turtle as asked him audience reaction and the very end of the run David Frost appeared from London on so talent spotting trip because we did our half our absolute silence but at the end someone came up shook hands warm and said that was very interesting yeah so that was a rub it was very important and then I met Terry Jones but it was doing cabaret with Robert Houston I was noticed by how come well I'm now I was chosen to be one the cost of five which did my confidence a lot of good yes did you have a suit of style that you were doing history he was doing English I I thought you seemed to do something with historical and literary figures and buddy who was the producer of the producer of the Edinburgh Festival Review and the end festival review in nineteen sixty four for wasn't turning point in my life really yes the wood carver most the first one I did and it's all about somebody who cops who Christ on the Cross and has a sort of vision I teen and at Prep School you did Martha Crutcher in Christmas Carol that was it and nothing field off to boomtown valley with I went about six miles down the road to the the the steelworks my father and I worked in the he was very well received and we had extra performances and we did late night shows and I realize a lot of the audience were friends or mates from college these people saying with surreal tell me about your partnership with Terry Jones because he began working together as writers then and it's a partnership that continued for many many that makes you think of the death is stolen we'll go you've narrative of my life I have I think but that she wanted and award for that the Bradford the Madman called Robert Houston who I give major credit to cause Robert was from London Metropolitan Cultured in a way Michael Side to me stronger perhaps in my own can you remember any of the early sketches right together which reveals the way that your styles meshed it could do what I've always really wanted to to act but also to write material which I could perform he had the frustrating yes yeah the Russians we didn't have it running that was the world we also ascending up the same time Terry was very stimulating and he could play lots of different carry shoes and there was this all truthfulness about in a lot of comedy that time more sort of self reflective on our education or or or television the world we were trying to get into food felt the best comedy comes from character from understanding people not from I can never mend member jokes not not telling jokes so much created the well I can remember how much they reveal the sketch we did for for the frost report about very boring Manitou party in all over the country all over the world who just come to see what you're doing and I was enjoying this I was enjoying the writing as enjoying that to playing the sketches I loved hearing me which just he just used Chaz from inside the House and stop action single frame and may one about chess escaping the house the running off and all that and I just thought to be able to do that that's great so terry had so technical side he'll say Terry had very very strong so is it told me when you first did we'll proper acting because he sort of did ZIP third call amateur dramatics yes yes that was very important to me I had a gap here in diversity of what we wrote and he was very interested in film remember Yawn He did this love you film at his Parents House in Downing Klay Gate enjoy low places or whatever and the tagline is only yes and the man says yes yes she was from Henderson who'd come from he's talking to this man what do you do I'm a I'm I've been lying Tammy a fool a herald three seven four nights attending the King I'm not in this Bit Madman I'm Michael Palin and I'm Cordelia I'm David Jason and I am the King of France Gloucester Edgar sons of the Gloucester an old man catch about an estate agent taking young couple round and trying to sell them stonehenge sort of the media and cameras and broadcasting throughout history so how do you treat each little area we treated the Stonehenge for the and this was sixty four the foster report was in sixty six that was the week that was the year that was that was around then but that was satirical comedy and what Terry and I would which we spent a lot of time on and we're able to practice that and I think my contribution was quite a fairly versatile every did which I like you know this wasn't somebody said look at me I'm going to be a star it was he wanted to dig down into the characters and he loved the sort of goes on alone so it's about sort of the the underdog talking to the end the overdose tells a wonderful tale to this guy about how clown program for children went down to five fifteen Jones and I'm king lear I'm Eric Idle and could do pretty much any kind of team row but also I think I kind of understood about writing on and I think I didn't know how a joke worked can you taught me that'll gaps and he says doors doors forty-three doors on like that and then of course she for a weekend the out is designed for us it's a premium car rental service without hassle just download the APP but kill vehicle and a car will be delivered to your doorstep within it came on and suddenly thought my mind agents any to me just maybe there is a chance that the and I was the sort of the the atheist condoms on you can't do this because he did the film maybe so I would say oh the husband was kind of an middle English gormless life whilst all the questions uh-huh so that's what we will do so take different ways shifting also about I think it was about character to the daughter of the chiefs of this tribe came in and spilled Arrow but let hello smell long black hair and then you know the trumpets Blue Harry worked together as writers on a number of TV programs including the Frost report yes what made the difference I know you worked on TV shows before Python didn't you the compete not a history of Britain through sketch because I knew from seeing some of the foods particularly of complete not as Jupiter sooner they did play on historical setting yes and there was one approach was that children know much more than we think they know that much more savvy it wants to be talked down to all the time so we had a sore python humor matt stay yes those about Stonehenge and the conceit of of the history was a bit like horrible histories now it was as if you had the characters which I suppose I was doing in the in the mail room of the UK Edinburgh's probably giving him some sort of character absolutely narrative cahiers really well yes some episodes of which I remember when they were rediscovered I think ninety s we also do not just Joe Sex which gave us twenty six shots life made sure it was about Lonzo I'm from Handan as where you live I live in a in a little house oh wait if pitting on line three and the site is audio for a young couple yourselves with forty children character job and a slap in the middle and what about the gaps doors the husband ends pushy run of the doors and it falls down gives you a little more confidence gives you the child to sort of test out material and when the material doesn't go very well if the two of you to sort of support each other he did say he felt no out of it necessarily a negative way but he wasn't in a partnership the way not necessarily were that's true the partnerships and we were very important awesome grammar myself Graham John cleese out for writing sketches Terry Gilliam the animated worked on do not just say there are these two divisions within it because Talk me through how you came to be in this amazing part shit became monty python because there were six of you what they're well you know we'll see as the different news put the great thing about Pythagoras somehow those a unity Eric's good and all that sort of just you're set why do we get together and do a television series altogether using you know your town of the it's sort of a situation and a set of characters the huma develops out of way you take them absolutely I think you've got to get got have a certain tension whilst that we knew how to make people laugh me new basically how how huma work to how it should be played and Terry Gilliam's very very who was a harmony in the humor what we wanted to do we didn't really spend much time home to explain to each other why something's funny it wasn't funny we wrote material the six of us all from slightly different backgrounds should sort of jelled together I don't know and it's very rare and very few comedy shows written by six this is old because I think quite why it happened I know the mechanics of what happened. It was awfully dumb completed on the history of Britain we did the schedules. JV Jason is hanging his fingertips off a cliff and these people come along and help help and they say on aren't you in writing I remember that and I was getting a bit bogged down with a sketch what it was but I think it was a woman Ah yes can you please just just and and it builds up and builds up and suddenly he's actually saying please I'm going to fall that's that's the voice Porton because he was sort of cemented together with his amazingly source surreal work just absolutely perfect but why the thing is that sometimes with sketches it takes awhile before the humor really kicks in you just gotTa have the tension that we did I remember do not just your view and Terry robustly already writing Partnership Graham Chapman and John cleese to some sent were Terry Gilliam did his own thing with amazing animations that I did into your idol recently for six people who've lost it can we talk three one or two of the ideas that you developed together on Ponti Pine Circus the Spanish Inquisition Sketch Sir John cleese Rang Up New John From the frost report and he said I've just been watching your series big nut history of Britain allows cut you off to sit go from the television do show we like your show good well thank you thank you I'm glad you like it now we like it what she my wife doesn't like it as much as I do usually in a sort of separate groups they're not we'd read it I read my stuff genre and suffocate him grammar and it didn't work I mean one of you must love and that is one that you directly what we three how that became well yes it was a little of late night the Spanish inquisition and they brought in a huge rush you just tell them up and throw them away and woman cyber power Cleveland and it wasn't getting anywhere so I thought what do we do so I brought in Graham Chapman Kite who says inquisition for yes that's the next move in and that was really I didn't expect the Spanish inquisition this guy he's got to sort of trapezoid gift get them involved would be there will be moments when someone would say can we take away and work on it because I think we can so faith funny idea but we go this way or that way but the actual assumption yeah what you've done and sorry Mr. I am too you'd have found the emergency at you right in the it's not a single gag the Welsh call it for you that is a mountain thought in your own home he needs to think of a comfy chair without thinking of that yes yeah she's they offer there was a good I mean I think works so well let me get the cycle granny's things like well first of all we liked dressing up whatever it is there's another sketch which I think is just an interesting about things why things are funniest it's called the the fish oil riff extinct to build up that comfy share confess being shown photographs by some news very boring and said this at the Front House there's me at the back of the house you can see the front of the house just in the corner that and the and then obviously not prepared they didn't know the lines and the costume own property and all that sort of thing began to take off because I felt this the group of people in the Spanish music was funny little group and they were look good in there all this outfit and they're all fairly hope that can moment I think is what makes it very very funny so interesting to you talk through them I do love the way that you all seem to enjoy dragging up something

Sir Michael Palin Britain Sheffield engineer Landrover North Korea Samir Ahmed Land Rover Discovery Sport London producer Leeds Sheffield Cambridge Oxford University Psychologica Apple Anita writer Jason Holland Stalin
RHLSTP 275 - Michael Palin

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

1:18:14 hr | 1 year ago

RHLSTP 275 - Michael Palin

"Hello and welcome to the greatest realistic of my life. And the greatest moment of my life rally style with so Michael Palin amazed. I didn't cry all the way through. This pouted together. Pretty well Things I'd do differently but Michael was incredible. I would just say that if you're a monthly badger the backstage video of Michael Answering emerge. Questions is extremely good. He improvises a home new. Seen Life of Brian. If you haven't taken the plunge become a monthly badger to see that. I'm hundreds of other backstage videos. Plus other extras almost up shows Membership Badge all sorts of things. Pack secret codes at a monthly. Draw your country into making more punk us. It's only three pounds a month. You can pay more if you want. Go to go faster. Stripe don't come sash badges. It is worth a year's membership of that in order to see the Michael Palin interview So chuffed that Michael did this as you can see from my reaction throughout And so glad that we managed to get this in a week before. The lockdown kicked in So I think this year was that was lots of good things coming up for me and this year and different things happened and they're still quite good. I'm doing twitch. Tv Don't come. So he twitch dot TV slash arcane herring and you can see me doing more interviews and other world where wonderful stuff but I think if I had missed out on interviewing Michael Palin then I would not be as happy as I am would twenty twenty. I'm not saying is it would have been worse than the corona virus but from me in my been So you'll podcast. It's lots of fun. It's such an incredible to have this man on stage and come on. Let's not waste people's time by took talking any more about it. Go Dot com slash badges. If you want to become a monthly bad jesse that extra scene of life of Brian Twitch Dot TV slash? Okay hearing if you want to continue what? Djing live realistic. We're doing them every Wednesday night with starting to put them out in the Puck as well so you don't have to watch the Montjuich but said they will pop up and a couple of weeks time we'll see the first one of those with Adam Buxton. So let's sit back. Relax and enjoy Rahula with Sir Michael Palin. I can die happy now. Richard Herring. Goodbye Blue Denim and welcome to the square heads. Please welcome man who has just retired from his most lucrative job he's ever done is Richard. Harry thank us. Could it be serious TAME SERIES? Nineteen recommissioned me this series. A few days of Pasta. Few people are home. But if it's been months I isn't. It's been months last. Welcome to rich herrings. Lobbying fences tuppence his. Podcast is if you listen to the Sara Pascoe. Podcast was without decided just to embrace because people. I like to throw coins in the face of my lovers going to cost about that. I don't know I guess was ready for that But I was hanging around on twitch yesterday. Three hundred and twenty thousand people came on the the no it wasn't playing the game and talking about it. They call it. That's going to catch on yet. Yesterday was by last ever Wins International. Men's Day Day all over. Thank God. It's over so yeah. It's kind of weighed ten times last. I'm GONNA do it. We think we got some plans to do something. I'm going to try and make men celebrate international men's Day that that's going to be harder than what we did but don't know I don't do it. I don't do that anymore. I mean I stopped the information. Just that's my head so but anyway thank you very much. If you watch that we might start doing some stuff on twitch with the podcast as well. The various podcasts. So you might be able to watch these live at home. We'll see we'll see and wearing seat tonight like I always do when these nothing trying to impress anyone here. I'M GONNA not take around too much at the start so that will make people happy. I feel like a child who has won the competition and if my family is organized this secrecy dying and I don't know about it. I pretty cool with. It's been worth. It's this so let's without further ado we. He's locking my guest best known as Gary in Robbie the reindeer close in cows. The herd kind again that we came the whole cost back together wondering about one gentleman. We please welcome Michael the morning really hope. I don't give you the corona virus that would be that would be. I didn't know how long corona virus is going to work. Well it's fun now. This is going to go in sort of a balanced early. May where there will be. Many people have died by PSYCHICS CODE. To seem insensitive. This is the cross rail of comedies time. No full how I use. It's so lovely to have you here. Thank you very much. I'm pleased to be here. Intoxicating atmosphere tell the soon as you went on the lot of intoxicated people. How nice very friendly there. They are they are. They don't get too close even non Corona Virus Day. There's one question I wanna ask you start to get this out of the way not that Mike Michael Palin Co pay. No no no. It's not the suit. Will you be my dad? Well yeah is going to be. Tricky Little Bre- writing history. But I wouldn't be put it this way. I wouldn't be embarrassed by having users sheild. Oh that's nice. I wouldn't call you Richard though. Of course on the what would you call Me Dick? Dad's says almost Richard just has a ring to it. Dick Karen doesn't it was great. My Dad's still alive but I still prefer to have as their my mum who she's eighty three and she looks a bit like Bobby Robson expert will but she's honestly she's looks like he's fifty five. I'd say do tell her this. Your Mommy Bobby. Robson should have brought pitcher. Because then you could sweeten the deal. Yeah my my mom. Look more like Chris Wilder. What she did she did not go. Chris Wanders here's the manager of my football team. Someone asked me to be a Wednesday. Oh United so dividing Sheffield United. Yeah you're GonNa ask me sorry. Now I made a terrible mistake because I'm from Sheffield and you're from Yorkshire as well come to London in London forty or something fifty years ago I love Sheffield also anytime. Sheffield team beat. London I didn't mind go back to Sheffield. You cannot support. Both of you are visceral traitor to support one or the other. They hate it because they hate each other more than they hate anybody else. Yeah at the moment great patriot. Shepard wouldn't so falling apart beaten five nil by Brentford which is just on the way to the apple told what else comes at. Brentford used to work in. Brendler works in a company that Manufactured Parts for lighthouses in Bradford's which which which part talk big the lights. I'm guessing I want to. I was dealing with invoices. I didn't see any of the actual merchandise funny. You should say that because my my mother's grandfather invented a revolving light in justic before then ran round with the missing. Then they got a machine to find it being static Nichols then people can see. It's there if it's moving. There's a point when people can't see it's like Russian roulette for boats. Yes it means. If you're on the show on the buddy light shining that's true. I'm shape that way good. This is this is a big deal for Michael. Your I think your my promptitude me. It's a big deal. I'm doing quite well. I'm kind of I think you'll my ultimate comedy hero. Everyone I've I've come here. Who would that be for you? Would you would for you? Who I know you like the goons well. Yes probably would be spike. Yeah but you did interviews by so you interviewing spike on comic roots did yes which I re watched was just so utterly completely legendary. Because when I was at school the goon show represented. Some was was nowhere else in a task. Sort of panoply of the media. That that sort of was silly and absurd. Yeah and the fact that was on the BBC Home Service which is full of people in black tie reading the news and all that and seven years. Another goon show for for half an hour hour's just very very silly inspired stuff. Grownups being silly. I thought this is what I want to be. When I grow up. Or they don't want to grow up so spike an I grew up in Sheffield and no idea or any sort of likely ever going into Showbiz of any now but we became very interested in the writers of shows writing I was. That's the key thing and spike wrote most of the goon show normal mainly means. Yeah so that made him quite a hero and the more I learned about the I got know him was just absolutely wonderful because his difficult man spike And you know the fact that we became. We became friends despite everything in fact at one One show it as an award show and spike was being given an a major award. I think it was some Simpson Lifetime Ward and all that I'm more got and spikes agent normal fans tacit. She was age of all these people. She said spikes in the bitter mood today. Can you sit next to you? Because he bureau. Can You keep him quiet? Try and on came. The shows where you had comedian came on and did so ten minutes. Yeah he didn't need the comedian. Do ten minutes but let me tell this thing to do so. Comedian comes on. Remember who was but now through Spicer's very loudly with a fuxing must be the worst thing you can hear on stage and and yet there was a nice twist because the spikes award came up. He went up onto station meal. Everyone just stood up just amazing of homage to the man and he collected the award and he came. And just back. I'm sat back and his seat. Norma LEAN spy. Why didn't you say anything and it was a chance? Is he said I couldn't think of anything to say you know. It's just lovely really. But he was like that he was sort of what he was manic depressive anywhere but the fact that the most mannix spike was one of the most inspired imaginative inventive writers. I've ever known you ended. I breeze you're interviewing him in the living room that you used to listen to the goon show that must have been the the conceit of that was the show about. Where am I began? My comic comic lives being all all babies laughing already. He's going to be coming. This didn't miss a so. We reconstructed this this room to look like living. We had the same radio right on which I used to listen to the goons and kept it for some wonderful one that Oh valve radios and we sat down and a bit of the goons and Pan Round. There were spycatcher. Sit here and there's not a nice moment. Nevis can be very touching and I said spike. What was it like you know the goons inspired so much? Meant so much to people like myself old generation of school boys and he said no no. It was like one good summer and I thought it was brave poetic fitness because for him it was hell writing it really. Yeah but they were brilliant and that meant a lot to people but one good summer I thought it was just a nice little moment golden moment in life which had otherwise being shit. He felt like he wasn't certainly end of his life. He appreciated in the way that he possibly should have been in. The BBC didn't treat him and I know he was running on different rails to else. Everything was interested in trees. We didn't wildlife is interested in history. I mean just the just no one could really keep up with it. Their nothing that was that was kind of difficult but that was also part of his skin inspiration. Show I think is interesting. 'cause they obviously monty python is a similar thing in the inspiration but it's also that coming together of the right people the right yeah but spike fell titan and he's more sort of depressive moments felt that pipe and totally ripped him off and he's absolutely right because in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine there was a show called. Q. Five which was one of a series of spike programs. It went on from BBC to nobody really saw much of it but wonderful. They did wonderful things I would do. One whole show all the actors who appeared those captured. Were COP underneath performs job Blumenthal take-home pay forty-eight tension. Imagine that in Downton Abbey wonderful. Your Sim home. Pay Four thousand and And another one of the terrible fears and BBC Costume Department was that somebody would go on to happen. Once before with the name of that costumes still asked still so pin to that media and this was head rolled and people who sat and all that so spike getting the entire show everyone came on with Novus labels so they were just. It was not it was I was thinking about pipelines where I sort of discovered you myself and I was a lot more films. Tv shows the TV show. It's been I was able to young Neil young lives in your bag. I miss. They never repeated occasionally come on the. Tv was very excited about. He's five or six years older than me but it was. It was life of Brian. Especially which I wasn't. I've got all the tapes and all the records and I wasn't allowed to go to see life O'Brien but we went anyway. Yeah I don't know how we go away. I mean I see. My parents must have just so we went to wells whether it was a cinema and me and my friends and someone came and picked his up. And we must pretend. I don't know how we got. We got we got away with it allowed. And that's the way to enjoy comedy gap as an illicit but that was the whole point that was having sought slight crack at the structure of society. But obviously that was the big one in terms of daring to religion. But I was thinking about it last night and I just think it's where you almost the heights of your powers. And then he was the one thing in python where just everyone was grain was brilliant in. Woburn it and and really fantastic. Well the songs oversee like the old Song of songs and your I was thinking because I think was my favorite character. You've done and I really loved the nicest wettest is the crucifixion. Just very seat on the left. The best thing in that Eric comes along and the crucifixion. Now I've being told that go free. Start Centurion who is nice? Young man is from Rome. Repairs is being sent this God awful parts of the world whereas haunting the people also revolutionaries and so it's just wonderful he says oh that's mark free and then the great line Eric's now now it's crucifix. Oh He's being made out SMYTH must've been people. Eighty always acronym but it also. There must have been people like that. It'd be but I think I know the films. I well honestly I as a charter as a young man. I watched it so many times. I know we all are but it's almost like you think I've talked to that I'm going to do But but that's your that you're the guy who's pontius pilot knew the same guy who's the ex leper. And obviously I know she was talking but the characterization I mean I think you're the best actor in them but the characterization of each of each one is so distinct and good. It's actually hard to believe that it's the same person playing that got lucky. Lucky Bastard guy in yeah I'm just I I really really enjoy playing characters in are not to me inhabiting inhabiting God. That's what I never thought I'd say. Trendy Pitching Calix Robin. Just being the words and the jokes and laugh. It was actually the person who is saying. It's and what what were they they were about. So you know bank who's been on the wall by the Romans and badly I wrote but that law and they did this. They absolutely ride deserved it. Also people lightning and that was the key to the key to writing. Life of Brian was not sort of. Let's sit down and see how we can not religion or shop people. Let's see how we can take that story and do the trick of transposing people we all know world today back to that world then. I'm sure people weren't all that different. Yeah so you've got cheeky. Cop Emmy Company. Cairo may still the same sort of character. You know Screw speech me. No NO LESS K. Based on on somebody who wasn't sort of you know you explored what they were like and you were that usually for only about three minutes Jimmy that long to develop characters in python but it was a sheer joy to do it and to do so many characters in the films if wheel at the time that you're making something that special I just feel everyone's at the top of the game. The writings brilliant all the as. Yeah I think it was certainly the best thing that we did because it was the most consistent and it was about something and it was. It was comfortable you. We worry mummy George Harrison given us five million quid eight film. Five million dollars actually mean pasta whereas the holy grail. Whichever had the loss of very funny stuff in it was desperately underfunded and pretty grim to do and was shot in Scotland and it was very cold very dirty. I had to play one character in the holy grail called the muddy and to people so pulled the month. A seem rather the villagers all that I incomes Graham and John Tummy rather grand took me anyway The coming through the village so as he came in the mud each was supposed to crawl across the foreground frame and go to one side and start eating mud star demand and so I remember asking is I mean what I'm so what making and the guy said don't worry might as chocolate is chocolate chocolate grading up but all around it. They'll be mud. Have you ever tried to different chocolate and mud? Most of it was and for some reason we did take after take and it didn't it didn't work. I did about ten takes and a lot of this stuff was probably full of or companies. Anyway I did it and it was. It was the others who are messing up not me. I was brilliant. Some reason Graham they were going to walk through and and we did the tenth shake and it seemed just brilliant at it and I was terrific and crawled on look miserable putting on myself into a self abasement and there's a pause and say wow that's great and I heard one of the directors. I can't remember which Terry was the one I hate most probably take Just say no sorry going to do it again. I said why some have we could see Michael. I I've been doing. You know one was even seeming. That's an idea that come up in the through. My you do that mindless working with the guys I was getting it. All right I was saw was I was. I was bleeding. I wasn't even being filmed so we can see Michael and demeaning. Sorry I didn't mean to go have a good relationship now. It is funny like big a fan of the stuff and realizing that thirty five years on I can still remember like massive chunks of stuff that I learned off the records. Really people come up to a lot. Yeah EXPECT EXPANSION. This yeah it's amazing. Yeah People Jake. Yeah I can never remember. I can never. I'm the lines. None of us can always a bit out which it when people come up and they say something and when you get that film send your film. You're the seventy seven. Have much say in hardy grab their constitutional peasants. The pleasure of that is the. The writing of it is so intense and presumably. The learning initially is quite difficult. Listening to on a record. Motion with saw most does seem executive power drives remember. The mass is not some fascel aquatic center to cause some moisture into lobbed a scimitar me. I'll be taking thirty. I've looked with it but it's more starts just with the resentment of the peasants and this of political the first thing is he just says. Hey Oh man. I'm a thirty seven. I'm not old so Megyn you've set up. Yeah he's not GonNa get it from what was so brilliant. I think in both films is Graham. Chapman's I think he was absolutely extraordinary because he was sober in live abroad. It wasn't so sober but he didn't manage to pay these poor character a bit like Brian. Who's terribly put upon? Not just twenty going with my life. And I'm a king who gave you a mandate. I'm just saying hello. Where's the consuls thing? And he gets into these conversations so the wonderful thing about power doesn't really get you anywhere compared to the stroke people you'll find to Lord it over and do you think I sort of theory about python that I think I know John Kerry Jones often wound each other up a little. Is that fair to say? Yeah I mean that was yeah I mean I sort of feel. I wouldn't tell you died. I saw Terry's was this heart of pipe and that he was the yes. It's sort of that you needed in doing that. So Yeah Terry. Very easily wound up particularly by John. John realized this early on and the Senators. The blood in the water. So you know if if Terry got passionate. John would say something rude about the Welsh and he was very good at being rude about the wealth. Not An admirable trait at all but that was it. So Terry would just because Terry Pasha up things and the way to do things and when someone didn't understand what he was trying to say and send him terribly frustrated but only for a minute. We all laugh afterwards and it was part of the dynamic up the whole the whole writing process. All of us came from slightly different angles. Yeah and wrote different characters different ways and that was really really important if it all being a MODULUS AMASS. It wouldn't have worked. Yeah you SORTA chose to work together but it was sort of almost all my strong together. It was just like a John wanted to work with. You is that right. And then you bring in Terry and I mean John like what turning I'd written and an Eric to and what he and Graham Don was. It was very much a sort of experiment. John just didn't join felt the something to be done in comedy. That was different but actually who made it different was she was terry the two carriers. Actually John was terrific. Sketch writer here. Graham broke these wonderful sketches pet shop G. show but it was. It was Terry Jones. Terry Gilliam who have had a concept Antares idea to Jones idea was it should be stream of consciousness. Sketches could end wherever they wanted. We wouldn't have to do the traditional sort of guide Tagline at the end because we had Terry Gilliam who is so brilliant fresh and original and he would just go to animation. It'd be do these wonderful little animated links so there was a kind of story that will is writing in those are fires but no one had written it quite like that before so I think the two towers the ones who made a python really distinctive. But of course John Lewis and everyone drama just absolutely brilliant performer. Because John Looks like the Authority figure. It looks like the bank manager. He looks like you know. The politician is upside. The freemason whatever undermines the map certainly brilliant so fantastic have you seen the film sliding doors not all of it. No Nelson Ages. They pay you for using masturbate. Your script no. Of course it didn't you and your shit about these things but there's a lot of things that make me angry about sliding does this isn't the main one one of the main ones in a John. Hannah manages to Seduce Gwyneth. Paltrow by reciting the Spanish Galician sketch heady of Monty Python Fan out. That will tell you that that is never worked as ten but man certainly not for going. Paltrow isn't going to go out with someone who knows all the way she go. Write your own fucking stuff copying Spanish inquisition. Did we doesn't even do it very well. Michael Annoys me. I would be much. Better Gwyneth paltrow thing just me. Yeah did you should ask. But I wouldn't have gone straight for Spanish position wouldn't have thought this is the person. Now this is some- somebody else. You Know Judy dench possibly. Yeah Dude. Have a great at but Gwen Ethan Allen now a little bit more sort of the guy? Those were the days days. What some Donald Campbell this audience. Maybe there was something a whole new life of Brian back site. So you know you look your extras. Let's say whether we're talking about the problem with you. We've gotten our is that you've done. I would say seven careers very adeptly in your life and being the last one. Sorry very rude. But you re Arabists fantastic of history book with about the ship which I didn't know anything about what I like about you. Interested in history. Eight your car. You're sort of a part of the book in that you. You're going back and saying well these places and revealing what you think about as well which I think is a very interesting way of writing a book but I like the way you home in on that small historical details which is important as well but this you talk about the guy who had been in the battlefield griffin can walk around the ship on his head recreated Trafalgar. That's great cat character. There's a guy who chokes on a piece of these thrown up. His something like that is there are wonderful things in research. Actually what what always attracts me? The little eccentric stories me not not I mean. I like the big idea of the journey the Arabist to Antarctica that. Nobody knew anything about that journey. I did not read history and then whenever told me and they were that you know. Little sailing. Ship goes to Antarctica the first ship to circumnavigate Antarctica to you that there for four years they come back with harvey any illness on board. Nearly all of them still alive. It's truly stunning story. But what interests me is when I started researching just little things like him. There's one with they're just in the ice sheet and that trapped in their terrific storm when the storm and the ice sheet. The ICE floes just sort of rise up and crack it sounds a hideous thing and the wind blows. At one point it blows fish flack onto the side of the ship on the debt. That and they'll things is amazing. Ship that this fish just splattered. They're like Tom and Jerry from that. So they all get the this this this remarkable Go back and get get a pen and paper. Make sketch of this time. The comeback ships cats is eaten ships. Cat Roundabout the North Pole. Still Alive listening and then later to find out. This was somebody. I thought that was an amazing story. Anyway somebody read the book and said did. I know that this was not just an ordinary fish. This was a deep waters Ice Ice codfish and the very very rare very few people ever seen as a French textbook. All about great discoveries of the World Katori our world and it mentions this this this a fish that was blown onto the deck of HMS Arabists. All infringing on a Jacuzzi pilots shop key Lemon so it's in the history books this let you act. Probably the only glimpse of this historic fish which I think is absolutely brilliant. That cats hero in the history books. That's right which should be a hero. Lost THE VOID. Just finally right. That's incredible in fact. They took cats and they go and on the voyage. North to the northwest passage John Franklin commanding his wife. Jane frankly it was a bit of a character and she sent them a monkey. This is what you'll need on the journey to the to the Arctic is a monkey. This Jacko yeah so we on then what did eight. But presumably who has Jacko now gieco bit cold the first monkey to mountains his wonderful things that his his project may be still around somebody down and this is this is silly? We don't worry Senate what what I like about. An audio book is with. You wrote that you'll reading. Your own. Audiobook is always fantastic. Northwards gets an extra dimension all of the history of Nice if you could have that. Is there an author that you would like to have heard read their own books on an audiobook from the past when before this technology existed? Yeah yeah I'd like to. I mean will there's Roman authors CICERO and Seneca. There was brilliant is in Latin called at school. I didn't get on well but now I read translations of them and then wonderfully up-to-date modern and I'd love to hear you know how they how they read of it. How did AVI speak who lull disposal? Diverse I caressed. Oh shut up shut. Should Cicero House. She row. We don't go very often because we live up here way. Have you ever w happy and way science? So don't feel sorry for my very embarrassed too much. Listen to it as as you want. You still don't told as much as Brian. Blessed so tell me about the fact. I didn't know this until we can pages. That might not be true but his team to obstacles that you in the film you've got mail and got cut out entirely. Yes Oh God. I still have the most unlikely thing that. I'm very glad that you saw one of the most difficult and embarrassing moments kid life. All right okay I got. Let's talk about this about it. We're all grown up. I was offered apart. And you've got mail with Tom. Hanks and Meg Ryan Grunt. Yeah and The newer Ephron. Yes gun touching me to do this come about and I went over to New York just for a costume. Fitting on Concord. That's what sort of film it was and I come back leg at concord again to do that acting bit. An I played a sort of character like Thomas. Pinch in you. Know as one of those sort of mysterious characters in the the the literary world in America Grow Brilliant Book character and I go into the shop at one point and Fancy Meg Ryan starts chatting her up and Spanish inquisition. Sketch that would work. I long maybe the cheese shop. She just job. It's not I think so. I'm not sure I really got through interesting to know. Gets you might have life. Yeah anyway so we'll get over there and it's a week a most extraordinary week of Stupa high-powered Sore American style. Filming in we the scenes did were night. We shot the upper west side. Whole streets were closed off and the huge lamps came just for me a meg to do a scene. And then we'd be doing during my words and she'll be doing this just absolutely colossal wonderful and amazing and makes husband that time was cut remember. Who would be but one of the big American stars who had a bit of a problem I think with juice anyway and he ring up rather in the middle not quite in the middle of a scene. But we're just waiting around how you doing manual. Hi honey and speak to Michael. Speak this mad cow. Great but don't quite quite quite something drinkable. Denny's Denny's Michael doing right. That's fine. I just wondering I'm talking to Dennis. Makes THEIR WAY? Do the huge lights all around us so when I heard that I was come Sam. Well new grabbing. You've been tell you attorneys just if I can't just break in in Brown blessed fashion and tell you how I found out. This was about sort of six months later. Starting on a serious called Hemingway adventure and for some reason decided to work with a new crew a new director I underst- director came round for the first meeting with me and the came to my house. And we'd just start the phone rings and I pick up the phone. I'll hi Nora. It's Nora C. Facing let's yeah I know. Oh Yup no no well. I KNOW UNDERSTAND. If it's not didn't work in the story terms like an understand the strategy so at the end to put the phone down there that was no reference. Oh what did she want to want to tell me? I've been cut from. You've got mail and very good friend of mine calls the still to this day calls the film you've got but I don't regret the week spent in New York is absolutely want and I would have emailed that to you. That would have been funny Yes they talked about this a lot. What shall we do honey? Shall we just we just tell them? We gotta tell who's because someone tell him. Do we have a lawyer can no no? I'm going to tell him. Now he probably got away with if you hadn't seen you don't always see things. I've been sat from sometimes right sometimes. Think I probably wouldn't of watched it. They didn't need to tell me they didn't yes. Yeah Finish Story. I've never maybe I've seen the film but great good Michael. That's why I'm surprised you. Oh No but you bring it up because finishing points a light to know why didn't work. Yeah I would like to see identity. My performance was that bad but it was fairly ordinary. I wasn't sort of bitching charrette that well in the deleted scenes on the DVD. He's seen laughter straight for the jugular. A was it not even in the deleted scenes for the Australian and Walson wasn't and you're absolutely right. I feel like you know when Stalin really took against just were written out of history and never even mentioned their name the Michael Palin Michael who did get your bits in some films though. So it's all right. You were entitled. Time time time in Brazil that was untested Brazil is. They must be I mean. Obviously it's the middle part of your daughter who might Dr is time is not. There isn't lots of time. But you know you have this this period going out to Hollywood and appearing. We were in here not much not much really. I mean the Hollywood thing was was lifted on this also the good things that work well the more light like physical wander in Brazil. We're all shot here. And that was a major difference. Because they've shot with British crew here. That sounds Turbie. British cruise Asian British food and voting keep Britain breathe. What I can't remember I didn't want to talk about that. But but it. If it was a difference was kind of all the Python Films. We were very often with the same crew. Terry Gilliam were with the same crew and we had some wonderful wonderful people excellent craftsman not just shooting it but also makeup costume Nolan. So that was the difference. I never really did Hollywood. I sort of a film star. I suppose is what I was I was. I was too new. Fiscal wonder as in Brazil. Amazing Time Ban System Atonement. Says is a film about time travel that I approve. Vary you wrote as well with Terry. Gilliam the initial idea so you should talk to him. But that's not. That was terrific. I mean I'm very at a run of films after life of Brian the meaning of life the machinery which my a stab at Rightey and Brazil and private function which I love them and Benneteau not that was a joy to do and getting the great team great actors. They're working with Maggie Maggie Smith for the second time something. I'm a lucky man. Say you went to do things like Saturday night. Live hosted four-time. Yeah I love the story about you taking your mum. Your mum was in as well. Yes yeah they for my mum's eightieth birthday nine hundred eighty eight. That's nice no four. Eighty four I I full. I decided I would take her to New York and I'd been asked to do not live again and it'll be good up. I'll take her. My sister will go over there and We flew with my mom concord to New York and then she never been on a on a plane once before but this was basically to thirty s and she'd been on the plane and so we get to New York and it's just incredible. I said how about that name. I'm Jay what do we do now? What you mean amazing three hours eight minutes. Some pick US UP IN TYPICAL MOTHER STUFF. I realized that she all planes traveled to New York and three thousand eight minutes. This is just what has happened since she lost. Went on the on the propeller light to the two K. Wherever and so we took it up any wherever we had. The meeting Michael's producer. Everybody and we're talking about my monologue. The Mama what could you do? I said I forgot my mother's here with me. And My mother into the Munlo he said. That's a brilliant idea. She'd be the oldest host ever to come on Sunday not not so the age of eighteen. I wrote her and she came on this show again in front goes out to about fifty million Americans absolutely live And she just thought it was very nice. What do I do I guess? Yeah so when I did the opening monologue. I'd come on and talk about great about being in America. Just say adjust my coat and say we decided to wear that. Did you deal very touchy really? And she was so good at doing. The opening bid that they gave us very other moments joined the show to introduce wild heavy metal groups. Names the The Pixel whatever it was you know she she did. She's just fantastic. And I realized that she's not really on that planet. All meant nothing to her own. You just that chair like I am now. Forgetting was on the most popular company shares in the world live data. Yeah you you obviously were hanging out with the Saturday night. Live cast in that. That sort of period seventies eighties. I guess was that. Hang on. Hang out you don't see John Belushi and Aykroyd Aykroyd. They had a big party animals. Least to say those those guys. Yes yeah. They were had their own kind of world dinner where they came from other. Dan ackroyd was very going sensible difference rioting and lot blues us a bit crazy. They're Turbie Nice. They love Pie. And all that. I'm Bill Murray was the one I I got snow. Best of all bills. Just great I mean anybody. But it's very bright shop and all that we go out and eat. What they did was the right is really with the wild ones. The the writers belived on Coke. They wouldn't pie nine to five. Usually we may after that. These guys wouldn't stop writing till nine in the evening and then it'd be nine to five in the morning and they couldn't get anything dumbs a little bit so I was just drinking a maybe a budweiser equally horrible but not not a all damaging to the brain getting hinds. Hey was crazy idea and all that and sometimes it works sometimes but there was sort of it was a hit and miss show but a terrific experience to do because the great mess of the show that was rehearsed during the week. Right up to the last minute you do. We do have dress rehearsal and then there was a now before you on at ten thirty live. Everything was live and things would be changed longer. Come round seven. Cut that sketch to cut this sketch. We're going to put you in that sketch going to this up here and this was just divorce. It really walls the excitement. Absolute excitement of doing live live television. And we hang hanging around a lot of musicians of you mentioned the George Harrison friends with Keith Moon. Remember was came to see you. When you're writing life of Brian is that right. Is that in the musicians. Who is had a very well with musicians. I love them and respect them and I think just just so or what. Good musicians and bands can do but they were. There was always connection with python. I didn't know they like Python. They SORTA sauces this sort of verbal equivalent of the music. They made and not life of site. Holy grail probably not to be made if we didn't have various Popular should put money in Genesis. Coming by who who the others were but there were three or four of the big groups at that time or put money into pie because they wanted to see it in a lot and of course George who say. Put money into life of Brian. After ear mind the beginning company had backed out because the head to head to be my read. The script said you know we can't recall. Do this voting disgusting immoral and George came up five. Five million dollars upset. Why you know flock choice so I just wanted to see it. Just great wonderful and joy produced a the lumberjack song we did version. Lumbered George very keen on the lumberjacks. In fact one of his. Aliases when you went around. The world was Jack Lumber so to impress hotel we did the numbers that songs up all night doing it and I think peach at about forty nine on the top fifty forty nine and Foley. Could we talk a little bit about a Terry Jones? Just I just think it's the friendship you had with. Terry is just extraordinary. Lifelong friendship with this with dairy which is really exemplified by the last few years of his life where you were just going to see him every week. Yeah SORTA is one of the most beautiful human love stories time. It's just so it's so you would read when you talk about it on your website and preserving your diarrhea about yeah I mean it. There are many relationships like that. I'm sure it's just because I suppose we were in the public spotlight and part of pipe and all that but I mean Terry was somebody. I just read my. I saw him at Oxford and he had this sort of this dark. Tense of say Welsh. Terry's great problem was he wasn't born in Wales in Colwyn Bay. He moved say the age of about two and a half to insurance. And if you're you WANNA rub passionate Welshman each doesn't look good on you see but the Terry which I loved the Nevis just interested in things. He was good at things and he had an energy. But you also had a way had a wonderful way of of wonderful friend. He relished companionship. And just being with somebody hanging out. Guess terribly important me do a lot of work together. We wrote a lot and performed a lot together but what I remember. Most of them are just hanging out. Terry. You have a drink and things like that. He loved drink. Loved this food brewery at one time. Because he was felt was something he could do. Better than anybody else but not in. Not In an unpleasant sort of Arrogant way in any shape or form is quite the opposite. He was just. He said we try this. Try that well. Let's do this. Let's do that and I was a little bit more relaxed and lazy and Terry. Push me into doing things. I wouldn't have done before so it was a very nice. It was nice relationship and we just got on ever say well. It's difficult if you work I've been in writing. Partnerships have been comedian on very difficult to to keep the friendship that usually will at least start the thing off. It's very difficult to keep it burning that long so it's sort of incredible that it was difficult one time because ripken's together. Bbc Didn't want they want me to do a show of my own unless to work with Terry. So they said fine in the end they said well. I think we just have one pipe. Them is the style rather than to otherwise. Looks like the end of Pie or something like that right so in. The End Terry didn't appear in Lot the repeal and that was a very difficult time. I think it was the right decision in the end but that was that was terry being credibly generous calm most. I'm devious person I've ever met. He was so wonderfully sort of open. The didn't do strategy. Didn't do sort of coming in. Yeah which is why his jump. He was such target for jobs devious cunning. It was a lovely lovely quality cherry. Yeah he wrote a book about the Knight's Tale which I studied for a level which was icon classic against the tree views of chaucer. So clearly correct. Yeah did use. I've met him shortly after the bookshop. Instead our did I used your by. We didn't fail as a result and I didn't say that but he was incredibly clever historian and he was tavern also. He did his research and he would go to the line bill round the world search on the nights down and all that and so amongst choice of scholars. He was both admired figure by some and feared others. Because you know they would say well. He's not really even as he's gotten these views totally different way of on. We've all done it. And he was in. He just sort of stirred things up. Brilliantly choices night was a totally different. Take on the this. I mean Terry saw choices chaucer's writing ironically on this fair wonderful night and all. That wasn't really that the tall chaucer Dima rotten cherry sore. Everybody is so intial python to carry. He'd like to now and Joseph by cat because you could send up these these very rich people and then he found enough in the text to make a case of it on the end. It was a lot of scholars said this breakthrough research is quite hard to go from comedy into that. Academic World Universities and studies. Society is that people don't like you see Comedians of sort of revolution. It's awesome. Yeah whether you a little bit you written novels yourself and I think maybe suffered from snobbish just as well a great and I think it's very hard for like you know p plays in places well people are saying. Always a comedian. Brian play and then there's a judgment immediately. Wouldn't this lab salute little bit? Stick to one thing you know we do plays we do poems or whatever mean not saying that rather lots of poets lightning like me but but there are there. Certainly I think the academic the critical world academia which is very tight world which is bay hanging on to that that they're the guardians of the reputation of this particular strand of the arts. Which is crazy should be able to say anything in any way should be able to fail fail better back it said or whatever but the should never really be the standard of this is this is what is brilliant. And you're not come across. Come across have to be on this and I sort agree. Agree course everything. I do feel huge doubts about will. This work will not work but there is something that does work because we know what it is. That seems to insufferably arrogant and intolerable. I'm sorry thirty critics and you terrific tasty so good rap stuffing is quite a bit of your North Korea. Travel log as well done. You've been everywhere as we talked about as off. Don's where you have been but the North Korea was pretty astonishing but I saw the just actually complete by chance. The other day flicked over Neuron. And you were talking to the guy on the board of the guy with the big how the military yes. Yes you talking about. Start writing it down so much did again you? You're trying to talk to that guy a asking about who won the war and lost the war in an North Korean allowed to question those things and increasingly and anywhere else. You question leaders coming. Trump is really very much like it could be it. Could be leading. North Korean got on so well Kim Jones despite colleagues awful things mentally retarded Todd Kim Jong UN called trump so something right Trump called little rocket man all that and they traded insults but then it came from the same place. They just this. This is how they how they behave in power there. You know you can call people these ridiculous saginaw with each other and you hope people recognize that. We're all the same if you travel which you obviously have met people you get into you just sort of. You'd you turn us off this North Korea South Korea problem by just saying. Why don't we will be nice to each other? No fight each other parts pretty. He's sort of agreed he didn't he sort of like well. You think if you were in charge of you decided to become a politician comedian. We think my vote. If you stood for prime minister people would vote for you and then you could just say we're going to be nice to just be nice three lying. You could win on being nice to reach. I just got to be a bit more than that. I try the very very nice party. Let's the North Sea nice. But you see I be nice to people in Europe that would be an Turbie. I'm populous country Well Albanians who we know how lucky we not how being and just so I think I'd probably fund problem there but what was the question wouldn't be good politics. I think it was very simple. And actually the guy who are very suspicious of you and then you said this thing has gone and he just said I would like to say a word whereas pieces. Well it's really what everyone wants. I know it's not that you know it's not that simple. It sort of. It's better than just people saying we're going to blow each other up. Yeah that was one of the surprising things about North Korea to say I have a sneaking apparition for North Korea. Is this small country. Okay you know they may have terrible concentration camps But you don't know nobody action knows and I wouldn't say there's any country in the world is entirely without some sort of unpleasant punishment areas. Whatever that I'm not be. May We see all that. And I'm quite sure we missed some but they believe in they believe in themselves. Well they can do that actually the they can enjoy themselves. They work That the intelligent quite cleverly done lot but this is a tiny little mountainous country cutoff anywhere which is managed to sort of survive after century of Japanese occupation and ten years of few sort of three or four years of American bombing. The actually of survived reasonably intact. There are not people guns on the streets. It's not a place has no humor. It's not a place that's utterly grim and grooming which I thought it might be when I went there so I'm still trying to work out of my mind what's going on but you always travel documents always about meeting the people. It's not a yes. You're interested about the people that come down the way. The country works is a lovely bitten in the grade. One way you you did talk to the woman and trying to explain what? Your job is in your. Show her the sketch monty python and I think she genuinely thinks that is your job not knowing that your job now because he asked you if the fish were alive. I didn't expect not because I we were stuck in this airport and so young is very nice but I was a bit worried. I'd been rather heavy handed some of the interviews asking too much about great leaders which you're not supposed to talk about. We just run out of things. Talk about and so yes. Yes what else. The walls and. The drug had was rather surprising. Brought along the fish. Nappy right and So funny watching watching it. She says this is what you do. A very good question used to long time ago as you rightly say this lovely thing amount but the fish was you dead falling in the water a python and you are a big. Dari right so you still presume. Still writing you diaries. I'm going to be in going to be in the diary tonight. Well is being ahead of a day being. I've being panic buying him out so so there's obviously going to be something about the toilet roll the it's a tricky time for all of us. Yeah I'm sure if I've got time tomorrow morning and I'm not promising the squeeze something about the end of the day won't be out for quite some time. You're still you're still coming up to twenty ten in the next volume comes to be out for long long like I might die before your real problem. I I'd been keeping the blog every day since November the twenty fifth two thousand two. So I've I've done a diary every day that is a public which is slightly different. Obviously yes that's my mind goes out on the night. So I understand that impetus to to record everything. But he's an amazing thing to in the book she put out on the whole thing. You had it because I writes an awful lot. I mean it's just recording what you did the day before and I stopped at sixty nine because my one year old son and I was a smoker at the time and I couldn't get on my knee and want to give me a hug and get us out of the way anal and and. He picked up the but out of Australia teaching. That and I thought cigarette smoking and and father would work and I just gave up really over. A couple of days virtually gave up smoking Kotecki. That and the thought of my will is strong enough to do that. What else can I do? Keeping a diary is on the blessings of always wanted to do and so I started and it was very hesitant the first year which is now really irritating all about the birth of Python. Yes but most of these about my son walking saying his first word not back John. Cleese doing the Petrov's but that's all on film anyways as one thing but I'm glad I kept at it I think thinking about Dr is is that you think what you're writing trivial. Are they for breakfast? But you never know thirty as time when eggs of sort of poisonous all. They hit them for br whole for breakfast. Just lots of little details in life. Become far more interesting to distance you. Did I really do that? And we like time right about driving through. London stopped here pot. The car going to Harris Harris didn't go to herons talk to be on the phone. You can actually just park your car absolutely anywhere in London. Just see naturally and now sort of supposed to have to plan a journey in London several days involved bits credits gonNA TAKE OUT BANK LOANS INTO POCKET. And then you know you're in traffic for four hours sitting down our street. It is boring Scott Sale. Just that Meg Ryan. That's about traffic live. What are they doing in the talk of cow? Make I don't know I don't know. There's a policy now to environmental areas. Oh you mean Idaho no no. It's just I was just wondering you mentioned the Dennis. I want to mention the client. Who's still talking to still talking to my wife about traffic control in London. Okay what are you wearing? You're the rates of the clangers by children. My son watches. That does that he was quitting. Dance love is and also I love that kind of vaulting of the centuries but they'll be people in the twenty second century. Who will remember you re doing the clangers that might be that might be the that might be the thing but definitely not might be the action you've got cut. The many. The clangers are really loved doing that. Such a partly because such a beautifully produced series the way they create these little creatures and they were the quite a narcotic and have their little world and seems to be. It's a lot of music in. It was a lot of inventiveness a lot of color and base quite nice to each other. It's about the sense of community. These people may do rather odd things but they will live together and and and sort of together on this planet. Nice I'm of the answer. We'll just going to live on a moon with the Dragon. Yes too many obviously is only about eight. Klang eighty billion whatever. We've got too many completely run out of time Oneida. You're doing a doctor. Who thing is what I want to mention the Torchwood self your blight you play an evil self. How tape yes now? That's interesting. Yeah his nose talk about which is why you're so good. Do suddenly realize I do this man? This man can ride quotes. No no that you put funding. The torchwood thing was extraordinarily quite out to the blue brilliant bit of writing and I could be quite menacing and I love that spit like playing the character. Brazil was pretty nasty and get good nasty. That's the thing I mean. Everyone says you're nice. Yeah that's definitely something inside there. Another half of it Boston. Well I we're GONNA have to wrap up but I would like to thank you for everything you've done and you've been an enormous influence on micro. I'm doing with that. I sort of followed review. Watch again if you as I am I gonNA. There's still Jessica Weaver said company. Oh that's the terrace. Where we stay data unsuccessful Michael Palin. I'm like Michael Palin. They went out. I'm the but no. It's it's obviously the work I've been. Obviously you feel that about the goons. But the work all the pipelines did is incredible. It was one does the same as they just wanted. I was very reticent. Am I going to see the two GIG and I went to the final night? The made a very last minute decision. I'm very delighted I saw it was incredible. And you. You look like you're about fifty three about ninety four stroke but that was extraordinary shows as and I didn't think they were going to work out. I thought we take health risk and could be seen as being amazingly greedy. Because we're only doing it for the money but actually turned out to be something much better for real celebration was different because people forgot their lines and the audience loved it because they would come in and they knew all the sketches and let sort of thing and John Managed to get up on stage and it was pretty amazing unaided. Yeah the nurses an equipment all stay. Just talk the head. Because he the tubes he goes on does a sketch and then go straight up. It wasn't wonderful swansong pipe and guys for that show and I'm sure I'm sure there's a lot coming up in the next twenty to thirty years for you. We'll see much more stuff. Yeah if you're GONNA die immediately because this makes this a very valuable Picasso Glazed. We'll be back. You haven't been listening to us with knee. Richard Herring you might get some Michael Palin walk. How did we get here? Thank you to pass for playing this music. I'm Matt would also very much like thank square feet. I hope they will get through this lockdown. Okay with red disappointed to after cancer so many shows exposed. If you got tickets for those shows hopefully they will rearrange some point in the future. Thank you want an old? The camera crew. Who again also missing out on getting paid and do some work because of his terrible situation. I I mean deathly my producer Ben Walker. I'm extremely dense to my zach executive producer Steph Swanson. We called STAT DOT COM. That's this is a fuzzed. Gophers STRIPED DOT COM and skype potato production head to go faster. Stripe DOT COM slash budgets. Become a monthly by Jesse that extra Michael Palin video and lots lots more honestly is three pounds a month of anyone's Money Cup of coffee and you'll be helping to make more cards in the future or subscribe on Twitter Twitch Dot TV Sasaki herring your member of Amazon Prime. You can do that for free and give us five pounds every month. Thanks very much for listening and watching. Now go fuck yourselves.

Brian Twitch Michael Answering Terry Sir Michael Palin BBC Graham Don New York Terry Gilliam Richard Herring Terry Jones George Harrison John Sara Pascoe Sheffield Eric North Korea Adam Buxton Turbie America
Freezer Aisle Finds for Baby-Led Weaning

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

14:23 min | 3 months ago

Freezer Aisle Finds for Baby-Led Weaning

"So yes this idea of when you're at the grocery store skipped the middle aisles. Only shop the perimeter. There's some validity there because yeah the ultra processed foods are in the middle but the freezer aisle which is also in the middle of grocery store has a ton of great low sodium options for babies to. Hey there i'm katie. Ferraro registered dietitian college nutritional professor and mama. Seven specializing in baby led weaning. Here on the baby led weaning. Made easy podcast. I help us trip belt all of the noise and nonsense about feeding leaving you with the competence and knowledge. You need to give your baby a safe. Start to solid. Foods using baby led weaning. Hey guys welcome back today. We're talking about frozen foods for baby led weaning and i don't mean the types of foods that you cook and put in the freezer and us again in the future like this is where you're at the grocery store in the frozen food aisle and you're curious. What kind of foods can you choose to feed your baby now. I don't want to discount making food and friesian because that's an awesome technique as well just did a podcast number eighty six. It was with the two time food network chopped champ. Chef tatyana rosanna. She here talking. All about baby led weaning meal. Prep go back to episode eighty six. If that's what you're looking for this episode we're talking about what foods you can feed your baby that you pick up in the frozen food aisle so i like to start. Each of these mini baby led weaning trading episodes with a baby led weaning tip of the day and when it comes to frozen foods my tip. Is you guys can learn to be a sodium sleuth. That's because the frozen food. Aisle is packed with a lot of good but also many more not so great food choices for babies and the good ones are not so good because a lot of frozen foods tend to be convenience foods or processed foods that are full of salt and therefore not appropriate for babies to eat. So just keep an eye on the sodium levels. Because there's lots of great finds in the frozen food you just have to look at the labels and just as an aside when it comes to sodium. My general rule of thumb for baby led weaning. Is that. I look for foods that have less than a hundred milligrams of sodium per serving. If i'm going to offer to my baby so for more information about limiting sodium for your baby go checkout episode number thirty three. It's all about salt. It's called salt three easy ways to minimize sodium for your baby for more information about limiting sodium for your baby. Go check out a previous episode. That i did with episode thirty three. It's all about salt three easy ways to minimize sodium for your baby. If you're like wait a minute why she talking so much about salt. If you listened to the podcast regularly ugo. Yeah she's always talking about salt and you might have ruled out the frozen foods. I also this episode is gonna make you fall back in love with frozen foods for baby led weaning but hang tight. Because i'm going to be sharing actual five favorite freezer. I'll fines in this episode. So let's dive in and learn a little bit about freezer. Aisle fines for baby led weaning so quick story before i get started whenever i talk about frozen foods someone inevitably will say. I've heard the grocery store you're supposed to skip the middle aisles and shop the perimeter. Now this is in some ways a good recommendation. This is generally attributed to michael palin in his book food rules and eaters manual michael palin well known food journalist and author. He wrote stay out of the middle of the supermarket shop the perimeter of the store. Now there are lots of great foods throughout the store. And i agree with michael paulin like most of the process. Package junk is living in the middle aisles. But i kind of just take a little bit with that because the canned food i ll is a great opportunity for babies. In episode seventy five went all through canned foods that can work for baby led weaning and also there's foods like lentils dried peas and beans and the whole freezer iowa. There are some good fine. So when i was after graduate school i taught nutrition at uc. Berkeley i taught fulltime energetics program and i was like the youngest faculty member so i got the crappiest teaching assignments and then i also got the crappiest classroom but i always would volunteer to teach summer because everyone else didn't want to and i want to make extra money and i remember getting stuck with my nutrition class in at berkeley normally were in the nutrition classes in the nutrition building in the school public health building but this one particular summer class for whatever reason i got stuck in the journalism building ever remember. It was the same summers that aaron rodgers was in my class. That was my claim to fame. Is new teachers. Aaron rodgers in my class and everyone always asked what his grade was. And i think it would be a violation of some sort. If i told you. I don't remember what it was regardless. I didn't even know who. Aaron rodgers was at the time. Michael palin was much more on my radar as far as like celebrities go and he was teaching in the journalism school at uc berkeley. At that time. And i remember. He came into my class one day and just sat in the back row in top. Like watch me teach nutrition and is a smaller class because it was summer but we were talking about processed and packaged food. So i saw him. Of course i do. He was very striking. Presence like looms very large in the world of journalism at uc berkeley. I remember just bringing up the issue of the conundrum of the shopping the perimeter like someone very famous one said referencing him and then talking about you know what potentially helpful foods you could find in the middle kind of quizzing. My students and a few of them were foods that you could find in the middle so he kind of snickering and laughing. He said no no. You're right there are some good foods you can find in the middle of the supermarket. He just kind of stopped in to see like what were they teach in about in the summer in his building. Very nerve wracking as a professor of michael walk on your class but was kinda cool that we could have him. Talk a little bit about that because i know shop. You the printers. A good idea but there are good foods. that'll aisles. And even michael palin would tell you that but they're not all created equal so let's look at the frozen foods that do work for baby led weaning all right so let's get right down to it. I don't need to tell you about all the foods that don't work in the frozen food aisle. Let's focus on all the foods that babies can eat right of course frozen dinners and frozen pizzas and food with lots of salt and sugar. Babies should not have a lotta those foods in the frozen food aisle. I'm gonna go through five of my favorite foods for baby led weaning. This is not an exhaustive list. Every time i do. I start with a list of like thirty things and then i'm like that will be too long narrow down to five. Here's five of my favorite foods. I love cauliflower rice. I love regular call from. There's a million different as you may call safe for babies to eat. I don't offer call prices like a lower calorie low carb option like the reason. Why a lot of adults he cauliflower rice. I think it's a really cool way to impart a different flavor in different foods and it's a convenience food normally would not. I'm pretty frugal. I would not spend money on many produce convenience foods. Like no thank you. I can cut up watermelon by myself. I don't need you to quintupled the price and do it for me. But coffers rice is one that is a pain in the neck to make and you can find it in the frozen food aisle. How do you use it for baby led weaning. I like to call for race when i make fritters. It's already all chopped up. Its rice like a very very fine dice consistency or size. I guess more so than consistency. So you can use it in if you're baking like zucchini muffins. I'll sometimes add. Call rice in there. I'll add it to fritters or patties as a vegetable. If i'm five just like some leftover grains like oh shoot. I don't wanna just make grains and eggs in my put the cauliflower rice in it. I'm you can use it as pizza crust. I'd also like regular pizza crust especially for babies but sometimes the commercials pizza crusts. Do you have a lot of sodium in them. So there's really cool recipes using call race for that also use it and mash it up of. I'm doing like baked potatoes. Just add different flavor so again if you're cruising through you have cauliflower rice any recipe you would make adult with cauliflower rice. You can just adopt that for babies. Just making sure doesn't have added sodium or any sugar. Second up. I remember being super surprised when i found out that there are some brands of hash brown potatoes that are in the freezer aisle. That don't have sodium now. Careful 'cause like there's just as many that have tons of sodium. So my general rule of thumb as i mentioned is less than one hundred milligrams of sodium per serving of food that i'm going to serve my baby. Now you feed your baby. Don't come out of the package so it was kind of a moot point but if you're choosing packaged food look for less than one hundred milligrams and also babies don't eat the same portion size that adults do so they're going to be eating significantly in many cases less than that but back to the hash brown potatoes peeling and shredding potatoes and then like pushing all the water out of them. It's takes so much time to me. It's like never work that. I do not like hash browns enough to do all that however i do like that. There are some brands of already shredded. Hash brown potatoes. That don't have salt in them. And the thing that. I use these primarily to make like a crust to line either quiche. Or if you do like muffin. Tins i'll make like the hash brown potatoes mixed with egg and push it down as the crust for making like zucchini. Ed cups for use it for a lot of breakfast foods. There's a million other ways to use hash brown potatoes. Not personally a huge fan of them. But i love that as a convenience food there an option for you if as a safer way to feed babies now you can of course feature babies regular potatoes if you want to. I do just point out that a lotta times especially if you're doing baked potato bake russet potato. It can be very mealy very dry and any dry bread product. Any dry food for that matter can potentially choking hazard so you want to add a lot of butter or a lot of fat lot of liquid a sauces to make any potentially dry potato product. A little bit more moist for your baby to eat so number one. Call our rights number two hash brown potatoes number three. It's kind of a weird. One ezekiel bread. Now i mentioned the brand usually try not to mention branded foods because of course everyone's grocery store looks different. But ezekiel is one of the few national brands in the us. That has a low sodium option now. Sodium breads are hard to come by breads by themselves. Don't love because they tend to be more on the dry side and dry bread products like albro products as just mentioned. Can you token hazar. But if you're gonna be doing better when you're ready to read you might be looking for a low sodium option. First of all you might have never looked at the sodium in the bread aisle. And you're like oh my gosh. Why does every single piece of bread need of two hundred fifty or three hundred milligrams of sodium will is obviously is a preservative. So that's why you're breads can stay on the shelf If you've ever traveled other parts of the world. Do not use as many of or the same preservatives as the united states and your bread will go moldy in a day or two whereas here. It can stay a lot longer. Some of that has to do with higher levels of sodium but sodium is also a leavening agent meaning that it makes bread rise and it also provides moisture so all those things are important for. Bread ezekiel brand. Is one of the national brands. That has a low sodium option. You don't always find the bread in the braille though so for example like if you go to a smaller grocery store they probably have ezekiel bread. But if it's not fresh in the bakery section you can actually find it in the freezer aisle so again check out. That brand ezekiel bread for lower sodium. Bread options you'll taste it and be like this is gross because it's low sodium bread. Do keep in mind. it gets pretty dry. Though because it's not retaining that moisture with assault so astra butter again. Add extra sauce. Do what you need to do. But the low sodium. Bread ezekiel bread. You can find it in your freezer number four frozen fruit. I know you can buy your baby fresh fruit. But i know i live in southern california where we have a good variety of affordable produce available pretty much around not everybody has that option so if there are fruits that you wanna try with your baby and they're out of season or they're too expensive were you can't find them frozen. Fruit is a great option. Now having said that there are a lot of not so great options with regards to frozen fruits. There's a lot of brands that make like smoothie blends so ridiculous they take regular fruit and then they add sugar to it and then put it in a bag and put it in the freezer and people like oh. I love that brand for my smoothies. And like of course you do because it has like a cup of added sugar on it so just make sure that on the label added sugars. the lines zero grams. We want zero grams of added sugar. The american academy of pediatrics reminds us that we should have no added sugars in any foods or drinks for our children up until age two. And even after that you want to minimize it so you can find like mango chunks. Do i don't care what you say how much you love cooking. Nobody really likes peeling and cutting mangoes into pieces. Like that is one of the few convenience foods that i will buy. I personally i a lot of produce at costco. You can always get the mango already cut chop but it seems to be really really hard so if i do the frozen mango chunks provided you're getting the ones that don't have the added sugar when you defrost them. They're actually a lot softer which is therefore safer for babies to eat now. You can do frozen strawberries. They also tend to be beneficial because a lot of the frozen fruits. They're picked at peak ripeness. Meaning that from a taste standpoint. It might be a better experience for you and your baby to be eating those so they may taste better. They may be more affordable if a fruit is frozen and then you're trying to get it fresh out season wouldn't even taste as good plus. It'd be pretty expensive but you can use those fruits when you defrost them just provided that they're nice and soft conservative baby that way you could put them in smoothies if you want to melt them into a compote without any added sugar. There's lots of ways you can use frozen fruit. Don't discount them. Just be aware that there are some frozen food products that have added sugar. Don't choose those ones number five of my favorite foods from the frozen food. Aisle art at amami. Now this is not for earlier. Eaters at a mommy are the little green japanese soybeans. You can buy them either in the pod or the pot. I always get them out of the pod to serve. The baby cooked them in boiling water for a little bit of time. It's a great way to serve your baby soifer food. It's not the way i prefer to do. Soifer i the problem with eta. Mommy is very small right. They'll like little tiny lima beans. So when your baby is just starting solid foods at six or seven months of agent doesn't have their pincer grasp they can't even pick up the eta. Mommy so it's not my favorite way to start with soy but once your baby gets that pincer grasp usually usually by the time they turn nine months then at amami is a good option. If you want more information on how to give your baby a safe start to soy you can go checkout podcast episode number thirty seven. It's called soy how to introduce your baby to this potentially allergenic food and inside of it. I explained why prefer tofu as a way to start soy babies over at amami but once you get jamming on a bunch of new foods definitely go check out at amami as a good option. Some of them do have added salt but most brands from the freezer aisle at a mommy would not have added salt. So you're making a shopping list to recap koffler rice hash brown. Potatoes ezekiel bread fruit. And etta mommy. of course. there's lots of other options in the frozen foods. I'll i love to hear which ones you guys like if you're on instagram. I'm there to at baby led. Weaning team hit me up in the comments. And let me know which frozen foods your buying and trying for your baby. Thank you guys so much for listening to this episode all about some freezer aisle fines for baby led weenie.

michael palin uc berkeley Aaron rodgers tatyana rosanna michael paulin Ferraro Ed cups katie uc Berkeley berkeley iowa browns michael ezekiel us astra
RHLSTP 284 - Richard Osman

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

1:12:14 hr | 10 months ago

RHLSTP 284 - Richard Osman

"Hello and welcome to A. Another upset of Sta This Week the Madras Richard Osmond dubbed, Forget. You can become monthly budget go. I struck dot costs. com slash badges. Get all kinds of extras and code, including lots of cool stuff with him putting up a including the full frame of me one vs me to Snooka the recipe for that very special thing I made for James Acosta the other week. THE NEXT DOOR TO YOU! James means feeling myself. The director's commentary of Brian Blessed lots of stuff. Go I. Strike Dot Com Slash Patches, let the dogs showed up the trying to do with serious Internet near the dogs are not gonNA. Let you have the box. Threes at the docks all right. Okay you out of the box refill. Shut you out. Come on become. Alone it's a early from. Lee and early in tearing Saturday night or That's all right. Allie and herrings cyst of. Go through the second neck. That's right. Allie and herrings twitch. Hon Yes, that's right the twitter from our. There's a new podcast. Me Starring. Alley terrifying dench done, either ons was used and nasty. They should hearings. Tiny little Dina's is not tiny. Tiny! Little I was not a grown man. Yes, I know I'm saying tiny Tina's I. Don't think that's an appropriate thing for the intro to hostile well. You can't stop anything the truth Richard I will tell the truth. Yes, look I'm for some reason of ended up doing twitch stream because I'm really not fly at with my hundred and twenty eight year old venture Lucas dummy who was once used in a mild sexual assault against Eh Silos. The Richard I know, and it's nothing. It's not your fault. That's why we can. Still what together you're. You're as much victim. Here's me I know. It's called alleyen herrings. I'm still the second one in the billing twitter fund You can watch it live every Thursday eight o'clock on twitch dot, TV slash talk having as you can watch rehearsed. PAS lives on Wednesdays. At eight PM and sneaker on Monday and Tuesday stoneking every now and again, and we're trying to put some other stuff together as well. And it's also a cost. Ali. Richard Herring. alleyen herrings twitch a fun. If you can look that up on itunes and subscribe that we love. We loved again hundred twenty eight-year-old. VENTRILOQUIST's dummy to the top of the I tunes, charts, or even just in the charts hard to get in as as Donald showed up hooking cotton tolin coordinate. Yeah unveiled in Fucker. She died reason itchy. Throat. They both did very well in the charts, but he's one hundred twenty eight, so he'd be I apologize defensively will infertile Allie said I'm not in control of what he says. You can't say anything. Did. You can say whatever you want, and you seem to say whatever you want well, and it's not my. If he says stuff, it's him. Say not well. You say that Richard the. Digital. It isn't my voice, your fault for her. The auden I suppose it is. Anyway, not do a whole bloody episode of this thing. You can watch more of this if you want to. If listening audio is an audio podcast, which I think is the best way to enjoy Ventura running agreed then you can't see your now. Would you can't anyway because you talking? Yes, I know. I shaved today which. That takes offer. Some of the cover had exactly you quality cafo. All Right, please will enjoy go. Is Twitch DOT TV shark herring. Those are the places to go you can of course subscribe to twitch. TV especially if with Amazon prime for free so you do for them. Brian Checkout, DVD on Youtube, pairing, nine, sixty seven. Let's let's go. We've done enough. Thanks very much for watching this I. Hope you enjoy. All listening I hope you enjoy roster with the wonderful Richard Osman. Welcome to my attic, please. Welcome amounts. See The bunny rabbit. I was out with my dog. Is Richard Herring Hello? And welcome to another remote and live episode of Herrings Languish, sluggish. Per podcast. I was J. just got to that point, but the lockdown where This afternoon it was beautiful. Though I was hanging around with the creators of scrabble. Go the new scrabble APP. 'cause scrabble really needed was loads of Jules, cartoons and potential dating opportunities in it that it was just wasn't good enough on its own so I'm glad they've ruined it by changing the they call it relates to, and that's going to catch on. Yeah go in I am going to bit nuts and drinking. I thought I was going to start drinking and get healthy because I was worried about dying of the corona virus and being overweight, but I'm just getting eaten crisps and drinking every night. Cheese I've got you tonight. Not that much left and What's been going on well idea. My dog did a massive shit in the kitchen yesterday morning. Well came down to it. It was like a huge someone. Spilled a massive tub of ice cream onto the floor of chocolate ice cream, and most of it had melted around the edges, but the middle bit was still ice cream. That's what it looked like. and. It was horrible I dry registers. I tried to clear up for the kids came down. It was the most disgusting thing I've ever seen, but it was just wonderful to have some variety in my day so i. I appreciate it 'cause what no one is really. Looking out for and no one's carrying around. is the bloggers in this situation Roy? In every single day, and there's nothing to blog about. You should be standing outside eight o'clock every night, applauding me, blogging has minko since two thousand and five, and I'm still going. So where's my applause? That's what I want to know. I've been coming up with stupid songs. Is a good job of not gonna live Koster and then because the standard of Mike Comedy material has come right down I've come up with a new TV show called bumming for gold. which is like going for the gold? It's the same format people from all over coming together Henry Keller's. Kelly is still the host of it, but they will have to bomb each other in the best one bumming. Becomes is the winner and it's solely because. I was thinking theme chewed like this. The heat is on the time is right. It's time for you for you. Play your game. People are coming. Everyone's bombing is better. Try to come the best that they can. When they're bombing for coming for gold, so that's why I've come up with. Hopefully, I mean it should be called going for bronze really, but there we go. That's the best I could do. And I've got angry with Rogers and Hammerstein write is. For some reason you know this is boring in lockdown. I feel that Dole were female deer is a very poor lyric. which ones which if I was rodgers? Hammerstein or hammers and Hammerstein and rodgers come in one day and said I've written a new song and I'd seen the shit. He came up with I'd have been like Jesus met you. Only job is to write words, which is a million times ease in the tune that people are light this result. You tossed off on the bus over here, could you? Not, it's like Doa deer ray a drop of Golden Sun. That's okay me and I call myself. Far along the way to run so. Bad Law and note to follow. So can you come up with somebody bevere for La La Short for Los Angeles or La, the feminine article in French or Law House. causses refer to their mates. and T isn't a drink with jam and bread of give you some examples that you don't have bread with T. Could have been better. t the Jink junction up ahead. Tae Electric Close. Tae In China. It's widespread like the Corona Virus T. I call in if I wasn't properly bread this stuff you're GonNa die so I came up with. A satire satirical version. To take that Russia's or Hammerstein Which? Doe a note to follow T ray. Follow me a note to follow ray for a note. Follow me so not. Last, short for Los Angeles, T, not Polito, which will bring us back to see. That's a better version of it. That's the kind of thing I've been doing. I've literally Gone Mad, so anyway I hope you enjoyed these live gusts. I'm really just trying to bump up the views before we bring. Our guest is up to six hundred and fifty people. That's very good. You listen to watch, the came out today with Michael Palin. I mean absolutely fantastic. What a tough act to follow I would hate to be the guest that has to come on to this one tonight and follow Michael Palin. Next week we'll be doing another. One of these I'm GonNa Guess for it yet. You can on twitter. All sorts of things snooka Monday Tuesday. Thursday sometimes Friday seven thirty stone clearing. Most mornings about am time. I'm Sunday. I am doing film commentaries to films. I have nothing to do with I've done sliding doors I've done total recall this Sunday four guys to plan. I will be doing the Cobbler Adam Sanders. Brilliant and Best Ville. So do tune in and come and see those are do listen to the costs de become a monthly budget guy, foster stripe dot com slash patches, and if you an Amazon prime member, you've got a free five pounds every month to give to someone on twitter, you could give it to me. Go to my youtube channel having one nine six seven to find out how if you find it confusing? Anyway. Let's get on with the show. My guest tonight is probably best known for being a regular contributor to turn up on BBC Radio Sussex. That was when he was about fifteen or sixteen years old. What's even up to? Since then? He was a flash in the PAN. We never saw him again. We please welcome. Bridget Osmond's Gentlemen Maria's. They're. Lovely, wonderful thing we, it's good. It's very special chairs. Coming out your question. Where did you get? In Boston what he called me. Dr Skinner maybe yeah. He was it was actually a Christmas present I think so I don't know where it came from my mom and Dad Nice. Would you like it? Is, really not what missing on that needed I've got. Good on your mom and Dad. Oh. Thank you just. From. The Host. Don't. Think it's incredible. Riches on his ipads. Has. It hasn't got to commute laptop. This. Or that use a lot. I would use it for I ride a my act which is. A years. Another occurring my ipad around with this. What you do your laptop that you can't do ramonic- parents. True from strict. They paddock COMPLA-. From the pinball on my ipod, which I can't do very well. My computer so is better. By Parents I. Rest my case fair enough. Remember being in ten up on BBC radio. Sussex! Did, yes, opted out I was like fifteen and the year before me. Joe Widely on the when she was fifteen sixty, my, he was on it from the news. So, there's a few equally ray. From the mayor's brother. Hill there Jane Hills ten. One. Was it was about music or something was what was? It was very cool. Be, property itself and Raises came on, and it was really good, but it's very very year. There's a cool. In People's music. Anyone listen to it, but we enjoyed it's. Lau. How did you get a? Job At the age of fifteen. Volunteers you can just turn up and. and. Give you. Some bulbs. Presented when he had an IRA Turk charisma. For. Out of me I was the last time you. Did Not Appear on TV until pointless lead was and it. was there anything in between ten and. Dawson will thank. You. Right. You. Make money then. To the from. Experience on BBC Radio Sussex. That set didn't need to do anymore. So, you are self-isolating on your own. Yeah been on your own for seven weeks eight weeks in that. HOUSE FLAT! Two months feels like more. Yes feel like more. It feels I. mean things from before I was just thinking. Is What. He's about the well. Yeah, ninth now is only about two months. It was about the. Michael Palin. Sperm the ninth. Look. Up Now so good you. Is a challenge. To Someone Co.. The boys might it doesn't mean the Beastie. Boys. Although briefly I was in the late ninety S. it's what happens if you do an interview. I've been on pointless. That's probably because I interviewed you. I was thinking was did we recorded another point? Celebrities with me in and I. IT feels like a hundred years ago, but it was some some point this year I think wasn't it was? O. Really. Our lying apart told you I had any sense of time when. I was trying to work out. He was a member of with less than Dennis retainment solar remember. Who else was even on it? And I can tell you voices that you know that. You know the Double Helix. The has no end has no beginning and has no end, yeah. Put this I never really know where an and then they repeat some of them recording yuan's and then that he wants. And so I. Like a like asthma yeah. That's where under control. It was February I. Think it was. Temporary recorded feels like a lifetime ago and. My brain has been wiped tecom account. Remember anything about it so then if we it was my fourth time, I, don't know if we. Probably what? Might. Come. Not Win. Would be ambassador when just the law of averages send you by chance one in four times. especially if you run. Out The games I want to some games champions. Think would win a champion of champions of champions. If that if that came up to who would you have your money on I? Think Probably Sleep Pemberton now. Disappointed that would be my guest. It's interesting because off the Steve Pendleton payment of. The three weeks I was I was in leader gentlemen is. Great Ready to. Out Look, but yeah, it is. Do the! Parents. Can't. Talk to Michael. Failing, they wouldn't play full. I took. All of he was what I liked about Mike. Palin my favorite thing about Michael Palin Richard. Market fighting a bit more. Than a Lotta people. You mentioned articles. Faithful. COMEDIANS especially don't like to go back over their old stuff and talk about the famous sketches and stuff. Michael Love I was talking about the bit where he goes. Know Crucifixion, one cross each nine hundred eight, we can. I loved anyone in just started doing it. It was pretty it was just it was crazy, but mostly talking. How do you think? You would if anyone ever? Skip just. Imagine. You. Haven't I will. If I'm an old man. Some says can. With, a SNAPPER COVER SEE! Funds, sketches and I. Don't remember them at all so I, can what? I'm memories getting ready to be. Rich you and me both my friends. Remember any of them. I knew you just come on. Be Rude I wa- why why did I do this? So how you finding lockdown alone? Do you have the corona virus right? Yeah I think I had something very early on. My never anything I never get. Something for like ten days, but it wasn't. The? Simpsons the Tokyo I had a few symptoms I. Think it was. And it was right at the beginning. Of Hanover before I think it was it was. Granted I'm sure when TVs US again, so we talk about on a bit. Yeah I. Assure tested but I. It I'm still incredibly temple. Obviously, yeah. And how is it being? Good you should stay. Thank. The. Ready. If you've? Got It in the. I haven't had it yet. So I've. Got Caught you probably got it now. Something so small. Take Dan someone so big. It must be the irony of that. Can you imagine a lying there? Airlines could be the irony. I was thinking. See I'm quite so. That's the good thing about. Yeah. They're just kind of the big guys. Take them down. Now! You've got Michael Palin. Target. And might be. Co? No complete. So. How'd you feel I'm with people in my as I've Gone Matt So. With solitude and I used to have you. Have you seen anyone? You've been out shops and stuff? Yeah I'm. A my best mate with a memory. Eight Times a day on them on facetime, so that smart certificates every day. Honestly I really liked it. I'd like I'd been by myself. Out Our to people when people? I'm I'm writing at the moment that sort of there. Is a am every night with me and my watch. Elliott remotely birthdates. This is how long within in lockdown you started with targeting it nine episode All the way through up. Is thirty episodes an now we need. He finished does. Absolutely with away through the. Grades. One episode tonight. Old Tallies. I think about it so. How'd you mean watchtower you said? We've been seeing talented remotely. You Watch all telling remotely that really necessarily in Atelli show which case you're in. I mean you've got to let me off at all. Muslims Because I was I've well I I'm trying to write, but finding the problem with me I have two young children to look after as well. And it's very very exhausting and not getting anything done and meant to finish a book by the end of this month which I might do. Didn't think about it's by international men's Day. When I don I have stopped. Say! Remember. Gone everything. I don't know if they'll have one this year. Because the coronavirus. Probably, that's typical. Bad and Parole Navarre's. That a Lotta days. So you'll. But you'll wife is. She is. She ever deadline to. She doesn't luckily for me. She's got a book, but she hasn't the notes back so she. Can't do any work on a book, but she has others. We're both trying to work and what's amazing. Is You know you realize how much help you from other people even just at school and your in laws? That actually have to. All of it is just horrendous. Is, culturally is. Important thing and A. An actually just. Any reason, send them there is A. Limit, the only reason. I felt that Mike My. Schooling, I'd be teaching degree level Chinese with us what my daughter's doing. That wouldn't go. I don't think. Anyone with with kids. HAW! It's been wonderful in lots of ways I'd like. Give always I'll talk live in the countryside, and that's so we can get out and just walk the dog up the Hill and looked at the beautiful village in the bunny rabbits jumping around the bulk. Of Your case, it isn't that's fine, but I do have to look at the dog shits on the floor after gratitude for all I'm doing her. But. But I mean, how are you coping with a loneliness in terms of having contact with other human beings, physical contact to the maybe if a love. Humane. than. Box. Emotional. Context is it turns out. I didn't realize rid us. Of Emotional context more potent. Celeste. Lessons learned. People who they everyday and they will get in the way in making the law from office but I'm really an introvert on I really am. Any excuse to not go around is perfect. This is a head of this. Is Not the year. Book is September and make you right second one. Even before the first one comes out, the art said on taking six zero. Six hundred orange. Is heightened right and tied no idea how true that will. Suspense. Is. The. Big One so have you needs any. Of You missed any recording of TV shows at the moment, or is it all to come the stuff? There's other house a game, we. Just started a run of another hundred house today. that. Two days into it. And we could have done a bit. The. Wheels Could have them as coming. Shop. The. Mystery and will not of. The thing. Is With. Much? About. Six cameras. TV Studio, or at least the. Contestants Appointments Telev- shoulder to shoulder. Other than you know makeup them having Alexa. Should be attacking the I get tested. Is GonNa be guests? Because if your Komo how sedans you're going to get? Pretty runabout at. A week. Yeah, it's yes, you think. Do Think TV's. Bounce back from this, or is it going to? Is it going to change TV or is it going to be? We're going to take a really. Long time I mean like a really long time certain. House gained about was lay maintenance. You can get in terms of. Getting close to people, An even that it seems impossible to mine female, Sunday Martin Luther. But. DRAMA COAST! is in huge trouble comes in huge trouble, and with a big audience isn't huge. Trouble in a none of this stuff is getting many anytime, saying that they said this week. Enough exploring with metlife stadium film, Industry. People have taken that to mean you. WanNa stop making Talian is not I. Think it's them saying you can now start looking at how he might. Go about doing that, but just practice into place at am I gonNA. Take a really really on the quizzes. You Might Tae but madman. Many New Drama Series Netflix series runtime invest at very. Low, down things. And if you started coming up with full Matt's food, that will work in remotely. You know honestly my look and people. Get on your Radio Caracas until they. Come up with new stuff. I've. Just up in lockdown. Up in lockdown. Have a Hawksley House. I'm a little bit out lockdown. The brain can deal with if I'm in lockdown. Give it. To be. Able to do which had herring. Shakoor down where they look everyone down in the House for eight weeks without any won't be able to see him. And then ask them some clever. The only thing I one show during. which is a? A. Big European company and our sodas coming though Hebrew talked about. This. And other soda in. Cause may have been made a lot of money of it. It's. Really pleased about birds once you think what I think of that. He went to the a theme music. They had the rights to get that to not going to be he's. Hans Zimmer, somebody's knee wrote that he's GonNa. Sold it. Hansel the format. Love! Go. I don't you know I did this team? Is it for the old one? May the ants. Ordinarily, my cost, you three hundred thousand, but you have it for free. Love the show. Is. A like. Minded things say yeah. Well if you talked him presumably is that will? I think he is I think. We mentioned him in. Tim To mention episode, I think he worked with Tim Megyn on something I may be wrong. Dimension, the the thing is. Hans Zimmer because. Zimmer Swiss. Checks. And? He's Henry Kelly on board. Present. homers been put celebrities. If you time damn, these are the thinking. Credibly expected and smart journalists. In autumn. Club heavyweights during the most using years and suddenly is something for all and can't. Get Him some monetary in. A Journalist that integrity. What people don't know about? Henry Kelly's? He opened a ship. Them Strawberry Fan in about nine, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety one. And during that I. Had, fumbled behind the store with Sandra Hellier. About She's my school. Whereas you now. She's still Cheddar Russia's. Ashbury should've been. My name there we go. It's like I saw last. About five years ago, I went back. To. to do something and she just in village up to Cheddar. And she was there and she. We gave each other a look. We remembered each other. You married I did I didn't I didn't I didn't don't. Embarrassed about the things, we. Frowns. It wasn't anything a very very innocent that to be fair I was it was very unusual? Interested in me. And we even case to be honest. Fumble already. Okay Sandra Sandra heavier we wrestled. Right now hold on I'm just I'm just kindling. Okay let's to write a mixed martial office. I'm in trouble yeah. Enough to. Really lovely? We gave each other small and I think. It was all got. Another another occasion in Cheddar, the girl I used to really fancy bridget sealy. She came up to me and I haven't seen that for twenty five years or something like that. And, she was now a woman to fifty. Fifty and she looked very good. About I. Didn't you recognize it, but that's the pro you get when you go back to places that people expect you to recognize them, and you don't recognize the Motoo you recognizable. Laren to my school was covering. This was fifty number kids in it. I sort of with everyone. Lives us from where Ron from sight. Even when you're at school, you didn't really recognize each other. A- people are Mason. I still recognize. Snow a tap away with them, Lindsey. A whenever. Possible Rocky my age absolutely now that I went to school with here. But it's we. They've seen you in the interim, and so they've at least know how much I just find that so when you're in your fifties. Is just like you'll see. Someone new haven't seen him for twenty thirty years, and you still remember them being. Just last night was just thinking about what the Gills shed a university combination with an I have seen more than them again since, but I haven't seen one of them about twenty or thirty years, and I was just thinking God. She's not. She's going to be a fifty two year old woman now and in my mind, she's crazy. So I can't even pick my best friends from the. Business in the university are set reading. Wants him up though something. Does it. and. She's been credibly senior Hanako judged. And let me tell you now. When I was at university with a, she was not an incredibly. faulk from it. But as you say. We. Think! Seven times in any slips forever. Older had kids yet. How one of them are senior, judges jettison the country when you used to do X. Lawrence it. mentioned a judge. Bank robberies and stuff murders. Got? See was terrible. Diversity in we used to back the most. This does have Internet yeah. Thanks to summer taste. It's it's weird. This time goes by the time contingent that way that I to me. A lot of that stuff from the lighten lake nine eight to me was university. Just seem so fresh and I can't quite get my head around the idea that that the thirty years passing doesn't seem possible because I'm still twenty three. Says at Union. Now see. Stores he just said Yeah. That was me oh. Yes, I'm. Not. Really it do and I. had a fixing chat with different school serve, and since I was ten. And then you're like eleven twelve old again. Lovely, it's nice. Not So people eastern tally. You'll know this. Those can tell went. To the House, friends, round. It's never friends from school. If it was France mother of injuries. Just wait right another in my mouth and you. You went to. School with them. But that's I think that's quite a lot of people. Aspire to becoming famous, so they can get into those fame circles, and then do leave everyone behind but I think you kind of. See, people, being friends with the people of my age who have friends without and John or go to all of Elton John's parties. That's kind of why. Why are you friends? Vote John, and why would you want to be authored? Become friends with. Leslie it it is. We re just walking down the street London. You bump the. Price and Decade from foolish. and. Retrieve. What's the when it was something to get invited to these policy, the second becomes famous. There's group apart again state. And you must think. Hold on a minute. Just million Milana this multi. To. Say Waves. Distraught. Society that's not happen to you. Then see you not see. Haven't become friends with I mean you. You make celebrities on putting the celebrities for example. The United afterwards. molyneaux starting to scrape. De. La. You work with. As few famous people the. Guy. Kenyan had come my friend. Damn more whites is really an on camera people, but here's a few. But not not. Not a huge amount although I like most. Things. Well, I, don't my I've shed friends and I don't I've finding lockdown. He's I don't really go out at anymore and my wife. Sometimes I'm very happy staying with my wife and my kids and I really go part from going to work. which wasn't doing that much I don't really go out anymore and I don't want any new friends the problem we've moved to a village, so you've got to make friends. My wife made friends, which means I've made some friends in the village and they're very nice. But I'd rather I'd rather not have maiden new friends. We pay We're playing like games. It's really good. Actually play on Sunday. Nights we play Games board, Games, and stuff and poker and things online now now because lockdown, so it is quite. New Friends, but it's sort of. Yeah but some. Yeah, I'm quite happy to to shed as many people's possible and get it down to. Listen are suspects. They're pretty happy clearly. Also you've gotTa shed a few among the PALIN. He has. To Be my dad, I said I said, would he take over to be my New Dad? My Dad's still alive bit route to my dad, but and I offered my momma. Listen. You've gotTa have. Not To date yeah. Yeah! That's easy to say Major. My Dad's a little older, but my mom's a little older than them, but my mom looks good. Like Bobby Robson the Xing the manager, but she's. She's a good look at eighty-three. She's grown into that. You know she. Took? When they use on the whole. Haydn so I think for Palin. She would be a price I think. She's very nice, lady I'm not. My Dad's a nice person as well but. If if it came down to it, if someone said a gun, the head of Michael Palin GonNa ahead of tk, herring I would have to say kilty caring. For I mean I think that's. I think my dad would extend. I think. About non that a Marco painted more than my dad. That's the main thing and be. Just for the good of the country I think my dad has done a lot of good for Cheddar and the surrounding Arab. More, people would be upset by the death of Michael Palin. Strangers on a train. No! Right one of the greatest climates will. On, the plot to be aware of is to. Get into the compensation. Training and very casually. Mention the murder. They would like to happen. Before you know it. They swap motors and the end of this era. Essentially, if somebody listened, will everything you've just on that. Zimmer, scum at the head of. That wasn't what I said. If someone got me in that situation and said you have to choose. It's like Sophie's choice I'd say. Can we not Kelly go? No, no, we kill of them by for them is up to you. been older. PALIN has a lot to give still I think. My Dad had a good life. You know you feel that you know it's not to say. My daughter doesn't My daughter doesn't love me so I think she would say this. My daughter's always telling me she hates me. She's only five. It's not fair. But she's always she's always i. She's mainly joking, but it's goes on enough for me to think. If my daughter's in the situation, they'd Richard Osborne, or your dad I think she would. Let, you live. So I've I've accepted we'll. We'll the other murder. Some train club. This completes good. This is Anita. Pull thing to isn't this is good to. It's good. Isn't about someone killing? The Dad Seldom can marry Michael Palin. Yes, I think it is, and then you'll say Maga findings a lot better off than my dad. I would imagine so you know. I hope he lives another twenty year. QUESTIONS YEAH! If. He told anyone he makes heavy in the. Ninety s thousands today exactly how much money they go. Plenty to compete in so I wouldn't have a clue what they made in the day or how much? Days I think. Palin is not got divorced to done any other things all the others to work for so like cleese. Extra work to pay off all his ten wives. And Palin has done all the extra work, but not have to pay anyone off, so hasn't export is whole street, and just by his his own streets, he had a house, and then he bought the houses around the House I think he owns quite a lot of north London somewhere. So. As with of Batman Man is that got the beautiful big houses up perhaps if In the sixties learning. Either people to houses, but that's not a good imitation of how much money they have. If? He said he must have been a Ryan. PUT MONEY, yeah, He is I mean now fenced. You Richard is being you don't because there was actually a direct after who? Following on from, but he has excelled in every single thing he's done. Make any sort of. Seven careers and got to the top of all those Chris, so he's a successful actress. Sexual successful comedian writer novelist travel journalists. Yeah, it's GonNa Crack on? As he has a pointless. Let's drive ever been on putting celebrities Mike Riley. Yes, he is. He's made himself available. To the selectors. Reason. I I don't have a very good idea of how much money people have and I look at my young Korean. Think. I haven't really done all that well and I've quite low of money, so the NBA must be must have loads. He must have heard San remedium absolutely abso- uses it wisely and it's a lot of way. What have you can tell? I don't know. He deserves as much money as possible. Doesn't. He doesn't have any money. Keeps. He's got this very nice. You know people of it, but it just go I'm having a is from Yorkshire as a my, and so you know he's. He'll be a bit county with it. And they why not just you know, he's a D.. V. East to go to the dead parrot sketch again and to. Thank you. They must do not oh, to GEIC. They did something like fifteen knights of the two and. The cost they put on a good show. It was a very good show, and there was a high production values, but taking half a million pounds of nights in the Middle East for that yeah. Of Mine. He's doing well. I bet you in nineteen eighty-five. He probably didn't have very much money. I think probably everything's since then I think probably you know. Because the BBC never used to pay very much, and I'm sure they didn't get much for Monty Python and they were always struggling for George Harrison. debaille out life. So you'd think if they have they don't even need it three million or something that they didn't have the money themselves will win for Pant. Penalty was keeping. He was holding. Of London! Of Zoom Quiz. Regardless! Of. This question was a party is. Over to Sunday Times a month. Is huck waste as a question game? Play at now because when you have to think about okay fiance at the end of the. At the end of this. What is the other night London cheap station? Has said in its name, ooh! Just let people might even from. And you see the comments I can't say that commits to. Someone might come up with. It King's cross. Someone says the first answer with his. Ed With his someone like crows. Crows. E One clear switch. Off Status, I didn't get us. Human get. I lost the out in the air at the end the central. He had done the GonNa get. I've said Crusius Rosie O. Someone's gotTa Inland. Someone's GonNa in the chat room. Yeah very because it's is quite obvious. I mean it's not obvious it's quite a bit. It's a big one, but says central. Ave at the end. At? Do that well you. You've been doing quite a few quiz shows on you. Know. We talked quite recently in Edinburgh. We didn't talk about your on catchphrase that we didn't really talk. We we when. You. Did it amazing Dublin Catchphrase? Love that make the most money in was ever made on catchwords. Yeah, we'll. Tell Ho career. Was Look test race. On. Our territory I mean I made more impact. Get on cashways. Great! With Gregg Wallace and Penny Lancaster. And For while right at the beginning, reckon penny took on strictly and Mojo is very very good. That Obesity in common as can you what is and they? Hit Movement only person Metro skew it. Advice, The first couple of countries came up. A banner this. Now, he had had still. The so is quite fossil. The buzzer and then you realize. If you've got. To have. You have a set of skills with going to carry three to the. Game and then you thought you have to take over pedal. Let me like the Muslim is. Nine. Every silver lining. Let's it like it. Like middle. When I when I realized that maybe. Didn't have didn't have the chops maybe. If you walk? into gap now you know what Mr Chips doing. That's what I'm saying and. What he's up to. You say what you say, you do, yeah. Y- 156 and It was amazing. That ARAMIS. in shaping. That money you took all that money home. It's been too under to be there. Yes, it'd be fat. Eight thousand of it. Take. The. Exit eight to an ex wife. Good millionaire you, you did the Jeremy Clarkson seen any of the Jeremy Clarkson's millionaires except a bit of your one because. Did. And I go. Up to the fifty neekam second floor, but they my much much as it's turned to child side for other. patriots whereas if I get to thirty two. We'll have permission just absolutely pay for it and she said he had. A deductible dinner and I'm twenty five hundred twenty five ago. I was really didn't even use my friend I was really. Getting to the end. What can you do? What's the best celebrity? Balance on the. Eight thousand question the kristen at a ranking of programs. Any to say. He sort of knew he wasn't. Is, one of those purchases and the Ordnance Ramon stuff. Okay, wait with them. He got no. Edna answer. I wasted. Oh, I have got a lot of strategies for Quiz Games on that. Ask the audience. It's a high one that people don't know. And if you know, it's not one of the answers I would say to you and it's before you vote on this if you don't know the answer. Can you. Read you do that. Sent to producer. Is Anyone side of the audience? Actual. Known A. Out Don't know because as interesting as. A, did you see the? Did you say the Chris the millionaire? Drama. See I thought was interesting about that. I thought more than what they did or did do they did? Where some the fact that the guys were cheating, the phone calls in they were they were coaching people and doing that whole network of people getting onto the show and getting onto throw multiple times. You'd even at the time thing. They must be bringing up a lot and blah, but that whole thing was that was rigged. So that, you know I, remember trying to. That's fine. If you had a site where you'll contest randomly. But how did you end up? With a series of sort of very faceless a fifty year olds. Is just what you get. On because they're the ones who are woods tournament and act as a replacement for them, but said I thought. uses was. A HERE'S A. Shot that she told us the host Oregon Jesus when I heard. The Ingram's talking rounding off with. A loved it loved it. I interview have this. I did it used to Polka chat show so I'd have liked the question John Barnes. Got Wrong. And they would. They would, too, because they after the after they were on. Maybe they tried to make money in lots of different ways, so I think they claim. They played poker. They played poker forbid, but he was really like I think she's something very sexy about her code detachment that they got very well on the program to say, but she's right up my street and she's got a nice big nose and I like that in a woman. A really Alex is someone to hang onto it. That's the way I look at it. A. Strong. It's tough talking muscle w narrow. Yeah, it is quite like. She's living who was? Married it's fun. And Hung around outside. You must hand around shops within the. World. Sometimes a lot of disappointed. That's the beauty. Of clothing, but he was. Very strange man, he lost some toes. Accent we're. GonNa show on Channel Four Dame's. Alright celebrities plants. And is really. He came on that and see was there. It was like she was. Likeable, he was very about site. That was one of their post. because. Obviously, they cheated. If you're the one thing about the one in. It was never said it was in cold is. Up Production Company wants to minimum quit. The Algorithm says we can afford to give away wants to series. We do a reading these crazy everybody rings in the next day shift, or is not like we've lost admitting create. It's like we just had a massive. He show and people in outlined for candidates. Give Him A. Good thing. In this million cricket. But some identity. Up. I would have done. So, but they they should have. Those guys anything they went to. The dramatisation. Will they even than lives unless they are so? It's I I feel a little bit. Sorry the cause also. It's like you know your your on my allowed to do this. It's finding what was interesting. I think they just found ways to notch things into their favor, and it's almost like Oh. This is just a game. We're just having fun, and we Lutheran crazy if there'd been sent to prison for it. But yeah, I agree, and this is my negative through innocence and have you. Are Justices too smart, but if he the equity with the court ruling. The common guilty, but some yeah I, think it's nothing in the rules explicitly decide. Confidential I. Think is kind of Kepa Right. Yeah! Where the isn't the victims actually the production company to make money out of it. They would have made money out of it. It's not snowing loses everybody wins. They sort of feel that's why people left at drama some us because. You could tell us if it was on went to Rome. There's. No one harmed even if even it was. But. Yeah, what was interesting is. That where he said it on, he thought it was nearly twenty Oh like an easy one about coronation street in everyone would know. Comey was Oh, so he knew he got it wrong and he made that point in court, but that must be a lot of people must have had that help from from the audience anyway? Could you hear the audience when you were in the hot seat? Are they hotter on this? Report is. Always take thoughts from Putin's goes. Millionaire done tickets onset because the whole point. Is the drummers in their. Toys! The series is I'm going get through this I'm not. GonNa go for it I'm going to change the muscle whereas most precise I humphries when you get so important. Sultana say though I think it's GonNa. They don't know why they. Do you ever do a quiz about point, scribner, don't put sometimes on the celebrity and one of the other subjects or whispered the answer to one of the other celebrity I've not done it because I'm very fan truthful, but I've heard people whispering the answers and they get tell them off. But. You think that that would be a big scandal by that and make a quiz about that. Gut It nonstop. Sight. was on your something. Nope, in some disciplines, not song. It sounded like you. Say. It's. Not confirmed we just. Right. Someone let both question. Is. Nothing will I know nothing about. GonNa need something. With his. Says it. was. Ill Nicholson. Thursday, if nothing, Bucko! It's awesome, but secondly. Nicholson exactly denounced. Someone else just ill. Mickelson correct on. into the area. In comedy come on. Come down. By the. Because, point district, it's a very valuable thing. They can sell this for like two hundred fifty on Ebay. So, I. Think Say Apple. That's what someone at. The? Production people toby. Wow that might do not. Pretty. Vacant one. Thousand. What is on a special episode? Zonda. Thousands episodes. What we start the anymore, thank. Zone this. Ben Miller. Almost? Bigger than vendetta. Out. Right Office. or The Queen. Believe that. Stuck, his? Stuff. Then give him. Did a young. The Women's Institute in Sanford Him. Him Come to talk. Queens Van and Played a witness, he's awesome by the way. He plays a thing. Of. Them. Team Captains Margaritas distinct pattern. Of! Clean Presenter. Queen is the team captain. The here on the. Witness Stop? How many people say this was harder under queen absolutely winced everyone but. I'm we. The people name House of meeting. How many people say? The Lost Ark. and. Team over there officially letter. And the. got a within hydrogen higher. No. T limit time. Human. Prices on this. What this one thousand episodes perfect that we worth. Bay If you put that on Ebay if the queen events signs it. Could be with three or four hundred. I've. I've a Richard Osman Dole I'm just storing away until I. The you die or I'm about to die. The I could leave Anorak I. Probably get sick for that. Faye uncle any house games stuff are gone. And though. which wasn't apprised that we will get him on filming a hassle threat. Okay, really must be House against and tomorrow is the producer who are even. Urgent. He said. Whatever you do, eat it. Okay. Our. Case when I get well hopefully hopefully. You'll pass on an. I can make some money from. For All. In this cross out of the. Some. Lot of these people in the Chattanooga crazy for that bet who give me five hundred for my. It's a golden one of Richardson's. Many of those. And I've chucking. Trophies. Osa looks like them. Either it could be me because he got one at per gas lake. multi-purpose I just wait for the first one of you to die, and then I'll sell on Ebay as a tribute to. Five, hundred, it will be interesting, but it will be one of us, yeah. Perkins one of us. Our guest me I. Help you less than? Probably A my guess is, he should do that as a death day. You can do predicting and then the scores. A later date a win there. Yeah I actually when celebrities die on the same day, and so therefore ever connected in time by you know, they might have some with their life, but they're basically unconnected celebrities, and they die on the same day. I always think quite interesting they're. They're both on the news of the same night. Left interesting for them, I guess Yeah He. Would you like to die on the same day as you? On if you if you could choose any one person to die in the same day as you, who's a celebrity? To good much. maybe maybe a higher sonora the president of Brazil. Of Nasi it's. It's yeah, but you know you might live for a long time. In a way conferring emit you know if you if you're gonNA live the fifty years. They will live another fifty years so it might not be the thing then. The patches made. My Life, he would he would. He would with me you. Know Gates. This if if Bill Gates knows is on the same day as And you could look whenever you want to pick up the phone insane. Afraid of it down bill Send you quit this moment. Goodwood. That could work. and. Your books pretty some very excited about your book. A fantastic newsletter, the people interested in your book with Games and stuff involved in this right. At timber the first day murder, providence, a crime, novel and Penguin for my purposes, absolutely love visit newsletter. Tell people about the. I said honestly people. I'll tell people about book, and if you out of it, and it's really good murder, but with a gang sows purchase of matters. I have run August. Their weakness garment branded honestly lockdown of the US every fifty questions a week at. Christmas and that's what the united, but Yeah I. Don't have to the perfect. Sunday, Ricky, tiny one. Up In there is there and there's a party. In Minnesota yet. Essentially it's become. So every week. With a then B fifty questions. Just finished G which comes out. Tomorrow protect people wants to sign up for says Thursday. Medical newsletter found panic. Is Not a lot of the book Americans although you will like the bit. As mate is mainly a Chris. I'm very much to the business. It's been a long time. This has been. You know you'd be. Good to get movies pre publicity clever way of doing it, but it feels like you could. We talked about it in LAS GSA. It's been. It was probably finished an extra pair of November. But it takes a long to pretty they end up Sandra. Even more priests in this idea. With us! It just takes a long time. To save them sometimes. Publicity for it is quite obvious and his for three months. Maybe with a few weeks ago, I'll pick up again and the Arctic. Here. I don't want people to get older than talking about it, and you're not doing the audio put yourself. I've got some Leslie Manville again the. Just my favorite actors in the world, you know Mama which I think is amazing and Austin nominated Nola. Some The early because the main the right to. Is a sort of seventy eight year old woman that. It wouldn't be right for me to. Do that. Maybe, you would have been. Nice amounts. As you head some. Credible. It's what I've I've merged question. Michael Palin. Answer this one pretty well. No pressure but You could have obviously like. That, you've got more than Michael Payment. Only quite a recent thing. Is there any historical or not? After not long ago an author, you would like to hear read their own book that we can no longer have that presume because their dad's or read the other nesting. site. As any oath on Audio Urgency either. Pendleton today. I would say. On that if we talk. About strangers on the train or the. awesome bitter radio father. When corruption assistance that will ripley? Tissue Hartson. Something I, but she was such a margin, and so don't. Answer. Other love to here. Telling afloat stories, but not to hit the bits where she was the minded a suspect, they'd be the opposite. Selected on our, luckily to hit, or she's horrified because they'd be offices were. An incredible. Opium. Have a voice in my head. Is Often. Go were coming up to the end of the Hour Alaska couple. I should say you made A. You made a guest appearance on my upcoming Radio Four. Sitcom relatively much. You played yourself. Remember that. Amongst all? DO I. was. Betty get laughing. Comic minds is. Great Man Very Much Rigid Osmond daily with my mom. But. Yes, which is not the first one? So do look out for that. I think is that in July, they might bring it forward tonight. Tell the nation through this difficult toy harm. Morale. The Nation of wait waiting for. You you did the I'm sorry I haven't a clue. Tour shows you. You've done some of the radio shows of that as well but certainly. That was. Having mean. Unfortunately lost timber Kayla. The couple of IT, was! That in January, yeah. Tim, malls. duffin study hoax, not the end. Of the other people. And I was sitting this tim every night, looking holes. Authors ignored any which I don't is back for talk through Tim was. Emma's his white wine and his monthly. What consumers are every now? And it is such a joy the Wigan and Almost impossible I think of someone. That had less lifeforce, and he was sort of site. Funny. Would see and charming and have such a law and set up terrible joke. Retire. Ready. What about taking before your his name? Yeah, well that I mean that's the sort of thing about this virus is influencing. Oh, it's people and people who are already, but actually you know a lot of old people still have A. Older, people so. It's not. This is this is going. WHO's time? It was not the is for sure and the forest. and. Often. Parents. Guide anything whatever you think about it. You might be covered in the rest of us are tonight. Whatever you think about science in whatever you've read. It's a big cool to make it. They're not a face moss in the Catholic network gloves and all that stuff. Cool to get Rome really is. I. Assure. You're young. End Up in the I get hundred percent, but in a you make somebody who meet some breaking news dies is. This is just just not. The, Market it's a good view. It's a correct view and on a more positive virus note. You've been mobile diplomat more positive. What more other than. Isn't You've you on now? The unit of spatial distance because you the problem is I think most people are naturally quiet. How you know you can say it's one Richard Osborne. You could be one Richard Osman Palms, but that's might behind them. PEOPLE START? With moms requirements. and. That's to me he's. Perfect. Is what I'm wondering. If. He don't know what to me is. either. I. Did it. Down as well presumably to to work, so he? was prone. In the Keefer. Eminence the other. Don't judge me. And! The. Queues outside kid in. Marsha ahead what I would say I think it's a perfect seven. From behind the aren't perfect, Senate See on my head literally just reached the front of. My foot. I mean that's nicely i. mean that really I am genuinely. There are genuinely rich Paul. Good? Services available now. Most people, is it? Does it mean that you say walking along? Because you are to me? Is above the ground I present. The virus has crawl along the ground to get from person to person, so that's. Grandfather, some safer phones. For that is that it? Could be that. The also your heart is also your wings family. But almost everybody has to start your own some to that. Teaches that luck and Ericsson? Going to SORTA. I. Get Salgueiros because I'm in the countryside. I usually Salero a day. That's my treat. Even making smoothies absolutely as I understand. I'm not kidding, so 'cause I got three. Every didn't. Know. Known to have. Some rasberries all something wherever you fencing some rubbish powder by from owner there. Are, the Caught too much, Lena. Yes I still hold on a minute. This Samaras Console based on Yoga is over stor a rasberries. The lyrics except occurs. You've ever. little bit of. All my days. was. Sensational I proves a whistle. Arrow icon guest celebrities out here. It was so. Awesome. I go to I. Go to waitress. I gotta go to waitress in hitching. Though so I've tried to avoid now mash to almost become. Thing might go tomorrow. 'cause they only thing I can get solaire and I honestly last year Salero every day last year and I lost loads of weight, because it was my treat in the day now have five or six streets, the Hans Lara's and GonNa go by all the scenarios and wait trace to mind. That put into the the. Skill. That's one of your fire today as well. and. Yes. Honestly terrific. Okay, it's ready. I'll give it a guy. I'll buy some exercise my kids into them. They get them like free pasta, lollies, kids, lollies, and then my guys is GonNa Daddy's their mind. This is my my. Daddy's lollies. And then so they go any three pack. That's three days, but if the kids have him, that's one day bomb. One box celebrities is a day. Today. But my birth yeah, suddenly say your favorite twister. is locked versus. White and green and red. We've got those. Guys love is that they are? They. Assist in my in my in the novel. Stuff again. Ok Kid when we look at. Doing any more of your birthday game podcast. That was really good, I. It was on. was that a witted into a unit, but TV in the way and again? I'm not. I'm not someone who looked. Out of. Comparison easily. Literally. Another Latam. Maybe when maybe we'll come out the other side of this yeah. I really enjoyed it. Yeah, good well. Thank you so much for Asparagus your time. I'm glad you're feeling better. and. something. A small device continued you. You're so big. Just look at it logically. You're so much bigger than a virus. That, They would need to get together and have to be so many of them to take you on i. mean how many viruses warm. Richmond it's got to be a lot of Her Majesty's must be plenty of earth. Based, so I think you'll be okay. I good luck with having sex in lockdown I'd like to say to you. And Fat, married people for the last two months had more sex than single people on average it's. Very small amount. So I'm glad I got. One an old. I'm so much this Richard. We'll be back next week of another one of these. I don't know who the guest next week is yet. These gentlemen Richard. Osborne thank you very much sees. Clear in the morning by, thank you very much. You have been listening to Rhonda with me. Which Tang them I guess. I Ne- arly Shelter Valley you not in this. Thank you to pass for playing the music? Man Not. It's a zone. Thank, you also to Chris Evans not that one for providing support. Thank you to twitch. Twitch, and everyone who subscribed. Using Amazon prime membership and their Germany. I'm indebted to my executive producer, Steven. Badger is if we called Him Tiger on that Gillian student system, Co. Banja. Is Team sometimes funny? With very good Thank you for listening. This is sky, potato fuzz and go faster stripe dot com production. Me E., just ninety new. Do tune in to see A. Lien herrings take down on. Twitch DOT TV. The text these. Slow notion you can call in the tests. Sloth underscore alley. Learn? Not. What origin hearing do his? Without me! On! Dot. Okay. Thanks. Everyone I guy guy.

Michael Palin Henry Kelly twitter Richard murder Chris Amazon Youtube Hans Zimmer Los Angeles Hammerstein Tim Megyn Richard Osman Dole Richard Herring Steve Pendleton London Richard Osman BBC
Eric Idle's life on the bright side

Conversations

53:57 min | 2 years ago

Eric Idle's life on the bright side

"This is an ABC podcast. Diane conversations behold, the wonder and majesty of Eric idle, Eric idle and five other chips formed Monty python back in sixty nine timeless absurd humid to the world, and they became absurdly popular in return. But Eric idle had a horrible early life. He was brought up in a cold gray often 'age in Britain, but his lot since then has been golden filled with creativity and love and humor and friendship with some extraordinary people. Eric odds written a very enjoyable memoir. A sort of biography he calls it the title is. Of course, always look on the bright side of life recorded this conversation with Eric idle last week at the Brisbane powerhouse am I have to say it was about as much fun as I've ever had doing one of these live events, but a quick heads up. He is from Monty python? There is some strong language a few. F bums, deployed in the name of human here. And there just in case you've got some young kids around or if that sort of thing just isn't your Cup of tea anyway. It is very much tonight. To let me just say what a wonderful book, this is. Helen was it taken you to put this farrago together. I suppose it took me about a little over year. I decided I would not go to a publisher and presell it, which is what people tend to do because I wanted to find out what sort of book I wanted to write am, I didn't know that. Until I written it show. It was it was good. Because if you look at my age if you look back on your life. It's quite interesting, you go release different people you've been and so that was a very nice exploration. For me. You begin by saying the app set at the time of my birth. Hitler was trying to kill me. Which is true. And poignant all the same time the images you have in the book and with the most ones we see of postwar Britain. They're very black and white and gray. Is that how it looked at the time? Yeah. No. It was very much. I was born in nineteen forty-three strange coincidence. I was born on my birthday. But. Lucky really? But we grew up in a fifties in England. It was rationing. And you everywhere you went there was damage and bomb sights and everything was going to miserable cold and not much to eat. And there was no television didn't come 'til about sixty later on in the sixties. And so we've radio is very very big for us. We will listen to radio, which I think python is the large generation of comics to go up not watching television, but listening to radio and did that mean the goon show for you, the goon show was partly for me, but I was boarding school. So I didn't get a lot of that. But there were lots of very funny comedians. You know, like our read come you smell gas? Or is it me? Music of the end of musical your dad had been in the RIF survived the war, but not the homecoming. Can you tell me about that? Well, my data being in the RIF since nineteen forty one. And he was a wireless operator rear gonna in Wellington's Lancaster's. We made worse seat in the house that is you know, the back, and but he survived the war. And then he was hitch-hiking home. They told them to get lifts and he was killed in a traffic accident coming home for Christmas. Which is really kind of. It's in one way. It's ironic. It's very weird and funny strangely funny. And how was your mum too that she was combined completely nuts? You know? She was very obviously distraught. And you know, she she didn't really take very well. So you can take very well. But it was it was very difficult for us at Christmas. What was the institution you? Was sent to was more of an orphanage or a boarding school and orphanage school, the Royal Wolverhampton orphanage and the war gave it a shot in the arm because it was running out of oftens. But so my -cation. This look on the bright side now to main there's always good and bad. You know? So it means of my education from the age of seven was paid for by the aria, and I went to school in this wonderful place. Call Hamson, which is not quite the end of the world. But you can't see it from there. And it's really miserable place in the Midland and horrible. And all the kids. I was at school with all the boys had all lost their fathers. So that's really strange, psychologically. I think. And I don't quite know what difference that made. But I was there from seven till nineteen how much was violence used as a character improving techniques. Well, it was it was very violence. It was like a kency when especially the senior schools junior school from seven to eleven and then eleven you into the senior school, and that was like there was a dormitory one hundred yards long with a bed every two fields, and the prefects could beat you slippers and the teachers had the privilege of beating with canes. So it was quite a lot of beating. And character building. And they were saying things like this is for your own good. I think we'll all do it for you. Then if you like. So, but you know. It was very Dickensian in a bleak sort of sterile environment. Like that where do you go? Do you go into your own hit a lot? I think. So I think that's in the end the scape for me, certainly was two ways almost to go over the wall for girls and beer, which we got very good at and tobacco. We have secret nightlife, we going, but the when you when you say that how did you get that climbing of the wolves to meet girls. Good because what they did from the Asia, Deb, and they made us go into the army so every Monday on bloody uniforms, March up and down the square, and he left and right. So by the age of fourteen I could stripper Bren gun blindfold. And we then send us over the Welsh hills crawling around, you know, compass a bit of cheese and see. And so, you know, you learn to creep about in the dark, and we use that to get into the school. Always a bright side. You know what I mean? So we go the awfullest since Crete parts and over the wall and come back armed with beer and pipes. We spoke long church church warden pipes and Balkan sobriety array, very posh pipe, tobacco and one. Call baby's bottom. Which is a smooth as a baby's bottom slogan plaque tobacco. But reading it seems like reading was the thing for you though. I think reading became very much more and more for me away of scape. And that's what I I loved reading. Because anytime you can be alone in a group of people get some privacy. So I loved history, and I loved literature, and I read and read and read, and we didn't have a teenage life because we stuck in this bloody school like twelve thirteen week terms and everybody else is having teenage time getting to be the sixties, and we're stuck there doing prep in the evening. So what made you wanna learn guitar? Elvis Elvis changed. Our lives at the age of twelve suddenly Elvis appeared. And he was like a gift from the gods. And it was it was marvelous. And I we went crazy for him because you seem to be so cool has Stalin Jing Pap and they would photograph. They wouldn't photograph him on television below the waist in America because about too much. And so we learn we would do we were skiffle group, and we do black negro songs from from the south. You know, jump down turn around pick a bale cotton, or if you're black if you're white you're all right? If you're Brown stick around, but if you're black all brother get back back, and for some reason in Wolverhampton, very white placed five thousand miles from the nearest black person. We identified with the clashes of the of the deep south, which is weird cut open notice. You do have Atara over there. Eric helps you kid to share a song this at this point. Song from the heart. Anyway to do. Here's a little song. He won't take very long. It's shebab the world today. And it's something I really need to. Fuck selfish and all those kids who asks for selfish digest get on my case. When your grinning lock and unit shake with people, you know, h hike somehow, finance, I get that fucking phone. Stor go and then another fifteen other fucking people show. Shell fees are a waste of fucking time. Tell shellfish shell fee gets next time. It comes to. To take death fucking shell fish sticks and shove them up. They're very much. The roar emotion behind that. I really felt that really felt that with every five of my being what was your introduction to the cut. It new wave of comedy that was washing over Britain in the very early sixties. Yeah. Well, when we ours about eighteen we would go to the West End of London in holiday time. And there was this amazing group did a review, and it was called beyond the fringe. And it was Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, Alan Bennett, and Jonathan Miller, and they would just show funny. They came out of the Edinburgh fringe, and they were from Auburn Cambridge four of them. And it was it was a revelation to me because I didn't realize you are loud to be funny about royalty. And the army and the war and the Queen and policemen, and they just ripped society apart with laughter anger, but it was lofta. And I just it just. Changed my life. I thought from that time on I wanna be funny. I learned the record. And I I just that was for me. It was a life changing experience that was during this called Setai boom of the early sixties in his Peter kookiest said yes, set are the did so much to defeat the Nazi party during one my Germany at the time. You didn't really go down that path you fill it chose a more absurdist fun. If humid that was more in line with the goons which in turn goes further back to Lewis Carroll, and this other English tradition that bunch on we got onto television, which is much later on like ten years later that being the beyond the fringe started it, and then we're off to Broadway, and then David Frost came on. And this is a good idea. We'll descent are on television. And he did this good show called that was the week that was with very funny people Willie Rushton than and that was very very big. And it was very powerful and actually got rid of the conservative government's. But then by the time, we got. Television it become old hat. Everybody had done satire. So we were very fortunate in the fact that we had to do a whole we had to do generic comedy about types rather than about real people. So now, you don't need notes to know who laughing at your work, much more timeless. Exactly exactly if you look at Saturday Night Live, for example, you need to know that Gerald Ford fellow ver lot before you laugh at Chevy Chase. But we don't have that problem because it's just generic comedy. There's one little gap in your book, which is sort of announced you hit boy at your your school and then go to scholarship to Cambridge. You must have been quite a clever young, man. And will you seen such and supported in that I think again that was just me reading because we didn't have much of a life. So I I had done done exams. I did you know I passed exams, and then I would do more exams, and then I think when I finally got an interview for Cambridge through my. History. Master who been to Pembroke? I was very fortunate. I think I'd just read more than anybody in England because we didn't have a life. So. Pembroke college was very good. They were looking for people who weren't, you know, normal grammar school public school boys, and they had pizza could been there. So the like comedy funny people, and it was very strange because in my first second term there. I will dish in for the Pembroke comedy show. Call the Pembridge smoker. And I was auditioned by timber Taylor and Bill Oddy. Isn't that weird? I mean to goodies auditioning future python is really quite bizarre. And the first piece of material I did was written by John Cleese who wasn't at Pembroke. But dined there every night because he liked the company, but he couldn't be Pembrey smoker. So I did his first catch I ever did was written by John Cleese? And he was there. And so that was my second February nineteen sixty three I met him that moment when you come to Cambridge. It's a bit like that moment in the wizard of Oz. Where it's been in black and white until Dorothy opens the door, and suddenly there's all this beautiful color is that how you remember it? It was extraordinarily. I mean going from Wolverhampton, and then you go to Cambridge. It's thirteen forty seven the colleges pounded. And it's it's so beautiful everywhere. You look and people are saying have Gloucester, Sherry, would you? It was nice about it was you had time to just follow. Whatever you whatever you wanted to do. And so. In the end what I did. Because I immediately joined the footlights was I just had comedy from that moment on and I met all these wonderful, people Graham Chapman. And we just you just watch them the good people. And then you got better by by trying watching. So you met John Cleese Graham Chapman at Cambridge. And then later you bit Michael Palin Terry Jones who from Oxford. But that was at the fringe did you recognize some kind of shades since ability amongst you as a group of four you ever became the. Yeah. It was the end of my first year. And there was a big final review at Cambridge which had Cleese and Chapman and Brooke Taylor. And Audie, and it was so good. It went to the West End and ran for five months, and then he went to Broadway. So they couldn't go to the end refresh civil so I got a telegram. I was in Germany and should come immediately. Suddenly in the Edinburgh festival with three other guys Graeme garden, and we will we will performing this wonderful material rave notices, and of course, then we went to check out the Oxford revue because we're Cambridge. And they were crap. But I did meet Terry Jones was wonderful and then a year later extraordinary Michael Palin. Who was who was extremely funny. Those days, obviously. I think he's the one that got away on serious. You know, he's he's actually really very funny quite, but he has to be nice, which is terrible curse. I think. Don't really know. She's near seething inside. I'm mistaken for Michael pay them when I'm on the road. I really am. When mistake of Michael pay said, yes, I am Michael Palin now. Call few Boston. He's such a nice man co-pilot. The things they said that really drove the creativity of the Beatles. Was that John and Paul and Georgia's well, of course, wanted to impress the other guys with the songs they'd written. It's like I really wanna make them love. What undoing once you started working with that? Amazing pool of comedians was dynamic between you. Yes. Absolutely. I mean when when we got our own show. It was like, well, let's not do what everybody else is done. See we we pushed off so VHS to the extremes and try things that are not this not do regular old light into tamen show. That's be more edgy. And so we would definitely compete with each other than the writing. And then we'd read it out to each other. And if we laughed we put it into Monty python? And if we didn't laugh, we showed it to the to Ronnie's. We were professionals you see. So the baby wanted you all to do show having worked on a whole bunch of shows sort of served a long apprenticeship in television company, the BBC broach together Uber yourself together. I suppose as to do this comedy show. Was there a strong idea of what you wanted to show to be or was it more about what you wanted. It not to be. I think the last one I think we had no realize we hadn't done any much thinking about it. And they were very kind of what are you going to do on more? You're gonna use film. Oh, that's a good. We'll use Phil. What are you gonna have stars? So guess maybe not now. There was like look in. Komo sell us, something, you know, we didn't know what we were doing. And they went, oh, well, just go away and make thirteen so we did is really great that never happened ever happens. But it's executive free comedy. You see we discovered what we wanted to do by just doing it. And finding out Terry Gilliam, I think is a key figure here. I think he gave body parts flying circus. It's visual esthetic, really the glue. The only thing that's holding all those disparate elements together or is this something else? That's holding it together. I think it's a shared sensibility. But lots of different kinds of writing inside that show, and I think that the Gilliam animations, which I think we did deliberately we he would link things together. But because he had this unique interesting new style by using old masters and pictures and making the move it gives you a framework to the show. So looks like it's got a lot in common. Where it hasn't. Really? This gets to another sketch to another sketch, and I think that's one of the visually. You can tell it's point. Because of that tell me about the struggle for title for the show, a what we didn't have a title, and we didn't have a clue what we wanted to call it. I mean, it was cool various things like an hour hour stretching time was one of our titles a horse spoon in a basin. You can't go the show comb flakes, really bad titles and say, no, no, no. And in the end, you know, they called it. Barry, trucks, flying circus on the contracts with that. We can't name it after him. So we I think Joan came up with python, and I came up with Monchy from in the pub, I knew Marcia, and that's it. That's well. Yeah. That would do it could have been called with Canada that was one of his titles. Good bogging down the street without you know. But luckily, we didn't trying at all. I mean like you went even trying because it sounds like we're gonna have. Well, that was there have to do any bullshit. We knew what we were going to do. We're going to write funny sketches, but we couldn't sell what we were going to do. So we'd written it. So we won't thing about not predicting. But then finding I think we pushed each other. I think it was very it was very strange. I remember early on. We were doing a sketch. I think it was about author to says sheds Jackson who had two sheds and something you Terry Gilliam had a ferret through Hatton said, however and went back to sketch, and I think that was definitely flexing muscles. And try to just be weird did character types archetypes emerged from the writing process like John cleese's, Mr. anxious. You is Mr. cheeky Markle, Mr. kind of innocent. That's what would. But is that how it emerged? John was Jomon Graham wrote together, and John Doe is from the frost report onwards, which is a frost show. It's very funny. And we all wrote for it. We all right. On it and John was on it. But he always specialize in being rather angry powerful man when somebody would be little person coming, you know, and in the ninety forty eight shows Monty Feldman who would you play that. And then John always like Michael Palin. And so it became Michael pennies roads beyond the account to be a long time, usually fella. Like cleese? Great anger is very funny. I think. It's a mazing thing. It's electrifying onscreen thing is kind of one of the things you did was that Mr. cheeky character, which seems like something you can draw on whenever you need to just push something further. What take it sidewise. Yeah. I mean, the cheeky wanted show from companies that we used to have these lighting engineers school spa. And they were always funny. I I live John. Out. If you ever need anybody hurt just come to us. We're look after I'm not problem. Great. You say it always pushing the generators out on stuck in the middle of rainstorm, and they were really good. Real companies. I think I can give you your music in your comedy writing. I think Mr. nudge, nudge, wink, wink, signed out. I mean, it's got cadence and lilt to it and all those sorts of things the only thing about that sketch. I gave it to Ronnie Barker, and they sent it back. If you look at it, of course, they did. It's no jokes in reading is your wife ago. I mean, I mean what I mean say what I mean say does she go. Does she go? I don't know it. It came back a one of the first meetings. We had a python. I got this. This one for the two houses as you off. Nice. Not sign them. All that. She she got all cheat. She does. Of course, that makes the whole difference. This case. In the way, it's done about. I remember seeing you do the nudge chocolate bar commercials and Astrid it when I was a little boy. And then when I finally saw the nudge, nudge, wink, makes these people are shaima Slee, ripping off that lovely commercial. That was a lot of may. Because I I was my marriage breaking up oddly to strike Lian. And I was stuck in a cold water flat. It was January in England. And they should would you like to fly to a stray Leah and make a nudge commercial for nudge bar said would I ever? Range and you come here. And it's January and people playing cricket the sun shining. It summa always so amazing fabulous and very funny. I fun doing him. And they wanted me to do some more the next year. I'm on done that I don't want to do that. So John Cleese came and did them. The same thing. I'm his brother. Do anything for money. John. Proud of it. He told me once all do anything for money so offered him a pound to shut up. And he took eight. Very open. Wants more departments flying six went to where what was it eleven twenty at night or something on the BBC or thereabouts light at night. It was at night nothing else should have been on that time. It was a Sunday night and the reason to be, but she didn't really care is. They're were trying to see if people stayed up at about ten forty five at night on a Sunday because the pubs have closed and the Queen had come on television cars down. Good night, everybody. Goodnight. We'll be back tomorrow. And so they were trying to see if there was anybody awake? And that were. Luckily for us we found these weird people come out the pops. Nothing personal. They they found it. It was a strange thing. And they didn't really mind what we were doing that didn't watch it. They didn't read it. They had no control over it. They just get on with it. Just do it. It seems like it's almost a bit like the Beatles Farris it something like a cultural miracle. What happened? I mean, you could call it all stretching time, and no one would have to call you. You could go to Canada. All that's just too hard to remember, you gave it the rotten end the right group of people in the right time in very very strange time slot on a Sunday night. And it became a gigantic into national cultural phenomenon that just seems miraculously. But it's a long long time till it did that it was a very slow takeoff. It didn't it didn't go to America until we'd finished doing it. So we went spoiled by fame. But it was it was it was always very weird. I don't quite. I can't quite explain it. I think. I think the point about the Beatles is is well made because I think Malcolm glad well in one of his books writes about them doing that ten thousand hours, and we done our ten thousand hours we'd written for television. We'd done our kids shows and we've done other television shows, and so we will ready to have our own show. And I think that's a good point. When did you begin to realize people had gone absolutely backing med for what you were doing. We didn't pay much money. So we went we've started to do live shows and the crowd would come and I would dress up. And then when we finally we toured then Canada, and when we on since around toe we came into Toronto airport, and there was a scream and cheer behind. Lose which group which coming in. And it was for us. And they're all there with Jessup stupidly as I welcome welcome. And they were completely crazy for it. The Canadian so absolutely mad, and they were being for one show in Winnipeg the curtain went up and the whole of the front row was dressed as a Caterpillar. Really lose show. John. Of course, hated it. Just hated it. They would come and they screen we come on stays ice cream. And he said shut up we I'm sending funny. These is conversations. Richard five on ABC radio. Jump ahead. A bit hits the making of Monty python and the holy grail, which still stands up as magnificent film. I think that you're a great. We see you in that film trudging through sleet and mud, but I'm sure just off camera warm in obey goes and catering. Tents. And it was all fine. We had we had. No, no, no, no. It was always very miserable. We it was done on a budget of two hundred thousand pounds that was the budgets of the holy grail and Sean in five weeks, and it was particularly miserable. And we were wearing NAMA, and you could tell what time of day. I was why high for your legs. The damp had got. So, but I think it wasn't our first pill. We Don Juan call now for something completely different of sketches. But that wasn't very good, and we didn't direct. So we've determined that. We would make our own film and the two terriers would direct it. And again, our money came from rock and roll it was paid for by the Pink Floyd Led Zeppelin. Genesis some other groups who just put in twenty thousand each ten thousand even each and said, they didn't want the money back. It was just they just wanted to say the film, which is very portraitist, really. But they still get money from spam? Which is nice. There are many films that can succeed with two directors. You know, the Coen brothers? I think that's about it. And yet here it is to Terry's, very different men. Both of them directing co directing the film. Can you explain what different strings Terry Jones, Terry Gilliam brought to making that film? It was dishonest to directors is to. Headed camel. It's really strange often anything at one eight by nights and the other day by day and they make different cuts. But I think the strengths were very simple. Terry Jones, always make sure the joke was on screen. So if you see something like, the the God seem not leave the room till you or anybody Nantes anybody else, not stay. No, you stay here until you know, not that is all in one take. And it's just one big frame. She all feet grams that we did it like in real time. It's like three or four minute scene. And that's Terry Jones is brilliance, and then there's other scenes that Gilliam who's just really uninterested in in things moving about on screen. Not listening to anything going on. He would give the dragon boat and things like that. So it made it look like a real movie in between the funny bits. And it was when we first screen for invest. Stors in some suburban cinema in west London. It was absolute disaster. We just died the death. And so we had a big meeting and once we put on a soundtrack by Neil Innes, which is all sacked butts and medical instruments, and it didn't work it didn't help. So we took it all off. And we put on cliche music from grams know once it sounded like a narrow fleeting film. Everybody sort of knew what it was. It was. They got it. And it started to be funny. And then we we altered the shape a lot. We did. And we did thirteen screenings before it became funny for us, which is a law. But instinctively if you're on stage you adjust to whether laugh style, but when you made a film, you can't do that you have to keep showing it and say, well, they start laughing there. So let's do a bit more of that. So keep keep it going. So thirteen was the number of cuts weeded despite your best efforts, George Harrison, succeeded in befriending, you you seem to be a little bit wary of his shy attempts at friendship towards you. Yeah. I heard he wanted to meet me like a beetle wants to meet you. L on about this. And anyway, he did he found me at a screening of holy grail in Los Angeles and say the credits were rolling chappie on the show looking for you. Let's go smoke Reefer up in the box. We started to talk. And we talk about a day. It was really extraordinary. I mean, it was love at first night, we bonded, and it's like his he wanted to know. I said, what's John light? He said, well, what's your John? Like, so. Similar around huge huge fan, and he was huge bite them fan. So we just talked about what it was like being in a group, and we have sort of parallel roles, really he had Lennon McCartney, and I had my content and John Graham with a big writing blocks. So we were little bombs in the middle. I say to the Beatles with Peter sellers, and they just remained goon show fans. And so they just got these kind of blissful expressions on their faces. I suspect John, and George we're both what'd comedians. What do you think of that theory? I think they were successful in America because of a funny, I think that I when they arrived there and Kennedy airports, and they do the press fronts. Everybody fell in love with Ringo. He's the reason they were successful because he had this funny knows funny. Hey cuts, and it was really funny. How did you find America turn left at Greenland? That scout Huma. I'm I think this is just really resistible stuff as well. As the songs was they were irresistible the same names of your friends keep popping up throughout the book. And it seems you had these very long term friendships, but could be with George Harrison. You seem to have a gift for friendship. What do you? What do you think? That is. Yes, I think I think that's possibly to. I mean, I doesn't ever really have a gift for friendship though. I mean that. All right. Well, be because of boarding school. I was used to boys, you know, getting along and finding let's go and have a drink cO gang. We would definitely our school was a gang who Stephanie a gang sauce against them. And I think by was a bit of a gang to us against them. But I think when you've I mean, I'd never met anybody like George I mean, he was so open, and he was all heart, and he was the same to everybody. I mean, if the waiter K mini was just as nice to the waiter. She wants to anybody else who might be famous or not famous. It didn't matter. He was just a really good haunted, man. I learned from him. He was very important to me. Learn I learned not to be an asshole. Famous you can famous bugger off. But he was very good about fame. He been the Beatles. And he would say doesn't matter famous. She while you're all going to die. You can't take it with you doesn't mean anything. So you'd better make sure you're having a good life and your perpetual, leave everything in America. What should become very famous you hosted Saturday Night Live four times in the nineteen seventies. We never got that here. So I had no idea this. This happened have different was the creative process on Saturday Night Live in that period, where you have John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd and Bill Murray compared to working at the BBC with apartments, we pythons a writers, very serious writers and since rights group, and we'd write everything before constant. But inside the Night Live. They were comedians, and they were very very strange because you up to their offices, and they were smoking weed all the time. Accession we would write nine to five we would not business hours and wouldn't dream of being naughty or even drinking. It was very strange. They stay up all night on Tuesday trying to run comedy. Really? It was not very good way to write. I found I found snitty averted actually is an amazing photo in your book, and your it's your home in London. And you're standing there the interest the door with a huge like platinum record something like that. And you gotta beat in your face kind of roaring like a madman. And next to you is Mark Hamill and Harrison Ford Harrison Ford looks like he's about to burst spleen, he's laughing son much. Mark Hamill looks pretty happy. Can you explain what happened on that night plays? Eric idle? Well, Carrie Carrie Fisher in New York, and she was the funniest she's just so funny. She was really funny and cute and lovely and we were out. I thought we were going to be an Australia. I think we'd been and I said we'll use my house in London because they were going to film the second Star Wars. And so they did. And so my house became of London base. And when I came back we had a party there. And they were very depressed filming in L street, and they're very miserable miserable place, filming special effects films can be very boring. So I bought this bottle of Buca back from Tunisia. Should this cheer you up? And so I drink of this fig sixty percent fig brandy thing, and they cheered up a bit. And then. Strange coincidence. All of the Rolling Stones came by serious, all of them all of them, not all the time. There's a drink type out yourselves. This policy this enormous party broke out, and then the house, and it was great party went on sold about six in the morning when the cost came to collect these guys to film Star Wars and the Rolling Stones went off to hang upside down in that caves. China too bad. And then when I saw the film the impostor back I show the sea night's show that morning, and they come out of the still stunned completely stone. Carry guys to Billy Dee Williams high. Harrison Ford smiling, I still drunk. So I was very proud. I'd ruined into seeing installed. The making of life, and Brian the life of Brian idea that just popped out of your mouth one day while it was it was the opening of holy grail in in New York on a journalist to me. What's the next python film going to be an I said Jesus Christ lust for glory. I don't know why. It's a sickness. What can I tell you? How many got back to London, please? That's a very good idea. I've been really nobody's ever been funny about religion. And he was right. And so what's nice in comedies? If you find a nice big wide open field. This something to be done because everybody's done it. But it's not a film about Jesus. Why was that decision might not make about Jesus and make it about someone else? Well, this nothing mug. Jesus. Christ says things good things like, you know, look after everybody love everybody, turn the other cheek. Forgive people blessed are the poor look after heal the sick, you all the poor. You know, all of those things very fine. Good morally, upstanding things to do nothing to mock about that tool. So we thought well, we're not going to do that for. So we're not gonna make just a blasphemous film in the series of bible jokes. So we did about four weeks research into the into the bible, and we read the Dead Sea scrolls, and we read the Apocrypha and all sorts of things, and then we watched a lot of films from Hollywood, you know, like, Ben. Ben him. They're awful for homes, really dreadful. Surely this man is the son of art. Really bad. So we knew that was going to be like that we're going to look like a biblical epic. But then we thought well the target really humanity people interpret religion, and then find each other over it which goes on. So that became our Santa. And we found that we'd make a surrogate a boy called Bryan born next door whose unfortunate enough to be mistaken for a messiah so it's a tragedy. I mean, what a dreadful thing. No matter what he says. I'm not the bizarre. I'm not only true. What did noise? What chances give me? So Phil about Jesus it's more about the kind of people who follow religious, gurus and religious leaders religion. It's about the position of religion in society. And how people argue and take over until people want to do and campus revolutionaries to they get a bit of a kicking in the film. The was there's John Jones these Graham Chapman about rage, which is lovely trade unions in England. Awesome. On on the menu brothers in charge destruction to our Roman empire within three weeks. Correct easy start Judy papers off with people. So that was like us mocking all the chops and people in London New very angry with each other. I mean, communism of religion too. So it's the same things apply. They're fighting with each other. The cleverest thing is to end the life of Brian with song. Did you reach a kind of an impasse at the end of the movie without the soul. Well, we go to the end of the movie, and we discover that all characters were heading crucifixion. How are we gonna finish this film? You know? So what we have to finish the song? That's a good idea. Yeah. We can be being crucified wishing. I'm not really needs to be like a cheery song. Cheeky cheery up each song about looking on the bright side. That's a good idea to it. Maybe it should have a whistle. Like a Disney song. We've got it. We can go home now. So I went off and wrote it. Home didn't take very long. They took about half an hour. And because I had these codes in my mind and brought it back next. I and I played it. I hate it. It was nice words. And it's pretty outrageous end to a film. Yeah. At the first vocal take you did on it didn't work one on. Well, it's sort of did. But it wasn't good in about a year. Lehto we came to record it before we went off to Tunisia to film it, and I was very nice jazz band arrangement. And I sang always look going abroad, rather, dull voice, actually, and when played it for the crew in Tunisia. They liked the song. And I thought something's missing. And I realized what was missing was the character. It should be sung by Mr. cheeky. He was a character is playing in the movie, and the ease the one that goes. My mind was going crucifixion years down for the dole along prosciutto on crucifixion years left crucifixion turn lights on the left or crucifixion freedom for me. Freedom as I should go live on an island somewhere. Joanie good. You. Now, put any legs crucifixion relay. So I thought he should be singing the song. So I got sound guy. I said can we put a new vocal on? And he said, yeah. So we went into a hotel room and Geneva, and we rugs down around the walls. And I spoke about LA Booker. There's trouble on Star Wars we recorded it. And so the track that you hear now is all live from a hotel room into nesia soundbites Daikin, really my mad and that made the song work. I think it was of cheeky it. It makes you work. I really remember walking out of seeing that. Well, he added the cinema. This lovely physi- feeling after Kris fiction sane. What's funny about it to me is it's it's it's ironic song is supposed to be run because you don't have much to look forward to Anchorage defied the bright sides. So it's all it became song to cheer people up. So you moved to the United States after years living in England. I'd like you to read something from your book about that about why you're not American now. All right. This is from my book. I wrote era is. I pay taxes in three countries, and I can vote in non of them. I wasn't even allowed to vote against Brexit. The Russians had more side than I did. Com. Boats in the states. They coined the phrase, no taxation without representation, I was once coming through LAX when a steely eyed immigration officer peered suspiciously at me, how long have you been green card holder? Oh, I've had it for ages. I said more than twenty years, and why aren't you on America? Oh, well, what should I say was the correct thing to say because I am an Englishman born and raised in England under the bombs of Hitler, a member of one of its most prestigious universities from college. Founded in thirteen forty seven a man who watch England win the World Cup at Wembley in nineteen. Sixty six leash won a proud Elizabethan traditions of Shakespeare choisir wild words with cola Rijn Dickins. Cricket loving survivor of the sixties and a member of one of the most admired comedy groups in the world. It's not enough. I live in your fat country and pay my taxes. Now, you wish me to put my hand on my heart and pledge allegiance to a self righteous lying tax voiding moron. And he's raciest day bashing environmentally dangerous, greedy bastard. Science denying cronies. Who reject evolution on the rights of women plunked, the planet for profits to please that powerful funders stealing the very air and clean water of that she'll dron while Tweety insanely lying through that cheese on propaganda TV channels that would have shamed. Joseph goebbels. No shot the French do not shrug it me saw Donnelly and ask me why I'm not French the Norwegians stopped me on their shores and insist I wear thick knitwear large red Iraq charge the countryside suffering from Ibsen on we the Australians don't force me into baggy swim pants to stand on planks, orange sunscreen hurtling across net shark infested waters singing bossom straightly fan. No sorry. I am a tax payer a member of your academy Grammy win a Tony win a father of an American a lover of America marriage an American wife with an American child, but not on American. Did I say any of this? Are you kidding me? Good question. I replied, and I think I'm happy being a now, I think perhaps I should be homage champions passport. I mean, I feel connected to individual states and more and more connected to human beings coming out of a Grammy cares music tribute to Paul McCartney an evening, I found very moving up lifting. I bumped into smokey Robinson. That was so great. I said it may be proud to be white. Me too. He said. The former and light great president of the Czech Republic. Wonderful men love hovel who had been a play ride into dissident spent years and years as a prisoner of the secret police country in ninety nine he was released in no time, he was suddenly president of that country, and he ascended to Prague Castle, and you could never quite believe it and he said while he was there. He kept waiting to wake up on rested and be put back in again and be told like it was all the bit of a bit of a judge. Do you ever feel like that? I mean, you've come from this extraordinary background and your life is so golden Eric it really is lots of friendship love of marriage could friends success money travel, all those things, but I done much of years in jail. I mean, I was at the orphanage for twelve years, you know, life can only get better off to that. So that's what I think, you know. What's good? I mean, that's the only thing about having an unhappy childhood is, you know. What makes you happy off to that? It's not being there. What is what is that being happy is that gratitude? I think you have to realize the privilege of being alive. I mean, just you know, not being oppressed. Not being in jail, we really stored republished to be alive in these bodies the short length of time on the planet, and and to know about we in the middle of this universe. Ninety billion years lie is from side to side. I mean, that's just an extraordinary thing that we all share the favorite of death towards the end of your book, lots of loss of friends. Job alerts. Spoiler to tell you. Keep away curious George Harrison's did happen to all of us. I'm sorry to have to break this to you on the radio, but that's inevitable. That comes with the humanity comes to be it's been so loaded to speak to you as a human on this stage. It's been under underprivileged to meet you Erica. I'm lucky to finish up with them. I don't know. Maybe you've got another song up your sleeve. Things are bad. I couldn't really make you mad things. Just might you swear on curves when you're chewing on March. Gristle grabble gave a whistle and they show help things turn out the base hind all wise, gone abroad side of live. Why? Allied side of life. If large seems Johnny rotten this something new forgotten, and that's often smile dogs and saying you're failing in the dumps forget about Trump's just per she'll observe all that stuff. I o. Why the bride side of life? The ride side of live. Life is quite absurd. And that's the final word must always spice the cotton with how forget about you're saying the audience grin and joy issue large. John they how so. Why is on the bride side of death? Just be all you draw your Germano. All. Pieces. When you look at it. Laffan joke. It's. You'll see it so much show offing 'cause you Josh remember the last law is on you. The side. All. Side of live. Giant all wise. The shod go on. Vice to Frank Sinatra's Miwa. And all is long gone. Side of law. Memoir is called. Always look the broadside of life. Of course. Huge. Thanks to the Brisbane powerhouse and sound engineer all EPA, epilepsy, ABC dot net. Thought I use slash conversations website on June five, thanks. The. Listening to a podcast of conversations with Richard Fidler. For more conversations interviews, please go to the website. I they say dot net slash conversations. Discover more great ABC podcasts. Live radio and exclusives. On the ABC. Listen up.

John Eric idle England America John Cleese Michael Palin Terry Jones Cambridge Canada London Saturday Night Live George Harrison BBC Terry Gilliam Britain ABC Wolverhampton Brisbane Graham Chapman
Eric Idle's life on the bright side

Conversations

53:57 min | 1 year ago

Eric Idle's life on the bright side

"This is an ABC podcast today on conversations. Were hold the wonder and majesty of Eric Idle Eric. Idle and five other chips formed monty python back in nineteen sixty nine eyebrow timeless absurd humor to the world and they became absurdly popular in return. Eric had a horrible early life. He was brought up in a cold gray orphanage in Britain but his life since then has been golden filled with creativity and love and Huma and friendship with some extraordinary people. Eric written a very enjoyable memoir a sorta biography. He calls it. The title is of course always look on. The bright side of life are recorded. This conversation with Eric idle at the Brisbane powerhouse. Am I have to say it was about as much fun as I've ever had doing? One of these live events but a quick heads up. He is from Monty Python. There is some strong language a few F. bombs deployed in the name of human here and there just in case you've got some young kids around or if that sort of thing just isn't your cup of tea anyway much. Let me just say what a wonderful book this is? How long was it taking you to put this Farrago together? I suppose it took me about a little over a year I decided I would not go to a publisher and priests telit. Which is what people tend to do. Because I wanted to find out what sort of book I wanted to write and I didn't know that until I'd written it so it was. It was good because if you look at my age if you look back on your life it's quite interesting you all these different people you've been and so that was a nice exploration for me. You begin by saying the APP said the time of my birth. Hitler was trying to kill me. Which is true in poignant or the same time the images you have in the book and with the most the ones we see of. Post War Britain. They're all very black and white gray. Is that how it looked at the time? Yeah no it was very much. I was born in Nineteen forty-three ambush strange coincidence. I was born on my birthday but I saw lucky really but we grew up in fifties in England. It was a rationing and everywhere you went. There was bomb damage and bomb sights and everything was miserable and cold and not much to eat and there was no television. I didn't come 'til about sixty later on in the sixties and we're so we radio is a very very big for us. We will listen to radio which I think python these large generation of comics to go up not watching television but listening to radio and did that mean the goon show for you. The goon show was partly for me but I was at boarding school so I didn't get a lot of that but there were there. Were lots of very funny comedians. You know like our read. Come you smell gas or is it me? I love music of the end of music. All Your Dad had been in the RIF and he survived the war. But not the homecoming. What can you tell me about that? Well my data being in the RIF since nine hundred forty one and he was a while operator rear gunner in Wellington's Lancaster's we should've made worse seat in the House. That is you know the back. And but he survived the war and then he was hitch-hiking home because they told them to lifts and he was killed in a traffic accident coming home for Christmas which is really kind of. It's in what way it's ironic. It's very fixable weird and funny strangely funding. And how was your mum? After that she was combined completely nuts. You know she was very obviously distraught. And you know she. She didn't really take that very well. I mean you can take you very well but it was it was. It was very difficult for us at Christmas. And what was the institution you sent to? An orphanage or a boarding school and orphanage called the Royal Wolverhampton Orphanage and the war gave it a shot in the arm because it was running out of orphans but so my education this look on the bright so I mean there's always good and bad you know certain means of my education from the age of seven was paid for by the Rif. And I went to school in this wonderful place call Wolverhampton which is not quite the end of the world but you can see it from there and it's really miserable place in the Midlands and horrible and all the kids. I was at school with all. The boys had all lost their fathers. So that's really strange. Psychologically I think and I don't quite know what difference that may from seven till nineteen. How much violence used as a character improving techniques? Well it was. It was very violence. It was luck Dickensian when especially the senior schools or junior school from seven till eleven eleven. You went to the senior school and that was like there was a dormitory at one hundred yards long with bed every two feet and a the prefects could beat you. Slippers and the teachers had the privilege of beating you with canes so it was quite lots of beating Character building and they will say things like this is for your own good or we'll all do it for you. Then if you like I was just so but you know it was very Dickensian in a bleak sort of sterile environment like that. Where do you go do you go into your own hit a lot? I think so. I think that's in the end. They escape for me. Certainly two ways almost to go over the wall for girls and beer which we got very good at and tobacco. We have a secret nightlife. We're going but the when you when you say that. How did you get that climbing walls to me? Go very good because what they did from the Asia Devon. They made us go into the army so every Monday we had on bloody uniforms march up and down the square left and right so by the age of fourteen could strip a Bren Gun. Blindfold they send us over the Welsh hills crawling around you know compass abilities and and so you know you learn to creep about in the dark and we use that to get to the school always bright side in that you know what I mean. So we go the off licence. Concrete Pass over the wall and come back armed with beer and respect pipes long church church warden pipes and Balkan Sabrina array wash pipe tobacco and one call baby's bottom which is a smooth as a baby's bottom with the slogan plaque tobacco but reading it seems like reading the thing for you though. I think reading became very much more for me a way of Escape. And that's what. I loved reading because you can be alone in a group of people. Get some privacy so I loved history and I loved literature and I I read and read and read and we didn't have a teenage life because we were stuck in this. Bloody School is like twelve thirteen week terms and nobody else is having a teenage time. You know getting to be the sixties and we're stuck there doing prep in the evening. So what made you WANNA learn? Guitar are Elvis. Elvis changed our lives at the age of twelve. Suddenly Elvis appeared and he was like a gift from the Gods and it was. It was marvelous and we went crazy for him. Because you seem to be so cool with Stalin Gina Pap and they would photograph. They wouldn't photograph him on television below the waist in America because he can about too much show. We learn we would do. We were skiffle group and we do you know Black Negro songs from from the south. Jump DOWN TURN AROUND. Pick A BALE OF COTTON. Or if you're black you're if you're white you're all right if you're brown stick around but if you're black over get back get back. And for some reason in Wolverhampton. It's very white blazed. Five thousand miles from the nearest black person we identified with the underclass of the deep South which is weird but notice. You do have a guitar over there. Nic Helps you care to share a song. This at this point is is a song from the heart. Anyway I'd like to do. Here's a little song. He won't take very long. It's about the world today and it's something I really need to say. Fuck Shelf is and all those gates who asked for shelties Digest. Get on my tapes when your grinning lock and unity with people. You don't know somehow get that fucking phone stir go and then another fifteen fucking people show shale fees are a waste of fucking time so tell shellfish. Alfie GETS NEXT TIME. It comes to pass to death fucking selfie sticks. Shove them up there. Thank you very much. The roar emotion behind that. I really felt. That's I really felt that with every five of my being. What was your introduction? Sue The new wave of comedy. That was washing over Britain in the very early sixties. Yeah well when we were is about eighteen we would go to west end of London in the holiday time and there was this amazing group a review and it was called beyond the fringe. And it was Peter. Cook and Dudley Moore Alan Bennett and Jonathan Miller. And they were just so funny. They came out of the Edinburgh fringe and they were from Oxford and Cambridge. Four of them and it was. It was a revelation to me because I didn't realize you were allowed to be funny about royalty and the army and the war and the queen and policemen and they just ripped society apart with laugh. Job was anger but it was laughter and I just. It just changed my life. I thought from that time on. I WanNa be funny and I learned the record. I I just that was it for me. It was a life changing experience that was during the so-called satire boom of the early sixties. Peter Cookies said Yes said either did so much to defeat the Nazi party during one by Germany at the time you didn't really go down that path you and the partners chose more absurdist humor. That was more in line with the goons which in turn goes back to Lewis Carroll and this other English tradition with that by the time we got onto television which much later on like ten years later the being the beyond the fringe started it. And then we're off to Broadway then. David Frost came along and this is a good idea. Descent are on television and he did. This show called. That was the week that was with very funny people Willie Rushton and and that was very very big and it's a very powerful and actually got rid of the conservative government's but then by the time we got into television become old hat. Everybody had done satire so we were very fortunate in the fact that we had to do a whole we have to do generic comedy about types rather than about real people so now you don't need notes to know who laughing at. Yes that's made your work much more timeless as a result. Exactly exactly if you look at Saturday night. Live for example. You need to know that. Gerald Ford Fellow Ver Lot. Then before you laugh at Chevy Chase but but we don't have that problem because it's just generic comedy. There's one little gap in your book. Which is sort of announced you became head boy at your your school and then got a scholarship to Cambridge. You must have been quite a clever young man and what you seen such and supported in that I think again. That was just me reading because we didn't have much of a life so I I had done. I've done exams did past exams and then I would do more exams. And then I think when I finally got an interview for Cambridge through my history master who've been to Pembroke. I was very fortunate. I think I'd just read more than anybody. In England. We didn't have a life so I'm pembroke. College was very good. They were looking for people. Who weren't your normal grammar school public school boys and they they had been there so like comedy of funny people and it was very strange because in my first second term. There I auditioned for the Pembroke. Comedy show called the pembroke smoker and auditioned by Tim. Brooke Taylor and Bill Oddy. Isn't that weird? I mean to goodies auditioning a future. Python is really quite bizarre and the first piece of material idea was written by John cleese. Who wasn't at pembroke but dined there every night because he liked the company better but you can be in the pembroke smoker so I did his first sketch I ever did was written by John cleese and he was there and that so that was my second term so it's February ninety sixty three. I met him that moment when you come to Cambridge. It's a bit like that moment. And the wizard of Oz where it's been in black and white until Darby opens the door and suddenly there's all this beautiful color. Is that how you remember it here? It was extraordinary I mean going from Wolverhampton and then you go to Cambridge. It's thirteen forty seven the colleges founded and it's it's so beautiful everywhere you look and people are saying you're GonNa have a glass of Sherry would you. It was what was nice about it. Was you had time to just follow whatever you wanted to do. And so in the end what I did because I immediately joined the footlights was I just had comedy from that moment on and I met all these wonderful people Graham Chapman and we just you just want them the good people and then you got better by by trying and watching so you met John cleese and Graham Chapman at Cambridge. And then later you bet Michael Palin Terry Jones who are from Oxford but that was at the Edinburgh fringe. Did you recognize some kind of shared sensibility amongst you? As Group of four you ever became the pythons. Yeah I mean at the end of my first year. And there was a big final review at Cambridge which had cleese and Chapman and Brooke Taylor and Audie and it was so good. It went to the west end and ran for five months. And then he went to Broadway so they couldn't go to the festival so I got a telegram. I was in Germany and come immediately and I was suddenly in the festival with three other guys graeme garden and we were we were performing this wonderful material and got rave notices and of course then we went to check out the Oxford Revue Cambridge and they were crap and but I did meet Terry Jones who is wonderful and then a year later extraordinary Michael Palin who was extremely funny this those days. Obviously I think he's. The one that got away is gone. Serious you know. He's he's actually really very funny quickey but he has to be nice. Which is a terrible curse. I think he's a really nice new seething inside the I'm after mistaken for Michael Palin when I'm on the road I really Ajello Mike and I say when I'm mistake of Michael Palin and said yes I am Michael Palin. I've called you ugly bastard. He's such a nice man. Michael pilot one of the things. They said that really drove. The creativity of the Beatles was the John and Paul George as well of course wanted to impress the other guys with the songs they'd written. It's like are really. WanNa make them love what undoing. Once you started working with that amazing pool. Comedians was dynamic between you. Yes absolutely I mean when when we got our own show. It was like well. Let's not do what everybody else has done? And we think we pushed ourselves extremes and try things that are not. Let's not do the regular old light? Entertainment show. Let's be more edgy. And so we would definitely compete with each other and the writing and then we'd read it out to each other and if we laughed we put it into Monty Python. And if we didn't laugh we showed it to the to Ronnie's we were professionals. You say so the BBC wanted you all to do a show having worked on a whole bunch of shows and served a long apprenticeship in television comedy the BBC brought you together and you yourselves together. I suppose to do this comedy show. What was their strong idea of what he wanted. The show to be or it more about what you wanted it not today. I think the last one. I think we had no real idea. And we hadn't done any much thinking about it and they were very kind of. What are you going to do more? You'RE GONNA use film. Oh that's a good idea. We'll use Phil. What are you gonNA have stars nine now? So yes no maybe not now. Now we there was like come on. Sell a something you know. And we didn't know what we were doing and they went. I'll just go away and make thirteen. So we did is really right. That never happened. Never happens but it's executive free comedy. You See. I mean we discovered what we wanted to do by just doing it. And Finding out Terry Gilliam. I think is a key figure here. I think he gave body. Parts Flying Circus. It's visual steady. There's really the glue the only thing that's holding all those disparate elements together or is there something else that's holding it together now. I think it's a shared sensibility. You but lots of different kinds of writing inside that show and I think that the Gilliam animations which is a thing we did deliberately we he would link things together but because he had this unique interesting new style by using our masters and pictures making the move it gives you like a framework to the show so it looks like it's got a lot in common where it hasn't really. This gets to another sketch to another sketch. And I think that's that's one of the visually you can tell it's pointing because of that to me about the struggle for a title for the show what we didn't have a title and we didn't have a clue what we wanted to call it. I mean it was called various things like an owl stretching time was one of our earliest titles are horses spoon and a basin. You can't call a show on flakes really bad titles and it'd be saying no no no And in the end you know they called it. Barry trucks flying circus on the contracts with the we can't named after him so we are. I think John came up with python and I came up with Monchy from Chapin the pub. I knew Marcia. And that's it. That's it well. Yeah that would do. It could have been called with Canada. That was one of our earliest. Titles we walking with up but luckily we didn't were you trying at all. I mean to says like you weren't even trying because it sounds like we're going to have well that was what was the bullshit. We knew what we were going to do. We're going to write funny sketches. But we couldn't sell what we were going to do until we'd written so we weren't you know. Is that thing about not predicting but then finding I think we pushed each other. I think it was very. It was very strange. I remember early on. We were doing a sketch I think it was the right author to say sheds Jackson who had two sheds and some were Terry Gilliam and you had a ferret through said however and then went back to sketch and I think that was definitely flexing our muscles and try and just be weird. Did character types archetypes emerged from the writing process like with John. Cleese'S MR anxious. You Mr Cheeky. Michael is Mr kind of innocent. I don't know if that's what would but but is that how it emerged. John had always burn and John and Graham wrote together and John Doors from the frost. Report Onwards which is a frost show. It's very funny and we all wrote for it. We are all arises on it and Yomas on it but always specialize in being assertive rather angry powerful man. When somebody would be the little person coming you know and in the ninety forty eight shows Marty Feldman. Who would you play that? And then John always like Michael Palin and so it became Michael Penn's role to beyond. I'm the account to be a lion Tamer. Little Fella awake cleese's great. Anger is very funny. I think yeah. It's amazing to to it's electrifying on screen and your thing is kind of one of the things you did was Mr Cheeky character. Which seems like something you can draw on whenever you need to. Just push something a bit further. We'll take it sideways. Yeah Cheeky wanted. Show is McCartney's we used to have. These lighting engineers called sparks and they were always very funny. I John Allow allow. If you ever need anybody hurt just come to us. You know we look after them no problem and they were. They were great. Say Pushing generators out on stuck in more in the middle of rainstorm and they were really good. They're real cottigny's. I think I can hear your your music in your comedy writing. I think Mr Nudge Nudge wink. Wink signed him on our two main. It's got cadence and Lilt to it and all those sorts of things but the odd thing about that sketch I gave it to Ronnie Barker and they send it back and if you look at it of course they did. It's got no jokes in reading. Is Your wife ago now at I mean not. I mean you know what I mean. Say more now what I mean. Not Saying. Does she go go? I don't know it came back and one of the first meetings we had a python. I got this I this one. For the two houses Co. is your I mean. Nice not sign them all that she she got off but she does. She does excitable and of course that makes the whole difference. Case is in the way it's done. I remember seeing. You do the nudge. Chocolate bar commercials Australia. When I was a little boy and then when I finally saw the genetic makes these people shamelessly ripping off that lovely commercial. What that was a lifesaver for me. Because I was my marriage is breaking up. Oddly to the styling and I was stuck in a cold water flat it was January in England and they should. Would you like to fly to Australia and make a nudge commercial for knowledgeable? And I said would I ever and I? It was great and you come here. It's January and people playing cricket the sun's Shining. It's summer or so amazing fabulous. And very funny I fun doing him and they wanted me to do some more the next year and I saw on. I've done that. I don't WanNa do that so John. Cleese came and did them. The same thing. Honest brought that. If you do anything for money I'll John each proud of it. He told me once. I'll do anything for money so often pound to shut up and he took it very open so once monty python's flying circus went to where what was it eleven twenty at night or something on the BBC or thereabouts late. At night it was late at night. Nothing else had ever been on at that time. It was a Sunday night and the reason she didn't really care is there. Were trying to see if people stayed up at about ten forty five at on a Sunday because the pumps it closed. And the Queen of come on television. Close Down Goodnight. Everybody good night which we'll be back tomorrow and so they were trying to see if there was anybody awake and there were luckily for us. I'm which is weird people. Come out the POPs now. Nothing personal they found it. It was a strange thing and they didn't really mind what we were doing. That didn't watch it. They didn't read it. They had no control over it. They just get on with it do it. It seems like it's almost a bit like the Beatles and so far as it's something that's almost like a cultural miracle what happened. I mean. You could've called IT AL stretching time and no one would've now what you could call with a Canada? There's just too hard to remember. You gotta give it the right and then the right group of people in the right time in a very very strange time slot on Sunday night and it became a gigantic international cultural phenomenon. It just seems miraculous yet. But it's a long long time till it did that. I mean it was a very slow takeoff. Didn't it didn't go to America until we'd finished doing it so we went spoiled by fame. It was it was always very weird. I don't I can't quite explain it. I think the point about the Beatles is well made because I think Malcolm Bradwell in one of his books writes about them doing their ten thousand hours and we done our ten thousand hours. We'd written for television. We've done our kids shows and we'd done other television shows and so we were kind of ready to have our own show and I think that's a good point. When did you begin to realize people had gone absolutely backing mad for what you were doing? We didn't pay much money so we went. We started to do live shows. Now the crowd would come and they would dress up and then when we finally we toured then Canada and when we got Toronto came into Toronto airport and there was a scream and cheer we will behind which group you know who's coming in and it was for us and they were all there with Jessup stupidly as hey welcome welcome and they were completely crazy for it Canadian so absolutely mad and they were being for one show in Winnipeg. The curtain went up and the whole of the front row was dressed as a caterpillar. I mean you can't really lose a shoreline. John of course hated it just hated it and they would come a new screen we come on stage. They scream and he said shut up. We sending funny yet. This is conversations Richard FIDLER ON ABC. Radio. I'm going to jump ahead of the making of Monty Python and the holy grail which still stands up as a magnificent film. I think the letters we see you in that film trudging through sleet and mud. But I'm sure just off camera. There were warming Bagosora catering tent and it was all fine like trailers. We had no cellist. No no it was. It was very miserable. We it was done on a budget of two hundred thousand pounds. That was the budget of the holy grail and shot in five weeks and it was particularly miserable and we were wearing woolen Armagh. And you could tell what time of day I was. Why high for your legs. The damp had got a but I think it wasn't our first film. We Don Juan called and now for something completely. Different of sketches. But that wasn't very good and we didn't direct it so we determined that we would make our own film and the two terriers would direct it and again our money came from rock and roll. It was paid for by the pink. Floyd led Zeppelin genesis some other groups who just put in twenty thousand each ten thousand even each and they didn't want the money back it was just. They just wanted to see the film. Which is very fortuitous really. But they still get money from spam locked which is nice now. There are many films that can succeed with two directors. The COEN brothers. I think that's about it and yet here it is to Terry's very different men both of them. Directing Co directing the film. Can you explain what strengths Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam brought to making that film? It was actually zoster to directors is like two headed camel. It's not really strange and that often they were editing. It warmer that eat by nights and the other day by day and they make different cuts were but I think the strengths were very simple. Terry Jones would always make sure the joke was on screen. So if you see something like the the God seen were not to leave the room till you or anybody else. Not We stay. No you stay here until you know not an a- that is all in one take and it's just one big frame feet grams there and we did it like in real time so three or four minute scene. And that's Jerry Jones his brilliance. And then there's other scenes that Gilliam who's just really uninterested in in things moving about on screen. Not Listening anything going on. He would like the dragon boat and things like that so it made it look like a real movie in between the funny bits and it was when we first screen it for our investors in some suburban cinema in West. London it was an absolute disaster. We just died the death and so we had a big meeting and we put on a by. Neil Innes which is all Saxon medieval instruments and it didn't work. It didn't help so we took it all off and we put on. Cliche music from grams. You know wants it sounded like an Arrow flew infill. Everybody sort of knew what it was. It was that they got it and it started to be funny and then we we alter the shape a lot we did. We did thirteen screenings before it became funny for us which is a law but instinctively. If you're on stage you adjust to wear the lobster but when you made a film. You can't do that. You have to keep showing it and they say well they start laughing there so let's do a bit more of that or keep him keep it going. So thirteen was the cut number of cuts weeded. Despite your best efforts George Harrison succeeded in befriending. You you seem to be built a little bit wary of his show attempts at friendship towards you. Yeah I heard he wanted to meet me and I was like a beetle. Wants to meet you bloody L. on about this. And anyway he did. He found me the screening of Holy Grail in Los Angeles. And the credits. Were each happy on the shows that. I'll be looking for you. L. Let's smoke a reefer up in the box and we started to talk and we talk a day. That was a really extraordinary. I mean it was like love at first sight we bonded and it's like his. He one is an hour. So what's John Light he said? Well what's your John like so we just similar huge huge fan and he was a huge bite them fan so we just talked about what it was like being in a group and we have sort of parallel roles. Really he had Lennon McCartney. And I had Mike and Terry and John and Graham big writing blocks so we were the bombs in the middle. I seen footage of the Beatles with Peter Sellers. And they're just mad goon show fans and so they just got these kind of blissful expressions on their. I suspect John and George were both thwarted. Comedians do you think of that theory. I think they were successful in America because of a funny. I think that I when they arrived there. And it's Kennedy Airport and they do the press conference everybody fell in love with Ringo. He's the reason they were successful because he had this. Funny nose is funny haircut and it was really funny. How did you find America turn left at Greenland? You know what we're doing what I saw that Scout Humor and I think this is just really irresistible stuff as well as the songs was. They were irresistible. The same names of your friends keep popping up throughout the book and it seems you had these very long term friendships particularly with George Harrison. You seem to have a gift a friendship what do you. What do you think that is? I'm yes I think I think that's possibly to. I mean I doesn't everybody have a gift for Friendship. Though. I mean. I know all right well because of boarding school I was used to boys. You know and getting along and finding let's have a drink or gang is at our school was a gang who Stephanie again. It's US against them. And I think biathlon was a bit of a gang to us against them. But I think when you've never met anybody like George I mean he was so open and he was all heart and he was the same to everybody. If waiter came in he was just as nice to the waiter as he wants to anybody else who might be famous or not famous. It didn't matter dame he was just a really good hearted man and I learned from him. He was very important to me to look at you learn. Learn not to be an asshole if you're famous famous now but you know. He was very good about fame. He been the Beatles and he would say it doesn't matter how famous you are. You're all going to die. You can't take it with. You doesn't mean anything so you better make sure you're having a good life and you're prepared to leave everything in America. What she become very famous. You hosted Saturday. Night live four times in the nineties. We never got that here so I had no idea this. This have different was the creative process on Saturday night. Live in that period where you have John Belushi. Dan Aykroyd and Bill Murray compared to working at the BBC with the pythons. We've pythons. Were writers very serious writers since a rightist group and we'd write everything before casting but in Saturday night live. They were comedians and they were very much very strange because you up to their and they were smoking weed all the time so we would write nine to five. We would business hours. Wouldn't dream of being naughty or even drinking. It was very strange. Stay up all night on a Tuesday. Trying to write comedy really. It was not not a very good way to write. I found I found snitty about it. Actually is an amazing photo in your book and your. I think it's your home in London. And you're standing there the interest of the door with a huge like record or something like that and your face being in your face. It's kind of like roaring like a madman and next to you is mark Hamill and Harrison Ford Harrison. Ford looks like he's about to list he spleen. He's laughing son. Much Mark Hamill looks pretty happy. Can you explain what happened on that? Not Please Eric idle well. Carrie I met Carrie Fisher in New York. And she was the funniest. She's so funny. She was really funny and cute and lovely and we were out where we were going to be in Australia. I think we've seen and I said well use my house in London because they were GonNa film the Second Star Wars and so they did and so. My house became this of London base and when I came back we had a party there and they were very depressed because they were filming in L. Street and they were very miserable because she's a miserable place. Filming Special Effects. Films can be very boring so I bought this bottle of Buca back from Tunisia. I should this cheer you up and so I gave them a drink of this fig sixty percent fig brandy thing and they cheered up a bit and then strange cousins. All of the rolling stones came by. I'm serious all of them. All of them not pretending to shop and all the time. There's there's a drink help yourselves this party. This enormous party broke out and then the house and it was great. Party went on until about six in the morning when the cars came to collect these guys to film star wars and the rolling stones went off home to hang upside down in the caves and China and went to bed and then we're not sure the film the Empire strikes back on the scene. They shot that morning and they come out of the still stone. Completely stone and carry Kazan goes to Billy Dee Williams. Hi I'm Harrison Ford smiling. I still drunk so I was very proud. I'd ruined the scene. Installed the making of life and Brian Block of Brian was an idea that just popped out of your mouth. One day while it was it was at the opening of Holy Grail in in New York and a journalist said to me. What's the next python film going to be an I said Jesus Christ lust for Glory? I don't know why instead of sickness. What can I tell you? How many got back to London? Lisa? That's a very good idea now. I've been really issues. Nobody's ever been funny about religion and he was right. And so what's Nice in comedies? If you find a nice big wide open field this something to be done because now everybody's done it but it's not a film about Jesus. Why was that decision? Made not to make it about Jesus and make it about someone else. Well there's nothing you can't Jesus Christ. She says things good things like you know. Look after everybody love everybody. Turn the other cheek forgive. People blessed are the poor. Look after heal the sick all the poor. All of those things are very fine. Good morally upstanding things to do. There's nothing to mock about that at all so we thought well we're not going to do that for saw. We're not GonNa make just a blasphemous film. The series of Bible jokes so we did about four weeks research into the into the Bible and we read the Dead Sea Scrolls and we read the Apocrypha and all sorts of things and then we watched a lot of films from Hollywood like Ben and Ben Him and you know Ben them and they're awesome films really dreadful Shirley this man is the son of God. You know really bad so we knew that was going to be like that we were going to look like a biblical epic but then we sort of thought well. The charge really is humanity. People interpret religion and then fight each other over it which goes on so that became our satire and we found that we'd make a surrogate boy called Bryan born next door. Who IS UNFORTUNATE ENOUGH TO BE MISTAKEN FOR MESSIAH? So it's a tragedy. I mean what a dreadful thing and no matter what he says. I'm not I'm not. I'm not a true Michelle We didn't know is what chance. Zac Give me so much. A film about Jesus. It's more about the kind of people who follow religious gurus religious leaders religion. It's about the position of religion in society and how people argue and take over until people want to do and campus revolutionaries to they they get a bit of a kicking in the film the worst. There's a lot of John. John's these wrote a lot of that Graham Chapman about rage which is lovely. It was more like trade unions in England. Yeah awesome one on the menu brothers. The entire destruction to our Roman Empire within three weeks. Crazy stunt you the Judean pay off with people's Front of Judea so that was like a mocking all the shots and people in London. Oua very angry with each other I mean. Communism was a religion too. So it's the same things apply. They're all fighting with each other. The cleverest thing is to end the life of Brian with the song. Did you richer kind of an impasse at the end of the movie without the song. Well we got to the end of the movie and we discover that all our characters. We're heading crucifixion. How are we gonNA finish this film? You know so I said well. We have to finish the song. That's a good idea. Yeah we can be being crucified. Roy wishing is era unless it has to be a like a cheery song cheeky. Cheerios song about looking on the bright side. You know and there's no less a good idea to and I said I mean maybe it should have a whistle like a Disney song. I said that's it. We got it. We can go home now so I went off and wrote it at home. It didn't take very long. It took about half an hour and because I had these chords in my mind and brought it back next day and I played it to them and they hated it was nice. It works and it's pretty outrageous into film. Yes but the first vocal take you did on. It didn't work one on well. Sort of did it wasn't good in about a year later. We came to record it before we went up to Tunisia to film. It and I was very nice jazz band arrangement and I sang. It always gone brides rather dull voice actually and when I played it for the crew in Tunisia they liked the song. I thought something's missing and I realized what was missing was the character. Cia should be sung by Mr Cheeky. Who was a character is playing in the movie? And the ease. The one who goes my mind was going crucifixion years down the line of who should fiction. Yes London left crucifixion. Turn Lights on it. After crucifixion. Now Freedom for me well freedom as I should go three live on an island somewhere. Johnny Goodall Fuego now mighty pulling your leg fiction really so I thought he should be singing the songs so I got the sound guy I said. Can we knew vocal on? And he said Yeah so. We went into a hotel room in. Geneva and we put rugs down around the walls and I talk show Kabbalah Booker. There's of course I'm it's trouble on Star Wars. We recorded it. And so the track that you hear now is all live from a hotel room into Nesia Soundbites Bank. I can really make you mad. And that made the song work I think because it of cheeky and it makes it makes you work really. Remember walking out of seeing that well. He added the cinema. This love Physi- feeling after a crucifixion scene. What's funny about it to me is. It's it's it's ironic. The the song is supposed to be Ironic. Because you don't have much to look forward to encourage defied there is no bright sides. So it's it's all that it became a song to cheer people up so you moved to the United States after years and years of living in England. Lucky to read something from your book about that about why. You're not American now. This is a bit from my book. I wrote area is I pay taxes in three countries and I can vote in non of them. I wasn't even allowed to vote against Brexit. The Russians had more say than I did. And of course com boat in the states though they coined the phrase no taxation without representation. I was once coming home through. Lax when a steely eyed immigration officer peered suspiciously at me. How long have you been a green card holder? Oh I've had it for ages. I said more than twenty years. And why don't you American? Oh a well what should I say what? What was the correct thing to say? Because I am an Englishman born and raised in England under the bombs of Hitler a member of one of its most prestigious universities from a college founded in thirteen forty seven. A man who watch England win the World Cup at Wembley in nineteen sixty six an Englishman a proud elizabeth and traditions of Shakespeare chaucer. Wild words with colour region Dickens cricket-loving survivor of the sixties and a member of one of the most admired comedy groups in the world. Is it not enough? I live in your country and pay my taxes. Now you wish me to put my hand on my heart and pledge allegiance to a self righteous lying tax avoiding Moron these racist gay bashing environmentally dangerous. Greedy bastard science denying cronies who reject evolution on the rights of women and plunder the planet for profits to please that powerful fungus stealing the very air and clean water of their children while tweet insanely lying through their teeth on propaganda. Tv channels that would have shamed Joseph. Goebbels the French do not shrug it me. I saw and ask me why. I'm not French. The Norwegians do not stop me on their shores and insist I wear thick knitwear and large red Anorak unretire charge of the countryside suffering from Ibsen on we the Australians. Don't force me into baggy. Swim Pants to stand on plankton. Orange sunscreen hurtling across the shark infested waters singing a good boss staley affair. No sorry enough sir. I am a taxpayer. A member of your academy a Grammy Winner a Tony Winner. A follower of an American a lover of America marriage you an American wife with an American child but not an American. Did I say any of this? Are Kidding me good question. I replied and I think I'm happiest being a foreigner. I think perhaps they should be Hamad. Sappy sport I mean I feel less and less connected to individual states and more connected to human beings coming out of a Grammy Cares Music Tribute to Paul McCartney. An evening I found very moving and that lifting I bumped into smokey Robinson that was so great. I said it may be proud to be white me too. He said the former and like writes president of the Czech Republic. That wonderful men. I Love Harvey. Who had been a playwright dissident? Who'd spent years and years as a prisoner of the secret police in his own country in ninety ninety nine he was released in no time he was suddenly president of that country and he ascended to Prague Castle and you can never quite believe it and he said while he was there he kept waiting to wake up one day and be arrested and be put back again and be told like it was all a bit of a bit of a joke. Do you ever feel like that. I mean you've come from this extraordinary background and your life is so Golden Eric. It really is lots of friendship. Love a lovely marriage could friends success. Money travel all those things. But I've done my twelve years in jail. I was at the Orphanage for twelve years. You know life can only get better after that so I think you know what's good I mean. That's the only thing about having an unhappy childhood. Is You know what makes you happy after that? And it's not being there and what is what is that being happy as their gratitude I think you have to realize the privilege of being alive. I mean just not being oppressed not being in jail. We Ray story privilege to be alive in these bodies the short length of time on a planet and and to know about winning the middle of the Universe Ninety Billion Years Liars from side to side. I mean that's just an extraordinary thing that we all share. This is a favorite of death. Was the end of your book. Lots of lots of friends join spoiler. Sorry to tell you. Give away but George. Harrison's did happen to all of us. I'm sorry to have to break this to you on the radio but it is that's inevitable that comes with the humanity comes with being human. It's been so lovely to speak to you as a human on this stage. It's been an a privilege to meet you on stage. Eric monkey to finish up with. I don't know maybe you got another song up your sleeve. Some things in life are bad. Daikin really might Alva- things might you swear and curse when you're chewing on. Last Grizzle Grumble gave a whistle. And this will help. Things turn out for the base hind whole wise. Look on the buy side of live all wise so look calmed allied side of life seems Johnny. Rotten this something forgotten and that's the laugh and smile and dogs and saying rain. You're feeling in dominance. Forget about trump's just per Sheila lipson whistle. That's the thing I always look the bride. Shy a look on the ride side of life. Life is quite absurd and death's the final were always spice the curtain with a bow. Forget about your sin. Give the audience. Agreem- enjoy the John. Sandy how show. Oh look the bride shy of death. I just be full. You Joel Your Germano bread or large the piece of Shit when you look at it lodged a laugh. And Death's Joe Pius through your sheets show them laughing because you just remember the large law. Beeson you look on the buy side all local the by side of life giant all wise look. Dong the number one funerals only days replaced Frank Sinatra's Miwa and all wise look the shy of law. Memoir is cooled. Always look on the bright side of life. Of course huge. Thanks to the Brisbane. Powerhouse and sound engineer. Ozzie Bob Epilepsy. Abc Dot net slash conversations as our website on June fidler. Thanks for listening. You've been listening to a podcast of conversations with Richard Fidler for more conversations interviews. Please go to the website. Abc Dot net dot edu slash conversations. Discover more great. Abc. Podcasts live radio and exclusives on the ABC Listen Up.

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S2 E72: "One Lucky Fan" author Rich O'Malley, Cape Fear, Fawlty Towers, Thor's Hammer and more!

The All New Dennis Miller Option

45:29 min | 1 year ago

S2 E72: "One Lucky Fan" author Rich O'Malley, Cape Fear, Fawlty Towers, Thor's Hammer and more!

"Left Penn superstar producer Lindsay Sloane on today's show all Sir Richard All valley and now it's Dennis Miller this is the tennis Miller option your source of opinion stories and laughs from comedian inactive is Dennis Miller is Guy Friday Christian and Peter Cook is dinner with Michael Palin and he's older now not ancient but he's in his career dotage the the climate hysterics out there just remember this eventually they'll come a day where my disbelief will lead and so I always hear these people have the lucid home and were there in the back end of the day New Mall and enough to call it re some would say so premeditated that I've seen Lindsey react to something by taking coffee in after she heard it and then spitting yes the big honking gruel Lucas flying across the cameron you'd have to hear billy jump in into you wanting to burn me at the stake and I just would remind you that's a lot of carbon I know I know I can't appeal to your the original exorcists I have not no well there's a couple of times the maximum side over really cracks young Linda Blair up and she does spit project it God Linda wasn't a Gruel Gi the pre yardbirds version tired at emotional to save me laugh out loud so what's up in the world I think we have a guest today Christian we do so it is rich o'malley who you surprised Lindsey and she almost Spit coffee all over the console so well done Sir yes thank you. Here's the thing that her expectations displayed fifty cent. He says he's going to work on his autobiography and it's called Retired emotional beyond the fringe and Peter Cook and Dudley Moore couple of other guys I should know their names but I don't and by the way as much fawlty towers the net remind me when I'm done maybe not just looking for any port in a climate storm Christian I'm doing quite well I wanted you to know that during that job they all grew up listening to all right okay so they like that but then the sort of literate pre python pythons I believe a little bit are in which sort of I don't it ruins the magic of the Split Day And by the way I remember have you ever seen the final credit out takes from the PALIN diaries didn't they you were talking about the Michael Palin diaries I don't remember I told you what about George Harrison running practiced tantric yoga and this is in light maybe nineteen ninety something and I think they were at their hottest weather in the sixties nineteen thirty years after the fact he's probably couldn't have chocolate meltzer as winter right but I don't think you mentioned peer Cook who I think most Americans might not know I think the name of the groups beyond the fringe wrote a book called One lucky fan that you mentioned to you mentioned recently on the show and the day that episode posted he tweeted at Eh podcast right yeah his uncle I guess six people subscribe well his uncle's one of them his uncle is subscribed on multiple devices so van that band was Jeff Beck was in yeah that's what I thought let me see I told you that great coach from Peter Cook in Michael Saint site that's sort of but hopefully in amongst the crazies there is a pragmatist they'll say that's lot of carbon uh-huh Python looks up to right correct or is it the goon show I think it was baldness show show a spike milligan and that was like a radio show that me as the kids say that he was very excited to hear mentioned so we started trading messages and I thought I would let him come on the show how to mention his because I might can you subscribe to a podcast on a vibrator genital vibrator my he's like counts as four of those six and he led him now so he was very excited so I thought that the it would be a good chat for the show and not just but anyway if you haven't seen those films kids that is a scary scary people always say what's scary and I I always have to okay the Diem Oh podcast vibrator was very professional I love that you just called the show Diem Oh moved into the hip fruits yes the way the Islamic can I tell you 'cause lumbar is so weak yeah somewhere near Beijing where you're going up the I think that's a key line in the The Chinese translation of the Scorsese remake of Cape Fear. Yeah that's that's still refers to you've got a bunch of worries up your ass or something as opposed to a place on a river start lear corrupting the young now now listen and Lindsey promised me I won't end up in Corden for this like laughing at jokes that's what you realize even women are a little touchy understand of course an ear woman so I'm just saying when you guys all get together for the you know up and saying you know dentist did something and I got a little I wasn't quite a high elbow was angry same thing and it's so so good I believe Mitchum and Gregory Peck turn up in a remake mistake I do believe you're correct I think really creeps me out or in cold blood original movies creepy but by and large I other other things to watch the you know they got a bus dot five times a day I always thing I can't do that strategy you have good beard though so like you have that part cover we can't watch them but to me scary is like things that creep in obsessionally and there's nothing scary William Shatner in that twilight zone episode so can the remake uses Bernard Herman's the Soundtrack Scorsese does intact but up being That's still in what I think it means or does that mean Larry Fishburne say The scariest thing to me and I can't watch the films where they just you know kids check into a cheap hotel and Switzerland end up carved up you know that sort of playing with this double header question answer have you seen it yeah diner yeah and he can't leave and eventually cost him his marriage I think that that's Hi Abbreviate are showed how you file names the New York New York New York is it too close to home or is that like when when you say up the Anyang or is it out the young young or up the union out the union I know I don't know maybe it's up don't creamy out half as much but Cape Fear's pretty creepy film so if you're Chinese out there and because she looks like she got like a quicksilver waving her hair and she always wearing high collared things I guess like Nora Ephron she hates her where are you going to hide your family and he says up the Yang and remains on a houseboat up there I've seen both those recently by the way and I can't the Obama where it's unexpected just crazy I'll say something when you turn around you turn all of our heads around thing where it's you know like the Grand Guignol Ymca thing kids getting together and bivouacking for a night don't which one I I like them both but I guess I'd have to go with the the original because of the black and white although Deniro's horrifying Fox and they hired Donna Brazile the next day and by the way Donna Brazile looks like doctor strange doesn't she well she is it is Islam we're going to turn on Yoga because they're trying to encroach with the downward dog thing carved out a grandfather clause see that's what I think being a God is you get the right to nickname everyone and it sticks are there any insulin maniacal gods and then there's some cats and hammered kid has gone off his feet and just comes in and hacks him up so I can't do those so I don't know if they're that's scary because they'd literate we sat that fractious discussion about what thors hammers called I always thought it was called the hammer but you told me it's me owner but is how do I get her because that's where Fox's after I got the get the message that the suns take it over from Roper is no longer welcome the hold the power of life and death today does the tribunal ever performed the wave DRC up so I know that they do usually hit around a beach ball ing-wen completely obsessed with mine fuck that is say Joel but there is a twilight zone an old one where shatner starts going up you know if you know Trish was in pacalypse now sixteen right yeah that's that's what I thought yeah what was his name speed so but in the wine type like Beaujolais Yeah and then there's the name of the the the little label so we're both breast when you think if you ever got to being a God that you wouldn't feel the need to give nicknames though I mean isn't that I mean if you could fly and wield a hammer so you wanted to be Islamic lumbar problems plus I don't trust the religions where you can get winded praying hey I see where the way you can Chris what's our number one eight six six five zero nine rant that's eight six six five nine seven two six eight or you prepare a vegetarian dishes made only with meat you know all sorts they put in a good word Dizengoff tasseled but he's a decent he's our asshole you start rounding and I am Oh that's right Christians honorary married into it Yeah Glimpse Zana you can save vegetable you know you know really we have to save think about what a hectic life she lied if you can't finish word vegetable is that the or that's your Reu I think is actually what they call it so you're you're not wrong that's the just it's not his nickname for it but that's the metal that it's forged from listen regular afternoon for them that they broke out the wave and their boredom but do God's maniacal and do tribunals are performed there for downward very touchy about things and by the way when you say the phrase again Yang right just sure when you say that in China where he starts the speaks to my inner OCD thing by the way I'm currently in the midst of an add OCD thing run constantly chain diced up or stripped up or made to look like an Eggplant parm made strictly with meets it sounds great thought King's son to my dog has fleas and I believe the last person I heard performed live was a karaoke night oddly enough in Manila by Manuel Noriega by COBB has parking's but of course as as a despot of the country therefore vegetetable now that's its own form of cash instable Yay just got to keep it simple Christ talking to these people insist she does always i WanNa do the the you know they're always moving things over sexually and if cumberbatch doesn't want it on duck strange to they ought to go with Donna Brazile Doc Hess borelli would that be the differentiation that we're talking about here between Earth Hammer and would you make me owner and the the metal the Hessian troops penis helmets were shape like those old Dr Presentations I think it would be cool to take all the corn things off and you know they lied those little parking's eight to be grotesque by saying caught my cobb has is to a specific type of helmet well anyway speaking of genetic modification I can actor deaf to everybody except interesting people something to do with feely in the station neck and she's always equipped with the eye of Obama Gatto group that's for insider and what does that mean imagine that you're hired by the tobacco industry to do in the safer alternative it'll be a Russell Crowe also same difference did Torque Amata ever start the wave really be disarming if you're in the cross intelligent people get through to me not be the invention of lease this week definitely this week for sure all right let me just see Union A. N. is suing Fox really I guess are no no not Fox when Rachel maddow but that reeks of Fox to me appeal had to say his penis is character do you think during World War One how you can't shut it off yeah and you've got a lot on your mind I asked this in the same way as a at tribunals where people Islam Lumbar but who do you think put the whammy on vaping somebody's got this misdirect dot there where all of a sudden vaping then reading from the dictionary putting these stops vegetable but undiscerning veg now I know you're trying to look hip all right what else it yeah let's say no does she said that's her favorite and that's why we should start we should yeah just pitched a show this morning to the food network counterintuitive but I think that might be the wave of the future I'm going to start I wanted to show ps now wouldn't you make that if you were like granite cats at the linea he's always looking for unique sup- something about I'm trying to take out every third little hair in there that picks up idiots and assholes and just to only let wise I would never go to vape country what is flavor country it's Marlboro Denton the nick foles plays like four plays and gets a broken something and they have to pay him and he's out for the rest of the year I really look at that then you get your veg- well where are you going that you can't put the bowl on the ad what about people put that extra syllable in my work what you wanted me to remind Fucker Fawlty Towers Genetically Modified Foods you had in my book lined up in your hand I think I think Amazon recommended it to me from all read and I I love reading a baseball books and gotta get back to Marlborough Lights cannot vape people were dying and wondering who put me on it well vaping flavor country so that's the smoking smoking obviously luckiest man in the world today Nick Fault I mean think about it I mean that's not that horrible injury that is lucky I'm not being perverse wouldn't be luckier for him to earn at now that's a whole year of taking harder shots you know that's like losing your toe Anton I wonder Leonard Bernstein had trouble with that was that Elmer Elmer Bernstein you know the theme from the magnificent from possibly be the only person who could hanging in a battle strength was hulk can you see going home at night and cracking a beer and going a nickname this hammer it just don't see that Pittsburgh but PNC parks absolutely beautiful magnificent it almost feels like a minor league park but the view out of the stadiums majestic we about this because all of a sudden vaping this morning is in giant noticed as infinitely more evil than smoking I people say you gotta get back to old school you meat dish you hate it when people say then you get your veg yet because it's not quite panties yeah it really at this point anytime he signed for over twenty it must be twenty five million dollars right are let's say got twenty think about fucked up the world is travel books and somehow you must have got Algorithm together Great Yeah I love roadies I took a beautiful Rhody a few years ago and six and eight nights barely a trifle compared to you that I I agree with you that and I thought well maybe my my view of this is skewed since I grew up in here's the second day and losing a baby toe in the NAM you know you're out purple heart and your back imbalances a little fucked up you're never gonNA do balanced tin you to work hard in my lab at night trying to come up with a serum that'll caused deafness in myself I'll test it like the guy who cured hillock up I mean that's where I grew up and when did it first START I I know for the book I just read the book but for the listeners purposes sure I mean we started Oh and I might told this joke it's pretty weak so sorry but I have these notes written did you get that and tonight I'm having some peas on a cop back in college a bunch of friends and I we took a couple of road trips after you know each of us graduated one year we went down we went over to the Midwest and we did a sort of normal it sounds fun but it's anybody who's watched the amazing race or anybody who's been a comedian like me on the road the planning is just unbelievable so some of the ballparks including your number one baseball park my friend Tom Hanks and I rented a tour bus and took some friends and our children and did eight hey folks welcome to the Dennis Miller option and right off the bat I just WanNa say Gotcha I indeed believe that at the end when you're emotional after the last one because you must have started this relatively early and it's the young I still think of Forbes field night get choked up I think twelve parks at that time so it really started with baseball is I think it does for most sports fans WANNA take these kinds of trips they're the most unique places in all of sports there's a lifetime right next to the John Three Sixteen Guy Yeah and it's just I don't know even creepy on your way to know that honors killed you know it killed as you did sort of eight parks over eight nights I think ours was like seven and ten and a year after we decided to go crazy we went all the way across the country and that's why I took the crazy trip that you're referring to their forty one games and fifty three days folks you must be a man in full I remember thinking turnout they paid over Marlboro but you never heard the beginning with the the little I it's more sprightly at the beginning thing they think Malik I'm here Don Hey there he is Ricardo you'll my friend crate that I know it's normally us the questions. I have one if I may hit shoot and the fragility of the connections and all that and I remember thinking God this guy is a pretty resilient cat because you seem to keep good spirits drew me those times couple of times you've got a little worn diner cranky or pissed off at a venue being so lack of trying don't they pick it up the you know my balls are in the saddle part you never get that little greatly from spammed these Camby's mom and she's got a lucky well and use him and then I branched up other sports and events look back and say well I've got about eighty teams under my belt here and I'm thinking of writing this book I better go finish the beam again but who gives a fuck your out of the swamp yeah back in DC fucked up bigger swamp believe our guest is with us with the city right there you feel like you can touch the yellow bridges when such charm yeah I absolutely adore that place I I was touched by how the these things matter uh-huh and from there it just you know every time I would go on a trip to go to a wedding or go see friends it was crazy working for its wants to go see game while he's in town you you you also good good spirit I thought that was a key part of the book if you're going to go on a bit of a caprice with a guy a junket you don't WanNa be out there with Letterman who's enjoying doing a shot he wanted to be out there somebody who's enjoying it and you you dug it gives us some of the highlights maybe three to five without tipping the whole thing I want people to go buy it and read it and remember to rate review and share until next time that's the show and we are out of here lucky fan from bleachers box each chasing the ultimate sports during the visit all under twenty three MLB NBA NFL NHL teams. Where do they only the book is one lucky fan from bleachers to box seats and our bridge the title but I was surprised you know when I looked at you you in your picture winner take up in Canada I loved you know the the spirit of the fans they had stolen away from the movement using they got it back rightfully and they passed wondering is crumbling the fan into the team stinks and you're like what am I doing here right Yep we're talking to rich the Go-to your favorite bookseller out online or a brick and mortar fashioned way and if they don't have it you can obviously asked him to order it but obviously the easiest over the course of two plus months barely getting home at all especially around the holidays which was doubly pointed when you're out on the road by yourself this is always not a triathlete but you must be some good shape you must not smoke or drink all that much because it was such an arduous schedule and yet even when you had an afternoon or evening super bowl their world series been played there a lot of people don't realize that history and all sports My mother highlight of the trip was from unassuming little town a regular fan including the coliseum but when I was young I read an article in sports illustrated magazine about Michigan I was fascinated because at a fraternity house there that was staffed by the band to get to be in that building one hundred thousand people you know screaming the fights on was just again such a huge bill and I had to take advantage of that two months sway nowadays is to go online and and most websites and sell books will have it yeah I mean the trip was a food it was obviously a grind twenty five thousand miles you want to experience everything that has to offer if you're a big music fan and you see a concert in town for me it was the killer is I'm like oh I love to kill her removes through this figure for book that you waited your whole life to write you gotta go figure the home and I was already out of there and I kept seeing these things along the way and I I say in one Chapter I tell people how I do what I do and make recommendations and like don't forget to look at other things while you're in town but it's not just about going to see a sports venue you wanna take in a city the Dan of the mellow men and one was billy Taylor and I remember another one was was it Raleigh Reggie McKenzie and I always thought oh I'd love to get up there tell me about Papua's touched that you would go to see a concert or I'm GonNa throw a college game in here I thought boy this guy is a bee's look at dance that you have put together as you said and you know it all out for you but you know you didn't come across those dungeons where it's at that building every night and they're proud and they're loud and it's a it's a great experience and then we also have the mold into where you know you missed that flight and you start panicking because you have this period where I can do anything I wanted and I happen to not just great I know it's like a woman in the latter stages of pregnancy can eat whatever she wants coliseum and you say holy crap this place is so much more than I imagined when I see it on TV and it's majestic and you feel like you're a part of history and Freddie panicking and I panicked so much that I took the first deal that I heard which was obviously steel so I got hosed I bought a student ticket which I did not notice like I of course didn't running a personal trainer you miss your family and your friends and you're wondering what the hell you're doing out there but yeah I mean you have those moments when you walk into you know Ellie Lane the La Forum I can go see the La four on a trip about you know sports where it's not a perfect and waited my whole life Michigan versus Ohio State is tell me about the hundred and four thousand seat Michigan Game I'll tell you what was the best part of that for me was trying to get into thing I mean you could obviously imagine it's the tell me so it was a valid ticket which I asked is this a real ticket and he said yes and written certainly but three over on the back and said students only I'm not a student so able to flip that to a student who was very gracious to the deal of a lifetime because I told him at a discount and then I went over to the alumni tent anybody got any extras and alumni ended up fellow that you didn't take the right off rather gave it to them but I was heartened in your travels how many lovely people you ran into you know it's disheartening you were definitely stuck at so why not imbibe I always Doug Michigan as you name some of these places I've been to many of them just desserts ticket I mean that's the library of the year right there and I am just walking up to the stadium like going to get in easily this is going to be fine and then I started seeing the prices being quoted in Ah I got some extras we want to pay and I told him what he wanted to pay you says great and then I walked in and on the forty yard line fifteen rosen right I mean you come across so many different people and one of the things that I talked about is how similar fans are no matter where they come from their experiences their background how they wind up from the field it was it was just a dream and then it turns out it was a charitable thing because the guy said sell this ticket I'm GonNa take the money and donate it to charity and I assume you seem like org misery with we're talking rich o'malley who is the author of one lucky fan from bleachers the box seats I finished the book in the last week and I enjoyed it immensely is because only the assholes seem to make the headlines Antonio Brown all over the place now but it's nice to get out amidst the in the hinterland and just remind you so you're a fan of or do you like the dolphins colors in the logo and you pick them and then later on in life that decision that you made when you were seven turns out to have a lot of you know in for who they wind up rooting for you know we all have different origin stories as you know where we become a fan as a kid usually not much thought goes into it. If you're doing your family tells you I think you will too you can follow rich on twitter at Rich o'malley you've had pretty good draw though because if you aren't going to have a team that you favour yourself that it is a bit of a Norman Rockwell though there are fine people everywhere and often are strangers to you but they ended up being friends right winter and one who does what they did yesterday and you know always chokes away on lose the game so they kind of forms who you are but we all these things one I'm it's probably the most famous one it's like the my Sharona of Super Bowl things and then I think you've also got the devils in there when I think hockey nothing Gordy Howe going in whol against the go clock this kid and beat the shit out of him at age fifty that might be hockey but next to that Scotty Stevenson us through the Yanks must be upper on twenty six or twenty five I can't even so many I can't keep count anymore but and then the jets are still at one but boy was it in the neutral zone lighten up lender created house of all time tell me about the devils and you were there for the sweet spot and you it got very messy I had a slade Gorton type skull formation always made him look helmeted even when he was just looked like he had a helmet on more when he didn't have his helmet off ear and other great stories I was able to see them skied around with the Cup even though I didn't have a ticket to that game because someone we marched up to the door of the arena after sure fan DNA no matter what kind of team we're at four at the end of the day we're just looking for instance just lounging and you know we're looking for someone else to share that moment of joy to he was just balding we're talking to Rich o'malley and the delightful book is one lucky fan from the box seats just the buzzer sounded someone held a hundred dollar bill up to the door and someone inside the door open and the onrush began about fifty doubles fans and we ran level of athleticism and it's been a rough ride in New York for basketball and that includes Saint John's which I obviously talk about in the book but yeah I would point where we're mark broke our hearts which is a natural hat trick the conference finals and the next ah been hushing this kind of person you become a Yankees fan of the jets managed no that's a very dichotomy fan experience I mean I wonder who's a pretty consistent overcame in and stole his job and we never let him down but obviously a certain point you realize well we wouldn't be having these Stanley Cups probably if we had gone plans so that's fine girl who is at six four six five small slash power forward in between Wellington and the the two thousand appearance which was just a blip rarely in the finals it's been really just I it's it's painful to even pay attention anymore and so me I really enjoyed going to the NBA Games when I did that on on the major trip that I took either just watching those athletes or close it it's a whole that was the year I started following them and it's just been a roller coaster straight down since but you have those moments where we have an upset or we beat number one villanova it's just Dolan was projected back in time Willis Reed doesn't even limp Outta the locker room it's it's it's a really rough funding to me you're not even a Mardi door fan like the the backup which made me laugh aloud yeah I mean when I became a devil's fan I did island was named Bill Thomas or something I can't remember he was a real man though I remember during that or one hundred twenty three stops on different birthing delivery you going around interjecting yourself into strangers lies being there for Lomas birth an epidural I can't I can't pretend that city field is my favorite probably because I've got so many bad memories there was funny we went to Ronnie Howard was with us at night I usually root for the Knicks and nets I the NBA was for a while sort of my least favorite pro sport now it's sort of usurped footballer Right Shomali on twitter at Richaud Alley I have to agree with both of you that my favorite ballpark is the one in Pittsburgh I was very impressed by when I saw and at the presser that's funny line motherfucking mother wow andy would be so pissed because of one friend and then everyone in our high schools arranger spanner islanders fan but my friend was a devil's fan like all right cool let's go with them and then it turned out to be the beginning of my heart and soul basketball I'm a college basketball junkie I'd always Louis Yeah and that was the last time they were any good on you know we had a a a on their views on that team was so much fun to watch and they really didn't take any go from anybody but since the one of the best runs in the last twenty years but we were diehard Kristiangaric fans and he was a starter and that you know the he did couple of last questions are is it knicks or Super John Williamson at the nets or because of its the knicks. I feel bad because the Olen I don't know man did you want to share your thoughts on having watched fawlty towers recently the first one did not work from there's a couple of key I feel like we're the kings in the world and for for a team

Lindsey Peter Cook Rich o'malley Dennis Miller Linda Blair Lindsay Sloane twitter Michael Palin Penn producer tennis Canada billy Lucas fawlty Camby Corden Gregory Peck DC NBA
What The Heck Should We Eat?

Food, We Need To Talk

24:04 min | 1 year ago

What The Heck Should We Eat?

"Hi thanks for listening to food. We need to talk and things also to our sponsor third love third. Love is of course known for their comfy bras but it doesn't stop op there. Not only can they fit bras to your individual body type. They also have a wide range of matching underwear and get cotton lounge sets that you might also like thirdlove knows. There's a perfect bra for everyone. So right now. They're offering our listeners. Fifteen percents off their first order go to third love dot com slash food now to to find your perfect fitting Bra. That's third love dot com slash food for fifteen percent off your first purchase and by Num Num is the Habit Abbott Change Program that uses psychology to help you figure out why you make the decisions you make and empowers you to replace your bad habits with better ones right now. You can go to NEUM DOT COM. I'm slash food to start your trial. What do you have to lose? That's neum and am dot com slash food produced by the I hi lab at WBZ. You are Boston okay. Okay so the top so so let's get to the real stuff we all want to know. which is what the heck to eat if you open your instagram or turn on the news? There's always some new celebrity requesting a new fad diet whether it's Vegan or Kito or Carnivore Blah Blah Blah. The list goes on one way that we can compare them all. Aw Pretty succinctly is if we look at their macro nutrient profile. Eddie can you elucidate. What our macro nutrients chance unit? I'll do my best before. We talk about macro nutrients. Let's get back briefly to the calorie. Piece Kay Halloran or simply the amount of energy the food all diets you mentioned than all the ones that will soon evolve can work at least temporarily because you're going to be cutting calories the macro nutrients so you mentioned are fat protein and carbs. So let's go through this if you see an instagram and there's something about bread and Pasta. You're thinking carbs. And if you hear something been about changing or eating less or more oil you're thinking fat and for Protein Chicken Fish and I'll throw in legumes and other plant sources so protein a question. Why so many of these diets have such devoted fan bases like there's always somebody who's lost forty pounds on low carb or lost fifteen pounds on low fat? I did some research and it turns out. It's not that these diets have some magical combination of foods like I used to think. Thank but it's more the foods these diets don't include like what have you ever seen. It says eat as much as you want or drink all the soda. You can drink if you're eliminating an entire food group or an entire time period of eating of course you're going to lose weight in the short term because way more food is off limits and you're taking in a lot less. I think I know where you're going with this. I think you do edi but just to be clear food. We need to talk. I'm Dr Traded Phillips and Java and let's go on talking about diet one of the first things that happens you know is that we become more mindful whatever it is. You're trying to eliminate emanate you're going to have to stop. Look think and analyze what you're planning on eating to say. Is it fitting my diet or not. Going on extreme diet does make us pay attention to to what we are eating and mindfulness does seem to be important and not just eating everything that's put in front of us because unfortunately in this country there's lots of bad stuff that's put in front of us many time. This is Dr Walter Willett professor at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health also some of these diets like the Atkins Diet do have a kernel of truth breath in them and that's because most people have been eating large amounts of refined starch and sugar and the Atkins Diet did take that out of their diet however over eating a lot of huge amounts of red meat. Sausage of butter is not an optimal diet. First things first. Let's tackle the Diet that most of us are on. which is the standard American diet or as I so fondly like to call it sad well I asked Dr Willett. What is the biggest problem with the standard American Diet as it stands today carbohydrate quality overall we get about half of Var calories from carbohydrates in that half about eighty percent comes from refined starch sugar or potatoes which actually are very rapidly converted into sugar when you eat them for a long time? I thought that Carb were of the devil that they were literally the cause of all weekend. So if there was is like muffins or something of the store and they were labeled low. CARB is like a hobby. This must be a healthy muffin because it has a low carb muffin. What is the deal of carbs they actually evil or like quite so you know it's not that carbs of the problem? It's refined carbs so if you eat fast digesting carbs like pasta white bread twinkies cereals sugary drinks. He it goes right into your bloodstream. Your blood sugar spikes and you feel great for maybe an hour or two and then you're bludger goes wade out. You're hungry angry again. And you're reaching for another fast acting fuel source. It's like throwing paper on a fire. You'RE GONNA get a little flash but it just doesn't last long and you end up being hungrier for the rest of the day. Okay so what about fruits and vegetables though because aren't like fruits and vegetables all carbs and like I mean doesn't everybody say eat fruits and vegetables. Hello yes and I'm GonNa tell you. EAT FRUITS and vegetables. What here's the deal with the fruits and vegetables? Of course we want you to ethos. They're really good for you. They are carbohydrates the hydrates but they're not the refined kind. They come along with a lot of fiber. Why is five or something we need to get enough of because it's going to slow down the absorption of the sugar? You're not going to get the high from the bludger going up and then the crash a little while later. Also when you're eating your vegetables it's GonNa make you feel full. And that's important and Dan. The fiber is going to help your gut motilal. That means you can move your bowel. That's important it's also. Why an orange? Let's say is so much better for you than drinking orange juice. It's it's the same amount of sugar but one has fiber that would be the fruit and one doesn't the other thing when you're eating and unrefined food like fruit or vegetables as a comes to us through nature. It's it's not been stripped away of the nutrients vitamins and minerals so. That's exactly what doctor will advise when I asked him to construct the ideal plate about half the plate by volume through some vegetables. The other half of the plate can be roughly divided into carbohydrate sources. Horse's like grains. But what's really important this. If we're going to eat grains at most of those behold rains and then the protein part of the plate is actually more plant based protein Jim by nuts seeds soy products other kinds of begins insufficient. There as well before we start talking about the Greens and the protein and stuff. Let's talk okay so I don't know why vegetables such a bad rap because I think there's so tasty if you cook them right and literally there's so many ways to speak their into your food these days for example. I've seen these at many stores where they will put cauliflower into a food processor and then it makes us like rice textured cauliflower. So that's a really simple way to sneak cauliflower into any dish or you can get like Zucchini spiraled into noodles or you can put that makes it into like these long pinstr noodles lane just put whatever you put on your ideal and noodles or whatever or you can put vegetables in your smoothies. There's so like easy to incorporate. So there's really no excuse for not having them so here's the word on carbs. They are definitely not all evil. And there are certain carbs sources like the veggies that you were just talking about the come with many anymore benefits. You'RE GONNA get your vitamins. You're going to get your minerals. You'RE GONNA get your fiber all packed into a low calorie package and they help your skin nails sales and whatever look good because they have all the vitamins also. You're going to need those carbs to fuel your day to do your exercise to do your activities of daily living and my favorite part vegetables is the fullness part because I know I like to feel full and like oh I mean how much can you really but I think we should address the elephant in the room which is his fat so for a million years. Fat was the devil like everything was fat and now it's like Super Trendy for everything to be high fat and it's so confusing because like what in the heck is the deal with fat. The nutrition community back in the late seventies nineteen eighties believed that all types of fat in the Diet were bad and the main cause of heart disease most cancers in the western populations relations so unit to answer your question. I'm going back to Dr Willett from the Harvard Chan School of Public Health and he says that there wasn't much good data to support the belief. That fat was bad and the evidence has evolved. It really has shown that the percentage of calories from fat in the Diet is actually really not important. It's the quality of the fat Sir. You just heard him say the quality of the fat. He's talking about healthy fats. Avocado olive oil nuts eggs and even a little bit of hall. Fat Dairy sorry. If you're not dairy intolerant these are the kind of fats that keep you full. This is going to fill you up. It adds great. Taste your food but high. Fat Foods like desserts and process stuff. That's probably not the best idea. Probably not the best idea. So my favorite part about fat is definitely that keeps me full because when I was eating low fat I was literally starving all the time and then as soon as I started eating a normal amount of fat not even high fat just like a normal amount. I felt so much more full and it turns out. That's because fat acts lot more like a log so that fire you were talking about whereas you're fine carbs like that paper that just goes sh- lights on fires quick and goes out fat just keeps on burning all day long I guess the last thing we should talk about is protein. And let me guess quality. Woody also matters. You got it so you want to focus on high quality sources of protein. We can mention fish which are full of mega three fatty acids poultry or even those nutrient dense organ meats. which a lot of us like to ignore if you WANNA go vegetarian or Vegan and avoid all animal products? You're still going to get plenty a protein just from plant sources. Do you have any doubts about that. Maybe a little okay. Then why don't you look at our cousins like gorillas. Okay all right. They're massively acidly strong. And what do they eat plants. That's it so if you have any shred of doubt left Yuna go look up Vegan bodybuilders. Swad these women. These men are massively strong on a plant based Diet and speaking about the protein that they're getting from their plants they needed in order to repair and rebuild their muscle. Protein is important if you're exercising especially in but for always but yes. Okay so what if I told you that you could sum up all nutrition advice in seven words seven words. We've been talking about this for ten minutes. And we're just touching the tip of the iceberg seven words but you're just GonNa have to wait a minute because we're going to a short break. There is nothing worse than a missed fitting BRA. You feel self self conscious all day long. You think everybody can see it in your clothes. Just don't look as good third. Love uses measurements of millions of women to Design Bras for all day comfort and support. Plus they have over eighty sizes so basically the way it works. is you go on the website and you take sixty second quiz and you answer questions about yourself else. So that's always fun and then you got to find the Bra that will get you the best. Plus you have sixty days to wear and wash raw and if you don't love it you can return Senate and third level wash it and donate it to a woman in need returns and exchanges are free and easy third knows that there's a perfect bra for everyone and that includes you so right now. They are offering our listeners. Fifteen percent off their first purchase. Just go to third love dot com slash food to find your perfect fitting broth and get fifteen percent off. That's third love dot com slash food. I'm sure you've downloaded downloaded a million fitness APPs before and they're all the same but neum is different with neum. You pick your goal and it can be anything from eating better to feel better to having more energy to learning to love the gym again New Music Psychology and small goals to help you feel empowered to change for good. Everyone is busy. That's my new only takes ten Hannity today which I think we can all spare plus your match with a goal specialist and a community of numerous. So you have a support system. You're never alone and people are going going through the same stuff you're going through. It's the perfect time to make a step towards better habits. Sign up for your child today at noon and dot com slash food. What do you have to lose? visit noon Dot com slash food to start your child today. That's neum and oh dot com slash food okay. You know. I'm still wondering how can anyone possibly fit all the principles of nutrition into just seven words. Yeah I know but after decades of research and looking at studies and writing several bestselling books the world renowned food writer and journalist analyst. Michael Palin has summarize everything he learned about nutrition in this seven word Haiku eat food not too much mostly plants. When I say eat food I mean eat food? As your ancestors recognized it eat food that has been minimally processed food. That's been uneaten for a long time. That's part of traditional diets. Doesn't have to be your traditional Dak anywhere in the world. EAT real food void. Edible food like substances not too much you know we're eating too much and lastly Mostly plants because one of the things we know is that a substantially plant based diet is better for you. We don't know why you know. Is it the antioxidants in the in the vegetables or the fact that those plants are pushing meat off. The plate doesn't matter her and the best piece of nutrition advice that Michael Pollen has to offer us. Cook Learn to cook. Nothing will do more to change your diet than if you prepare food yourself yourself. It's finally the only way you can take back control of your diet from the corporations who are trying to feed you junk unit. Did you just notice how Michael Michael Pollen talked about food. He didn't mention the macro nutrients that we were going on about. Talk about protein or fat or carbs. Food is where we should put our attention action. Okay I think that makes a lot of sense because if you're cooking you will probably be using whole foods right because nobody is cooking with Oreos twinkies. Were cooking with vegetables can find recipes recipes. Aside stay focused on task. If you're cooking most likely you're cooking with whole foods right. Yeah so it turns out that just the act of cooking is one of the healthiest activities that you can do. I'm introduce you to Dr Ronnie pollock. He's a publish public sheff. He's a family physician a certified health coach and he's a former fellow of mind. That's why known so well. He invented chef coaching to help patients improve their relationship with food and to cook more at home. The science show. People who cook for themselv- usually consumed healthier ingredients less calories smaller portions. It's people who cook at home and joy mo not just from the cooking from eating with your family and with your friend. This all sounds great stuff eddie but listen. I don't think that cooking is like a feasible thing for me to be doing all the time because like while also speak on my behalf. Affleck if you ever really busy work schedule. It's just hard to set aside that time or I'll speak on others behalf kids and like if you're cooking all the time like how in the heck can you do everything so you know I I hear you. I'm really interested in healthy food as it can imagine from our conversations and I don't feel like I'm a good cook. It also seems really like unreasonable reasonable to me that we would spend our preparing food that I could gobble down in ten minutes. I've been it's for me. But then we asked Ronny what his solution is to that batch cooking so you know. When you cook soup you can cook ten portions and freeze eight potions and then defrost it it? When you are lacking time cook more any ingredient that you cook for example you make rice and then freeze it and then use the rise throughout the week week all throughout the month so we call it re purposing? They Cook in one ingredient for specific dish and repurpose the leftovers. Two other dish so I love how we're moving beyond leftovers which is sort of like unintentional to actually repurposing won a pr but what it helps because the we have re purposed food in our freezer and let me tell you. Because I'm still not sold on the idea of cooking for an hour to eat for five or ten minutes chair when you come home and you're hungry you're willpower is low. It's late in the day. The kids are screaming. You got something else to do that evening. That's when when you open up your refrigerator and your freezer and you see the frozen rice or the soup that you made two weeks ago sitting there waiting and all you have to defrost it. That's where the magic comes in. So what can you do with this meal. prepping thing besides rice or is that it. No you can do anything so think about even like vegetables. Antipasto is the family of vegetable dishes taking vegetables. Cut them into cubes and roast them in the oven with olive oil and salt and pepper and then they can leave in the fridge for up to five days and you you can snuck them. You can end side dish a scrape so I think we're starting to wrap this up a little bit. We've got the protein. We've got the CARBS we've talked about. Ah That's why we have not covered desert the most important thing. Those blonde is coming back. Not The blondie but there must be something else that we you can eat healthy quote that desert. How about some fruit one way to enhance the flavor of the fruit is to warm it up so if you Grill Lil? Lets say slices of apple slices of pair. They will feel much sweeter and Yuna Ronnie talks about this all natural dupe joop for ice cream. If you take grapes and put them in the freezer you can just snack frozen grapes that unbelievable. I mean you don't need to buy ice cream anymore. Four okay. Ronnie's my friend but I'm not so sure about this one. I mean I am not giving up my ice cream. I think it comes close. You know like sometimes if you're like kind of wanting ice can you can get away with the grade you can. There are always healthier alternatives. Actually talk about doing like dessert. flips right rather than having a big piece of chocolate cake with a little. It'll be strawberry on it. You could take a big strawberry and dip it in chocolate eclair speaking of sweep things. There's one thing that we have to cover before we close for today today something that may be gets pretty close to an evil food. Here's Walter again at this point in time probably the biggest problem in the US. I would say sugar. Bigger sweetened beverages. That's usually comes in the form of Soda but now even some of the sweet coffees have massive amounts of sugar in them as well as we end. coffees excuse anymore. Currently the human body isn't meant to deal with sugar in its liquid form says Michael Palin. We didn't involve to get substantial amounts of calories from liquids starbucks great example. We think they're selling caffeine. They're really selling sugar And we go in there thinking. We're we're not buying a soda. We're buying coffee. But in fact we ended up having a you know sorta like I'm so sorry I know I'm bumming you out. So if sugar sweetened beverages are regular part of your Diet Yuna one massive change and you can simply but not easily writings right. Jinx is to cut back on those and it doesn't have to be all at once you can start to slowly drink less and less until maybe someday you're not drinking any at all. Well maybe water becomes your beverage. Okay can I give you a really good example of so freshman year of college every single day our get a camel MAKIHATA which is like I. I think it's like forty grams of sugar and I'm happy to report six years later. I now get a cold brew. Moshe no melt and I love it but hello it took six years so you you made the change gradually all right. So let's go back to the plate because now we're talking about food now about the macronutrients. Okay so let's rebuild that dinner plate plate so half of it half of it's going to be that she wasn't free next. QUARTER IS GONNA be a quality source of carbohydrates such as whole Greens and then the last quarter acre a quality protein source excellent. I'm going to add in a little bit of healthy fat because it's going to be delicious and it's GonNa fill me up great okay. I'm GONNA leave the last word for Dr Walter Willett. I think the most important thing is to have a diet that's very mostly plant-based and find a way A to put this together in a way that can be enjoyable and be something that we can stay with for the rest of our life so basically nobody wants to be miserable bowl so enjoyable to be able to do it forever because we're not doing an eight week body challenge Okay so we talked to a lot of really important foodie nutrition Tricia any people for this episode. But when I asked them what is the most important piece of advice you can give people to impact their health forever like like one thing. They food anything with smoking. No IT WASN caress Chesley. No okay. You're terrible they don't mean it was. Exercise is good exercise as much as I possibly can and the best benefit for the least amount of time would definitely be exercise so I think that is what we should talk about in the next episode. Will you be there. I'll be there if you'd like many more more than seven words on the subject of nutrition jog on overture instagram and follow us at food. We need to talk. We post helpful stuff all the time but most importantly we we post fun stuff. Also if you haven't subscribed already head on over to apple podcasts or wherever your podcast and subscribe and if you like it leave serve you because it helps us reach more listeners. And if what you've heard leaves you with a burning question send a voice memo to food. We need to talk a g mail DOT COM. And we'll try. Try to answer you in future episodes. We have just two words for our guest. Dr Walter Willett Michael Palin Dr Ronnie pollock. Thank you food food. We talk is a production of our producer and editor is George Hicks. Our final arbiter and editor is Elizabeth Harrison and our founding godmother is Keri Eric Goldberg and I'm Dr Eddie see you next time. Mostly plant food now p much most to stop this stop this now.

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Shaking the snow globe: Michael Pollan on the therapeutic use of psychedelic drugs

Ideas

54:36 min | 2 years ago

Shaking the snow globe: Michael Pollan on the therapeutic use of psychedelic drugs

"This is a CBC podcast. Hey, I'm Michelle Parisi. I wanna tell you something about my podcast alone. Elope story when I first started writing it five years ago, it wasn't a diary. It was a cautionary tale, a call to arms. We've all been disappointed, made mistakes tried to forgive, and we've all believed in love clung to hope. More of all that in season two of loan, a love story stick with me. Takes about a half an hour, forty, five minutes for the drug to actually get into your system, your senses start to shift. And so the first thing I noticed was around the my peripheral vision. It looked as if things were sparkling. I'm Paul Kennedy and you're listening to ideas about psychedelics. As soon as I closed my eyes, I had, I lost all sense of perception of depth. I felt like I was at some kind of boundary. Lucas is a medical doctor and took part in a clinical trial, exploring how psychedelics produce a spiritual experience. And it was as if I was just immediately transported to being in this beautifully, eliminated subterranean lagoon. That was kind of bio luminescent green and I was back stroking in this beautiful cool, green water. Stories like this, that caught the attention of Michael. Paul, author of the omnivores dilemma and the botany of desire. When Michael Palin interviewed volunteers about their medically supervised experiences while they were on psychedelics. He was transfixed actually became envious of the volunteers talking to because I don't think I'd ever had a spiritual experience and here were people some, you know, stone cold, eighth Theus materialists like me. They're understanding of spirituality had been transformed and in here was this whole dimension of human existence that I was blind to. Michael pollen's recent book is called how to change your mind. In this episode, ideas producer, Mary O'Connell sits down with Michael Paulin to explore why we're once again studying the medical benefits of psychedelic drugs. We're calling this episode shaking the snow globe. Now you have a quote, Michael, the beginning of your book by Emily Dickinson. The soul should always stand a jar. Why did you choose that yet? So beautiful line because I think one of the, my takeaways from my explorations of psychedelics was that we need to keep an open mind and that the the universe is vaster more wonderful than we realize. And in a way I did this to try to open a mind that was increasingly closed to spiritual possibilities and certain understandings of consciousness. And so I just feel like you've got a, you know, as Emily Dickenson understand, you have to leave the door ajar to let the breezes of novelty and a mystery get in. You know, Michael, I wanna talk to you about a few of the people who loom large in this history. You've written him psychedelics. You write about Albert Hoffman, who was a chemist. He discovered LSD was nineteen forty-three. He tried it. He had a first scary, and then a mystical experience in when he reported this to his company Sandos laboratories. It was interested in figuring out what could the world use LSD Ford. Now, you know, it seems like an unusual question considering this was the middle of World War Two? Yes. Sandoz had a very interesting very contemporary idea, which is let's crowd source the research, and they offered LSD twenty five any legitimate researcher who offered to give them reports on what they discovered. And these researchers could be academic researchers. They could be just psychotherapists who were gonna use it in their practice in report back what happened. So they kind of flooded the world with LSD twenty five and really inaugurated this period of research in the fifties to figure out what it might be good for could could treat mental illness and what doses would be appropriate therapy and people were early in the fifties, experimenting with. What was called a psycho lick dose of LSD that just means mind, loosening. So they would give people before they're psychoanalytic session with shrink. They take a a light dose of LSD and they found it would kind of loosen them up. Their ego defenses were relaxed, and they could really access difficult emotions. And this became a very common form of therapy, especially in Los Angeles in the early fifties in a great many celebrities actually had LSD therapy, including people like Jack Nicholson, Andre Previn and. Carey grant who had had like fifty, some odd LSD sessions that he claimed made him a new man that all that flows from this chance discovery of amend him Albert Hoffman who who lived to be a hundred two. He became something of a mystic himself as a rose as a result of his experience on on LSD and reportedly was using it in microdosing till very late in his life. And as I said, he lived to be one hundred two. That's quite amazing yet. I think he, he actually said he saw LSD as opening a crack in the edifice of materialist rationality. Yes, yeah. And what an interesting thing for a chemist to say, you think of chemists has staunch materialists that everything can be explained by substances founded nature created by man. And he came to understand that there was more to this edifice than mature. Cereal. Science could explain right now, but you seemed at the time an I think you say this yourself, an unlikely prospect to be writing a book about the benefits of psychedelic drugs, right? Because you weren't a child really the psychedelic sixties? No, I came along a little too late and I was a little too frayed to have much to do psychedelic. So I mean, I was, you know, twelve during the summer of love in San Francisco in fourteen for Woodstock, so I wasn't going to, you know, be present at those kind of events, but also I was afraid of them. I'm the the backlash, you know, really gets in into gear in the second half of the decade of the sixties and everything you hear about. Second dogs is terrifying. What stayed with you? Oh, well, art linkletter TV personality claim that his daughter's suicide. He jumped out of her apartment window was due to tripping on LSD even though we, there's actually no evidence of that, but it was a very widely reported story. There was a story about a group of college students who went blind because they stared at the sun. There were stories about, you know, the trip from which someone never came back. I mean, we didn't know it then, but we were in the throes of a moral panic about LSD in particular, and I believed all those stories. So I do come kind of late. I'm not your natural proponent of that kind of consciousness change, and so it just took me a a while to get there. Right. And on that, no, you mentioned the moral panic, right? What was that? The base of this? What was under the fear of psychedelics? Yeah, they were very threatening and they were identified with this assault on hierarchy that was going on a salt on thority, the antiwar movement, the counterculture. I mean, the sixties was a very unusual period in terms of the the degree of ferment at every level, cultural and political and social, and it is the case that psychedelics had something to do with that. Another person, Michael, along the way that you interviewed for your book, how to change your mind is Bill Richards, he's a psychologist, and I think he has had more experienced guiding people on psychedelic journeys than probably anyone else alive. Right. So so tell me about Bill and his career. Yeah. Well, Bill is a psychologist. The we also is a graduate degree in divinity, and he is the bridge between the first chapter of research in the sixties and and the modern era. And he eventually ended up at the spring grove center, which was a psychiatric hospital that in the sixties had started a psychedelic research arm and had a lot of grants to study the potential of psychedelics to he'll mental illness and they did work with people who are dying. They did work with alcohol IX depressive people with personality disorder, and it was a very lively a research institution and Bill was the key figure there, but gradually the funding petered out, it became a controversial. It was the state institution being funded by the state of Maryland, and then. It stopped and he thought will that was it. He had this amazing run as a as a a psychedelic psychologist and guiding trips and helping people, but must have been crushed. Right because they didn't believe this was the future of psychiatry. Yes. And you ask what kinda Manny is. He's an incredible man. He's a man of incredible optimism of faith laughs very easily. Just he's very happy jovial person with with demonic cackle. And yeah, they really thought this was the future of psychiatry. They sat around thinking, how are we going to train the hundreds and thousands of people? We need to guide all these psychedelic trips and it did look like the future for a long time. And so it was crushing when it was stopped and he went back to a conventional psychology practice. So there been a lot of medical research in the fifties and some of the sixties using psychedelics to help with alcoholism smoking depression anxiety, we had the moral panic. Everything was shut down and I guess -ociety kind of went to sleep until the early two, thousands when researchers began studying the medical benefits of psychedelics again, right? Like giving it to cancer patients to relieve their anxiety about dying. What went through your mind, Michael, when you heard that doctors were returning to this idea is weird what a weird ideas. Someone is as terminal diagnosis for cancer, and they're going to go on a suicide been trip. That's the LSD like compound in magic mushrooms, and that this single experience is going to reset their attitude toward their death that seem like so implausible that seem to me. The last thing I would do under the circumstances. To give up control of your mind at a moment of of mental crisis. But as I looked into it, I realize we were right on a frontier of of understanding of consciousness with with these experiments, and that led me to decide, well, I'm going to dig into this topic and it might answer some really interesting questions about dying about consciousness. Yes, I could interview a lot of volunteers and I did that. I go then from Elizabeth Dignam then to the Ganj as river. And yes, this is. Dining done. I was in a suddenly. I found myself on a vote on the Ganges that it was dozens of people around the place and certainly wasn't afraid was fires everywhere on the on the riverbanks Evian. I just said, I'm going to die and I just moved myself over there and I just died in the fire and then just come back again and everything was totally painless. Oh, yeah. So the desk part seemed quite easy. So this was more of the being unafraid. Actually became envious of the volunteers talking to because I had I had never, really. I don't think I've ever had a spiritual experience and here were people some, you know, stone cold, eighth Theisen materialists like me who their understanding of spirituality had been transformed in in here was this whole dimension of human existence that I was blind to. And here was a opportunity at least to open my eyes and see what it was all about. Right, right. And as part of that, I realize, well, how could I possibly right about this experience without having it myself. So after a drought of about thirty five years now, psychedelics are being tested in clinical trials at UCLA New York University university of British Columbia. They're using ecstasy MDA for post traumatic stress disorder. And I believe at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, using magic mushrooms, Silla Simon for various ailments, including depression, VERA. They're going to be a face three site for the treatment of depression using so Sivan. They work mostly was so Sivan. They have studied addiction and have a big smoking study underway right now. Smoking cessation study. They study mystical experience in a couple ways. One is they have a really interesting study underway right now of giving suicide been to religious professionals. People with a congregation. In all different denominations to see what insight those people might bring to the experience and how the second Delic experience might change their practice. I think they've got planned to study on eating disorders, which sounds very promising. That's interesting. I hadn't heard that one. Yeah, there's a lot of interesting overlap between meditation Secca doc experience. I found that many of the important American Buddhists that people really brought Buddhism to America beginning in the seventies and beyond began on psychedelics. They had had powerful experiences of a less ego driven form of consciousness that they then sought to continue accessing via meditation because you can't do psychedelics every day. You can meditate every day horror, but so what is that connection then with? Did it by meditating and simply make them more open. And go deeper in fem so they would be natural for perhaps trying psychedelic, yes, but also particular interest in a form of consciousness that transcends the usual self directed consciousness a place that you take your mind whether on secular or meditation, where you really quiet your mind, and you feel like you're entering a more universal consciousness that is not defined by your narrow self interest or ego Centric concerns, but the connections are maybe physiological as well because one of the really interesting findings when when scientists neuroscientists begin imaging, the brains of people on psychedelics, uh, specifically. So aside and later LSD is that their brain scans and the brain scans of experienced meditators also put in the machine, looked identical the same parts of your. Your brain are down regulated or muffled or quiet during meditation as they are doing the second experience. So and this part of the brain is it's called the default mode network had never heard of it, but it's a, it's a network that connects parts of the cortex, which is the evolutionary most recent or advanced part of the brain that controls executive function and things like that. Conscious awareness to older deeper centers of memory and emotion. And the default mode network is appears to be involved in a range of functions having to do with giving us the allusion of self. Now I use the word allusion advisedly that that's what Buddhists would tell you. But I mean, it's it's a feeling we have that it's something special to be me or you and that there's a continuity over time that defines our identity. So in this part of the brain is worse. Self talk happen. Self reflection, rumination time travel appears to happen here. The ability to think about the future of the past, which if you think about it, you don't have a self unless you have a concept of the past or the future and the future. The continuity over time depends on being able to look back and forward theory of mind. That's what philosophers and psychologists talk about as the ability to imagine mental states in others, which is, of course, the core of moral reasoning, compassion and empathy. And there's a part of the Defoe network that's very much involved in the stories we tell ourselves about who we are. The posterior cingulate cortex is in node in this network that's called the autobahn graphical or narrative self. So all that is happening. It appears in this in this particular network. And the really striking thing about what's I could delicate meditation does is. Cutoff or limit activity in this in this network and limit blood flow to it. And that's very curious. And that's taught us for interesting things about the self. And and so what happens when the self goes off line? Well, other parts of the brain that don't normally communicate with one another strike up conversations because this self network is me network is people call. It is exerts a kind of hierarchical at the top of the brain hierarchies. It's it's the traffic cop orchestrator and it's been neutralist, but it's been neutralizes. Power has been diminished and then all his bottom up stuff starts happening. And so let's say your visual cortex might start talking to your sense of smell and you can suddenly. Smell sites or or see smells, and your brain gets temporarily rewired. And instead of every every signal passing through this central hub. Parts of the brain that don't normally talk to one another, begin talking to another, and that may give may account for some of the hallucinations. People experienced the the sinister that I was describing and possibly the new perspectives. The dots get connected in new ways on a psychedelic experience in may have to do with the relaxation of this controller. That is the self. And I could see images that looked like a very. Stylized jungle drawing in all these strange colors, and I felt that I was being drawn into the body of aloft. And as I was being pulled into that, I just had this feeling. I'm gone. You're listening to Lucas describing her experience on psychedelics. I don't know if I was giving any signs of distress, but I remember Bill saying, trust, let go open frost, let go open. And I just took a deep breath. End it all disappeared. I'm Paul Kennedy and on CBC radio one Sirius XM and CBC dot CA slash ideas. This is ideas. Over the past, the teen years supervised psychedelic Crips to treat a variety of illnesses have been conducted major medical institutions around the world. Early results are promising. Conditions like anxiety, post, traumatic stress disorder, addictions like cigarette smoking Doukas can be treated with medically supervised psychedelic sessions writer. Michael pollen has chronicled the social history of psychedelic drugs and spoken to many volunteers in the process. In this idea program shaking the snow globe, Mary O'Connell speaks with Michael Paulin about his recent book how change your mind. But first, let's return to lose mine. I was. Searching through like a bio at night. And so the images were very, it was very dark, sort of dark gray with black trees. But with the shimmery silvery -ness of moonlight glistening on everything. And I felt like I was in there and I was following something and it was kind of hunting something I was looking for something had no idea what it was, but I thought it was scary. It was a monster. It was something that I needed to find, and I didn't know what for but I would. I was hunting through these trees and finally plunged my hands down. Grab something and pulled it out, and I thought it was gonna be this horrible, awful creature and pulled up. And it was holding a little possum by the tail and I looked at gonna something terrifying. Here's a puff. I looked at are so cute. I was afraid of you. That's ridiculous. What's to be afraid of giving it little kissing you are. How could I been afraid of you? Now, Michael, some of these experiences reported by volunteers, jaw-dropping compelling, but you know, the medical researchers who work in this field truly believe psychedelics are not just about benefiting the individual, but the also believes psychedelics are good for society because the progress we've achieved has blunted our consciousness, our spirituality, and that second can re dress that balance. I'm sure you've heard that. Haven't you. Yes, I think they do see the drugs is having the potential to kind of renovate our sense of self in our in our sense of how the world works. We've been our society has encourage the the, the cultivation of self and ego, and he goes centrism. And much as lost as a result. For example, I think the ego Centric consciousness. Most of us has makes it harder to die. Because we feel that it's it's a final extinction and that nothing survives. But if your sense of self is not so narrowly defined as this body this, you know sack of skin and you define yourself as embracing some larger entity, whether it's the natural world or your or your children, or your family, your community as people once. Did your sense of what is lost in death changes? And and I think that redefinition of self that broadening of the self concept is one of the things that seems to happen on the psychedelic experience. One of the really striking things is people's relationship to nature shifts. And this is I mean, I experienced this, but it's been measured. There's a scale of nature relatedness where you're s cassette a question. See how much do I do you feel like you're part of nature or standing apart from nature and that changes that metric changes after psychedelic experience. Because I think this subject object duality, that most of us have that we are the the, the feeling perceiving subject and whatever we, behold, in nature is a mute object. Therefore, subject to our manipulation exploitation, that changes that subject object duality falls away and everything feels like it has subjectivity feels more alive, and I think that's true with other people to that, our ability to objectify other people people different than us people with different faith or religion or race, or whatever it is becomes harder to do because it's the ego that's building those walls. And if if the ego comes down, so do. Those walls and and there is an this channel opens, and I'm going to sound really silly now, but what flows through this channel for a lot of people on psychedelics is love is powerful feeling of connection to other people. So yeah, I think that there many aspects of the modern mind that it's been shaped by the industrial revolution, the enlightenment, whatever you wanna call it blunted or something or close to soft. Look. There's great power and objectify the other objectify nature. It allows us to make what we have made of nature for better or worse that we can exploit it. We can put pigs on factory farms without a second thought because they have no subjectivity. So it gives us cheap meat. It gives us cheap energy it. It's done a lot for us. Cheapens us as well. Well, exactly. There is a cost. There's always a cost is always a trade off. So a shift in that dimension of whether you see the world outside you as in object subject to your wims or as something as precious as you and more like you than you ever imagine. That's a big deal. I wanted to ask you, you interviewed a number of people, of course, who you you alluded to earlier, who spoke about incredible, mystical experiences, extraordinary visuals, but what story is there? One that stayed with Hugh someone's experience? Yeah. I mean, I'll give you a fairly brief one. The people who mystified me the most perhaps where the addicts who had after a single suicide experience had been able to break in addiction lex mocking, which is a very tough addiction debris as anyone has ever. Done, it knows and I didn't understand why this experience would do that. I remember interviewing this one woman who was about sixty. She's a book editor. She was irate and she had been a lifelong smoker and she had suicide experience at Johns Hopkins. And I said, so how did allow you to stop? And she said, well, I had this amazing journey where I sprouted wings and I was able to kinda fly through European history and witness all these amazing scenes of European history. And then I saw myself die three times and I saw my the smoke from my body rise from funeral pyre on the Gandhi's, and then I witnessed the birth of creation of the dawn of creation, and and I realized then that there were so many amazing things to do and see in the world that killing yourself with cigarettes seem really stupid. Now, that's kind of a banal observation, but it acquired this extraordinary of thirty in her mind, and that's a hallmark of the experience that people have on psychedelics. I think because this subject object distinction is disappearing. Everything seems either subjective in the sense of alive or objective in the sense of true and she appreciated her breath to be alive and wish she'd never had before and that allowed her to change her behavior. And what people told me is that the the experience on psychedelics is like having the camera pulled back on the scene of your life further than it ever has been before you see yourself from this overview perspective, you get this great distance on whatever it is you do and smoking begins to look like. A really dumb thing to do. And any smoker has had that insight at one point or another. But the difference here is how sticky it is and how empowering it is. And William James spoke of the no weta quality in the mystical experience by which he meant this sense that this wasn't just an opinion or an insight that you had gleaned. During this experience. It was a revealed truth and that power I think is what allows people to change. So her experienced stayed with me for that reason. But so many of them did. I talked to people who were dying who'd had. Experiences that allowed them to die with incredible equanimity. Patrick medicine, a journalist who I- profound the book I never met him, but based on his trip reports and many interviews with his guide and psychologist and his wife. I reconstruct his story and this is a man who was in his fifties when he got bile duct cancer that had spread to his lungs. And he was incredibly anxious if you're about death and had a psychedelic experience, that was so awesome and so beautiful in many ways. Not that it was without pain, but involved a rebirth of himself. And an a sense of that. There was a great plain of consciousness out there that that would survive him. And he emerged from his experience in a whole new place and enjoyed his last seventeen months described himself as the luckiest person on earth. You know, dying died and he was dying. And when his death came, he was in a hospital room, Mount Sinai, and he was comforting everybody around him. Soling them about what was happening because he was ready and he approached it with inequity. Anybody would envy. And that was the result of a single experience on a mushroom. I mean, how incredible is that. Our world, it is believable. Yeah. Well, and for me, one of the most convincing moments was I realized that interviewed his wife many times, but never seen him and I asked his wife if she would send me a picture, Lisa Callahan and she's sent me a snapshot of him that she had taken. I think, seven days before he died and when I clicked it opened on my computer. It took my breath away. Here was this a Macy's man with these bright blue eyes. He had an oxygen clip in his nose. He's wearing a blue hospital gown, and he's beaming. The man is beaming. He looked like Yogi, and it was, you know, just amazing to behold this this image. And so, yeah, they're very powerful, very powerful substances were still learning how best to use them. They're still a lot more research that needs to be done. We haven't pinned it all down yet, but I think to turn away. From the potential right now would be would be criminal. I have to ask you about someone you met on this journey, took sport this terrain pulse stem. It's, yeah, this guy is wild. I mean, he's out there. Can you yet? He is, well, he's a visionary. Paul is police in my college est. Although he has no academic training. He's he's revered my colleges and he has a business of fungi perfecting where he sells various mushroom growing kits and supplements made from mushrooms. And he, he has this fervent belief in the potential of mushrooms of one kind or another to save the world. It's as if the mushroom sent somebody to earth to promote their importance because they are overlooked kingdom, we know much less about mushrooms than we do about plants. They're actually more like us than plants, you know, mushrooms in, we both rely on plants. We were. We're parasitic on plants for our lively 'cause we can't convert sunlight. Food the way they can and we are on the visionary tree, much closer to them. They're really weird. Some of them will kill you. Some of them will give you psychedelic journeys, but he's also made very important inventions. I mean, I always was skeptical Paul because he was always telling me that you could deal with toxic waste using mushrooms. You could find drugs to save the bees from colony collapse from mushrooms. You could use mushrooms to treat cancer to kill termites. I had. I was skeptical. I had my journalists skepticism about him, but one by one, his claims have been proven, not never case, but in many cases, eight. Now, in your book you mention how after the Exxon Valdez ran aground off Alaska spilling millions of gallons of crude, how pulse damage for five old tradition apparently putting fund she to work break. Down petrochemical waste, and it actually worked buddy also deals today with mushrooms that boost the immune system of cancer patients. He's engaged with studies with the National Institute of health, but he had his own experience to with Cilla cyb and when he was very young, right? With magic mushrooms. Yeah, he got his start on Seoul assignment. He had an associate been experienced in college that almost killed him. But in the end, left him a changed person with a with a commitment to he really thinks mushrooms are are speaking to us from the heart of nature and bringing us a message that we need to heed about how we're ruining the planet. And, and anyway, he's so he was my teacher about the about the the suicide mushroom, and we went hunting for mushrooms in the Pacific northwest, and I learned a lot from him about mushrooms in the whole story of how much from k.. To the west. One aspect of psychedelics we haven't touched on is that this is not a new things is not a creation of the twentieth century tunnel, right? Or of western culture and that the native peoples of Mexico and Central America were using suicide Ben for possibly thousands of years. It was used as a sacrament when the Spanish got to Mexico and they crushed it. They were terrified of the sacrament because it was it was better than their sacrament. You actually saw God on there on the on the Indian Sacramento. Whereas, you know the, the bread and wine. You really had you needed faith to realize to see that as Akron as the body and blood of Christ. And so they crush these mushroom colts and they were only discovered in nineteen fifty five. So yes. So the whole mushroom story, the natural history. Like, why do these mushrooms make this chemical? That's. Very curious. Is it a defense chemical or is it an attractive of some kind? We don't really know. I wanna get to the part of your book how to change your mind. We'll have to jump to trip to Silla cyber magic mushroom drip. We're gonna. Have someone read the opening? Yeah, this was this was my second guided trip and it was the most profound. I think of all the trips I had and the one with the most lasting effect, it started out in all. My second journey began to round an altar in the middle of a second story law in a suburb of a small city on the eastern seaboard does the altar was being prayed over by an attractive woman with long blond hair. Seated across from me. Mary's is closed as she recited the long and elaborate native American prayer. She invoked in turn the power of each of the cardinal directions, the four elements and the animal plant and mineral rooms. The spirits of which she implored to help guide me on my journey. My eyes were close to, but sometimes I couldn't resist peaking. I see the squash colored loft with its potted plants, symbols of fertility in female power, the embroidered purple fabric from Peru that covered the altered. And there was an amethyst in the shape of heart, a purple crystal holding a candle. And sitting squarely before me on a grandmotherly floral pattern plate was the biggest Silla cyb and mushroom ever seen. It was hard to believe I was about to eat that whole thing. At the beginning, I found myself in this kind of digital video game landscape, and I really didn't like that. I thought had been generated by the music. I was hearing my God was playing this. It's just seemed like electron IQ and put me in the dark place. I, it wasn't scary, but it was a little cost phobic. I wanted to be outside. I wanted to see natural. It was impressive. It was. It was digital imagery and it was all black, black and white. So I was stuck there for a while. And at a certain point I had this kind of rising panic like I ever going to get out of there. Now, it's important to saying when you're being God that you have, you're listening to music and at the very important part of the experience you're doing for two reasons. One is to block out traffic noise and other sounds, and the other is that music has a special power on psychedelics can generate landscapes. It can take you places it's incredibly suggestive, and so the guides use it to kind of drive and and underscore the experience. And you're also wearing is shades which is to encourage inward journey of your imagination. Not a kind of responding to all the incredible sensory information you're getting because this is supposed to be healing trip. You're supposed to go to the psychological places. And so I- certain point I was feeling a little bit claustrophobic. So I took off my shades and this amazing flood of sparkling light hit my eyes. And my guide asked me if I'd like. Some more and she was a woman about my age and she had long blond hair parted in the middle and high cheekbones for attractive. But as she handed me the mushroom, she was she was squatting next to me and I looked and she had been transformed into a Mexican Indian. Black hair and this leathery dark skin. And I knew exactly who she was. She'd become a rea- Sabina. The Mexican healer says a very important person in this history and Mary guide had turned into Maria, Sabina. And then I put on my shades and took another dose. And then the most incredible thing happened. I saw myself kind of burst into. Slips of paper. My usual self had been reduced to this cloud of little posted host. Post it notes. Yes, and I had, but I was fine with it. There was another is that opened up another first person that opened up in that it could in this incredibly objective on invested way, watch the destruction of myself, but it was not my usual self perceiving this, and I had no desire to, you know, pile the little post its back together again. And then I looked out again and I had been spread out over the landscape like a thin coat of paint or butter. And, and that was fine. I wasn't troubled by at all, and I realized that was the dissolution of my sense of self ego dissolve completely. But what was no worthy about it is that there was still a presiding awareness. There was some other vantage that had opened up now. This Huxley would have said that was the mind at large, some kind of universal consciousness that I was residing in. I tend not to believe that there is consciousness outside of our brains, but it was certainly a sign that there was another ground to stand on and greet reality, then your ego. And it gave me a kind of distance on my ego that I'd never had before and made me realize maybe the egos not as indispensable as it likes us to believe that witnessing you're got me the wild end that you were. At notes who was that? I don't know. I don't know that it was a who. Okay. It was just this incredibly calm, disinterested consciousness awareness. And this is something commonly reported, and I have a feeling that that it was that awareness that the people who were facing death to comfort in that they too had watched themselves die. Their egos died during their experience. They'd had a rehearsal of death and the fact that they could observe it as happens by the way during near death experiences where people actually do dying, come back. I don't know. I think it's, I think it's a big mystery. Look, if the self is in allusion, there may be another consciousness that precedes it or succeeds it. And you know here we're on very squishy ground. I don't know. I'm just reporting what I saw. I don't have a metaphysics yet to to to account for all, but it was. It was quite amazing. And the piece of that moment was amazing. At this point, I have persuaded my God to put on better music, and we read on Bach unaccompanied cello suite. Number two, d minor believe it is played by yoyo. And this became the most sublime experience of music, not having a self. I wasn't listening to the news, became the. I, I moved so completely not just with the sounds, but with the space, you know, the well of the cello that was producing it, and I could feel the the friction of the horsehair Bogo over me. I was a sound wave. I was vibration. I was identical with that piece of music just so breathtaking. It was incredible. I think that was the climax of that experience. Now the question is so what good is that? Well, you know, after you have one of these experiences with a guide as I did you go back the next day for what's called an integration session, and that's where you try to make sense of what happened and apply it to the conduct of your life. And so I told her what had happened that I had, you know, witnessed the dissolution of my ego and and realized there was another ground on which to stand beside your ego, and she said, well, don't you think that's worth the price of admission right there? And I said, yeah, except what good is it because now my ego is, you know, back in uniform back on patrol getting things done, getting things done, getting books written, but she said that, you know, well, having had a taste of that other way to be. And I think that's a key phrase, a taste. Of another way to be. That's what psychedelics gives you. You can cultivate that. And I asked her how she said through meditation. Meditation is a way you can access that kind of awareness. And I think she's right, and I have, you know, worked with a lot more commitment to my meditation practice than I did before and every now and then not every day, certainly. But every now and then I can achieve that state of awareness or something very, like it through meditation and and it's worth striving for. Has it has been a transformation? Have you been transformed? How would you care to rise. Well, I think I have been changed in certain ways. I think that I have a little more perspective on my ego on unless whipsawed by it I can. I can see when he's up to his old tricks and and you know, shut them down or or just have that kind of distance. I think that's very valuable because I think that our egos do get in our way and they do erect walls and make us less open than we would be. And I do think I am a a somewhat more open person, more patient person, less defended person that I was before. So yeah, there's been a shift in my in the role of my ego. I mean, it's still present a minute. Somebody wrote in, you know, to say your ego was painted over the landscape. You know, that's kinda egotistical. I am. So yeah, it's probably not as simple as I think. And I went through death of someone very close to me my father in January, and I think I, at least according to my wife said this when I asked her the same question, you just asked me about how this change me. She said, well, you were more present in more open to what was happening more able to say, what needed to be said. I mean, one of the things are egos defend us against is thinking about death and the experience of death in the sight of death. It's a big part of that. The goes job and I was not defending myself against what was happening. I was very present to, and it was a gift. You know, in reading through your book, how to change your mind. I was reminded many times of sentence from a novel that I read the famished road by the Nigerian writer. Ben Okri because one of the main characters concludes, human beings are God's hidden from themselves. Beautiful. That resonates with me. On ideas. You've been listening to shaking the snow globe produced by Mary O'Connell who was in conversation with Michael Paulin about his book how to change your mind. You can find a link to it on our website. CBC dot CA, slash ideas where of course, you can always get our podcast. You can also stream all of our episodes on the radio player, Canada app, Liz nauseous, the associate producer of ideas, chemical production, Mitch, Stewart, and Daniel out the executive producer of ideas. Greg, Kelly. I'm Paul Kennedy. For more CBC podcasts, Goto CBC dot CA, slash podcasts.

LSD Mary O'Connell Michael Paul Kennedy Michael Paulin Bill Richards cancer Michael pollen Lucas Albert Hoffman Michael Palin Emily Dickinson producer Ben Okri writer Michelle Parisi Sandos laboratories Mexico Maryland
Why Food Matters More Than You Think: From Plate to Planet with Mark Bittman

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

1:02:39 hr | 1 year ago

Why Food Matters More Than You Think: From Plate to Planet with Mark Bittman

"Coming up on this week's episode of the doctors pharmacy every year that passes that we are not teaching for year olds how to eat well means that twenty years from now yeah. We're gonna have twenty four year olds and forty years from now. We're gonna have forty four year olds who are struggling with their diets. Everybody nobody is dr martin behrman now before we get started with this week's episode. I'm gonna tell you about a company called thrive market. This made so easy for me to stay healthy even with my crazy travel abbas kidul in fact i believe in him so much that i was one of their first investors over five years ago so here's a little background i split my time between three different from locations cleveland the berkshires and new york and i'm constantly traveling anyone else who drives a lot knows that airport food and restaurant food is horrible. It's junk is pretty scary out there. Actually i recently drove through ohio and it was a food. Wasteland is easier to make healthy choices at home for sure but when you're hungry and you're on the road. It's pretty easy to get in a food emergency. Those french fries incentive means while it just just seem to call your name. I never let myself get into food emergency. I bring enough food with me for at least a whole day sometimes more than a day whole foods real foods that order online from thrive market they sell all my favorite snacks condiments cleaning products self off your products pretty much all the stuff in my kitchen and the rest of my house at discounted prices now they don't sell fresh fruits and veggies but pretty much everything else including regenerative beef in sustainable harvest fish. I just order a boxful. All my favorite stuff have a delivered to my house. In fact wherever i am and i stock my pantry i am i backpack with all my favorite stuff and care with me and all of its clean coal food and is between twenty five and fifty percent off the retail price that you get a place like whole foods the also carry one of my favorite snacks of all time hugh kitchen dark chocolate now. This is probably the best chocolate in the world. They have all the flavors that you need in that. I love and if you haven't tried this chocolate is pretty amazing. They use only the most high quality organic ingredients these coconut sugar which doesn't spike mike blood sugar and make harry so many different flavors like hazelnut butter dark chocolate almond butter chocolate covered almonds or caches. My wife's favorite are the gooseberries covered in chocolate. They're addictive so be careful. Hugh kitchen chocolate is hands down. My favorite and thrive market offers all their products up to thirty percent off so not only is thrive offer great deals and carry all my favorite bands but they also give back for every membership purchased a give a membership to a family family who's in need and right now. Thrive is offering all of our doctors pharmacy listeners a fabulous deal. You're going to receive an extra twenty five percent off your first. I purchase plus a free thirty day membership to thrive. There's no minimum amount to buy is no code at the checkout. All you have to do is head over to thrive market dot com slash pharmacy. That's thrive market dot com <unk> pharmacy. That's with an f. f. a. r. a. z. y. I think you're gonna love him as much as i do. I'm really proud to have them as a sponsor and be an investor in their company all right. Let's get back to the episode welcomes doctors pharmacy. I'm dr mark hyman in pharmacy with f f a._r. Place for conversations that matter and today's conversations with one of my idols and mentors <hes> even though he doesn't know it mark pitman who i've been following for decades and it has been one of the leading voices not just in reinvigorating cooking and has written mazing books on this twenty different books including how to cook everything <hes> mm food matters a guide to conscious cooking v. b. six and many many other box but he's also been a leader in the food movement and which is really focusing on the idea idea that the food system itself is driving many of our social problems and i had the chance to watch his extraordinary ted talk which i encourage you all to watch ten years old in two thousand and seven maybe it's twelve years old and in one of the <hes> compelling images i remember was you showed <hes> mushroom cloud which was emblematic of how we grow meet in this country that it is the nuclear bomb of today in terms of climate environment <hes> global destruction and we're going to get into that <hes>. He has written extensively in the times. I was devastated when his new york times column stopped because i read it every every weekend. It was just a a wonderful compendium of various ideas around food that really went far beyond just cooking cooking <hes> he has had some extraordinary television shows emmy award winning show called years of living dangerously about climate change. He's we're in for so many publications. He's now teaching at columbia and food policy social justice and many other things. He's certainly new magazine on on medium <hes>. We don't know the title yet doing. Let's say it's great aspects of food that are being talked about. It's not the usual cooking column. It's actually about the issues that matter that relate to food and he's gonna be having a podcast newsletter and i can't wait for all of it <hes> he's just getting started and seems like in his work around food and one of the questions i have for you. Mark and welcome to the doctors pharmacy is is you got into this field through the doorway of cooking and cited and somehow you took a different direction direction where it took you into thinking about food in a global way in food system. The consequences of the food system had to happen because a lot of ships are out there and they're just cooking talking about food and cooking but you're talking about food as a solution to all the world's problems right well. I think i was never a chef off. <hes> i was cooked by accident and a writer by trade and when i started writing i was writing about community organizing and local issues and things like that and and bought the boston area when i started to write for whatever reason no one was interested in anything thing i was writing about until i started writing about food so i started writing about food which was fine with me. I love cooking. I love cooking <hes> but i did have this this <hes> i did have this kind of dilemma or challenge which was that i wondered wondered whether writing about cooking was really the most important thing could be doing and gradually came to end. We're talking about a career that at this point is forty forty years long so i started writing about food in nineteen eighty so literally almost forty years of writing about food and i think by nineteen ninety ninety nine hundred ninety five maybe two thousand i come to terms with it because i thought you know cooking is so valuable and so important and you know in those twenty on a years say the world around food had really changed local food had kind of gone away and was starting to come back but i mean the i lived in massachusetts and connecticut dan when i started to write about food. There were local farms. There were people doing dairy and meat and vegetables nobles within twenty thirty miles of boston and new haven both of which i lived in and doing it real it was not was that a hobby it was not small people or farming by two thousand that wasn't happening anymore. <hes> and i thought you know to preserve these traditions traditions to talk about food to talk about food and nutrition because was also becoming clear that time that cooking was really a much better way to eat beat than take out fast food dutta and i thought you know if i can encourage. I used to say if i can get everybody in the united states to cook rice and beans means once a week i will have had a successful career that but that was kind of a little bit of corner-turning there and by two thousand thousands or so i thought you know eric schlosser had just written <hes> fast food nation and michael palin starring to write some food oriented things than i thought you you know people are beginning to write more seriously about food. It's not just cooking. It's not certainly not just restaurants. It's not even just nutrition which had gone through a a bad period. I'm sure we can talk about because there was a there has been a lot of confusing information which i think is there's less of that now. I think we understand stan things better but there was a period where writing about nutrition was like a minefield <hes> but anyway people were starting to write about the link between the links between between good food cooking good agriculture food access what we grew how we grew it etc cetera et cetera and as i said around two thousand i started to think i could do that too and by two thousand five or so i wrote a piece for the times called which was brilliant headline which i didn't write called taming the meat guzzler and and it was a piece about the links between hi consumed high production and high consumption of factory raised meat and rates of cancer and other chronic onic diseases and global warming and no one had written that yeah so <hes> is kind of the first to write that piece and i was lucky enough to have written it been on a great platform the times platform and it was super popular peace and from there i. I didn't stop writing learning about cooking. I still do and i love writing about cooking and i think it's important but i started to shift and add more and more writing about policy policy in about food in general and so now kind of slipped my time between those things yeah and they're and they're not is connected right. I mean only cooking real food at at home in a way is revolutionary act. That can solve a lot of our problems if people do it right. I it's true but but you know when you get into these conversations. It's not a but it's true nevertheless when you get into these conversations you quickly realize that not everybody is gonna cook at home. It just ain't going to happen. Some people can't and some people won't meals are now eaten outside the right and so it's a it's a partial solution at best or it's a solution for those who could do it in can do it well but it's not a panacea and i only say that because there was a time when i thought okay my job is to get everybody to cook all dime and then all all the world's problems will be solved not that simple but it would help it would really would help and it would improve people's health it would help promote the right cuts agriculture would reduce our healthcare costs who helps people pick the right food it would end global warming would end to warn but it put a dent in it. I think you're right. It's a revolutionary act yeah because with good ingredients gradients is a revolutionary act but making sure that you consume good ingredients however they are prepared though so revolution yeah you so you actually sort of came at this an interesting way through one of your books called v six which is begin before six which is interesting concept. I love it. I i <hes> sort of coined the term impeding which was which was actually related to that which is paleo vegan as a joke on the extremes of diet and usa came through. Hey we should eat mostly plants and i i agree with you oughta present. I mean no matter really putting labels on diets as stupid people like labels. I get it but so you know it's like yeah e. Plants don't eat a lot of junk food. Don't eat a lot of animal products. Call it whatever you want right yeah and that has has been. I think a key part of message. I want to jump into what you sort of come into in later party. Which is this whole food movement and the and you are one of the leaders. Here's an consonant and you wrote an article. I think it was in the new york times magazine. I was a letter basically to a future president two thousand fifteen <hes> which unfortunately wasn't taken as advice but it was very powerful and you linked together so many disparate things that people just don't connect the dots on and and i just want to share a little bit of what you wrote with michael pollen and others that was i think for me one of the best summaries a couple of paragraphs of this problem then i wanna so glad you're reading it because you said to me what off so you wrote that you know the basically the the the thing is is we have no food policy in this country even though it the food system and all the consequences of it are driving most of the crises that are happening. Today's world environmental degradation climate change economic inequality the burden on the federal budget <hes>. There's no plan or principles i suppose that we actually agree on for managing our food system and you wrote that the current and future wellbeing of the nation can be significantly improved by creating a national food policy see such a policy you said if properly conceived and implemented will result in a healthier population a reduction in hunger mitigation of an adaption to climate change decreases in energy consumption like because one fifth of our fossil fuels used for agriculture improved environmental conservation rural and inner city economic development evolvement. We'll talk about that. A reduction in socio economic inequalities is really a social justice issue in your teaching a course on that a safer and more secure food system and savings to the federal budget especially in spending on healthcare and you said the previous administrations have failed to appreciate the linkages between farming diet the public health and the environment with the result that the food system has never been effectively overseen administered or regulated back. Nobody's really paying attention to all these linkages. This in turn has resulted in severe market failures that we called by other names that are seemingly separate issues right so the obesity crisis runaway hunger epidemics that makes a chronic disease the ethanol bubble surface water contamination i- poxy. Ah you know killing dead zones in the gulf of mexico it will relieve that we lose two hundred twelve four thousand metric tons of fish because of the runoff from nitrogen from the farming we do that wasn't in your article. I just added that soil degradation and soils critical for storing carbon food safety scares and recalls rural economic decline inner-city food desert's labor exploitation rising economic inequality and the federal fiscal crisis by attending to the food system. It's possible to connect all these dots begin to address them in a coordinated effective way. This is a big idea and it's it's an idea. That's been around for a while but nobody's paying attention to it. How do we get people to pay attention to this. I want to say two things here. One is that you everything that we just said you could pretty much say about the climate change issue also yeah <hes> and they only klein who said i love mine. I'm sure you know wrote. This book called this changes everything which was about if we were to address climate change seriously and bill mckibben been saying this for years. If we were seriously address climate change we would have to address. Yes all of those issues to and including food and food is the same kind of thin end of the wedge. If you were to address food seriously you'd have have to address everything from climate change income inequality to soil quality you name it to cooking for them so that's one thing i want to say other other than i wanted to say is this in the history of this country and in the last hundred hundred and fifty years this country has determined a lot of what happens in the world like like it or not that you know you might hate america but you can't deny its power so <hes> certainly since world war two but arguably even since the beginning of the twentieth century late nineteenth century a lot of what happens here determines what happens elsewhere and we in this country have never once said. What do we want food to be. What do we want it to do if there were a food system what might it look like what would its primary goals be be. We've never stated that and if i say to you and i'm not gonna put you on the spot because that's a rhetorical question but if i say to you or almost anyone else if you were czar of food if there were food system like what would your priorities be and i think most people would say something like well. Let's try to feed everybody body as well as we can and do as little damage to the earth is possible something like that. You know you get into animal welfare. You can get into the details of what feeding eating everybody well means and get into the details of soil maintenance and all that but it would would pretty much be. Let's benefit greatest good for greatest number kind of thing. That's not what we have a. We don't have a system but be what we have. What we call a system what we call food system is a bunch of rich people just trying to get pitcher. I mean that's the big big agan bid food the goal of the food system the goal of the people who determine what we eat is to to make money and they make money by selling chemicals by selling fertilizer by selling seeds by selling equipment by selling hyper processed food that makes us sick and so on that's where the food system is so the difference between a and b greatest good for greatest number and and a bunch of people trying to get rich selling a bunch the stuff we don't really need. That's a huge difference yeah. So how do we get there. That's really the question and it's not a shortcut. It's not a i'm not going to sit here and say here's what we do in order to do that. It's a big question but i have to ask. I mean you were part of a conference called the the true cost of food which i am so jealous that i didn't get to go to london yeah no. I wasn't there one in california. Oh yeah there was one in california so good yes it was really stunning and it it products issues together from different experts across the world and in in this concept is something that would be useful which is what is the real cost of what we're eating what is real cost of a feed lot hamburger or arkansas' soda to the environment to humans to social justice to the economy to our kids who have to eat this food that have developmental issues and cognitive impairment. I mean those measurements. Those metrics have to be solidified. You know what matters here's has to be measured and if we measure it changes what we do right you know but it can of soda. Let's say again of sort across the dollar. I don't know if it matters that the true cross is two dollars or four dollars somewhere in that range and it depends that you counting healthcare costs the accounting everything. I know you're counting. The cost of mining the aluminum etcetera costed the dead fish in mexico but there are things that are immeasurable vo because <hes> the industrial farming and the production of junk food and so and so forth decreases bio-diversity. We don't even know what decreasing increasing biodiversity costs. There's no way to put a price tag on that. You know you're into <unk> esoteric ways of improving health there could be some. You know there could be some micro. They're unlikely his <hes> amore. They're likely is some microbes bacteria some this or that out there. That could be a cure for cancer. I mean it's it's silly and elementary to say that but there's only species. We haven't even identified but we're killing them anyway. So like the biodiversity of the soil. I mean our friend daphne miller dr she focuses on the health of the soil as a way of creating health of humans which is something living in people aren't even thinking about and that that is right and i think we we can't measure everything. What is it <hes> who said everything that matters can't be measured. Everything is can be measured doesn't doesn't necessarily matter wasn't he was einstein or something like that. <hes> and i think that that <hes> we have have to start looking at these things and the impediments are houston. What are you what do you think are the greatest impediments and how do we overcome that because you know the these issues have been laid eight out so clearly by so many people including you michael pollen and others the food movement and yet they fall on deaf ears and we don't hear this political discourse. We don't hear in the media. We just set for rogue elements but it's it's a tough issue. You know it's funny. We don't <hes> we haven't made much progress on climate change. We haven't made much progress on income inequality. We haven't made much progress on addressing what the role of people is in the labor force in the future by the big issues. Don't get tackled very well and i think we understand. Are we get that. They're hard to tackle when we get a a lot of politicians are corrupt than we get. The some of them are just stupid on but food not mentioning any names roy us any good food is food is different because food so core and it's both so obvious that it needs to be fixed i and yet because food is cheap because so many of those external costs that you were just talking that aren't paid directly by us us the consumer or the industry that produces the out them then food of fear appears to be cheap so politicians would just say look everybody in the united states. It's more or less is eating okay. I mean some people need food stamps. I don't want to belittle that but these people in the united states relative to the rest of the world doing pretty well wise in terms of getting the right number of cowers enough calories and not the right color. No we can get into that but the thing is it's not an issue is not a huge issue of hunger or lack of calories in this country and so i think politicians i would just as soon leave well enough alone not to mention the fact that the food industry's lobbying budget is as big as defense industry's lobbying budget so there's a lot of pressure asher. Just say let us do our thing. We know that we're not feeding people ideally but at least we're kind of feeding people and i think there's a lot of that. We can address other things i was. I think it's really really hard to address food. I mean from a policy perspective and yet where can we start. What's obvious so on the fact that we're relying on industry to get antibiotics out of the food supply. Despite despite increasing numbers of antibiotic resistant bacteria legis stop because because that is such a big issue that's twenty nine million in pounds of antibiotics may twenty four for preventing faction in overcrowding animals right superbugs kill thirty thousand people year and millions around the world and rising and rising writing and at one eight percent. I met an estimate that globally inside of the cost of all that is about two point one trillion dollars and the f._d._a. And this is the corruption of the government the f._d._a. T._a. said pretty please. Will you not do this because we don't think it's a good idea to you know sort of voluntary guidelines which nobody follows and there's they might be following them but there's no oversight. You wouldn't know there's always companies that have pledged to take antibiotics out of their food supply and our d._c. In the national resources defense council says they're actually doing it to a large extent. I believe in our d._c. I'm not sure i believe that this is really happening. It sure would have happened. Faster of the obama. Administration had come in in two thousand eight and said here's an issue. We you want to resolve this by two thousand twelve or two thousand fifteen would have been resolved by now. That hasn't happened it. Hasn't you know in the seventies. We're talking. We're talking forty forty years ago. In the late sixties early seventies actually talking close to fifty years ago. People were saying we have to stop marketing junk food to children this. This is really bad. We are teaching young children. That soda is a cool thing to drink even before they can talk for their even marginally able to understand stand. What's coming at them. We're teaching them so to sweden. Jews brek sweetened breakfast cereal cookies. These are the things that make life worth living right fifty years ago. There was noise being made about that the federal trade commission which was on the verge of doing something about it was effectively silenced. Congress was effectively bought off. No one even raises the issue atmore. You can't even get the national government to talk doc about this stuff so you're relying on things like soda taxes which are better than nothing but not much yeah was interesting barry popkin who i know you know very well. He said to me that in chile where they implemented a sweeping policy change around food including soda tax of eighteen percent right and in great labeling labeling including eliminating marketing to kids right <hes> through any media and also on the cereal boxes so tony the tiger is dead right. He said shockingly when they analyze the impact of these policies that the marketing restrictions were four times effective as soda tax. I would imagine in that and in this country i think mayor nestle wrote an article. I think newland journal years ago about food marketing kids and said i think we're one of the only countries other than syria korea that doesn't restrict food marketing to kids in some way. I don't know maybe in some way and we do restricted in some way but again. These are to a large part. It's voluntary like the industry it said well. Don't worry about it. Will we won't market junk to kids which was a total lie. They took one sliver of their marketing budget and moved it somewhere else so they can say oh. Oh years this saturday mornings. We don't sell junk on children's programming. That's kind of it. The the real tragedy here is that i mean suppose we have this conversation. Great conversation filled with interesting thing too indulgent guys. Maybe do we change a couple of people's. Minds are a few people have insights fabulous. Meanwhile the budget for the fast food junk food industries is in the billions of dollars and they're targeting young kids who can't really say oh. What a bunch of garbage they say oh wow i can paddle mike canoe down a- the river made of milk and capture fruit loops in this game that fruit loops fauner isn't coke enjoyable every year that passes that we are not teaching for your olds how to eat. Well means that twenty years from now. We're going to have twenty four year olds and forty years from now. We're gonna in a forty four year olds who are struggling with their diets who are coming to see you in other doctors and saying gee overweight. I can't control more. Why is that while the reason it's not a bad person. The reason is that you were trained as a young person to eat badly and that you're surrounded by not not the most ideal food that you should be eating factors surrounded by the opposite of the ideal and your every place you go every the david kessler is always talked about this. I mean the silly scientific term is obese inorganic environment but basically what it means is that we are in a permanent carnival of junk food food swamp airfreight food swap is much better than food desert everywhere you go there's cotton candy handy and marshmallow oats cinna bon and double cheeseburger and it's all screaming eat me and when you're a little kid you were being told this is the cool stuff yeah like stir fry with broccoli and those who but this it's tough average kid sees between six and ten thousand as for junk food in a year year a year and if you spoke to your kid three times a day every meal about healthy eating you could not compete that would be one and then i think even even today it's worse because that was based on traditional media. Now we have social media which is all subversive invisible embedded in much harder. This is jealous. That's it's true. If you do get three times a day at the time right and then might hate you either way the kid would hey so you so that's true and my daughter's fascinating. She ryan story when i was <hes> you know reading about this. Kids who are two years old to recognize labeled labeled brand name products before the basic couldn't even walk or talk. You have to be a before you can distinguish fact from fiction. I remember my daughter was eight or nine daddy. How come all those commercials on television in real life. It doesn't actually kind of match up with what you see and i'm like wow that's very insightful. She kinda eh awake awakening like all that crap she sees in the media is actually what it really is and and <hes> you know our friend. Kelly brownell was also a <unk> a pioneering some of this research around food marketing said the worst foods have the most marketing so the ones that have the most harm in the least nutritional value are the ones is that are most promoted right well on adulterated foods or not very profitable aaliyah's rock. Where do you see those super bowl ads for broccoli cashews. Is it gonna get don't <hes> all right so let's talk about the the the way we can help shift us and i if you were adviser to the president did it and you were sitting in the white house and maybe <hes> this next election cycle and you could help shape that national food policy. Where would you folks folks. The two things we've talked about. I would do the antibiotic thing like that. I wouldn't even you know just yeah it has to be an edict and by the way bow would transform animal komo agricultural overnight it might although they've taken antibiotics out of industrial agriculture in denmark and the netherlands and they're still producing a lot of factory farms so you can do it without antibiotics. It's not a panacea but a shirt. It sure starts to solve solve one public health problem. Which is the r antibiotics. They're not as effective as they were and so that's an easy thing is great. Public relations victories a lot you could talk about you could use it in tandem with making factory farmed me better. You're not gonna make it go away by this but you could. There are degrees of if that would be like okay. You want to know what i wanna do. It's not it's not the biggest problem. It's not the biggest solution but it's the easiest thing things such low hanging fruit and really we all those of us who wrote this call for a national policy honestly thought that it would be one of the first things the obama administration would do. That's ten years that it hasn't happened that. It could've happened so that's unfortunate. The second thing i do is start working on marketing in the marketing of junk tickets. We just talked about that also but i i would just say what's feasible. What can we do here. Can we make it so that minors can't <unk> by soda without their parents permission. It's radical notion because they can't buy cigarettes and it's sodas arguably as harmful as cigarettes. Let's we had no problem with that. It's certainly armful as beers so well. I mean it's now clear that diet particularly sugar sweetened beverages kill more people than dan smoking war and terrorism and <hes> combined writing a transportation. Well you know experts are now saying that the leading cause of death worldwide can be traced diet so we know that a billion people don't have enough to eat. That's that's an income issue and that's a justice issue and that's an issue that needs to be dealt with in one way on the other hand. We know that another billion or more people or getting the wrong calories billion overweight are getting the wrong calories in our and our getting chronic diseases from their diet. You know it can have mean mean could happen to non overweight people too. So how do we address that and you know until we until we change our economic system. Were not going to be directly regulating what food manufacturers can produce by. Maybe we can directly regulate what they can sell. Yes yeah that's that would be so what about the this sort of dichotomy between the message that meat is bad in the the sense of harming the planet harming people causing climate change and feed lot factories and the emphasis he also play some regenerator culture which necessitates animals being part of the cycle of regenerating soil holding water drawing noncarbon reducing climate change because it's i think it's a debate that is as dichotomies but falsely so if meat is bad it doesn't mean all meat is bad right and how how do you explain that to people. I think so you start with the fact that the way we produce meat is mostly bad and you start. I'm bad as simple term but it works. I guess and you start art with the fact that we mostly too much of this meat. That's produced badly so if we ate less meat and produce better and saw so our animal friends as a way of keeping soil healthy as a way of promoting regenerative agriculture and so on it becomes more of that that kind of closed system where everybody has a role and it's not just we're raising animals as if they were little machines and were killing them as if they had no oh life worth thinking about and we're just eating them as fast as we can and by the way we're doing it at a rate that the rest of the world can't but tough luck because we're americans americans or whatever you're saying you know the the latest thing five years ago so lancet said lancet said that people in the west should be reducing their meat consumption by ninety percent. I don't think they're actually the latest stuff. I think is a little less onerous but even if it's fifty percent that's a lot for a lot of people think it's just clear to say we need fewer animals in industrial production action we need more animals on pasture and we as humans need to be eating fewer of them and paying more attention to which ones were eating when and how i mean that's that's a broad overall statement to come out and say look we all have to be vegan or we have to reduce our consumption by ninety percent like this people just gonna shut their ears. I think was fascinating those if you look at the the problem the price of feed lot meat is pretty low. It's unbelievably unbelievably cheap until you get to that true costs that true costing so you add in the cost of the fossil fuels to grow you add in the cost of soil destruction in from cornyn so i mean one pound of soil is laws for every pound of corn grown. We have the greenhouse gases water per pound of me right that kind of thing era of on and on and on public health costs. I don't think you mentioned exactly trillions of dollars a year absolutely so there's a huge cost of maybe be a pound of meat should be a thousand dollars fee lot meat or whatever whatever it is never it is on the other hand. Grasping rib is seventy dollars for a steak. Thank you know that's ridiculous but what if the true cost of that was incorporated in terms of the benefits to the soil in the water retention in the soil l. and the deduction climate change in the health benefits of more mega three fats in the diet from the foo who they're aiming so we have to equalize that and we put all these price supports it's for feed lot me through subsidies that gross corn and soy we'd <unk> rainforests and destroy soil. None of that's incorporate the cost and on the regional side is very hard for people he will start that because it's cost a lot of money up front. It's hard to transition <hes> you know and a lot of range. Lands are not being used in this way but could be restored. I mean you know i always talk about how we had sixty million bison in this country before we kill them off to start off the native americans and now we have about eighty million cows. We didn't have climate change back then. We didn't have soil destruction. We're actually building kenza feet of topsoil. So how do we sort of rethink bat and include that equation so i think to me policies that actually help account for the true cost of food and reduced support for that doc in feedlots meet and then having subsidies and support for regenerative egg seems to be like a great solution right and you put that in conjunction with putting farmers back on the land who want to do the kind of farming that will support the environment that produce meat that's raised without torture. You're and and so on and you have your beginning abbott kind of comprehensive plan for how to address food. I think a big thing is. I mean you asked what i would do. If if i were foods are or whatever <hes> other big thing that address that addresses those that package that you just raised list is how do we get how do we make land affordable for people who are going to farm it in a way that will sustain that land as opposed to scraping off the top layer of topsoil having the wind blow it away and that's what happened to bury gasping. Oh god that was the dust bowl we killed the bison and then we got the dust bowl all that was killed the bison we kill the bison and killed the original people or move them in order to be able to scrape that the the prairie down to the topsoil in order to plant the topsoil in wheat and then much of that topsoil blue during the dust the ball right and then there was an attempt to reestablish that environment which now hasn't worked that well and it's certainly not as sustainable system now either either. I mean it's only what seventy five ninety years after the dust bowl that land is it repaired in that land is not being used in a sustainable way yeah it's it's really all interconnected and that was so great about that article to create a twenty first century national food policy because it connected all these disparate dots lots and appointed out points of light of people actually doing the right things that need more support and help right and and the truth is we have the potential angelique change what's going on with simple government policies like the good food purchasing program for example in l. A. is where the local government says. We're only going to buy food for our institutional things that we serve as the government. It's sustainable. That's high nutrition that meets all these metrics and it's measured asher and it's reproducible so those kinds of initiatives could be huge if we put little compost on it not gasoline that that is a good for food purchasing policy and you know the the great thing about it and this is because of the terrific people behind it but the great thing about is is that it even talks about the parts of the food system that aren't again. Get talknet hidden costs for a bitter. We're talking about <hes> factors that aren't normally associated with good food. Purchasing policy says well we want this food to be grown by people who were treated well by bye-bye people who have fair labor practices yeah <hes> so that we want to make sure that workers who are bringing our food or treated well. That's a novel concept yes to say i mean you probably know that something like eight of the ten worst. Paying jobs in the united states are in the food system farmers who -greeing us our food for farm workers food workers redel workers. <hes> people who bring us food often are on food stamps. They can't afford ford to buy food in the same way that many of us do so. They're being underpaid. They're being paid minimum wages wage theft and a lot of those kinds of jobs that being paid they less than minimum wage. They're taped workers which is a problem and could food purchasing. Policy is a way that cities can say well. We don't want workers who are in the food chain who were supplying us our food our cities food to be mistreated. We want them to be making at least fair living wage and that's that's a food food issue and that's not food is usually is you and it's a big ish and the other part of it that people don't think about is that farming is the most dangerous occupation in america and people all farmworkers diet seven times a raiders up nonfarm workers and it's because of the pesticides the chemicals and the farm injuries these and and these are often poor under served workers who have no health care and guess what we pay for that and all these costs are sort of imbedded in the system system that aren't reflected in the price of food and we we actually don't even talk about them so mark you've been advocating this way for food for a long time but you also have another another life which is as a chef and as a cookbook writer and and i used to watch <hes> all your little things on when i was flying on t._v. Having said all mark bit cooking jet blue on jetblue it was great. I was like how simple you make cooking and how easy it is on those days and i saw my face on like sixty screens yeah an thank a new york times cooking thing but it's all online writings little cooking videos does well yeah the there's also the minute the ones the minimalist videos which ran on the time site are still on the super complicated and then your new book look is dinner for everyone whether you're vegan or whether you're vegetarian or whether you're an omnivore or whatever you are if you love food and most of us do love food dude. This book is a pretty great way for people to enter into thinking about making food at home. Which is something people don't do right well anyway something. The most people don't do but you know there are a dinner for everyone is a a kind of three pronged book and because we asked ourselves also what do people really want at this point. Everyone wants to cook quickly so we have that. Everybody's looking for better plant based meals. We have that and people like to cook for each other so we have that so the idea is that we take a concept like stroganoff or scampi or pizza or were possible as a or a glenn parmesan her stir fry. I mean there's a hundred different sort of iconic onic concepts on each one. We do a fast recipe like under half an hour really fast of ian recipes so we take that concept even if it's a meat base concept than we do a vegan version of it and we don't use fake meat or anything like that we just take the soul of the recipe al steel at fatty austin bulletin as actually remember the details of our there are grains that if you put an tomato sauce. Do you swear those ground meaning. Yeah baldur's really good r._o. Is really good. You just think what are those. There's these little chewy bits and it's like wow it'd be hamburger and then the third one is cooking for company so it's more complicated project based meals. That might take a little while so i like it. I it's a really good book. It's <hes> you note that it has the word every in it because my books tend to have their either cook everything this is dinner for everyone but so that we like big scale but this is really a way to kind of attack dinner from three different directions all of which are i think thing ways with people wanna cook yeah. I mean i think of you as the replacement for the joy of cooking. I mean that book has been iconic book but your books how to cook everything are sort of the modern version of the joy of cooking in a way and i. I just think if anybody really interested in cooking your books are the go-to books on how to make pretty much everything well thank you whether it's a vegetarian idea healthy and it's also mostly healthy and delicious and there's like a little indulgence in there which is awesome. There's nothing wrong with that. <hes> and i think it's <hes> it's important that people understand what you're saying. Which is that it doesn't have to be hassle to cook can be quick it can be easy and it doesn't have to be super expensive and i think these are the myths that the food industry tells us leave the cooking us. You deserve a break today. Get out of the kitchen and we disenfranchised americans americans from the kitchen intentionally as a as a culture and now you're saying let's get back in the kitchen and eero food and it's part of the solution to this food crisis. We're talking about it. Is it's funny. When i started writing about food as i said has started in the eighties by started cooking in the seventies you know that that <hes> there's a long long time ago now and that that notion that you deserve a break today in that food should be convenient than that. Your time is too good to be spent in the kitchen. That was a notion of my childhood. I grew up in the fifties and i mean really that's stuff started. Convenience food processed food really started in the twenties or even a little earlier but in the fifties after the war that's when women wear in a way being chased data the kitchen. You know what i'm certainly not saying that down is women's responsibility but that's who was doing it in those days and they're being told you're too good to be spending. Take time is due valuable. We have an easier way to do it that another and my reaction to that as a very young man at the time was while i'm interested in this. I'm gonna do it. I really like it and i did as we talked about before it became it became part of my career but now oh it's forty years later fifty years later and that notion that no one really wants to spend time in the kitchen has forty fifty more years years of advertising in behind really a hard habit to break and so many people say to me you know. I don't even want to cook and i i don't know i don't even care so people. Don't work is really cut out for us. Cookbooks do to help address that but we also have to you know push hard the notion that cooking is good for your cooking can be less expensive of cooking is really a gives you control over what you're eating. It's a really important thing and you know as i said before i still think this if you can convince people to cook rice and beans once a a week you're doing a great job a really great thing because you know a nutritious nutritious serving of rice and beans i may be with a green is like fifty or seventy five cents per per se and it doesn't cost anything so and that's like that's the staff of life right right there. You know that's everything you need to live on and you know cheeseburgers and fries. Don't cut it compared to that though and you know it's really true that we we really raise generation. Americans don't know how to cook. I think michael ponds and people watch more cooking on t._v. Than they do cook at home and i think <hes> skills answer lost a how out of chop vegetables had appeal garlic. I mean just simple things that have been passed down from generation to generation loss right and so people actually are tim needed rated by their frayed of it. <hes> we just had a wonderful event in cleveland called the functional food festival where we had a cooking demo and we had you know doctors come from cleveland clinic who are into the food and cooking and did cooking demos and cooking classes and actually participatory groups with about two hundred people hose amazing and people are hungry for this might no pun intended or maybe yeah so you gotta check out mark's books. They're really great if you're interested in cooking at all if you want to get started there's so so many different books. He's got out there but they're all amazing dinner for everyone is is just i look through. The pictures are great. It's very pretty book book. <hes> okay so let's talk about on your new projects 'cause you're. You're not out of the game yet. You're still in the game after forty years. You're creating new things you're doing fun. Things you've got your newsletter which is a lot about food food and recipes at mark pitman dot com which anchorage everybody sign up for i just did and also you've got this new project with medium which is a big platform for also so it's a different <hes> insights article's topics and you're writing about things that are related food but not necessarily about recipes for example well how does food connect to agriculture and politics and history and labor and culture and identity and family loved. These are really unusual topics. That aren't aren't really getting voice anywhere. So what inspired you to create this project with medium at what <hes> what what do you hope for it. You know it's the stuff we've been talking about for the last whatever whatever <hes> and i think we will do some cooking on the medium site which doesn't have a name yet. Although i think it's going to be called either. You're bit or heated. You heard it here first okay <hes> but it might not be going to bid or heated because we have decided yet but we're it's being those are the two names that are being vetted at the moment <hes> we had some naming issues but we don't have is issues with our approach. Which was i have wanted for for a long time to do pretty much exactly what we're talking about here which is tie cooking the joy of food the love of food farming the responsibility for land the love of growing things <hes> labor nutrition climate change of course everything that circles around food and most of which needs to be better in one place and we have sites that <hes> that address different parts parts of this this and do it very very well but we don't have a site that addresses all of it and does it well and that's what i'd like dude or bid or medium or pitman or whatever whatever we wind up calling it to be <hes> a place where you would come not only for recipes and as you said my newsletter will feed leads somewhat into that and we'll and we'll generate recipes things. They're simple to cook a few times a week but people would come to for recipes. You're really i see the recipes almost as bait come because you know me for recipes and you know they're going to be good and quick and healthy and blah blah blah but meanwhile unwired here read this story about food and race or yeah agriculture and labor or restaurants in minimum wage age or whatever the whatever the topic happens to be so the beautiful thing about this site is in this column. You're going to be creating essentially. It's a it's a gathering place for other thinkers and writers and authors and activists in food to have a voice well. That's what we hope and we people will come to us and also i taking article from me. I will assure i will now that. You said arguing but i also would like to get people who don't ordinarily right about food food writing about so. It's not only people who write about food writing about different aspects of food. We definitely want to do that but it's also people who right right but don't write about food saying okay well. I actually have something to say apple because everybody does everybody thinks they're an expert on food which is great so we can find finds them writers who normally don't write about food but would like to. I think that'll be really fun for us. Also in is the intersection of so many different areas of life are related related creates this gathering place. Yes we get paul hawkins to write something yeah <hes> absolutely but also can we get i. I don't know who who can. We get deborah eisenberg. Who's a novelist. I really like to write about food. She never writes about food but can we get that kind of thing because you wrote about was about african american farmer and the issues of race and land and farming in the disenfranchisement franchise men of the the african americans who actually were big farmers and grew most food in america as slaves. I mean these are topics that are fascinating fascinating. I don't get the light of day and it matter right well. I mean you people when they think about food they tend to think about cooking or restaurants or eating out or fast food or whatever the there's not enough talk about agriculture agriculture's the beginning and end of it all so <hes> if you don't care about how your food is raised in where you come from then you can't say that you care about food all i mean 'cause that's the bottom line line there is where did this come from. How is it raised who raised it where was erased howard was used and so on it's true i mean once you know wait. You can't unknow it. I mean now when i go out to dinner. I'm like do i order the meat which is probably fee lot beef right and what are the consequences winces that and i feel tremendous awareness and guilt basically that should matter. I doubt i'll be really conscious and go. Where do they have grass fed meat. I mean i can afford it. Most people can't but if we start to begin to shift how people understand what they're doing now people don't want to buy water in plastic bottles halls where everything is just right and i think we all sort of take that is a given but now people are having awareness of things are really shifting their behavior and i think it may seem disempowering some of the things we're talking about because it's overwhelming so big. There's so many market forces big food companies and add companies driving the agenda with the truth is they do respond to consumer behavior and consumer action in a way that i think is is under appreciated. I think that there's something you're right but i think there's actually something bigger than that to. Which is that you change. If you change your own behavior you could say well. I'm having a one billionth of a percent. I an impact and that may well be true but you're also talking to people about how you're changing behavior in change your behavior or thinking even if you're not changing your behaviors <hes> yeah you know maybe there's something to this single serving single use issue. You know plastic water bottles plastic silverware throwing napkins blah blah blah. I'm not going to change anything about the way dubin do this stuff but maybe this maybe it's an interesting conversation and maybe that conversation with someone else and you you know the this conversation multiplies exponentially and before long maybe it's an issue. I mean you have cities. It's not the biggest issue in the world but you have city saying we're not ah using plastic shopping bags new york how to sing do though okay this is not the world's biggest issue but it is an issue and it's a consciousness raising issue alot hello wired. Why are we not using single use shopping bags. That's an interesting question. What does that reflect on. What does it mean for the single use stuff. What is it mean in genoa. Aw where do those plastic bags come from. The first turns out. That's a fossil fuel issue and so on yes. I actually met this woman who's started new straw company any cause of the plastic straws and the amount of pollution they cause and what's fascinating to me. Is that the big food. Companies like fast food companies. Mcdonald's and others are <unk> are hungry to incorporate these products into their businesses because they realized where things are going and so with a simple idea to change something being in all of a sudden. It's changes behavior of these big corporations and that changes everything right well. That single use stuff. Is that all down to the fast food industry day are you're like who the hell needed. A strong in the first place not even sure what their what their forces there have a big cop that you're gonna throw a covered by lid which by the way we don't have a lid on this and because you a big up covered by lid need a straw to poke through the lid so now you've got three things that you're the throwaway in order to consume something that is worthless in the i will say i would you consider big gulp like for two teaspoons of sugar her well mark. This has been a great conversation. You're real light in the food movement. Yeah i think you underestimate your bag and it's it's <hes> you know i hear presidential candidates wanting to call you help them. Write their speeches so you doing something right. You're one presidential candidate home. I think there's going to be more because i'm going to be sending them. Your way and i think this is the moment this is the moment hopefully this election cycle where we can actually start to bring these issues if we at least just in the last election cycle <hes> ricardo salvador who is one of the people who wrote the call for the national food bosley and i and a couple other people the number of other people really worked hard to try to get candidates to recognize food as a issue were talking bad. We even went to iowa in the dead of winter and talked tibet and we got nowhere. We got absolutely nowhere and we got absolutely nowhere with the obama administration to not pleased about that. I'm proud of the the work that we tried to do and we did the work but but maybe we're seeing it now and maybe we'll see something this election cycle wouldn't be great. I mean we have to take a long. You you mean the abolitionists in the early eighteen hundreds. They had to wait fifty years. You know the right the the the movement around women's rights suffrage movement but then took another. You know seventy years to get those really wranglings. Sometimes things happen quickly like gay marriage happened very quickly legalization of marijuana not a huge issue issue but it's happening pretty quickly. This is like so bigoted and turn it around turns. Everything around makes the world a better place. I mean how great is that. It's great. That's a great message. Thank you mark for joining us in the doctor's pharmacy. Thanks for having me and if you love this conversation. Please feel free share with your friends and family social media. I would love to hear from you. Leave a comment house we think and we'll see time when the doctors pharmacy and make sure you go to mark pippen dot consignors newsletter google medium and mark bateman and you will follow him on medium for his new amazing column in section which i don't know what is called hauled by then and and i really enjoyed this conversation with i think really matter so we'll see next time on the doctors pharmacy. Thanks mark hi dr mark hyman so two quick things number one. Thanks so much for listening to this week's podcast. It really means a lot to me. If you'll love the podcast i really appreciate you sharing with your friends and family second. I wanna tell you about a brand new newsletter. I started order. Call marks picks every week. I'm gonna send out a list of a few things that i've been using take my own health. The next level is could be books. Podcasts podcasts research that i found supplement recommendations recipes or even gadgets. I use a few of those and if you'd like to get access to this free weekly list. All you have have to do is visit. Dr hyman dot com forward slash picks. That's dr hyman dot com for slash picks. I'll only email you once a week. I promise i'll never send you anything else. Besides my own recommendations so just go to dr hyman dot com for sized picks p. I c k s sign up free today. Hey hi everyone. I hope you enjoyed this week's episode just a reminder that this podcast is for educational purposes. Only this podcast is not a substitute shoot for professional care by a doctor or other qualified medical professional. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. If you're looking for helping your journey seek out a qualified medical practitioner. If you're looking for a functional medicine practitioner you can visit ifm dot org and searched. They're fine a practitioner database. It's important that you have someone in your corner. Who's trained who's a licensed healthcare practitioner and can help. You make changes especially when it comes to your health.

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Quizbeard #36: Halloween Special

Quizbeard weekly trivia quiz

15:55 min | 6 months ago

Quizbeard #36: Halloween Special

"Sinister Celluloid General Coolidge ghastly geography monstrous music and on this day of the dead. These are the five topics in today's Halloween special quiz, so get ready for a quiz bed number thirty-six and hello and welcome to quiz bed. Number 36. This is the first-ever Halloween special. Of course. However things remain exactly the same in terms of the rules. I will be asking 25 trivia questions with the themed over the usual five subject rounds. You get a point for everyone you get right, but you can also play a black spot card on any one particular round which will double your score and those correct answers. You're going to play a black spot. Please try to do so before the first question in that round has been asked so that all you have is there around title as a clue again, everything's explained to the website which can be found at quiz bed, And then you can find the archived previous quizzes links to social media contact information and the quiz kit where you can get blank answer sheets and black spot cards again, if you'd like to nominate a subject to be covered in next X quiz back, please get in touch and I'll give you a mention and if you can leave a review at Apple podcast that would really help to help more people to discover the quiz play the quiz and get in touch. You can support the podcast further by birth. About buying me a coffee and quizlet.com support now. I've got an announcement to make and it's in response to the picture and competition that I've been running over at quiz b.com over the last couple of weeks. You could go to quizlet.com and have a look at our picture and composition of a celebrity. So there are five celebrity faces. And all I want to do to do was the name the celebrity in each one so I can now give some answers to those if you had to go at them. You can check these off celebrity number one was Michael Palin celebs number two was Dwayne The Rock Johnson. Celebrity number three is Michelle Obama celebrity number four is Greta thunberg and celebrity number five which people had a lot of trouble with Tom Cruise. So well done if you manage to answer those correctly and thank you very much. If you entered I have written down all the names of those who entered correctly and I drove one name out of the Hat who's the lucky winner of the quiz bed t-shirt and that winter I can now announce is Linley haste well of Portsmouth congratulations Lindley, you're the first ever lucky winner wage of the quiz bet speech around quiz, I will be getting in touch with you over the next day or two to arrange sizes and delivery so it out for that. Okay on a quiz this week as I say, it's a Halloween special. So quick reminder of the rounds round one is Sinister Celluloid round two dead. Is General gulledge around 3 is ghastly geography around 4 is monstrous music and ran five is on this day of the dead. So have a think about which one am quite fancy for your black spot round and let's get on with the questions. Around 1 today is Sinister celluloid. number one in Stanley Kubrick's The Shining what makes Jack a Dull Boy number two in the first two installments of the Halloween series of slasher films antagonist. Michael Myers wears a mask during the face of which iconic actor. Number three in The Nightmare on Elm Street films which two colors make up the stripes on Freddy fruit Freddy Krueger sweater. Number four in Robert Eggers 2015 Supernatural historical film The which what type of animal is Black Phillip? And number five which German actor played the vampire count. Aulakh in the 1922 silent horror nicer are too. Round two is General gullage. Number six which book of the New Testament makes reference to 666 the Number of the Beast. Number seven in what century was the last person tried for witchcraft in Britain? number 8 in the original spelling of the word Halloween. Where does the apostrophe occur? Number nine to which metal a werewolves vulnerable. And number 10 in the gothic novel by Mary Shelley. What was dr. Frankenstein's first name? Around 3 is ghastly geography. Number 11 to the south and east which mountain range borders the historical Romanian region of Transylvania. Number 12 in which country did the custom of carving jack-o'-lanterns Halloween originate? Number 13 in which US state is the city of Salem home of the infamous 17th century witch trials. number 14 Hope tuna is an ancient Celtic Festival celebrated on the 31st of October on which island. Is it a the Isle of Man be wage Beyond of Butte or c anglesea? and number 15 Shakespeare's Hamlet is visited by the ghost of his dead father. Who was the king of which European country? Round four is monstrous music. Number 16 which classic horror actor provided the voice over at the start of Michael Jackson's Thriller. number 17 which singer songwriter sued fellow musician Ray Parker Junior in Nineteen Eighty-Four claiming that the melody to Parker's Ghostbusters movie theme infringed copyright on a prior work. number 18 which band released monster their ninth studio album in September Nineteen Ninety Four in the nineteen which Andrew Lloyd Webber musical is based on a 1909 novel by French author Gaston leroux. And number 20 which boy bands 1997 track everybody featured in its music video band members dancing in a haunted house dressed as typical horror creatures such a vampires werewolves and Frankenstein's monster. Ram 5n is on this day of the dead. So they're all questions about events that have happened on the 31st of October. Number Twenty-One, which hungarian-born Illusionist and stunt performer died on this day in 1926. number 22 On the 31st of October of which year did the Battle of Britain officially end preventing the German invasion of the United Kingdom? Number 23 who was made prime minister of Italy on this day in 1922. number 24 Born on Halloween in 1967 American rapper and actor Robert Van Winkle is better known by which cool stage name. And number twenty-five which Academy Award winning actor once polled is the greatest living Scott and Scotland's greatest living National Treasure died p i t today in 2020. Okay, some answers to today's spooky rounds round one was Sinister Celluloid number one in The Shining what makes Jack a Dull Boy it is all work and no play song number two in the first two installments of Halloween films. Michael Myers was wearing a William Shatner mask. It was actually a Captain Kirk mask that had been painted white number three in 9th streets Freddy Krueger sweater has red and green stripes. And before in the which you will find that Black Phillip is in fact the goat and number five the German actor that played count orlok in Nosferatu in nineteen eighty-two was Max Schreck. Round two was General gulledge number six the book of the New Testament that mentions 666 the Number of the Beast is the Book of Revelation number seven. The last person tried for witchcraft in Britain was in the twentieth century was someone called Helen Duncan who was jailed for nine months in nineteen forty-four number eight. The original spelling of the word Halloween has an apostrophe between the two e's number nine werewolves are vulnerable to Silver and number 10 in Frankenstein doctor Frankenstein's first name is Victor ran3 was ghastly geography number 11 to the southeast the mountain range that borders Transylvania is the Carpathian Mountain Range. Number 12 carving jack-o'-lanterns on Halloween originated in Ireland number 13. Salem is in Massachusetts. Number 14 hop to now the ancient Celtic Festival celebrates on 31st. October is celebrated on a man and number fifteen Shakespeare's Hamlet features a king ghost from Denmark. Number four was monstrous music questions sixteen the classic horror actor that did the voiceover on Thriller was Vincent Price number 17 the song song right to the sued Ray Parker jr. Over the Ghostbusters movie theme was Huey Lewis number 18 the band that released monster in September Nineteen Ninety Four was REM wage in nineteen the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical based on the work by Gaston leroux is the Phantom of the Opera and number twenty the boy band that featured the thump eyes werewolves and Frankenstein's monster in the video for everybody was the Backstreet Boys. Around 5 then was on this day of the dead number 21 The hungarian-born Illusionist that died on Halloween in nineteen. Twenty-six. Is Harry Houdini. Number 22 the year that the Battle of Britain officially ended on this day was 1940. Number 23 on this day in 1922 it was Benito Mussolini. He was made prime minister number 24 on this day in 1967. Robert Van Winkle was born but he's better known as Vanilla Ice. And finally twenty-five very sorry to hear this one, but the Academy Award winning actor that died aged. Ninety today in 2020 today. In fact is Sean Connery wage. Well, that's it for this Halloween special. Thank you very much for playing and if you want to get in touch about around idea, please just go to the website and contact me their congratulations again, 2012 from Portsmouth for your fantastic win of your equipment t-shirt again, I'll be in touch very soon with the details of how you can claim that until next week. Thank you very much for lunch, and I'll be back with 25 more questions. Do take care and goodbye.

Britain Robert Van Winkle Freddy Krueger Academy Award Ray Parker jr Michael Myers prime minister Transylvania Gaston leroux Andrew Lloyd Webber Salem Jack Michael Palin dr. Frankenstein Michelle Obama Sean Connery Mary Shelley Stanley Kubrick
RHLSTP 277 - Adam Buxton

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

1:30:45 hr | 11 months ago

RHLSTP 277 - Adam Buxton

"Hello welcome to a bit of a different. This is a new era. It'll be like this for the short term. And maybe the term who knows but this is a remote Hamas the best up saying that you people over there with the wonderful Adam Buxton. We recorded in about seven weeks ago. I think a near the beginning of lockdown on nearer the beginning of lockdown We are now near the end of lockdown who knows when that will be We're going to carry on doing these. We've done five or six already and That will be more we record them. An ICAN watched them live on Wednesday nights at eight PM on Twitch Dot TV Slash Archaic Herring There might be a couple of weeks. I take off just because I'm writing a book at the moment but Choon in then there's lots of other stuff on twitch dot TV Ashok herring including morning stone appearing evening Snooka playing Sunday nights. I'm watching films and directors commentaries and you can watch along with the film at home And playing video games and planning what other stuff we can get up to with A live broadcast on twitch. You can subscribe to that. And if you're with Amazon prime you can give me five pounds a month with no extra cost yourself. You just have to link your accounts and then subscribe. Remember to come back each month and subscribe again. If you've got to do it for me please do for someone on twitch because this free money sitting in your account that you can give take it from me an Amazon gift to someone who deserves it. I will use any money I get to turn back into making more podcast content for you so yeah. It's sad that we lost lots of potentially fantastic live guests But hopefully they will all return and we'll be doing stuff in the theatre again in the autumn. That's when some suspect to go back in but we'll see if not we'll keep providing content online and wait until we have the all clear to come out of our bunkers and be humans once again were. That's in five months or five hundred years I will. We will return and it was it. Last week wasn't a bad way to end and suddenly the week before we've Michael Palin got that one in the back you know what I'm talking about anyway. Gophers destroyed don't badges. If you want to just give us some money and get lots of stuff in return. Lots of Nice Extras. Let's sit back. Relax and enjoy this slightly weird but rather charming and lovely to fuel clapping. Hoste with Sir Adam Buxton. Thank you very much. Oh how you doing? Welcome welcome to the first ever live stream the share his pencil rich herrings live streaming on twitch podcast that but I was hanging around with myself in self-isolation honest about so I don't know if that's going to catch him Welcome to the show about please. Well the man is very strange during without an audience. Though there's those people say zooming by in the chat room if you're listening to the Paul cost a couple of months time. Hello hope the world is still here. You may be ordered the ragbag of survivors so because of the current situation in the world we assigned to do. We have loads of stored up in a big podcast silo and food. She's given out to a week because we thought we'll never get through these Ohio. We regret that now. So we didn't want of these every Wednesday night on twitch it will then be released you better watch on twitter about him up and then released its ton as a genuine regular rather because if this works which it seems to be done so far the news. I- hundred and eight to nine view is in already that's fantastic. We'll pass the when nearly the highest ever released a live audience ever. Maybe that will happen as we go through. We surpassed the total very sad that we should have been doing Adam and Joe and lally had a p just two days ago It's very sad to miss those costs. They should hopefully be rescheduled We'll do our best. And those are the Birmingham Festival and Edinburgh. Festival PROBABLY WON'T BE RESCHEDULED Do something from home if you enjoy this. Hey you can become a bad jurist you know you can subscribe on twitch. If you're an Amazon prime member you can subscribe without any custody yourself and give us five dollars every month if he wants to By linking your accounts. There's a video on my youtube one. Nine having one nine six seven. That would explain all that if you would prefer to not give any money. We have no money. That is fine too. If you prefer to give some money to charity could you google just giving heckle the virus and you can donate some money to help all the club? Comedians who are currently unable to work suddenly still their work. And we've got up by eight to five thousand pounds with that fund but that is enough to last eight tweaks so we do need some more Whether it's over an exciting we self isolating. It's been nice to spend time with the kids and also living help spend time with the kids. It's the worst thing ever this morning. Although it's come study feels a bit like rural. It'll and it's nice to be with the family all the time and we've been playing Anne in the breakfast. My daughter loves the soundtrack to Anne. This the Sun will come out. Tomorrow is a very inspirational song. That's been helping through especially this morning when they sang. Bet Your bottom dollar and my daughter went bottom laughed and my son Loft. Everything's GonNa be off it. We still laughing that we'd find a at the news today. Is that men in the fifties and sixties the most susceptible new demographic to get the virus and die so I'm delighted also sort of think. This is really bad news risks. I was getting quite fit till lockdown. Now I'm just drinking beer and not exercising and so we can have what happened at two months of this just as the viruses is most virulent. They will hit to some willow Wipeout it'd be like the Pied Piper Feminine of Middle Age men and maybe it's good. Maybe we should die. I've been married for eight years. I guess that I I didn't any snoop yesterday. I was disappointed. Hold of that seventy of Maj. I didn't get seventy eight shuttle this come to the eight year. Weeping sores spray away but as said a sign that I'm in love or something a good isn't it. What else was I going to talk? I was worried about money. I've had to cancel so many gigs. And of ostentatiously gave way loads of money because of that. Oh to come up hopefully will be rescheduled. But I haven't heard anything from them And I was getting paid. Well for that GIG so I'll give money to the heck well the virus thing that not canceled like the day before I mean on the day I think it was but luckily on Friday the twentieth much I got an email. That says this is official. Notice of unclaimed fund of ten point. Five million left by Mr Herring. Who died in a car crash upon your positive response will make all the information known to once I confirm your wing regards mark so that was good news of ten point. Five million coming in from a guide a formal letter but he's very informal. Marcus naked just signing mark. I think he's trying to in with may so that when I get the money he give some of it. But I'm not going to vote for that. It's my money. I'm going to enjoy gullible. May I'm not going to give you the money. Just 'cause you're trying to be my mates. I'm a bit consent. Says ten point five million? That doesn't seem ten point. Five million of what? I think he might be ten point. Five MILLION TRIM PHONES. We will seek anyway. I hope you enjoyed off menu. You can still catch the off mid new fade and also the cosmic shambles video feed on Youtube. Bettas putting caused a lot of consternation. It's a real thing I didn't make. It was like the first. I've been playing football manager here. Snoop on here Kevin. Toms who created for managers been watching me play football manager which is one of the most surreal things. I've ever experienced matching the fourteen year old maid knowing that one day the man who created the game was playing would be watching me playing. What would be the worst thing that you could have the person you were thinking of what you did. Matt. Let's move on. We'll think some more emergency questions as we subscribe if you want to follow me. We've currently as we speak full thousand. Eight hundred eighty two follow. We might get up to five thousand and we got one thousand. Five hundred twenty two viewers is the highest ever viewership for an episode of lestas. I thank you very much for that. Hopefully more will come in Do Subscribe to follow me at least and if you can afford to pay money you can pay money if you want to do. The free money tell friends will be here every Wednesday evening but my guest tonight. He's probably best known as the ghost of Prince Quintas in Stardust. I've ever talked to him about before which I can't believe. Will you please welcome? Amanda was meant to be talking to with another man on Monday. It's Adam Buxton here. He is there he is. Hey how you doing man. I'm very good how are you? This is exciting isn't it? It is exciting. Yes modern technology. We thought it was a bunch of Shit we thought all day was enable disgruntled disaffected angry loses on the Internet wrong. It enables middle aged soon to die geniuses like ourselves to produce important broadcasts like this one to keep the nation's packers up. I think so I wanted you to the first one because I thought who better to chair everyone up and hopefully hopefully will we. Weren't you worried about the you know I wasn't that worried about it? And then when Boris Johnson got seriously ill OFA. This could actually get me. Are you worried? Now you're if you're fifty now I am fifty. Been the danger zone. I don't know I feel I've had I've been through the the thinking that you've got the symptoms phase course and he have you had the thing of kind of breathing and thinking. Oh that's a little painful painful I have not I. I was a bit ill when stole signed up. I had a bit of either kind of bug of the kid. So right aunt. That's the thing is that visited loads of bugs around anyway. Hard to tell which one is which everyone is desperate to reach the point where you can take the test and find out if you had it or not. You know the dream scenario is actually you did have it and you. J- you just toughed it out didn't even affect fuck corona virus. But but you should. Should we say at the top here that Like should we say a serious thing about how seriously we take it and how grateful we ought to the frontline workers and all that kind of thing and then put that will get us off the hook if we are then from then on flipping and inappropriate about the entire situation? Well I yeah by also. I'm disappointed that hasn't been an eight o'clock clap for the podcast is the world on on the clap else's finished doing the clap without for Jack was that for Boris. You've made me so it was that for the having. I'm happy to have been praying for him all day. I when I have a fair you know. I want to get to the point where we're able to go make the joke of. I wish he had died when he had the coronavirus. That is what I'm hoping for but I'm I'm still still I'm I'm very. I'm hoping you'll have a go through. It will survive and go then just is really good. We should be much nicer than than we planned to be pretending to be nice to them anyway. So I I predict that. He asked him to be absolutely fine. I confidently predict boy. Maybe this is a stupid confident prediction coming out. I comforted that. He is as we speak. watching a box set Propped up on pillows Checking his twitter feed catching up on some reading and having a nice little break. Yeah and you know. Because they haven't into into baited him or anything like that have they. I think he's I that I mean. This is gonNA come out in the PUCK Australia compliment. So they will know Home my fear is that he'll die on Good Friday and then come back alive on Easter Sunday. And he is the new. Jesus that is my worry. That's my mcmurray. We'll we'll the scenarios that is the worst thing that can happen But if he is Jesus will say we'll see what happens but what I'm most other you know. I don't want him to die. I hope he survives more scared for myself as a middle-aged man. I kind of thought I was quite good to get it. Get it get it over with but now I'm sort of thinking probably the one that happen. The random factor the not knowing how you will respond to. It is a frightening aspect. But it's quite if you die if you die animals still put this as a tribute to an open up. I'll I'll do an intro from where I can hold a picture of you and go. Very say happened Buxton and if you do this for me but well have an zing charity all the Comedians of the UK and all the finest comedians all across the world will come together and senior praises and say lines that you did and will play back times when you offended people and said the wrong thing. Stephen Merchant will give a very tasteful speech About how you are an edgy genius. Kayla a CIA this radical change of subject go for Your Shot Yorkshire. Tea made me some customized t like bespoke a bit further over. 'cause you're not in the quite a bit of the camera put it in front of your face. Dr Buckles T no way. Yeah and I think they said to me back in the day when I think they maybe they hoped I would tweet it or something like that but I always feel a bit queasy when people do things like that when they send you stuff in the and they're obviously hoping that you will tweet it and So I didn't but I do love it and I do love Yorkshire Tea and I thought this my and now I'm not on twitter so I thought well this this'll be a good opportunity to just take those show off they made me some personalized t haven't opened it yet. You're going to drink tea Well we'll see how things go. I mean H age teabag might be made from your flake skin or something like that or release of your face. It'd be great if it was just the tea. Just face made Adam Buxton face the on as every time you don't be possible Kiara it. It does say it's made from my flaked skin. Fuck no I don't want to. I think that's quite good. Isn't it personalized pretty good? I haven't sought out of t t t this being like t supplies or okay at the shops. Yes yeah well I mean nearly. Everything's back to normal. Low went before and obviously toilet roll. Inexplicably disappeared and flower. Flower has not come back one thing flour and fish fingers which I understand. What is my the kids all that sort of bits or tape flour? There was when I went to eggs before will happen. I was in white throws in Hitchin and only pags were was one. Pack of Quayle's x is the most hate is the most hitch in sick. But I still meant the old. The other quayle's exit there are now eggs But no flower. Everyones tending to a baking. British bake off champion. I Dunno if ever thought will make our own food from scratch. What about the chocolates situation chocolate? But I don't eat chocolate stopped eating chocolate. I don't eat chocolate and most of that. But that's the for that low. The by for the kids. Everything was fine. I tried both. I tried by full bottles of five hundred milliliter diet coke and I had to put one back because they were limited three that I got caught out. How does it work than with do they do? They define. What essential items are. I haven't actually been to the supermarket since the lockdown began. Living while how you eat to the My my wife goes so she does. I think she likes doing it because she gets to go. Out of the compound and Kilo human beings and you saw the hero for risking your life going out there but you are risking else life by returning home. The person that goes to save mark as lockdown for fourteen days mate. She threw white a lengthy talks procedure when she gets back. I swear I shouldn't be saying this. Probably but she doesn't bring the bags into the house she leaves from outside the House and then she transfers each item in two into like a been and then she hoses down the band. And then she whites everything with sanitary wipes and stuff and I mean. It's she thinks that can opals happen. Does something but it is. It's going to get him. It's the only way it's going to get in post post deliveries or so but you know cautions at the supermarket at all or I mean but then people come and I went. You know I go in and you touch something indigo no. We'll have that one. You know you pick something up and then you put down. Does that everyone just totally touch my face. All the time a concept during that I was doing the key pattern though it's not just the drought is the I touched the keypad to pay for my food. So you know it's just last time. I took a big bottle of hand sanitizer in my pocket that was. I decided to date to get cut. Now you're right you're right now. I thought that's what you're gonNA come in. They can't get into the house without someone bringing in on the packet Joel from outside from the outside world. So you know. We're safe as long as we stay inside. Yes no you're right. You're right now that I think of it. When I go to the supermarket I sneeze. I drew Dariel. I kiss the woman at the checkout or the guy just kissed the checkout us in an. It's very it's there's a lot of saliva so it's just as well that I'm not recovered doing the shop We ran out of toilet paper ages ago. So Yeah I've been just every morning one of the routines now is I. Use the Jet Washer everyone lines up Ben's over and jet wash load on a Lotta acting. Otherwise it's just mayhem but that's a good routine. What about have you got any good new routines lockdown routines? I'm just finding it so we're trying to work ways that we can work and he's writing and look after the case just awful haven't took after kids all the time. Yeah because you'll don't don't rea- How old are yours? Five and two so the five year old was at school which was helpful in the two year old. We had help and my mother-in-law come over and you know you realize how much help had and so did not have any of that at all and you still trying to. I'm just so tired. I'm drinking to excess to get. It's it's it's a beautiful thing is lovely and the the the I think you'll thinking this morning you saw stop film. I understand the spirit of the blitz and I'm not comparing to the blitz in any other way but you understand how people back at the blitz and thought L. but it was a happy time we did business. 'cause you're closer an even things are happening. You'll think he wants. This is over. I'm going to look back at my daughter laughing at your bottom dollar and I'm going to really love that memory if I'm still alive if not I'll leave a over there. I remember that and she can enjoy So you know I think you understand that in a year almost in the moment fitting the nostalgia for the so loads of a is with living in the country as you are Kinda Delic and it's fine. It's not that different than my real normal life to me on. Yeah that's the thing. It's it's only when you look at the news that everything Suddenly slides into perspective. And and the and you can't I mean it's hard not to while you're always reminded of how lucky w-we and how grim it would be if you'll situation was different if you didn't like where you living few Living with people you didn't want to be with a few Living with Gary I mean God. The ceremony ways it could just be unbearable and Even like when we moved to this house we just had a some of the assassin. I baby every was half built in. You know it was just happened then it would have been and we had a terrible for five months where things that wrong event happened. Then it would have just been dammed of literally I'm now thinking of. It happened in the nineties when I lived on my own. And you know that wasn't even a proper Internet to help you out really It would have been just saw people like that so the Nice thing I think is there is the Internet. There is stuff to do there. Are you can talk to people and interact with people? But yeah I mean if you dating if you were in a relationship but you you know you if you WANNA have sex in the next three months you're GonNa do just winkled you have to do. This would likely be. It'd be like being married. That's the other thing now for six months. Married people on average having slightly more sex than single people think night is the. That's why would say the single people having no sex and some web married couples one just a couple of upsets once in the next two months and would have had more sex and the single people. Yes I reckon do that in the next few months. How about arguments have you had? What kind of things if you argued about have? You argued with your. I'm arguing less. Always argue like we always get the frustration of just the tidiness gets to us and we have had one or two but actually everything's become a lot. Calmer as a result of this is kind of weird out things in the news not too badly. Have you been arguing about that view? Argued about I mean low level stuff. It's all being fairly harmonious. Actually it's all I like God. It feels like wow we. We went nice. We made a good decision here. And I like my children. Most of the time My wife is great and I just think she's terrific. The only time that she has made me a little bit sad is she's just discovered What's up and said social networking and messaging APPS and now. All her buddies are in constant contact sending her means and so she just a maintenance as far as I can tell most of them come from the Daily Mail Online. So she's just got this nonstop. Daily Mail online memed feed which is Making me a bit sad. Some of them quite good. Have you seen the Irish goal? Saying I'm six. Why can't I go to the pub you would you let go to the public? Six I haven't I haven't seen many names that that's a good one. I mean that's not an owner virus. What I don't know where that one came. But she's very charming humorous young woman who is six and very indignant that she is not allowed to go to the poverty and What are the other ones this up? There's a corona virus one of a guy a set of sexy guy dancing around with his top off and then off to the lockdown. And it's a fat guy bouncing around with this. Talk off yeah. My mother-in-law thought that standard that's happened in. What was that? My mother Rosa forwarding humorous things and not miss us so much mainly for the childcare that I have to pretend by. Enjoy all of an. Everything's but I think she has sent me that one yet so have seen a few means we didn't. We didn't argue about that. But I was a bit shitty about it. I just said Like that was in the first week of lockdown. And I said something like Oh Jesus I hope you. Don't show me these memes every day of the law and I said it in quite as Shitty way and so that was a that was some tension there and then we had from nowhere. This ridiculous conversation at supper about while Sweden doing things so differently. Okay and she said like. Isn't it weird that Sweden had just taking a totally different approach to the whole thing and I I and maybe I was in a bad mood or something but I just said no? It's a totally different country. They do every they do loads of things different than the society is structured in a totally different way. It's not comparable. They can do things their own way. They lie anyway. It said degenerated from the. I think it'd be better if every country did hundred different way. We could find out the best way to handle it. That's the thing so I think every country say I'm choosing to lockdown. I'm choosing everyone still goes out. And then we say which was the best way is heard. I heard immunity would work now. That's there's too many variables. That's the thing it's like you could. The islands could do it so if all the island said right. We're going to do. We could say we're going to do here. Immunity and ATMs the only way to do that experiment to do it with Center. Parcs seeing how all the different center pox. Do it have community down within each sent pox in the UK and then see how it spreads within the lodges. I've well it'd be interesting to say how people live the future. Listen to this in the in the near future do with that. Well let's move. Let's move on. Let's talk about something else. Okay let me get my way reading back to. I love go free will we? Of course we will. I as much as this is why I wanted. This is the worst things to me this year. Out of everything eight well. The worst thing is was going to have a really good year especially end of March. Everybody was really kicking off I had a really good at TV. Thinking that cy was happening and the had Loads OF GIGS. And Big Gigs. And I was going to end of money and then everything shut down so that was bad. I saw the guy. Everything's GonNa be fine. I'm having a great year. So that's bad but the the thing the worst thing that's happened to me dishes I realized that I. My Mind's eye is blind a blind minds. I do you know about this. There was a big on facebook a few weeks ago. Where asks you to visualize an apple in your mind? If you close your eyes and visualizing apple got a very three dimensional lovely colored apple. A two dimensional countered apple would you see? A to eventual black and white apple. You see a very blurry. So of apple or nothing may it's HD Jazz Apple. It's terminator in three hundred sixty degrees a taken a bite out of it. I can see the bite now. It's delicious this how it hasn't been dropped. There's no bruising. There's no soft part. Yeah so all functioning correctly in the mind. Cy I say I say if I if I think of an apple I just think of the word Apple Water Apple. What about if you think of genitals is that better now? I was started because obviously if I'm thinking if someone's face right remember something if someone's face but it's very. I'd no idea that I had this mental disability. It is really. I think it's almost twice. What happened is I of got a flash of IT. But it's like if you've got a flash on your retinas you would have vague. It's like the images store behind my head. I can think less than Boxton same but can sort of work it out from there. I don't I don't see you can see. I'm looking at you but I have no minds I is that what is that. Is that memory. You don't have good visual recall. Been Just not even memories. Just I can't have closed minds. I don't see anything. Everything in my head is is in an internal monologue if I think of an Apple. I'm just I'm just thinking of what an apple is like but I can't say it may be all over stimulated visually and if you were on a desert island or in a blank room like in a dark room or something have you do you meditate now because there's no point silicon. I've got now. I didn't if they hadn't told me I wouldn't have known about this and now I know about it. I'm just bereft icon clothing like well when you imagine. Say that. Say you're imagining a past sexual encounter at with somebody wasn't your current partner. I believe it's known as the bank. I can't I don't I don't see I don't actually see you don't have anything say you don't have any bank. We'll I thought I did and I thought maybe it's just in the you know. I've used pornography so much. I think of anything that maybe it's so wipes is like an sketching. It's broken how much I shake everything backing and yeah exactly. But it's really. What is the WIG to find that in fifty two that you've dispiritedly did not about? I'm hoping I can have a parking space. Been trying to get the parking spaces for a long time. You'll get one for that way. So you've got it's a great thing and loads of. I've met several people who like me conduct the people doing as well now and trying to work out where they can see things in the head. What do you think about when you go to sleep like just before you fall asleep on you foaming images in your mind then but then images that? I'm thinking all the time when somebody will have no internal model. That's terrifies me. Some people don't think in words a tool. What did they just noises? I guess just they only say things I guess but they have no they have no voice in the head narrating voice the rights. Yeah that's sort of what my internal monologue is like a lot of the time thinking in court Moore. I mean yes. I've got vase own words so I guess my brain is just telling me. I think if the minute I fall asleep I say stuff and the minute when I'm half asleep Started Madrid's but I just can't bring anything to mind I bet you is. I bet you can't visualize how you would respond if bt sent you a new look bill well. Luckily I've got a leaflet that shows you look. You'll bill has a new look and here's what it looks like when two people see bill you'll said this lady saying how do you feel now that you're bt? Bill has she's saying how is just such a surprise in great and Sny Mahaffey? Just fill so hurtful. Now that the bill hasn't you look it's Great. Isn't it beyond? That's that makes. I'm worrying about everything. Now what about everyone big? Every time I see anyone that close I just worry about the catching the coronavirus. Econ kind enjoys ways changes the world. Maybe no one will ever touch each other again. You know I've been thinking about that. I do think that you know. In in China. The face mosques people wearing facemasks has been part of that culture for many years. Not everybody used to wear them. But you would see people in China with face masks and I wonder if it'll be more like that here now and yeah the idea of of going to a a a sweaty auty and dancing around and Kinda draping your arm around someone and just. I think I would think twice about doing that now. Not that I have did it very often in olden days but I think I would not quite are like what about after a Gig doing sell fees and things like that. Yeah well I thought because I was the date which might talk about later. I did my final live realistic over and I went out and did all the signings stuff and it was still just at that point. I know you know it's that we do. We have to care for was laughing about. I went from meeting two days later. It was so still shaking hands. We went to do that and then suddenly by the time the know within wake by Monday. We were canceling all the gigs of that thing. So yeah did so think about that. When I was thinking I was going to do the Monday gig. So I'M GONNA go out and sell merchant sign virtual that be weird or it's all those things completely change because I'm happy for people. They these nerd to watch this stuff. They will come up and you don't they. Did they do that to you? Yeah I enjoy it. I like hugging people. And I like Kissing people if I get an opportunity. I'll miss them so I have. You know okay yes. That is a shame I spoke to is. She's out in reading and she's on her own. So you'll SAM. I am a bit worried about. I think she's finally getting the measure of the situation. She was in denial for quite a long time. She lives in a Seattle village and she was saying. Oh I wish this. I'm looking forward to this crisis when it's not really a crisis is it anding and I said yeah is. Mum is a crisis it's an actual crisis. And she said well. Yes okay I mean. I don't like it it's not very it's just. It's all a bit depressing and I go from my walk down by the river and I'm allowed to go for a walk so I go for the my war and in before people used to look at you and say hello and and now people don't even look at you know. I know I felt bad for her. Everyone's been much more friendly a thing. I live in quite friendly village anyway. But everyone's been really supportive a nice here. That's what you're gonNA walk in Ohio. Hey doing yeah. It's been attacked. My Dog's not coping well with an dogs. Having the worst time of the everyone she usually gets walked at some with a load of the dogs by Doug. Wilkin the village. He's really missing that but she's just died if she's off the league show just just going to live from adults so you're gonNA keep on. She's never done that before. The rain is that's really way but apart from that everyone's been very nice. My dog attacking their dogs. She ever has been very nice. I literally unseen anyone apart from my family for three weeks. Apart from the post delivery person right going out you walking. Have you got big enough garden to what your dog ran the garden or do you take the Dog Rosie? We're in the middle of a load of fields. Were Very Lucky. And we can just walk along the fields and we don't see anyone like we. We never see anyone anyway and I. It's where I go and record my intros and our troth the podcast and the reason if you listen to the podcast that I'm able to shout as loudly as I do at the end of each odd cost. Say I love you is that there's no one around there's never I never see anyone so We're lucky we can kind of come and go as we please necessarily. You're going out more than once. You're doing more than once a day walking around or you I mean it. Just it works out that it's generally once And then the rest of the time you know to if you press ups And then go out with Rosie. I've tried to my mission is to be able to pogo round the house. My wife thoughts in Pogo sticks. You have done Poe going. My brother did it when I was a kid and I was in deep but he was a bit older than me and I was in a lot of admiration by was too young bill to do it then. I never let to do it living nightmare. It's the worst my dad when when my dad was alive and he used to review music videos for the Adam and Joe show and one of the videos. He reviewed was Super Cross late in the day. And I don't remember that video it's them all on pogo sticks going around London and my dad just got a bee in his bonnet about that video and he said why are they on pogo sticks. It's absurd it's utterly absurd. How Music Video? It's just fun. It's that the director just thought while fits in with a bouncy feel of the track. It's the worst form of transport ever invented. He said that was his main objection. Was that it wasn't a good form of transport. So why would you have it in a video? But he's right. It is absolutely shit as a form of travel and also. It's not fun because it's so it requires so much energy and coordination that it's absolutely exhausting within about three bounces. Especially if you're fifty years old enough especially fit. You're ready to have a coronary. So my mission is to be able to get round the whole house without toppling off the pogo stick. Good to have something to aim for. Just I'd like to think I would achieve something while I'm in lockdown but I'm really. I'm finding very difficult to do anything over you or your kids belder but you home schooling your kids are they. Just getting on with themselves Now the thing my two boys one of them was GONNA do as GPS's and the other one was going to do his a levels right so you know that whole situation is still up in the rear. Know what they're GONNA do. I have a vague feeling that. They're going to reopen the schools before September. I can't believe they going to remain closed until then I think for all sorts of reasons to give people a break to get the economy going a little bit more and I don't know I feel as if maybe they'll go back but then if they do it'll be weird like it's hard to know what the teachers would actually teach them now that they've had all this time often the exams a completely up the spout because at the moment the idea is that they're going to be assessed and assessed on their coursework plus the mark. They got in the mocks. My some one of my children didn't do wellness marks as she eight and he said he was saying to us like when he did incredibly badly. We were saying Why did you do quite so badly as there's something emotionally up that we should know about new? No no no no. I'm fine? I'm fine He's not did badly with the I just didn't revise. So you've got to revise. That's the thing about exams protests you have is and then you do much better when you revised said Yeah. I'm GonNa do that for the real ones. So that's not gonNA happen now. And they get this wit assessment. And then you're gonNA get like the older ones go away at assessment for his a levels and then he has to apply to University of the back of the anyway so that's all a bit weird and stressful and a now that it's officially Easter holidays ignoring it. Ignoring Nazis to whole nice is you know is quite signing my daughter. Obviously then trying to teach Someone to read and it's not very full on. She's five but then there's a two year old running around trying to get involved in everything Incredibly stressful very difficult. We're trying to do half a day on half a day off so we could work like if we been around. I do morning my wife until the afternoon but we just got nowhere them so now we're doing a day on a day off but then the day on would look enough. The kids even without the schooling is just so hot. So I'm so tired today to it's just read the idea of like reading a book anything. Icon. I can't let you come even leave the kids for more than a minute. In say you go to be in the room with the one The other day yesterday I kind of basically tuned out there watching the Little Mermaid and like knew he was doing something bothell is fine and I was watching that and it was behind this for any. Pull THE TABLE OVER. Climbed the bookcase and pulled down my daughter's Growing patients and then it will Farah Garden. He pulled down and thrown. And I haven't seen any of this thrown at clump by clump all over the floor and then thrown all the upside down to the floor and got simple what you doing. He said that. Don't my Daddy. It's only soil was so it was like innocent. I and I was thinking my wife is absolutely gonNA murder machine working on this thing with my daughter and it's entirely my fault so because I take them off the ball. I was in the same room as in by taking off the bowl. And then did you. Did you say to your wife's okay Sony soil so I managed to go? I just knew I had to go right in. This is entirely my fault. It was very upset when he was when he's on a new everything that should have done but I just I'd slacked back for ten minutes and it was. It was a bad thing but then it could be worse. Couldn't he slapped back with ten minutes and then go what's way? Oh these these things a no. It's been very difficult. I'm very very grateful that Old enough to sort of look after themselves during the day and at left me time to do all my projects I've written Two two and a half screenplays I've written a very good play which about a middle-aged man on lockdown any finds a portal to another dimension behind the blues. And that's already been nominated for several major awards and I'm learning Chinese and I am becoming very fit and I'm volunteering for the NHS. I've got the APP the good Sam. I'm going out and helping people and Yeah I've been recording my audio book so of course you have. Yeah so you're the ramble books. So what is the rambled? But is it an autobiography as it? Just no I think it's called a memoir so I think the difference between an autobiography memoir as far as I am aware is autobiography. Is your whole life. All the exciting things you've done but as I haven't done that many exciting things and it's not like oh I can't wait till he gets to that bit about the persuasion est or whatever I know this is about. It's mainly about growing up in the eighties. It's it's sort of a forensic series of reminiscences about my adolescence and making friends with Joe and the music I was listening to in the movies we were watching and formative cultural influences and then juxtaposed with that the other main. Motif is my relationship with my dad who For those who don't know was in our TV show the TV show. I did with Joe Cornish on Channel. Four in the nineties and then He died a few years ago and so when he died. I realized that It was quite a weird relationship that I had with him in some ways. I mean not weird just quite formal I think like a lot of people of a certain generation and perhaps a certain class. There's a kind of weird formality. I was always envious of people who got on so well with their parents you know and wanted to call them every day and chat and laugh with them and tell share secrets and I never ever had that relationship with my parents I wanted them to do is go away. I wanted them to give me what I wanted. And the naval me to do everything I wanted but there was no sort of Close Bond and my theory is that that's probably because they sent me to boarding school and I think one of the prices you pay for being sent to boarding school is not really ever having that same close relationship with your parents again. I'm sure that's not true for everyone. I'm sure some people find with it but I think that's what happened to me anyway. So the book is like hopefully funny series of Ramblings about my dad my relationship with him what it was like when he came to live with us when he was will and looking off to him and And then stuff about my own family and stuff about Joe and friends and all that kind of stuff so it sounds good evening. Audiobook that last week you will recall nearly but if you're doing that You doing that. We do now. Yeah been doing right here in my not room and I listened to a lot of audiobooks. I like well. I like the fact that I've been asking this emergency questions. I'll ask you this. I listened to what works. And it's a real privilege to get to hear the author reading their own work when it's the win it's the actual subduing him. If you could have any book from history or from all time before they start doing the books probably read by the author. Who would you like to hear? Reads a book out. A We imagining. They all going to be any good at reading it. Yeah I mean maybe maybe not. I mean Charles. Dickens probably pretty good because he used to those state shows of his own books than these big you I'll be very interested to hear that because I would like to know if he's good or if he was Bahamian as you never know it was good. Dickens might have had a very cliquey mouth or he might you know. There's there's all manner of quite distracting irritating vocal tics. Yeah Yeah That you get with audio books. I I downloaded one the other day and I won't say who is just trying to scan forward in this anecdote to check for potential problems But that it's like a quite serious side memoir about someone who loved them and then she got ill and died and it's all about the process of grieving for this guy's mom and it is it was written by someone roughly our age Same sort of social background. Whatever and the guy they got to read the Audio Book is just Nothing like the F- The fellow that wrote it whatsoever. It sounds if they got a set of aging Thespian to read the audiobook and he he reads it a so. It's just stuff like he reads it in this offense and so he's talking about his mother and saying she goes to bake the most marvelous cakes and I would come into the kitchen and say mum. I love your cakes. The going full on with their with espy read and it just completely destroys it And I I had to stop reading after well for for a bit. It was fun. It was quite good. I was seen my mates more and more often than those standards and be feeling very excited about the prospect of getting it together with my new girlfriend. I don't I'm not doing justice to the actual tax but it was all that set of pitch of Well it's into. What is wrong when the wrong person doing something? It's really interesting or just for you sometimes. Isn't it some of them? I just find impossible especially novel. Sometimes you'll really get into sometimes. It's like impossible getting to listening to John. Malkovich do breakfast of champions which is Great He's just like the way he's just. He's very Malkovich and any sort of fits it very well. I had Michael Palin. Which will. We'll talk about some of the guests you've had had mike and finally on That's the only good thing that's happened this year. If that had been canceled as well I think that would have been just so upset because that was the most exciting thing for me this year. but he's he he was doing erebus. He adds so much more having him. He's so good but I asked him. He'd happened he went. He did a funny bit about Roman ulcers which people humble hit or willing light like. I'd quite like I'd like J- you know James. Joyce doing ulysses something with weird language. Yeah what I make him do that as well making after. Sit through and read all that required goods. Yeah do like I listened to the audio of Clockwork orange the other day anthony birds and of course that's all written in Nad. Sat. This would made up semi Russian language. That the all do and who was the guy that Read it He's an actor and he's British and he's anyway Ron no not hugh grant young. I think maybe is it. Even the guy who's who does the I'm embarrassed forgotten his name because I should know it. James mcevoy No. It's but it's not not a million miles away. Is Maybe the guy who does the Sitcom about the refugee who comes to the UK? Yes this is the worst thing about dubious. I know exactly what you mean. Terry Jones in In the Monty Python thing I'm a I've I don't know put a follow him on twitter and he's a lovely guy I've got to his name by the Rufus Jones Rufus I'm not sure it's Rufus Jones. Reading this is a bad tangent. I apologize but anyway. That was very good. Whoever reads that It's a fairly recent one and is brilliant that clockwork orange one What is your favorite audio book? Ever that you just wished it wouldn't end I tell you I really love Glynis Autobiography is short. Story was a pretty good defensively baton. The second moved the short stories. But it's good hair and read that. But his autobiography is so good. I think I think it's sort of. He stopped doing everything. Twitch like a fucking idiot would like to talk in the bedroom. Play Video Games. What kind of print would do that But but his it's sort of so it's a voice you don't use the hair in books and he so talented as a writer thing but it's feels like catcher in the rye or some just fails some of and some of. It's all about programming computers and stuff which is more boring but it's his story of or a novelist. I should say rather but his story of of going through nearly killing himself and getting being a massive drinker and stuff that and it's just the chapter about having a Jackie late in for the first time after having a lot of trouble. Jack Lighting is Larry allows laughing and crying like poetry so I could have. I could've listened to let me talk about his life a lot lot longer. Which is sort of weird choice but I heard about it on Esta and I I bought it off the back of that but then I was still writing my book at the time and so I started listening to and I thought I can't listen to this because it's too good and it's GonNa just depress me so I stopped listening to it but now I'm going to I'm going to go back to neither. That mine is finished low. It still might be a bit depressing. Anyway it's a different thing. He's had a colorful life. He's had a totally different background. He different life to you. Go to Westminster while they go. Yeah exactly is a different is it? You had a different upbringing. But even that's but I think that I'd be interested in a if you're covering that in your book. I think that's very interesting. I think Westminster's quite interesting education establishment. But I think to hear a that doesn't happen. The live shows to hit like a normal person that you can identify with talking about experience because got into public. School is no. It's not your choice. What what I think is interesting about. Is People Judge People going to public school? I'm rightly in some cases. It's I can understand why they're upset. But it's never the Don't choose to do that as a young person. Yeah that's the choice if someone else's made for your life and so to judge someone solely by that I think is weird but also it feels like Westminster's quiet and the interest when I've been around it. It seems an and you. Adam and Louis through will came so you enjoy when I've done the thing I've done the thing they do and Louis through Oh came mouth that your role valley balanced and normal people. Yes it is it slightly different one. Westminster is it is it. Is it slightly. You know it's not eaten as voice seeming like a slightly different type of. I think we all thought that it was Yeah we we used to take the piss out of the kind of Etonians and we thought of them as public schoolboys. We didn't think of ourselves as public school. We thought we were normal. And you know because we lived in London and you couldn't really get away with you right in the center of London so when whenever you went out you couldn't get away with acting like kind of freaky off no But then I look back at videos of myself from around then and and we were freaky toffs kind of but we just thought we were a bit cool and we thought that people who went to Eton well we colder E tone he Really Great and we talk about those people as if we weren't like that ourselves and we were kind of like that a bit but no I suppose no full-on we were embarrassed about it. We will self conscious. I think that was the thing being in London. That was just you self conscious more quickly. So that was a lot of people at Westminster who embarrassed about being for school and Which is sort of understandable. But it's also a little bit of a shame because it wasn't amazing place in lot of ways you know you go to press in Westminster Abbey every other morning Leno that pot. I love that part of London. I Love Westminster Abbey Been Around Westminster school to come on doing other things. Didn't chatting things or whatever and it does that does seem to be a nice feeling a becoming. That would be a nice place to school see. It does Seem Cooler. And Yeah Yeah being right in your opposite. The houses of Parliament Opposite Westminster Abbey. It's Kinda crazy. Yeah it is I mean is the they in every sense. The the privilege of being there is of the scale but No it's it's I do right about that and I do write about. Sit of feeling slightly conflicted about it and wondering why it was that my dad thought it was so important that he sent his children to private schools because it ended up ruining him financially. You know and His life was made miserable by that for a very long time and I just thought was really was a good trade off. You know like lots of people. Don't go to private. And they they do fine anyway so yeah I mean the limits life is very different. Your Life. It's it's sort of again again. I don't know that's it. It's so different than most people's lives very different the my life even though I went to. I suppose a mess of Public School people at University as a result getting talks with but it was had a taste of it but it's it is you know it's interesting to say books written by people who have had unusual lights tonight life that you don't necessarily coveralls which may be as public school as much. Maybe there's a bit more Public School. Memos going on there are groping glass. But I think there's I think there's the right person covering I think is the is the interesting thing about now. Let's talk a little bit about Because we've been chatting away navy nearly dumb you a fantastic go from strength to strength and absolutely. I mean I've got people like you of my podcast but you've got like proper people in your podcast until able he's got like Billy Connolly's got to be. The only one is superb if he will have listened to it but he's he's apart from Michael Palin who was absent. My number one person wanted on Billy Connolly's right up there and a thing did he was so good. Yeah he was great but he was really good. I mean I didn't really have to do very much. Just sat there and he was just. I was lucky that he was just in the right mood. But I was really quite nervous because I didn't know that much about him. I wasn't a fan when I was growing up. I just didn't I couldn't relate to him at all I was Monty Python Guy and Billy Connolly there was no reference points for me whatsoever. I didn't get it and so then I got the opportunity to talk to him because he was publishing his book of all his routines and bits and pieces. And I thought Oh. I don't know if I should because it'll probably annoy people that I don't know his stuff well often and it'll be a wasted opportunity and I don't know and also he'll realize that I don't really know what I'm talking about. And it'll piss him often he might be a bit tricky and there's too many variables but then in the end. I thought Oscar it. I'll just I'll give it a go. It's too big an opportunity to pass up and but then the night before I emailed a friend of mine who had worked with him and she said She said she wrote back quite a long list of things like things to say in things not to say. I was just expecting her to say. Oh you know like you know he likes to be. I don't tell jokes. He doesn't really like it when other people tell jokes. I'm just making these up. These these things she said but instead she wrote me like a long pretty specific list of things to avoid to say and then I was just thinking. Oh Shit and I emailed my producer. Shame and said Look Man. I think maybe I should pull out of this Because I didn't WANNA fuck it up. It's just that feels feels bad. Feels like I'm definitely gonNA fuck it up because one of the things she said knowing that I'm a man who likes wearing shorts was don't wear shorts. He hates people that wear shorts. He thinks it's pathetic for a grown man to wear shorts. And you know look at me. I mean I'm always I always enjoy it any opportunity to rock the creepy middle aged J. Look so and it was on the hottest day of last year as well. I like wearing shorts. They're comfortable. They're practical so that just put me in a really bad mood. Like why he he he fuck him. He doesn't like Ben who wear shorts. I'm not gonNA spend the afternoon. I'M GONNA travel all the way down to London interviewing this guy. I don't even know his stuff particularly and You know getting nasty looks because I'm wearing shorts because he anyway but actually the fact was that by that time I immersed myself in his stuff for weeks and I got it and it was like. Oh Yeah Okay I get it. And it was amazing and I just watched everything I could get my hands on and listen to all his albums on spotify and the language and the cadence of it and then the peculiarities of his own. Life and Watch interviews with him and found out and it was yeah it was really amazing but then then that email did really make me even more nervous because I thought this is a complicated guy and I don't WanNa fuck this up. Anyway it worked out. He was in a good news right and I got there. I was wearing my shorts. I was I got there early because I thought I'm going to change out of my shorts but he was fine and I said like Oh. I heard that you like men in shorts and he laughed and said he told you that it was well. What for the people listening to gossip. We like two weeks ago When's it coming out is coming out like about six weeks from we're from recordings so we only did. This year was still to last year and it was like a huge deal. So jealous of you getting getting you to beat. Sfu Job with Michael. I'm yours was I mean you can't wait to listen to yours but it was obviously your shows So different anyway. Because they're in in front of a live audience. My talk with Michael was very downbeat often. My Dad died and I was feeling very emotional and So it was. It was quiet kind of it. Wasn't somber. There was some funny bits but it. But but it certainly wasn't the kind of chat you would have in front of an audience. How does it was good? I mean I was so in all not saying he's absolutely. I number one person in the world but sending us as as a as a performer and writer. He's just everything he was so nice. They think regretting like I wish I'd I didn't really ask any questions on stage. You didn't suck his own car. I did ask that I wish had asked him some more because back we did some. We like backstage as you know. And he basically improvise asked him a question if your if your monthly bad jurists worth watching this one. He improvised basically a whole new. To life of Brian. Grow Up King. Herod the provide. He improvised the Senate. We never did that and then did embrace the improvised the whole that they might if done in life of Brian and I think just because I want there was so much to cover with him and I wanted to try and get as much like the I just and it was. It was great right. He was he was in my but I just saw. I think maybe I should have been is always that difficult thing with my poker is working out. That line of how respectable had the responsibility? Frozen like frozen hype. You're still there and the The of I on frozen working at how rude you have on about his working out the how rude you can be to people in whether you can get a sounded we've richly GROP. Who IS STILL? Don't quite understand why he doesn't he or is people do not want to go out. I wonder was I. I didn't I didn't go on enough about his major triumphs. He seemed to be enjoying it but I was much more. His took them his my theory about why he didn't want to go out because I think he'd been on a massive publicity push because he was in that film What's it called again Can you ever forgive me? Forgive me which is Great. And he's great and he was nominated for an Oscar and it was all felt right and he was going for it and he was doing lows publicity and then he didn't win and then he just went off the map and I don't know if the timing is right for might have been something about that. He doesn't see the same week. It was meant to go out. Think go around the time. They pulled it where he'd been revealed. Something about Julianne Moore who is meant to been in that film to give with And so I think they will worried he would. He might be saying stuff that affected his cash. The well that's interesting is that I mean I'm just guessing because honestly top three Po costs. I was avalon. Everyone I've done. He was brilliant. It was very funny. I was cheeky to him but I felt it. He appreciates the worked with the I think but maybe if I just even done five minutes an I'll you what robot when you've done this and you've done. That must've been amazing. I think he would've made baby done anyway. So I think made with Michael Palin. I kind of wish 'cause he's so respect him so much but he's still he's not like he's not a minute is not rude is not much money. You couldn't ask you have a century coke or something like that would be a wrong big Iran I've every sperm lake but yeah it was great. It was interesting and he talks a little bit. You know told by Terry Jones a little bit but not too much Push too much and they wanna make them cry or make myself cry. Although he's interesting talked about Having modern quite fallen out with him but there were such good friends but when ripping on came out 'cause the BBC trying to push as his thing as Michael payments they didn't really want to pipelines involve so Terry's rolling. It was kind of you know even though we obviously right together kind of a little bit underplayed and I think Terry Jones was bit put out by it so he did talk about that. Which is again quite interesting. Because I'm fascinated by that double-act dynamic and how that works and how you if you remain friends over the don't remain. Friends will be friends. But with that with those two I mean certain that all the tributes that Michael did to Terry is just an him going to Sam is house. Yeah go take him to the pub every week even though he didn't know he was. Yeah now so moving and beautiful this beautiful male friendship. That's quite a rat thing think. Yeah that's right. Well Louis I sent Louis. I'm just GonNa make it myself again. Fessel yeah because I watched Michael Palin talking about Terry Jones and Choking up on the news and it was yeah and I. I'm sure like a lot of people just started crying myself watching that clip But Yeah I sent my book to Louis through to read because he's in it as well and But Louis described it as a kind of love story But you know it's the story of my affair. My Love Affair With Joe from charting it from the beginning and I do sort of right about explicitly not explicitly in a sexual sense. Well other is some very hot sex with joe the is described but yeah it just you know that thing when you look back on it you you think like. Oh Gosh yeah it is. It is a love affair really just without the sex and everything about is the same. You know the the feeling of excitement you get when you're going to see the person the feeling of missing them so much when they're not around and imagining the kind of things that they would say if they were there instead of laughing at the things that you imagine them saying you can hear their voice so clearly all that sort of stuff as well as admiring them and being inspired by them and anyway so I hope I've I've kind of done some justice to that and then at the end there's a few sit of moments as well when when I don't really touch on negative stuff too much. But there's a couple of moments when I just thought. Whoa what's going on here where where felt like our friendship was kind of dissolving or whatever towards the end of the eighties and I never really resolved any of those things but then I did a a bonus podcast thing with Joe just the other day Remote thing it's going to go at the end of the audiobook and he he picks out various bits and pieces from the book and he picked out one of the things I wrote about in and we talked about that. We should have resolved it at the end of the book so that was quite satisfying coverage. Isn't it is. It's that element of marriage to and like some marriages as we are very hamernicks than some a based And I think that's what I think in Monty Python. I talked to him about. I think the hopped Python John cleese and Terry Jones kind of not really getting on that. Well I think I think Terry Jones and John cleese rubbed each other up so much that that was the grit in the Oyster. That created the poll. You know I think that they came from a different angle and had such different talents. I mean they were Monday. Pipe in an amazing group of people and Terry is is saw the harvey again the takes realizing United Looking back at it to kind of realize that as much but I think without him antagonizing junk please I think it probably an and vice versa identical. Be Quite what it was so I think you know with me and stay on it and it was always You know the competitiveness was more like that competitive thing that you can get into marriage. Where your way you're more fighting and then that leads to fantastic sex or comedy hopefully. So yeah but you know. There's loads of things that you know. I saw. There's an incident. I've never talked about it. I'm never told the steel about and this came very early on when we sort of that university I was the I've been so affected as the main performer. I done the Oxford View Written it and there was a software thing with that and then when we came when we came into the real world was much better to stand up and I wasn't and he was saying that performer is the is kind of flipped around. And I really want to act. And he got this He offered this pie in there like a student show filming and let it was like nothing. It wasn't important but it was a short Ville a which a won't happen but ended up with him to a guy's house and then they ended up on this date together and they dance together. I love that funding. How come when it was called. John Maloney didn't answer told us to John me about it and I kinda thought the Tony Thought. It's kind of weird. The there that he's an actor Nisus. It would seem obvious to sell off of me the other part but I don't think that's you know wage golfer that leading. Obviously I wasn't you didn't for it so and then it was in Norwich. Actually if we're doing together and they have the after show they had filmed at Norwich and then there was a party with all the up together and One of the crew said to me so you didn't fancy during the filming and and but I A and this is why this is an interesting story because obviously he'd but we'd both been often it. I never got told that I've been offered. She said I'll do it but not if he's doing. Obviously this is very early on but I also just went. In that moment I went. Again the infancy. It's SORTA like I didn't even an I never told you that I I knew if done that. But that such you know. He didn't want to be an actor and I really wanted to go back. And that was a really weird little power play going on between the two but the reason I tell the story is I think it says as much about me as it does about him because I was in I was in such a kind of low status position by then the I didn't even go. What now fuck. Why did you just saw and I never ever even told him that I knew that happened. I never spoke downriver. I'm you know I could have said to the guy yet. I didn't know you know no one told me about it. But that's kind of interesting isn't and I'm sure he could come up with some stories where I did something similar to him. I doubt I'm a very nice guy but I would just been thinking about and such it just sums up that the weirdness at the heart of our relationship even then you know so. Y- fascinates it fascinates. We were. We were friends. I think working together made it harder. Befriends than stopping working together made it easier to be friends. We friends but before you started working together. How many we worked. We met and then decide to work together but we if we certainly friend friendly to begin with but I think it was it. Was it all kind of came down to It was a win thing because I did the review and he didn't but it was the of you that got ready tumbled by all the STANDUP comedians in Edinburgh but had a terrible time in basically nearly stopped performing and he wasn't bothered because he wasn't in it and then he really got into stand up then so right. At the beginning of also professional relationship he was pushing motorway. Stand up comedy sketch comedy and felt resentful of all these people who bullish and he was siding with allies. People so immediately created this this divide between us. That was a little bit way it but I think again. I think it's I think that was what made it work as well as a as a double but yeah I mean. I'm glad we ended at the right time. And I would never WANNA go back to it. Which is I think is different than say you and you and Joe who's still so seem happily to get together when you do get together. Yeah Yeah No. It's good now I really like. There's not a shred of Envy or bitterness left. I really can say that with my hand on my heart. Which side is it but But yeah definitely was for a while. Wrote big thing in for the book all about when we when we did the toy. Movie of Toy Tannock. Do you remember. We used to do parodies of TV shows and films in our in our TV show with with little stuff toys and stuff and off when we did. The I think it was the second series. I was nineteen Nineteen Ninety eight or something like that and To series of our show had gone out and we were out in california staying with the people that produced our show that ran the production company fenton and randy they were called and we kind of on top of the world and it was like we made it. We had two shows that down ready well gone. They've gotten pretty good ratings for what it was. We got some good reviews. It was like yes with kings are fucking world and so we went out to california and they they hide the skiing lodge out. In Mammoth Mountain. We went skiing and we were out on a hot. We were in a hot tub me and joe out on a On a balcony overlooking the mountains. And we're just like this is it. We're the kings. I was drinking a beer and I think joe was smoking a Doobie and we would just sit Hollywood moment of success and I was playing around with my mtpa bottle. It was bobbing around in the hot tub. And I said something like iceberg right ahead and I notice and Joe said Yeah we should. We should do titanic as toy movie and I was like I don't know about that and soon as he said it. I just thought I'll fucking hell he's going to do he's GonNa do. Titanic and it's GonNa be really good and it's obviously it's going to be brilliant because everyone's seen fucking titanic and he's going to do a really good job and sure enough. The absolutely went to town because the thing the thing that we never admitted really was that we used to divvy apple the toy movies. We always said we did everything absolutely together because we wanted to maintain a- coherent image. You know just like yet we share. We share all the responsibilities. But actually for practical reasons puttering the else we divided everything up so it was fit really competitive like who's done the best toy movie and stuff and it was generally joe the best ones. I can see now and So he went completely to town on this. Fucking titanic thing and I went on holiday just met my beautiful wife. Although we weren't married point and we went away for a first foreign holiday and when we got back I went into the studio and and the entire studio was filled with this foot fucking cardboard model of Titanic Joe it may real called Bordon straws and and it was completely amazing and I I I thought this is bad and I was gonNA. I mean I really had to stop myself from breaking in their nine. Just burning it and Basically I had buckled to do with Totani I did the voices on like we came together and do voices and things like that and then it was just everyone loved. Titanic came out and Channel Four. They did film for. They launched the film for Channel and on the launch night. They showed us it of ten minute. Cut of Toy Tanic and everyone was guy. Oh it's so amazing. It's so brilliant and every time someone said I would just go back no for. Yes really good. Isn't it. Yes and and then but we were saying you know to everyone. We do everything together. We do everything together. And then timeout rang up just before the film for launch night and they said Oh we just wanted to just chat with you quickly about the titanic thing and so I was thinking while you're phoning the wrong guy but I can't say that because we're supposed to. I can't say oh you need to talk to Joe. He did that one so I had to. Just sit started and say Oh yeah what do you want to know and I was very. I thought I was very careful to say we about everything we did this and we did that. And you know and trying to justice to what Joe had done it in any anyway obviously and I must have slipped through And the next light. When when time out came came out that week I got a phone call and it was joe and he was apoplectic and he just said what the fuck of you said now as I want what do you ought about. And he said You're talking you basically made out that you did toy. Sonic and the thing I mean. It's so matt. Just incredibly ludicrous and pathetic but the but the tensions and the lack of perspective at the time is just so overwhelming anyway. I wrote a big story about it but then it was one of the pieces that I eventually just chopped out of the book. And it's less about all that stuff and it's more about the kind of Fun Times. Yeah yeah which there there were as well but but yeah but it's it's it's fascinating could as it's the in the way anti-french knows way if you meet someone especially when you're you're very young you met. Joe Of safer I nothing was also which I read today in an interview with Joe is that you basically got him into the first TV thing that you you you've been offered everything in got joe into it so is that there's always that weird dynamic where someone has to be great gossipy grateful for the opportunity which he obviously still is but then you know then you yes you start off forever right. Let's start out as the senior partner. I got various points you wanted to say. Can I just remember how this lack? I WanNa find me from special. I'm the special guy. No in that voice and then And then you know. The the dynamic is constantly shifting and ought so exhausting. I wish I could go back. That was the overwhelming thing writing. The book was at certain points just wishing more than anything I could go back in and just say mate calmed down and don't do that but then the the way we took things so seriously and we were so important. We'd argue over whether at will though is in the sentence for day I was nuts but that level that you need that level sending that stage I think you need that level of passion and self belief you know we were so this weird mixture of insecurity and Atta confidence. You know I mean. It's it's such a weird. Japan comedian to to believe that you deserve any of those things that either side of the ninety S. You know as well as going home and know no know. I'm not I'm terrible everything so you know. It's it's a bizarre thing. And it's very difficult to navigate those waters in a special very well. And and and things you know and you'll annual motivations what you want to have it. Changes is sought to me. It's just amazing. Those double acts the keep working forever and the haven't There's ones that together and don't like each other but it's still force which is interesting because I saw successful becomes. I'm as a mess those like Terri and Michael and adorned Jennifer. I guess and who would just like accidentally best friends. Yeah Bob and people find it very interesting and it's and episode me because I think it's it's like being brothers. It's like being a lovers is like being best friends who have for anyone is. It's still matches up. I think can it's understandable ratio to anyone because everyone has gotten relationship with someone in their life is someone they work with someone who's their someone they had. A relationship with a word relationship will roster. Yeah yeah but I know and I think I in the ninety s and early two thousands. The women I chose who chose may identify. You know. We're always inappropriate and always but nearly always wrong and bullying and you know and took advantage of being nice And I wasn't always nice either but you know it was. I would always have a certain type. So had your making certain choices in your life about who your interacted with and I think with women Kinda went. I'M NOT GONNA I'M NOT GONNA have go into relationship with someone like that and I think that's I think that's what you realize. You realize that as as we go anyway to we've taken a lot of your time. That is my wife texting your wife. My wife hasn't texted me told me it's over. I mean have you finished. We said we would finish eating there. We go so anyway. I really hope I can get you in and Adam. No Joe the other one now. We were really looking forward to it. So yeah let's make it happen. Yeah so we'll do it again at some other time out. See how he feels about this. And I'll be talking to me. After this. After I doubted toy tannock story ramble broke out in September. The book is at a physical book is out in September. The idea is for the audio book to come out in a few weeks. I suggest my publishes and said light. Well why don't we just put the Audio Book Out Now? I mean and so that's what we're GonNa do think great good and the back continuing what fantastic guests that. I'LL BE JEALOUS OF COMING UP. Not let's say Well it's all scrambled now. Because of the thing you can do them. I'm going to do it. Works for you remotely and this is what very well I think remotely you and it's so different though. It's so different to being a really need to be in a room. The only one I ever did remotely before this whole crisis was bill. Hader and I like I and it was good but I felt as if it would have been a lot better if I'd been in a room with him. You know what I mean. So it's difficult but and so that's why I'm leaning on old friends and people. I already have a relationship with repeat guests. So Joe will probably do one If he's still talked me off to this and Louis through I hope and Tash Dmitri you and past podcast guests who who I already know. I'm going to terrific. Well thank you so much for being my first remotes guest expanding good to see every loved. Say you take care and Let's hope we both get through this alive. One of statistically one of us is GONNA die. I mean I've got young kids. I hope it's you just young kids. Yeah look my books finished. I've had a great run. Thanks very much bye. Ladies and gentlemen Adam Buxton array thanks. We're GONNA go thanks. Everyone is listened to watch them. Subscribed subscribe and do every like fuck off. Goodbye thank you bye-bye as to us with me tearing my guest Adam Buxton. Thank you to past playing this music. Even lockdown about past apartment problem. My right must be regretting that name. Now I am indebted and would like to thank come Adam on the four thing I against everyone. Is Castor resume for helping do everyone at twitch for giving us the chance to today's and especially of course the Chris Evans not that one who is doing the whole me. All the behind the scenes of setting this up to seventy being now the super producer of the show so I am very indebted to him. Our executive producer of this show was wonderful. Martin defeat we called him months in details on the on the set all into the deeds. Say about we music upon I also called him house mountains while others including this is a skype potato though buster strike dot com production. WanNa strike dot com slash bagism Jason. Become monthly budget help helpless. Why some funds to keep making up costs and get cavalcade of lovely Extras Self Self Shiny Badejo to the membership. God practice page interviews. All right my friends I will see you on the other side of this terrible trustee.

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BOX140: Let's Paint Our Faces Blue & Shave our Nethers

The Box Of Oddities

42:16 min | 1 year ago

BOX140: Let's Paint Our Faces Blue & Shave our Nethers

"What follows may not be suitable for all audiences? Listener discretion is advised the world is full of stories stories of mysteries of curiosities join and Joe Through for the strange. The unexpected has the bid and cautiously E._P._A.. Inside the box oddities let me pull my creaky chair and Uncle Jeff Road. Tell you story we've. I've been preparing for our weekend getaway vacation vacation anniversary weekend getaway. You've been working double time in order to get the time off. I was just wondering how your day went today. You you look like Hugh <hes> you had a full one. I was told hold that mercury in retrograde and that's what's going on with people but honestly please be nice to customer service. Humans say humans for a reason because I am here to assist and I don't know why while you're being mean to me what was the most interesting part of your day today well. It actually didn't involve customers at all. It was in the bathroom and just taking care of some some number one and I take someone fart and then go which is what I do. It's just funny that you know that's kind of a weird reaction to a very normal bodily function especially in a restroom but we still do that weird weird shit. I know that's one of my co workers the other day it was like I wish everyone would just relaxed like a you know. Some people are waiting until you leave to drop a bomb right and you just want to be like just ship. That's what I'm doing. I worked with a guy you remember Matthew. Matthew would come bursting out of the restroom door scrolling through his phone going. Hey guys look at this yeah. He'd rarely closed the door yeah. Are you ready for my story today. Oh we're just just getting right to. I'm just going to jump right in. I love it I want. I want to warn you up front. It's kind of sad. Do I kinda sad. I don't know if I can handle sad. We've already watched a movie this week. That made me weep uncontrollably yet but you heard somebody go oop after they farted the restroom at work so we kinda balances out by the way whoever requested we watch about time fantastic film also made me weep uncontrollably. It was an emotional night for both of us. Okay tell me a story okay on December twenty seventh in twenty twelve James Nichols. He died alone in his garbage filled house in Poughkeepsie New York. He was eighty two years old. Everybody kind of thought that James was a bit of an oddball. He was a strange guy. One of his neighbors guy named Walter with skied. It was his neighbor for like sixteen years or something and he he said that James House was just full of garbage quarter big time horder and not just a little bit like floor to ceiling. You've seen some of those extreme hoarding episodes where they they have to climb up on the garbage in crawl across on their belly with their backside still touching the ceiling kind of of hoarding and not only was his house full of garbage but Nichols also oh had seven sheds in his yard filled with debris from Florida's ceiling. Now we lived in kind of a modest house. It was on a nice treeline street. It had a backyard it was enclosed with a stockade fence but then there were all these additional outbuildings with garbage and junk and just trash spilling out everywhere nichols had retired from I._B._M.. Years before he was a loner he was detached pretty antisocial. He never spoke to the neighbors. His neighbor was ski too said he was very strange. I rarely saw him that much when I did. He was just standing in his yard staring he never spoke to anybody didn't say hello or anything he said that Nichols almost kind of an unemotional feel about him that he was just like a blank slate more or less. Sometimes I would just see him in his back yard. He'd just be staring off into space is very weird or he would just sit in his car and read the newspaper paper just hang out in his car. He wouldn't go on his house. Sometimes I do that in your house is filled with garbage mostly most of the time most of the time although today at the end of the week he also said that once he saw <hes> Nichols just driving around this is like for days he would just drive around and he had a store mannequin in the front seat. Oh with a hat on for the Carpool Lane. Maybe I don't know but people thought that was kind of strange that he had a a dummy in his car with a hat on he never had any visitors. There were never any guests that anyone ever saw he didn't appear to have any family or friends and people just kind of stayed away from them. Neighbors did because he was so eccentric in odd and that's one of the reasons why they didn't discover his body for a couple of few days because people just like yeah he's weird in. We don't really pay that much attention to him but then finally the neighbors became concerned and called police and then they discovered the body now there are many theories as to why James Nichols was so odd in so introverted and it appears as though the nineteen eighties were there was a very dark time his only child a son on who also was named James drowned in May of one thousand nine hundred eighty two and then on December twenty sixth in nineteen eighty-five three years later his wife Joanne who was suffering from severe depression because does of losing a child in a in a drowning accident just disappeared. They found her vehicle in a parking lot at a shopping mall in town. No He'd always been a bit of a hoarder but after that it appeared to become much much much worse now like I said he was found dead in his home in December of twenty twelve after the neighbors had called police. They determined that he died of natural causes officers confirmed that the house was in fact filled with personal satellite debris and mostly garbage according to C._N._N.. They were able to locate to family members of Nichols but neither of them would claim the body. Oh okay. I thought you were saying that they'd found to family members. inside the garbage yeah no no he was buried by the duchess county department of community and family services in an unknown location now since no one in nichols family came forward to claim mm-hmm is body or take control of his estate the duchess county commissioner of finance her name was pamela barack was appointed as temporary administrator they often have to do this in cases like this where they have to liquidate the unclaimed estate but the dwelling was in such disarray in such a mess that they hired contractors to come in hall off all the junk in the trash before they could fix up the place and diane put it on the market the cleaning process alone took six months well to empty the place out and clean it and then they had to start the repairs on a house that's been buried in garbage for however however long yeah it's not good for the woodwork it wreaks havoc on one's wainscoting the deed board does not fare well so at five pm on june twenty eighth twenty thirteen six months after james nichols was found dead one of the workers was repairing sheet rock in the nichols basement once he punched through he quickly discovered that it was in fact a false wall behind a wall was a plastic barrel inside inside the plastic barrel sealed in plastic was joanne nichols or what was left of her she'd been in there for twenty eight years dr joy nichols was fifty five year old former first grade teacher at gay head elementary school in hopewell junction new york she was very well liked in fact every year the they would have the students vote on their favourite teacher and she was often the one that they voted for she was described as very kind very quiet very soft spoken a deeply religious woman when she disappeared the community just they all kind of pulled together searched tirelessly for of course to no avail i worried that this is where this was going so they pull a barrel out from behind the wall and what they found in the barrel was pretty rough of course it had been hidden behind the wall for twenty eight years and again it was in one of those giant like what other forty gallon plastic drum and it was sealed shut in the body had been sealed in airtight plastic inside inside that drum in an apparent attempt to contain the smell of dekom but even though it had been it had been in there for nearly three decades in the body had plenty of time to completely deteriorate in decompose everything that remained was still inside this plastic bag dr kerry rieber the duchess county medical examiner said the body was skeleton is d- the hands were tied with rope and there was a large area on the right side of her skull that was missing and she went on to say that the ceiling of the body and plastic behind a false wall was probably enough to mask the smell of the yeah so blunt force trauma is that what yeah a few days after the gruesome discovery dr webber said that through dental records the remains had been positively identified fighting joanne nichols in according to the forensic pathologist the first grade teacher had been murdered by blunt force trauma to the head pretty severe new part of the skull was missing the retired to keep c. d. <hes> detective captain charles middle stat he ran the investigation twenty eight years prior said there was never any doubt in his mind he said that he knew that nichols knew where his wife was he said the man was cold i mean seriously cold according to c._n._n. he said investigators never searched the house because they did not have legal grounds to get a warrant when they brought nicholson he told detectives that is marriage was fine and now they did find a note on her computer that led them to believe that she was depressed but but not suicidal although that's what james nichols was trying to present was that she was so distraught over the death of their son son that she just took off or ended her life the retired detective said he sat across from me my office he looked me straight in the face and told me he thought she was depressed and he hinted at maybe suicidal we had suspicions right from the start start because of the way he acted so they put nichols under surveillance and investigators learned within a couple of weeks that he was visiting another woman so they confronted him with that and nichols rickles replied according to the retired police detective if you don't have a warrant from i._r._s. you can talk to my lawyer and that is the last time they spoke with him wow they never followed up anymore from that point he said there were a couple of other twists costs to that raised his suspicions when they went to the house after nichols reported his wife missing there was no car in the driveway the car was missing the next day the car was in the driveway i mentioned that it was found at a shopping mall well that's what nichols said he said he just had depan it happened upon it and drove it home he was just walking around the shopping mall apparently and saw his car had the keys with him and then drove at home ah the car had been washed and vacuumed in all the rugs had been cleaned on the inside he said now before i abandoned my family i wanna wash and vacuum my car and then leave it in a in a grocery store parking lot now the current captain captain paul kante told the associated press obviously the evidence is very very old we might have gotten a better opportunity years ago to pull fingerprints or something like that but here's where we are we might not be able to you it's so old and he wouldn't discuss details of the investigation going forward or what evidence had been sent to the police lab he said that they wanted to do a fresh round of interviews he noted that most of the officers who worked on the case in one thousand nine hundred five are retired or have died police captain paul kante You've said he never let the case go. He said quote. I remember the case like it happened yesterday because every time I drove past her house. I wondered if she was in there. He said it's just a sin that he got away with it all these years. I probably I believe shouldn't say this because it's not politically correct but I hope he rots in Hell. I don't think there's anything not politically correct about that. I think we can all get on board with that. I hope he rots in Hell. It reminds reminds me like there was a <hes>. There was a forensic files episode years ago that I saw where a guy had a mistress who ended up becoming pregnant with his baby and when she was confronting fronting him about his wife and if he was going to be <hes> leaving his family to take on the responsibility of this new baby <hes> he killed her and put her in a in a barrel and then and just shoved it in crawlspace in the basement and then when new owners bought the house they tried to get this barrel out there like what the heck and there you go and they go on and the only way that they were able to prove that it was him because of like these little pebbles of fake flower plastic that they found in the bin where he had worked at a fake flower thing or something like that but anyway interesting with guys putting women in barrels and then to Waller Moore up with shoddy drywall grow. It sounds like he was a miserable human now. So at least we have that to hold onto. It makes me wonder if his son drowning was an accident interesting. I don't know it's just kind of where my mind goes but then I wonder if because they people said that after his wife disappeared he seemed to go downhill at least mentally it could have been a normal function of where he was and and or it could be maybe the guilt of what he had done started to pray on his mind and exacerbate the situation like him sitting in his car all the time and not wanting to go in the house or standing in the backyard for hours just staring off into space it could be that his house which is full of garbage and he didn't WanNa go in there but it could be that the guilt was keeping him from going in there knowing that he murdered his wife and that she was behind Drywall drywall in the basement and if you consider the psychology behind walling your dead wife up in a bin and then filling the rest of your home with garbage I mean what is that saying about what you think of that human person I mean you're continuing to fill your home with garbage. After you've made garbage of your debt wife like I said you know he kind of kept to himself even before his wife went missing but one of the neighbors who had been in the neighborhood for years said that they remembered just about that time that his wife was really on him about his hoarding Boarding Okay and she disappeared Christmas Day their theory is that it was Christmas. They had a big fight about this and he clocked her. It's gotTa be impossible to conduct any sort of investigation in a home where there's hoarding gotta be tremendous. How could you possibly find the minute little details that often lead to a case being broken when so you've got eighteen tons of debris right? That's why I keep my car dirty all the time. You're not finding miniscule fibers in their thank you wait but if I get then I want them to be able to Dan. This doesn't work both ways now. It's time for that thing in the middle in October of twenty seventeen a young man named -Tarian Pouncey in the West pullman neighborhood of Chicago's south side needed some extra money so like any enterprising entrepreneurial man. He decided his best option would be armed robbery of a hot dog stand so shortly after six A._M.. TYRIAN entered the hot dog stand waved a gun in the managers face ace and demanded cash once he had the cash he stuffed the gun in the front of his belt and made a run for it. Unfortunately the gun discharged and shot him in the Groin. The unlucky robber was taken to Christ Medical Center and arrested he was charged with armed robbery and unauthorized circumcision by a handgun the box of oddities with cat and JETHRO Gilligan to off despite the predictions of the future Gernon everything will be sent over the so called Internet's. Something's packages laboratory samples will always rely on the U._S.. Postal Service the finest network of mail carriers ever assembled to deliver goods in Soviet era white light trucks with no license plates. That's why the box of auditees now has a secure mailing address where you can send us things too big for the Internet's. You'll sleep easy knowing your partner will be guarded around the clock in a highly secure facility staffed by some of main spokes trustworthy hourly employees. Many are actually awake during their shifts just send those packages and letters to this address. The box of oddities four nine nine Broadway bucks one on sixty four Bangor Maine zero four four zero one. That's four ninety nine Broadway box one six four Bangor Maine zero four four zero one the box oddities mailing address the smart way to reach out and touch someone without actually touching anyone this overboard in areas with no postal service packages with animals. She remains ready to use the box oddities. Hi said box. I love the concept of solving problems through songs Benji way of solving all issues. Whenever you have something you want to say to me you say here listen to this and you hand me a mix cassette that humaid in the eighties and it's basically about how you need to do laundry more and it's expressed through songs written by heart well? We wanted to tell you about a new podcast called band tastic. It's a sci fi musical adventure podcast about the most popular Miller band in the universe. It is assembled by a super intelligent spaceship called Deborah which is a rat named for a spaceship and not so intelligent robot sidekick randy in the intergalactic musicians travel new world world's with one goal to. Solve all their problems through incredible songs. The band consists of D._J.. Yeah who is a Dinosaur D._J.. With a one word vocabulary I guess you might be saying what now each episode the presents a new challenge for the band whether it's teaching joy to a planet full of haters and trolls or bringing music to a space station full of aliens that don't have ears so the idea is that this is for the young lions who might enjoy learning running through a podcast but it's also not terrible for you as an adult to listen to voices by Janet Varney from the legend of Cora as thorough pop singer featured in songs by black eyed peas and most deaf Mike Furman Sirius. X._M.'s uh-huh kids place live Drennan Davis from N._B._C.'s bring the funny you can find band tastic on the Himalayas APP or anywhere you listen to podcasts and you can listen to the trailer at the end of the episode it. We got this email from Andrew who likes to be called Dragon so I'm GonNa Call Him Dragon on a recent episode you mentioned eccentric geniuses and their respective quirks when you mentioned Protagoras I nearly scared my wife to death in the car with my gleeful giggles I just I knew you would mention the being thing if you recall one of the eccentricities of pathetic when he started his own religion. One of the religious tenants was do everything possible to avoid coming in contact with beans MHM dragons says but you missed a beautiful beautiful detail protagoras death is somewhat a mystery because of several different conflicting accounts but the one that is most generally accepted as true is as follows locals weren't cool with our boys cult and decided to chase him all Frankenstein monster style out of the village Protagoras ran for his life all the way to the lush city of Metaponto M- where he encountered his greatest foe a bean field beggars violently burned to death in four ninety five at the hands of his enemies because he would rather do that than touch a bean. Thanks you weird freaks. Oh man hope you giggle every time U._C._L._A.. Geun Hey thanks dragon that I had never heard that that was not in any of the information that that I saw while researching that that's amazing. You guys are so smart. I love your little tidbits. You always hope US flesh the stories out and we appreciate that because we're lazy great sorry. What do you got for me what you want you would? You aren't talk today about the picks the what the picks the picks picks okay P. A. C. T. S. pits P. I C picks okay picks. I wonder picks the picks were a people of northern Scotland who are defined as a quote confederation of tribal units whose political motivations derived from a need to ally against against common enemies they lived in and around the late Iron Age and early medieval periods and they weren't a single tribe <hes> nor necessarily really a single people. I like to think of it as like the the term pit bull so pit bulls not a breed of dog <hes> pit bull describes a dog types that carry certain characteristics and <hes> so the picks are kind of like that I see most of what is known about about them comes from much later on from Roman and Scottish writers and the images that picks themselves carved into stones so they're known mostly for being kind of this almost host mythical group of people using guerrilla warfare tactics. They're being credited for one of the primary reasons that the Romans didn't conquer all of Scotland as because of the picks really so every time the Roman Roman Empire tried to move into their territory the pick successfully fought back and the Roman legions were the greatest military force that the world had ever seen and the only people that they could not conquer where the picks. How do they do okay so historians claim that the people of Northern Scotland referred to themselves as pecked and that's p. e. c. h. t. meaning both that they honored the ancestors and were themselves of ancient stock and and <hes> some believed that the picks were so named because the Romans who observed them and then recorded them called them the painted or tattooed people but there are some that argue that point that that's not actually it but they're described often as being tattooed or painted so interesting yeah in some writings <hes> they're described as being painted all over being tattooed with various colors and designs signs all over their bodies and some reports that they were completely covered in blue so these were a warrior people and so I'm guessing that this was a way to make make them more look more fierce in battle Yep that sort of thing yes okay other wild stories included that they were actually dark skinned pygmies who hid in holes at night <hes> but had magical powers and there did become this kind of folklore? 'em Mythological connection with the idea of the pits you said pygmies were they of shorter stature. No it just kind of interesting doing stories started to okay especially as the the stories are told much later on <hes> it changes a bitch you know obviously if you're a group of people who have never been beaten by any other group of people and then all of a sudden this one group of people can beat you you maybe start making all they have supernatural powers. They live in holes in the pygmies. nope they scooter holes very tiny. You couldn't even beat them because they were so tiny. I don't don't know scooping a whole whole scooters so there was a study of one of the most important archaeological discoveries in Scotland. That's happened in a really long time time and it's actually a pick dish monastery that found that these were not barbarian people who were just warriors who just went around sharpening knives all the time they. They were actually a very they weren't whole scooters. They weren't whole sculptures they were very advanced society especially considering the region of the world that they lived in so they had this use of complex architectural principles and <hes> we've learned that they had an incredible use of language and the evolution of language and where it sprouted up when it became more formalized and all that you know that's that's something to talk about separately but <hes> they <music> seemed to have a much more formal language than much of the surrounding area did and it was more complex more complex and they used rather than the thought process is that they based it on on <hes> Roman writings but used their own style so more like hieroglyphs but using Roman literature as a guideline the name picks appears in written records from late antiquity to the tenth century <hes> where they're thought to have merged with the gaels their language no longer exists and in fact the written language is has been so far impossible to to decipher. I mean they had some really nice drawings of fish so you know that that Means Fish Julius Caesar himself was fascinated by the culture so and his Gaelic war book five he recorded that they a quote die themselves with load which produces a blue color and makes their appearance embattled more terrible they wear their hair long and shave every part of their bodies save the head and upper lip really there must have been quite terrifying to cede coming at you yelling in a language you don't understand in medieval times now. According to other Roman sources <hes> the only clothing that the picts war were iron chains around their wastes and throats iron was considered to them a sign of wealth and material more valuable than gold and it also served very practical use so they could hang their weapons from any Cheney part of of their outfit which is probably why they were so well manscaping right knives flailing about just you know trimming up all the time can't even stop the early picks are associated with piracy and raiding along the coast of Roman Britain and even in the late Middle Ages. The line between traders and pirates is very unclear so that the pitch pirates were probably merchants is on other occasions and so that that was apparently a slow transition and that's true the really the difference between a merchant and pirate is who's telling the story as with most people in the north of Europe in that time they were becoming farmers and living in small communities they had cattle and horses they were obvious signs of wealth and sheep and pigs kept in large numbers and because of the way that they lived or what we assume is the way that they lived based on on ruins that we found <hes> transhumance was common now. I'm not sure that I'm pronouncing that correctly T. R. A. N. S. H. U. M. A. N. S.. I'm sorry T. R. A. N. S. S. U.. God Damnit T._r._A._N.. S. H. U. M. A. N. C.. transhumance hill well. I don't know all right anyway. It means to move your herds from place to place depending on the weather and <hes> how best the the land at that place will feed your herds this movement equalled strength <hes> the Romans in fact never conquered that region <hes> despite the repeated attempts and the tribal nature of the picks meant that they could move quickly from one location location to the other now Romans came at fighting in a very structured very formal way large slow moving way. That's exactly right. <hes> the picks on the other hand were were dotty. They were nimbly emily. Emily can't stop won't stop and they were not settled to one geographical region so they would move about you can't conquer ah peoples who who aren't there the Romans therefore found themselves facing opponents who had no central cities to conquer. They didn't the way that they went about warring didn't work with these people so the picks were unconquerable because they presented to the Romans this paradigm which they didn't know how to address. How do you conquer somebody when they don't have stuff to take yeah and they they had stuff they just took it with them right in they moved around and you couldn't find them in? They found you instead he. I can see where that was a pretty good strategy. Yeah I look at it like when I picture that that fight in my head I I hear the clink clink clink of Roman soldiers like moving toward an area and then ha ha you know it's like the last night I was just GonNa say. I envision Michael Palin doing that. Yes just as you said that Michael Palin in my mind so the picks were amazing lots of really interesting false narratives told later on about their incredible magical skills and you know their fierceness but really it was probably that they teamed up and they just didn't go at warring the same way that that the Romans instead and like I said it was not necessarily just this group of people. It was people who are willing to say hey the Romans are coming. You want to go at this together because right so let's painter interfaces blue and shave our netters exactly speaking of which this weekend did we make plans for shaving our numbers well. We are going away together now anyway <hes> so the picks what happened to them. We don't really know there are some ideas that they relocated. <hes> more to the Mediterranean Regions <hes> there are ideas that they kind of. Have just spread there are ideas that because they weren't a central people's that really it was just the picks kind of petered. Maybe they're all scooting in holes and we can't see them. Maybe their whole scooters who knows but it's <hes> interesting that they were so advanced as far as <hes> architecturally <hes> as far as language goes they were amazing artists and we don't really have any written history of them by them. We just have stories of them. Do you think that they were absorbed into other cultures palpably like well like the neanderthals. Were not to compare but you know what I mean. The neanderthals didn't just just disappear. They became us in many ways a lot of us. We've talked about this a lot of us carry neanderthal DNA yeah because they were getting busy in the caves. I'm well that's interesting. I think one of the things that fascinates me. The most is the idea that their language has totally disappeared disappear. We can interpret it. It's just gone and that makes me. It's interesting but that makes me sad and I think about native American culture here. In the state of Maine the Ponobscott nation for example there is a concerted effort art to preserve the language that hasn't always been the case in fact it was encouraged for so long. Don't speak that language that's wrong but but now it's being preserved in it's fascinating because some of the names of places in Maine like a rootstock or Ponobscott camelback these are all native American words and there's one word for a particular place in the coastal region and and I can't remember which which one it was but the name literally means the place where we hunted sturgeon by torchlight. That's the definition of the word in so it's a snapshot. It's a picture picture right right back to a point in time that no longer exists and I love that and I'm so glad at least that's being preserved. We are going to bar harbor this weekend and there is they say in main the watanake people referred to an I do apologize. I'm going to apologize before even say it because there's no way that I can pronounce this correctly but they they called that area mony Scott Tick Mona Scott IQ which means the clam gathering place see there you go their language was so descriptive and it really is. It's a picture into the past yeah it absolutely absolutely is and I think it also creates an attachment to places when you understand what that kind of word means when you attach a meaning to a word <hes> I was just watching Yeah Ted talk not long ago about <hes> people in the Amazon who don't have words for left or right. They just have the directions that they use so no matter where they're at they will refer for two that being to the west of you or to the northeast of you now. It has made them inherently so good at directions that they can find their way anywhere and they could drive in Boston. Eh One of the few peoples that can it's just it's it's just a great example of how language can change who you are as a person absolutely no. It's wonderful. I love that that's very interesting mm-hmm so anyway. We got a little sidetracked there but it's okay it all ties together whole scrooge pulse Cochin. Oh I was just I was just informed that the I._P.. Tickets in San Francisco I they they went on sale. Half of the V._I._P.'s have already sold out yeah. That's exciting. It really is it's encouraging because we'd be so embarrassed humiliated really need to sell well. This is really did not talk to an empty room. Yeah that'd be great thank you you can get your tickets to the San Francisco. Show October Sixteenth Boston show October Twenty Seventh Charlotte North Carolina October Twenty Eighth Nashville Nashville Tennessee October thirtieth tickets on sale now Halloween tour and you can find links at the box dot com please deal that's to seeing you on Thursday and until then light proudly beautiful we know that the box oddities belongs to its feet is in your hands. The box of oddities commits to the telling of stories stories of strange the bizarre the unexpected we wish to offer our deeply filled gratitude and appreciation for your patronage the box dot com on facebook facebook at facebook dot com slash box of oddities podcast on twitter at box of oddities and Instagram at box of oddities podcast copyright twenty nineteen. All rights reserved search ready speaking to Iran eight. That's your Mandy Endeavor in. We're supercomputers. We're both supercomputers yeah. We're here to talk about your show fantastic getting. He's The D._J.. Fantastic he's a D._J.. For Band tastic mentioned fantastic is the greatest band tour in the universe and I also fantastic is an all new all age musical county podcast they deal for fans of adventure time star wars and Ricky Mooney. Yeah we're like friends well. Some friends were played instruments and travel to other planets and save the universe through music then yes yeah Chandler's getting married yeah done place off.

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Leif Pettersen - The First (Failed) Travel Food Show

This Week in Travel

51:46 min | Last month

Leif Pettersen - The First (Failed) Travel Food Show

"We'll come to this weekend travel. The show talks to some of the most interesting and notable travelers in the world. Learn about the top travel stories from the world travel get valuable travel tips and some thought process now your host. Gary aren't and gently. Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of this weekend travel. My name is gary. Aren't coming to you from sunny. Northeastern wisconsin with me again as usual. She is the co host with the most gen. Leo are we doing jen. I'm doing great gary. We are on a roll. Are we wear cranking these out. I know we're like we're like actually doing stuff. We've done more episodes in the last week than we had in the previous six months so we got that going for us with someone who's been on the show before he is the author of the brand new book. I fail to travel food show. But he's welcome back life pederson. How're you doing life. I'm great it is also sunny in downtown. Minneapolis where i am. So we have that in common. What's the temperature there no idea. I know it's going to reach mid fifties today though you usually get whether about a day before we do here because everything kind goes west so can always look to that as being a precursor so let's jump into things. Let's do a new new story and this week again not surprising. We got another covid related story. But this one is kind of at least sort of promising and forward-looking. Cnn had an article about the piano cruise line is going to start launching cruises to nowhere for vaccinated passengers. So basically they're just going to go to see and then come back tread water for a little while. But here's the weird thing. I think this has to be one of the ideal things for a cruise ship. I think they would prefer not to have ports of call. Almost don't don't you agree. Yeah because then you have to get up and walk around me. Why i mean they can keep people on the ship drinking and eating and buying bad art and jewelry and gambling. Don't forget about gambling. Gotta love those little mini casinos. I've often buffets twenty four hours a day. I mean why would you ever want to leave that ship. I've often said that. I think crew shits get back in the business of actual transportation. I don't know why they just don't do that like okay. We're going to go to new york. We'll drop everyone off and then we'll come back a week later or something. Gary didn't you say that you sort of saw that as a trend as a future trend coming up on one of our recent episodes. I think i heard you say that. Yeah i've been saying in a lot. And i think it's more of a wish than a trend. I think it makes economic sense for these companies to do that. And i think it's gonna make sense with starlink because if you can be productive on a ship in let's say it takes four days to go from new york to london and you can arrive. You know no jet lag with the meals. You're going to have a ship far better than an airplane. A cabin on a ship far better than even business class on an airplane. It's just a function of time at that point and not everyone's going want to take ship but i think some people would i would because i hate flying so yeah i think there would be a market for it but i'm also just pulling that data out of my butt you flying this formation. I think that's because the last. I guess it was about two years ago. Now when he was flying he stopped eating on flights altogether to help with his jetlag. I mean i can see that. But i don't have a fear of flying hours without eating. I just hate flying. I just i just hate it. Oh yeah i hate. Everyone hates it. Yeah exactly and if i could be on a cruise ship and the reason why most people you know couldn't take four days to go to europe is because they got jobs and everything but that's all our vacation four days per year but with all of the remote working that's happening. I think the idea of being able to work from anywhere including on a ship you had decent internet would open up that possibility whereas what's cruise internet like these days horrible but about to get awesome. Oh all right then. yeah. I've been talking about it on every episode of this we can travel but starlink which is the elon. Musk project they've they now. Have a constellation of over thousand satellites. They're launching somewhere between sixty to one. Hundred twenty. every month and people in rural areas are now able to get download speeds of like three hundred megabits a second. That's way better than i. Get in my condo downtown. Minneapolis exactly and they're going to be able to put these on on ships ships. No problem because it's a. It's a rather big dish but for ship it doesn't matter as well as airplanes and then suddenly you know because right now you're getting satellite from geosynchronous satellite it's slow it's expensive it's limited bandwidth but with startling low-earth orbit satellites and it's super fast and yeah. I think they're going to gobble this up once it's available and even if you have to pay extra it's probably gonna be cheaper than what they have now and way better and we're talking speeds where you could easily you know stream netflix. So are they going to make that consumer initial as someone that owns a converted van or whatever. Can they get that or is it more of a large-scale ship slash busts. No people people's houses there's ten over ten thousand people that have that are in the beta right. Now they're signing up for it a go just search for the starlink sub reddit or the starling facebook groups and there's people every day who are getting these dishes and like everyone has a life changing testimonial about how they had some crappy one megabit connection from some rural. Isp and you know it's so bad that the the isp's are really starting to lobby the fcc and congress to stop them because they're losing so much business and gary. Do they have an affiliate program. Because i feel like one or two more episodes and you could definitely qualify for our brand ambassador ship. They don't but if you on moscow's listening. I'm open to whatever that he might come up with he's on clubhouse you know sometimes he has some chats you can get on the stage and suggest it and i think in theory with where like my mom lives i could. She could get it because it's kind of a rural area. Yeah i mean. I i can spend a lot more time talking about it but it's a let's nine. Yeah we got better things to talk about like well. We one more second to the cruise thing. Because here's the. Here's the part that i'm excited about. It's not just piano. Royal is also planning a vaccinated passengers only cruz for its new ship. Odyssey of the seas and that is departing from israel in may to sail to the greek islands and cyprus. But check this out. Richard branson virgin voyages no doubt there is going to be a purple theme with mood. Lighting have have they launched that yet it says yet to be inaugurated cruise line. But they did mention it in the same article that we have linked. Yeah because while the american airlines no longer. But i think there's still a virgin era and the uk and australia. I think well they have announced that the voyages the virgin wages will only accommodate back seated passengers and crew. Yeah i think that's going to be their way kind of out of a lot of this is to get people who are vaccinated life. Did you get a vaccine yet. Yes My new day job is at a hospital and so i got my vaccine back in december and then The second one in january nice glamorous at all. But i got the vaccine early excellent. And you're not dead. You didn't have any blood clots or nothing else so far so good. In addition to a fancy new vaccine you also got a brand new book. The first male travel food show book. So why don't you tell us about. The first failed travel food show so this happened way back in nineteen ninety-three before there was a any travel. Food show is too. I did the best research. I could do you a full decade before any danes. No reservations kind of change. That every i mean. I know a cook's tour preceded that but it didn't have the same kind of impact as no reservations because like the next day. Every other channel tried to make their own travel food show so a decade before all that liveliness me and some other newbies went into landed in morocco and tried to make our own travel and food show. I was just an employee. I had nothing to do with creativity or production. I was a camera person. Pretty adept camera person at the time and they hired me out of out of my chair in london pub basically. While i was studying in london and two months later we were on site and morocco for people. That had never done anything like this before attempting to do it and you know the end product wasn't bad. It's just that. Broadcasters had no interest and therefore it just died so who is that hired you so Random folks in a london pub that i met drink karoki night because it was nineteen ninety-three that was croaky and the was a engaged to be married And they decided to pool their money. They both had some money. Saved up to try this project. They were both big fans or at least be the hosts the brain behind the whole thing. I guess he was an infatuated with michael palin surround the world in eighty days Which in a follow up in nineteen ninety-two called a pole to pole with michael palin and those were great shows and he thought you know he said okay this. This is obviously going to be big. What can i do. That's can be like it but a little different and he decided. Hey let's do. It's not about activities not about attractions do this about food and he Yeah he put that together. He got his childhood friend on the team. And then a chance encounter with me. I was the fourth member and two months later. We run another continent together. Trying to produce the pilot did they just was supposed to be like a syndicated show. Okay so one. One caveat. One of the reasons why i waited so long to right. It's is because it has happened so long ago. Twenty eight years now. And i just didn't trust my memory to rate an honest account but Oddly enough once. I started writing my brain. Fold sort of like you know on wrinkled. In all these memories came flooding back. So i don't recall. Exactly what's i i know. They shopped at around to european. Broadcasters only these these two folks were the british and french the the The guy was british and his fiancee. She was french. They were partners. Ostensibly but when you get into the book you'll get more into that dynamic and Yeah so. I don't think they ever pitched it to in the us markets and we didn't have much in the way. I don't believe there was a travel channel nine hundred ninety three anyway but yeah so my my my my process. I think they did in ten to be syndicated We were going to do a whole season. That was the original plan. We're in band. The roads six months and instead we filmed the pilot and returned to paris to edit it together and then The things never really Develop from there and that was that was the beginning. End of the first failed travel food. Show what sort of. So how did you just do the pilot. The one episode. Yeah in morocco morocco. Six weeks We we'd been prepping for a few months and you know this is nineteen ninety-three so we we read some books about how to make. Tv show there was very little in the way of like frame of reference. I mean we had palance shows but otherwise you know it wasn't like the internet today where you can just google it and get like youtube tutorials galore so we were sort of inventing the wheel as we went and Yeah it was. I don't want to give too much away. It is a short read so that you know even a little bit of detail is is going gonna give too much but yeah it was just four people that had apart from me and my camera experience. We had no experience whatsoever life. Tell me a little bit about so duke. Do you call this. John rao writing that you're doing man lit. I've never heard that term before. Can you define it maybe We'll literature like literature about men's adventures. Like but not. Like you know not like tim k. He'll type of thing but more just sort of like your style of writing is completely irrelevant. Irrelevant and light and kind of edgy. I hope you would say irreverence instead of irrelevant. But yes i did i wrote. I didn't mean to say reverend. Now the tone In the media stuff. I've known life along type so i could. I could make that blunder with without too much of his conscience. So but what. I what i will do is i will buy you a six pack of siders. The next time i see you been a longtime cider fans but no manley. Your tone is completely sad I can't say it ever. Its irreverent that one. But i checked it out on amazon because they give you that look inside and you get to peek inside the book even even in the books they let you pick inside which is fantastic. So is there any sex and nudity. None none at all Was i should remind you. There was a four person crew and one of the most female. That's twenty five percent. Okay but no. I mean you know it was nineteen ninety-three. I was much younger. Much stupider person you know We did a lot of stuff that i was not proud of that. I'm not proud of now. But i didn't know better back then. You know as hate to use the excuse but it was a different time. You those different ideas about was what was was was not politically correct and things like that. So i wouldn't have. I wouldn't describe us as ideal like travelers. That should be good examples of good travelers. We we drank too much a few times and and got into trouble. But i don't know if it's man. Let's necessarily they well. It's got that bro book. Kind of feel which i think is refreshing. Because there's not a there's not there's ton of it out there at least i don't know we don't have a lot of authors that that come from this sort of tone and i think it's i think it's cool. I think it's brave. I think it's so good it's you well. Yeah i i tried to be as honest and you know. And i'm i'm not. I don't shy away from my regrettable behavior as well. I mean the four of us we were. It was an interesting dynamic Both the personalities and also the time and the a developing country in the early nineties With did have a lonely planet was the first time i ever heard the words lonely planet in my life on that trip And little did. I know fifteen years later. It'd be lonely planet author again. We were you know we were just young people trying to do something and always not on our best behavior so i'm not sure if that qualifies as mandalit but also i've my whole shtick for most of my writing. Career is to take stuff not in this case but mainly as stuff that's been thoroughly researched and informative but present it in a humorous kind of light accessible way so that i keep the readers focus yes and i think i i mean even though i know you're older the style of writing which i appreciate is a good read for young men who are about to go off on their first big adventure because you do address some things about you know learning how to drive on on the other side of the in your land rover on the right side driver's seat stuff like that. Which if you haven't left your house in your town yet. Things like that are are sort of milestones to to your adult life on the road. Wouldn't you say being stopped by. The popo was formative for sure. You know and again it was back in the day where you just had to learn things through trial and error. There was no forums where you could learn like be careful of the popo morocco. if you Get in the way of politicians car for thirty seconds. He'll have the cops pull you over and try to find you because you know his time is very important and we're just some idiots that were in his way for a brief moment but yeah so there was lots of mistakes Very honest about that It again it's it's funny. But also i try to present it in a funny and informative way just sort of like we did this. It wasn't our proudest moments. But you know we weren't terrible people we were. We had good intentions but we accidentally Didn't we were we're accidental bad travellers on several occasions. What kind of food did you talk about all right. So this is the one thing that i'm already getting feedback about. Don't talk enough about food in this. It's about the show. And i think the title might suggest that it's more about food than it really is but Since it was a travel food show we were doing segments about food the main That the segment. that was anchoring. The whole pilot was gene. which is i don't know if it's moroccan or north african. but it's it's a kind of stu scott. It's it's wonderful. It's baked in a in an unusual clay. I don't want to call it. I don't even know how to describe it. it's got like a comical cone. It's kind of like a clay pot with a chimney. Thank you oh man. That's perfect so we did. That was the main thing but also we were in a c- Seaside and fishing town called essaouira so we did some stuff about Seafood as well. There was a lobster. seen Stuff like that but the taj was the the main star But you know i. I wasn't part of the whole foods. I was the camera guy was told where to point the camera and i did what i was told And so i. I didn't get that deep into the food and my notes from the time are very light on the food and as such. I wasn't able to really expand on the food when i wrote it now. Other than to mention you know a handful of dishes without any elaboration. I just want to say that all the signature is we. Love your berlet thanki bra. We're playing beer pong and like one of the guys is reading it and it's great. That sounds like a fun night. Some guy reading aloud. Well you play a big beer pong You know it's it's it's funny because the whole jonah of travel food at least with television has almost taken over all of travel. I'll be honest. I don't even pay attention to the travel channel anymore but for a while that was kind of like the majority of all the shows were food shows. Oh yeah it went from polar went from one end to the other for you couldn't find a show about attractions and activities for a while there. There weren't any there. Were just riding trying to catch the tail end of the no reservations wave and you know and i put this in the trailer. There's just all just overnight. There was so many food shows travel related food shows and some of them. Were you know modest like the die. Diners drive ins and dives whatever man versus food. I remember watching that and thinking this guy's gonna die young foods like that and you know and shows like that and It for a while there. I mean i'm trying to samantha brown. I think had a regular old normal food show or travel. Show are johnny jet. Did a pilot for a regular travel. Show that didn't involve food. They're hard to find if it wasn't food you couldn't find it. Well that in the food network just exploded and the travel channel kind of became sort of a has been and it's food that really you know exploded in popularity. I yeah. I don't know i mean. Obviously that was a it was a very popular genre at the time. But also i i think that just you know you can only do so much standing around in a kitchen on tv. Show before you sort of things. Get stale. And i think they they. They saw this as a way to you. Know make it bring nick food interesting again. I don't know yea. I heard an interesting theory that the reason why food has kind of ascended culturally. Is that with the internet. It fills a role that used to be had by music. That if you were on the cutting edge of music all. I got this import you know. It's the beatles hamburg sessions and they were very hard to find because music was attached to a physical object. So you had to get an album or cassette or something you know or if you had bootlegs or something like that and now the internet everyone has all music available at all times and so this sort of you know. Cultural snobbery has sort of shifted over to food. And that's one of the reasons why food has become so popular over the last ten twenty years kind of in all aspects. Because it's the one thing. You really can't digitize you can't download food yet but yeah i hadn't thought about it that way that's interesting but all i know. Is that ten years before it was a thing and like a really big deal We made a thing that nobody cared about. You know i might not have been the subject matter per. I did see a mostly final cut of the pilot but it didn't see a final final cut. Maybe maybe they had issue with our hosts or a. You know who knows why it was rejected. I just know that we made a thing. That was an wildly popular star making vehicle a decade later. So i actually that was going to be one of my next question is do you know if there's a copy of this floating around somewhere or not hunt down the people that you worked with and find it. I did hunt them. Down cyber stuck them quietly I didn't want to. I didn't reach out for a number of reasons But i have to assume that One or both of the producers have copy somewhere. I hope i mean that's got at the very least. It's a great party story. The you like profiles did not mention the program. Life can really quickly before we move onto the next section. Just mentioned a couple of your other books. Yes okay so. The first failed travel show is a very short e book. It's about a ninety minute. Read or to our read if you read slowly like i do But i do have two full length book projects. One of them is a travel memoir slash history slash Vampires situations called backpacking with dracula. While i was lonely planet author lived in romania for about a year and a half and with the every summer for seven summers to research. Lonely planet guidebooks. And i got very familiar with this guy. Vlad the impaler From you know well he was born in. Transylvania was the ruler of will which is just south of that which is in modern day romania. And there's a lot of surviving stuff around with vlad the impaler name or or you know some something. He did probably he murdered some people. You know that there's a lot of surviving sites. So i wrote about him in historical And it's a deep dive. But also as we all know centuries after his death Brahms stoker was inspired by this guy. and his exploits to name his blood swilling vampire after him. So it's part memoir part travelogue and part history. Deep dive about vlad the impaler But also i mean. I go into great depth about being a little plan author and romania Pre european union membership and and the unique challenges that presented. The second book is not travel book. It's called Throwing up notes from thirty five years of juggling. And for those of you who have who don't know me or have never heard of me. I have been juggler. Since i was a little kid. It is a big part of my identity. And so i just wrote a memoir Myself a deep dive into the world of elite chuckling so those are my two bucks. Find them on amazon. I actually Kind of became obsessed for a very short period of time about i forget his name. But he's like the greatest juggler in the world. Anthony auto. yes that's him and like all the records he said and there's pictures of him like setting these videos of him setting all these records and it's crazy like he's like it's not like he's like really challenged like barely it's he makes it look effortless and that is the worst part of it all. I'm going to break the world record for juggling balls today and he just does it. Mind blowing yeah. Greatest living juggler maybe greatest juggler of all time. He trying to figure. I read it but there was this long article on him and he basically used the greatest juggler he worked for cirque du soleil. I think free and then he quit and now he has like a black topping service or something for houses and business. It's has to do with cements anyway. Yeah he He retired at the age of forty of the article. You're thinking of is called dropped and it was on grants land grantland. Yeah that's probably that's sports related. It's a very it's like six thousand five hundred words like half the length of my epoch almost and so it's a very long exhaustive article that you think okay. This is really over the top for an article about a juggler but it is fascinating even for non jugglers. It's i. I read it several times as part of a research for my book because this guy who wrote it isn't even a juggler. I mean he he just wrote it he walked in to the to that arena blind and wrote this fantastic article and and encapsulated juggling and anthony gatto so well so i strongly recommend going out in the articles called dropped and again it was on grantland written by jason pavone in addition to being a juggler. Are you also a juggle. Oh which are fans of the okay. Those are the fans. Saint clown posse time so make this quick but in the in nineteen eighty two right after learn how to juggle a juggling prop maker That had invented some new balls called juggle ohs Here in minnesota needed a small child. That knew how to juggle to be on the cover of the package. And i was the only child juggler in minnesota at the time and so I guess i kind of peaked kinda early but my my young face on the cover of these juggling balls gigolos really cool. Yeah so for a minute. When i was twelve before there were juggle owes. I was the juggle all right. So let's move on to our destination this week. Life is from minnesota. I've spent a good chunk of my life in minnesota. So let's give some recommendations for the state of minnesota and we won't just limit it to the twin cities. I'll go first. Minnesota is kind of like three different states as far as like the terrain. The southern part of the state is prairie. That's the great plains. The top part of the state is all coniferous forest. That's the lakes what you might think of as minnesota tons of lakes pine trees and then there's this middle section which is like deciduous forest which is like this strip. That goes through it. So it's really you can really have a completely different experience depending on what part of the state you're in but my favorite part in this is where i always recommend. People go is the north shore of lake superior and a lot of people. Don't think to visit there. But it's one of the most beautiful and scenic parts of the united states. Basically you got to drive up to duluth. I think duluth is about four hours from minneapolis. If you were to fly in there and duluth is kind of at the very point of lake superior and then from there you can basically kind of drive up to eight hours to get to thunder bay ontario. Which is just over. The border and the other thing is in the town of grand portage which is again very close to the canadian border. That's the stopping off point. Four isle royale national park. Technically isle royale is in michigan. Just because of the way they did the mapping but it's actually closer to minnesota and it's the least visited national park in the continental united states mainly because it's it's an island it's closed during the winter but that would be my recommendation definitely go to the north shore life. What do you suggest people do in minnesota so i am woefully Poorly traveled In minnesota i've never the boundary waters. Which is one of the most famous outdoorsy destinations in minnesota. I've never been there It's it's on my list. It's on my bucket list belatedly but you know i'm i'm fifty years old and i've never been there. I have spent a lot of time in duluth and that area of the north shore of gary. I think you and i have different driving styles. Because i can get from minneapolis to duluth in about two and a half hours really. Well i know one time i did it. That fast i suppose is closer to three hours. But you're right from minneapolis to hudson not hudson. What's it called the in ontario. That's an eight hour day thunder bay. thank you. that's an eight hour drive. I've been thunder bay. It's you know it's quaint but said yes. So since you took up the entire northern minnesota there which Just an are going to have the rest of it. Well you forgot to mention one of the things. Worse mildly famous for is is the northern That little wedge of northern minnesota that is north west angle united states. Yes i've been there. I haven't been there he You know much like minnesota but yes. You have to go through canada to get there. It's a very bizarre. You do an episode about that on your new podcast. Gary i kinda did. I did one about the. Us canadian border If you ever get the chance so years ago this must have been close to twenty years ago. I just took off one weekend. And i drove up to the northwest angle. I literally just went to see what that was all about. Yeah so i just got in a car. And i drove up there and sold. It was like and i would recommend it sometime. If you're ever bored just getting a car and go and check it out. Probably not in the winter. But it's i don't think you could even do it right now. Because of the whole porter restrictions. No you can't i mean they for this winter and i guess it was a special winter because they i've never heard of it before but they had an ice road that connected minnesota to the northwest angle This year it just Thoughts you can't do it anymore. So it sounds like for a brief moment there. You could get there without going through canada but yes right now. I don't think it's even possible or or or dirty diseased. Americans allowed in canada yet. I don't think so. Okay so don't go there not yet so since you And i don't know enough about northern minnesota anyway. I'm gonna talking about the twin cities which Having visited fifty seven countries and hundreds and hundreds of cities is one of my favorite places in the world. It's it's it's like what you described very green like the the one thing described to people how it stands out is when you fly into most metropolitan areas. It's just rooftops just like urban rooftops when you fly into the twin cities. It's just green this canopy because they there's so many trees even in like you know urban urban parts of the city and you're like wow my flying into my flying into but underneath that canopy of trees is a whole city and it's kind of like what minnesota's like there's water and green everywhere and that's what kind of sets the twin cities apart there's I forget how. Many lakes are within the metropolitan area alone but a lot The mississippi river. Lots of creeks there a A circuit around the twin cities area called the grand rounds It's i think it's fifty one miles in and it's just like this green sort of corridor that it's it goes around the the metropolitan area Using you know parkways and them sippy river lavar ends the chain of lakes which is chain of four or five lakes I really wow. I need to cannery familiarize myself. Because i haven't left downtown. Minneapolis in a very long time. i was saying before we recorded. I actually went to south minneapolis last week. It was a big deal So the what's what makes the twin cities so fun for for me is just all this like greenery. You don't have to go very far. Every minneapolis resident lives six blocks or less from a park in parks or just everywhere. And that's by urban design and Also it's reportable. It's very affordable. Which is why i chose to resettle here as a destitute travel writer because i could actually afford to live here life. I was I have. I have not been to minnesota but all you guys need to say is lakes and that is really exciting to me but guess what i was looking up mall of america dot com to bring in that family travel angle and it it. It crashed the website crashed my computer. I i don't. I don't even have an old computer. But i was trying to load the mall of america site and you just I i have to turn off my computer right now. Thankfully for the recording. One i don't know mall of america dot com. But i just. I wanted to see. I wanted to see if they were open for kobe. Can you just tell us. Oh no no don't do it. I can't even. I can't even shut down my computer enter open. They've they shut down for quite some time. And then have been you know slowly reopening I think there's still a lot of hesitancy to go out there. But it's i mean. I'm i'm not going to encourage people to cluster around endorse together but it is an enormous site. It's basically like being outside. It's an enormous sites So i don't think that you know. As far as indoor you know attractions go during a pandemic. It's probably one of your safer indoor attractions You know like Maybe like i. I guess i could compare it to a like a football stadium at you know. Quarter one quarter capacity. So there's i. I wouldn't feel nervous about going out there but Yeah they've they've been slow to reopen suffering. I think they defaulted on their mortgage for a coupla months. There there they've been struggling out there But it is open to some degree right now. that's good. I'm glad it's open right before. I closed down the site. I did see that there was like a a spring break Article about what you could do there. I don't know if they're hotels are open. But you know my heart definitely goes out to all the businesses and the small businesses. And i didn't even think about what could happen to giant mall because we have both things happening we have an outdoor mall is thriving a westfield outdoor mall in la hoya. That will at least every time. I show up it's thriving. There's plenty of people there And then we have a local mall over here in carlsbad that is just bare bones. Like it's open. People are going but there so many shops that have closed inside. So i didn't know what was going on for mall of america. Well i just googled and the The radisson blu out there is definitely open and it looks like the j w marriott is open as well. Those are the two hotels physically connected to the mall. In bloomington minnesota where mall of america lives. has the highest concentration of hotels in the whole state. obviously So if if some hotels are close There's certainly enough open for for people to go out there. if if that's the type of vacation they wanna take during a pandemic. I'm not gonna. I'm not gonna encourage it but i won't discourage it either. Well we're we're talking about destinations in general not necessarily that. They have to go this minute. We just kind of you know when we talked to against we talk about we wanna tap into a little bit about what they might be familiar with from a town perspective or a city perspective region. Even though i haven't been there are listeners. Know i love traveling through my stomach and so i was super excited to see that. Twin cities is on eater dot com. Oh yeah yeah. Oh my gosh. There are amazing. Amazing restaurants in minneapolis. And i would have never known at. I'm not looked at this. I forget what the i forget. The exact phrasing very famous food writer referred to the twin cities Like a not an experimental. But it's it's it's a food like testing ground or proving ground that's a. I'm not explaining this very well. It is a surprising. Foodi destination here Particularly since in the eighties and the nineties. It wasn't really that great place to eat. It has gone like the exact opposite direction now. it's fantastic. It's amazing it does look amazing. And here's i'm gonna so for our listeners. You can go to twin cities. Dot eater dot com. You can see all the typical hipster modern foodie type restaurants. But i was really drawn to this article. And maybe you guys know something about it. there are twenty two restaurants serving divine fish baskets. They have fish fry. Fish fry fridays and they have a whole article on twenty two different restaurants devoted to fish and chips. Yeah i i love that. I love that kind of weird weird staff. But what about no lows kitchen and bar. This has sort of stood out to me on a couple of different websites. Either of you been there. No nope okay. Well it made the list of the third on the thirty eight twin city restaurants that capture the taste of the city's Nineteen another list of nineteen solid. Take our options but it was also on the fish. Friday lists to i mean name name cuisine and someone is doing it and again. It's a lot of People just ten and doing new and weird stuff. Some of them are people that are just breaking into the industry and some of them are very famous established chefs. That wanna do you know their little passion project or their or their eccentric. You know test out their eccentric idea in the do it here now. Here's something that i wouldn't have expected. There are twenty one winter. patios open in minneapolis. Saint paul area so talking about kobe. Traveling and people. Are you know safer and more comfortable dining outside. I wouldn't have expected winter patios in this. Now whoever is selling those those giant like tree like heater outdoor thing is. I don't i don't know what they're called. That person is rich Here in the twin cities because Every every patio has them we we. Despite being minnesota we have a very robust patio culture and it goes I would say ten months a year so those heaters get a lot of us. One of the other interesting things i noticed about the twin cities is that once it hits a certain temperature. I'd say maybe fifty sixty degrees. There's just an explosion of people outside. Oh it goes from nothing to everyone and like there's just one day like it to your first sunny day of spring or whatever and like all the parks and everything are just full and suddenly there are tables and chairs outside of restaurants and it just kind of one day just happens just like all the leaves bloom well and minnesotans are famous for. Are we this. After months of the teens and maybe below zero as soon as they hit like forty five forty eight degrees people are suddenly outside and their shorts famous for this because coming comparatively it's really warm out and that's when the shorts come out even though sane people in any other destination wouldn't dream of wearing shorts in that whether we some of us do that all right. Well let's move on. Let's quickly do you have a pick for us this week. I do and this a little bit funny for me We were talking about the cruises that don't go anywhere but they you can just write on him while i just found out that jet blue has these new suites called mint. Have you guys heard about these yet. Oh they are like little pods where you have your own section. So it's not just a not just a first class seat but you have like there's walls and it's kind of container and my husband was actually the first person to tell me about these. You have your very own. i'll land But when i saw these. When i saw the pictures of these. I thought that's it. I'm gonna get on a jetblue plane and go cross country and just get a return flight and i don't even need to get out on the other end and go anywhere. I just wanna be by myself in ride in one of these pods. Which is you know. Many parts ridiculous. They are calling it your own apart. Mint so it has anyway. You have to see him. You get your. It's a front row romance studio with A large the largest bed and twenty two inch. tv amir vanity. I don't need storage in a guest seat and a table for working. It's to meet someone on the flight. I mean i don't know this kind of brings the mile high club to a whole new level. I i have a feeling so the walls don't go all the way up so they go just a little bit too like they kind of go to shoulder level. So you've got your and i. Did we lose gen Yeah sounds like it all right well. Then let's i'm looking at pictures of what she's talking about if you go jet blue and look at their mint thing There's a video and photos. It does look. I don't see anything about prices though. Any who interesting interesting idea i. Do you got any sort of pick for us this week. I don't know if i have a pick. But i have a a current fascination with van life thing which even just a few years ago i took one look at it and thought it was ghastly and thought there's no way and i don't know how i came upon this but i stumbled upon one van light video that i watched any youtube and of course now for months now youtube just wants to serve those up to me and it's doesn't look that bad like they've made huge progress in just a few years. Almost i mean it's still looks hard but doesn't look horrible and it's making me think i mean if i'm going to do a vacation here again During while we're suffering with pandemic stuff kind of thinking about renting one of those vans just to give it a try. Yeah i was. I was thinking of a kind of doing something similar. Because i'm doing so much podcasting right now. I could just have a microphone and do it in a van and kind of just go around that way. I've done the backpacking thing. So this'll be something a little bit different right. And then you can get that satellite. Three hundred megabits internet service in you just business as usual except for you in a van absolutely in an eighty inch tv. Let's take the entire back wall. The van i mean. That's i mean. Obviously i became addicted to fortnight during a pandemic lockdown and i would have to bring the fortnight with me if i were to hit the road on a long-term basis. Obviously i saw one. They didn't have a tv. They had a projector which i thought was kind of clever. They just have like this white cloth screen that they drop down and it looked like just looked a lot less cumbersome than having a proper giant. Tv just they had this projector. I don't know what the what the quality is like that. I thought that was interesting. I used to have a projection tv. And i gotta say the flat panel tvs of. Today are just so much superior in terms of image quality that i don't think i would ever go back to it. All right i know you know and one of the things. That van lifers talk about most is security You know. I guess it's very it's there's a lot of anxiety leaving your home on wheels for any length of time It's seems more vulnerable than leaving your your regular home. But yeah i'm not sure would want like a big flashy. Tv in my van. I'd have to think about no. I was just kidding. I actually wouldn't have massive. Okay i would. I watch a lot of tv. Gary so that some somehow i need my net flicks so my pick this week and we've talked about it. A little bit on. The previous episode is a clubhouse which is kind of a sort of audio social media app. So basically you can host or take part in these live chat rooms where people talk and there's some some decent travel content. I started a club. You can join if you just. If you're on it you search for extraordinary travelers and you can join and a couple of times a week will host these rooms it the thing is you gotta be on live while it's taking place so it's not a recorded thing so it has to take place and you can have guests and swap people out in the amazing thing is because you're actually hearing real people. The level of discourse is so much better than what you see unlike twitter or places where people can be anonymous where people seem to have no problem just being horrible humans when they can hide behind in an empty. Then what you can do. If you can actually hear someone's voice and see their face so yeah check it out. And it's only works for iphone right now. It's kind of huge limitation. There isn't even a web version not even an android version. But if you do have an iphone definitely check it out and you have to. Actually i think still be invited by someone but it just keeps growing everyone tons of invites and if you go to my facebook group and you just need an invite. Just ask for one and i invite you. Yeah it was just going there on my browser just as you were saying it was only for iphones. I realized i couldn't All right well. I'm an android guy so i'll have to wait. Yeah all right well. Let's wrap things up life. Where can people find you online. Pederson dot com. Which is a. It's not easy to spell l. e. f. p. e. r. s. e. n. dot com the fame on twitter. And i'm pederson life on instagram. But also go onto. Amazon and either search for backpacking with dracula or the i failed travel food show or throwing up. Maybe not just throwing up throwing up for thirty five years of juggling and yeah please please support me. I i have an entry level job at a hospital. Right now also helps and i should. The i failed. Travel food show is available on kindle unlimited as well so you can't if you're if you're subscribe to that you can read it for free and it's about a ninety minute read or two hours if you're like me but it's a it's a one sitting read in in theory so basically one trip to duluth. Yeah if you're in the car with me for sure. I think the reason. I realized why said four hours. Because i'd always stop and hinckley. Oh yeah and it wouldn't fact end up close to four hours but obsessed with making good time. This is like it's in our genes so just stop on the gas and don't let up until you're in in the city. We lost gen. But i think she can hear us. And you can find all the usual places you can find out where to follow her in the show notes and as usual. You can always follow me over at the everything everywhere daily. Podcast wherever you find podcasts. Putting a show up every single day so they're always be something for you. I listened to almost every day gary. It's it's fantastic. Thank you very much. I appreciate it. They're like to rados. I'll keep making more are. What's the eat one guests. Listen to one anyway anyways until next time. Stay tuned for another episode of this week and travel. Thank you for listening. You enjoyed the show. Please subscribe and leave a review wherever you get your podcast.

minnesota morocco gary duluth michael palin london Minneapolis america Gary minneapolis John rao tim k romania stu scott pederson johnny jet new york
How To Talk To Your Kids About Consent (with Amber Rollo)

Good Kids: How Not to Raise an A**hole

19:43 min | 1 year ago

How To Talk To Your Kids About Consent (with Amber Rollo)

"The following episode of kids contains language. We love but that might not be suitable for tiny ears. Lemon Adam media has a new podcast to check out it's called mouthpiece with Michael Bennett and Palin it Michael Bennett is currently a defensive Lineman for the Dallas cowboys that's correct. Lemonade has signed a current pro football player and his wonderful wife. PAY TO CO host. Our next podcast. Why because Michael Palin are incredible voices of our time and our about so much more than football? They're activists they're hilarious there so raw and real unfiltered about race family politics sports culture religion. The Mufti's trailer is out now. So check it out today. Subscribe to mouthpiece with Michael and Palay Bennett wherever you listen to podcasts. Hi I'm Amber Rallo and you're listening to good kids. How not to raise an asshole? I grew up in a little bit of a different household. My mother died when I was eleven. And my father died when I was sixteen and then I moved into my aunt and uncle's house and all three of them had very different ways of parenting and then there was a lot of parenting myself because of that situation. Let's see when my parents were alive. When I was a young child? They were out of the house a lot. They both worked. My Dad was a firefighter. Firefighter paramedic and my mom was a real estate broker very successful real estate broker and they were just not there a lot of the time so even before they passed away we were sort of me and my sisters were Latchkey kids. We were just on our own all the time. We were fending for ourselves figuring out what we're going to eat. I ate a lot of the marshmallows from lucky charms. Most of my Diet my sisters and I taught each other. You know how to tire shoes. How to make a peanut butter and Jelly Sandwich? My I anti teach me how to balance a checkbook. That was something that she taught me and I have never used since then I do feel like I was self sustaining a very young age. I knew how to take care of myself. I knew when I was feeling sad how to work my way through that I had to learn at a very young age how to talk to myself and soothe myself. Give myself a hug because there wasn't someone there that sounds when I was going through through it I had severe depression and suicidal idealization. And I think that's something that we do need to not push under the rug. Children are having thoughts of suicide. And it's something we need to talk to them about openly and I would say any kid that's going through that the deal that I have made with myself that I made myself when I was very young and have kept going forward is I can totally take my own life. I can't take that off the table but I have to try everything else first so it feels oftentimes like taking my own. Life is the only way to escape a situation but when I remind myself I have to try everything else first. There are so many other options. I can move to a new school. You can talk to your the parents about doing that like if you're dealing with bullying situation and you can cut off all your hair. You can get a new group of friends. You can start a new sport you can in my case like moved of two new country. Quit your job get other relationship. You're N Whatever it is before trying that and you'll be surprised by just how changing other do things changes your life and your perspective and you can start having fun? I Journal every day and at the end of it I always write. A little sentence is to myself as though I'm speaking to my child self with like you're doing a really great job I love you. I'm really proud of you and I think that's a real skill that I picked up when I was young being able to talk to myself nicely. Not a lot of people do that. It's really hard. It takes a real concentration in order to talk to yourself nicely or get yourself out of that negative talk because your brain is wired to focus on all the negatives so it takes practice this to be nice to yourself. I know that I was a shy kid. I I was super shy because I had four sisters and were like a very loud Italian family and so was valued to be quiet. It and I knew that I wanted to break out of that so I signed up for theatre and I was like. I'm I WANNA be in theater and I got myself on stage and that's how I started performing so it's little things like that that I'm really look back on my childhood. Soften yeah well. Those are impressive thoughtful idea and nobody told me to do that. But me I was twelve at that was when I was trying to figure out where to find my place and my people and actually in that theater class. I found another girl same age whose mom passed away from breast. Cancer are the same weekend that my mom did and we were very different girls. I was like a tomboy and like raggedy like didn't shower often enough uh-huh and she was a girly girl who wore high ponytails and had like three girls together like Allie Brittany and Nikki. They all is at the end of their names. And I am amber but we would never hang out together but because of this thing that we have gone through your like automatically the biggest thieves because we've gone through a similar situation that nobody else seemed to really understand and she taught me on. I put my hair and high punish L.. So that's cool. I loved performing Middle School but I will say that my second performance I was doing chorus line and I was told that I said my monologue too fast so I tried to slow it down on the second time. We were reforming. I completely Louis blanked and I was sitting there for good two three minutes. Not Saying anything thing before I picked it back up again and of course my family and was like we didn't notice like nobody knew and I know that they knew and I messed up really big so I think I think after that I continued performing to sort of prove that I could I was minor in theatre in college and when I got to New York I was. I was just going to comedy shows all the time and a really loved it and I hadn't really I didn't really realize it was an art form until then like I did not know even though it's so funny. I was listening when I was a kid to Julia. Sweeney's God said Haw over and over and over again but I didn't even think about that as a possibility for something I could do with my life I was just like Oh this is really great. She is also definitely my inspiration for talking about hard topics on stage. It just gave me so much joy when I was a kid to have someone sort of understand what I was going through and talk about it and make eight people laugh. And that's the way my family deals with hardships is to laugh. I mean when my dad passed away I was sixteen and I did like a eulogy of him. It was essentially a roast of my father. I have always found myself connecting with people who've had similar experiences to me and I think my favorite great thing on stages when I talked about being an orphan or I talked about being a survivor talked about being an addict someone comes up to me afterwards and was like I'm so happy I got the chance to laugh about that. Like the Great Chris. Rock said the three ladies in my life. My wife and two daughters need food water. Compliments and the occasional pair of shoes. If you were the ladies in your life need an occasional shoes. It's time to check out Rossi's I agree. Iraqis makes my new favorite shoes. I'm living in their Chelsea. Booties in Plum Malaj. They're gorgeous they're stylish. They're comfortable they go with everything from Yoga Pants to dresses and skirts. SCART Rossi's make stylish shoes for women and girls out of recycled plastic water bottles. What and the shoes come? In an incredible ever changing array of colors prints and patterns. They're available in a range of styles like sneakers loafers. Points more in the words of biggie. Smalls if you didn't know Naina you'll quickly discover what buzzfeed called rockies there forever shoes they come with free shipping and and free returns and exchanges. No risk no worries no reason not to try so check out all the amazing styles available right now at Rossi's dot com slash. Good kids go to R. Our own T. H. Y. S. dot com slash. Good kids to get your new favourite pair. That's Rossi's dot com slash. Good kids today. Okay one more podcast. y'All should listen to. I truly love its name. It's called food. We need to talk. Love it it's a new podcast that will help you learn how to eat better and feel better about it out now food. We need to talk. Covers every every question around healthy eating including what the hell are we supposed to eat. How can I become a fat-burning machine stress and your waistline and food? As an addictive addictive drug new episodes are now available on Mondays. Listen and subscribe to food. We need to talk on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts as a comedian something that is the most fun for me is connecting with the audience and having that mpn being able to understand my own experience and how it might relate to their experience. That's the most valuable skill that I have And being able to teach kids that is cool L. and they'll be able to be cool and funny like me my personal because I don't feel like I can experience and the world through anyone's shoes but my own. I've tried a lot of times to like. Do those more like the world is like this this jokes but I can't. It's not my style. I feel insincere when I do it and then I don't get laughs when I'm insincere one of the things that was hardest for me growing up was creating boundaries and saying no because I didn't didn't grow up with my parents I feel like I felt a little unsure of my security and that made me into a little bit of people pleaser. I just always want people to like me so that I can feel secure and taking care of so saying no and like standing up for what I believe in is something. I've had to teach myself at something I've had to really think about and put into place and that connects with this thing. That happened Oh my gosh. It's like two months ago now which it doesn't feel like it feels like yesterday but I was at this variety comedy show in the lower east side in New York at this place called downtime bar you're and it was a it was a one off show they're put on by this group called actors our actors our is supposed to be a group that creates art worked for artists so they put on like salons and shows and the audience is supposed to be made up of artists themselves. Maybe like other people in the industry maybe producers and also my friend Kelly performing on this show so I came. I was excited to be part of this community and when I got there talked to this actor though sitting next to me introduced myself and I was like hey have you been to one of these shows before and he said well yes crazy thing. Last time was up this show Harvey Weinstein showed up and I was like what okay. Okay like I had to figure out what to do with that in my head I was thinking so only different things I was like. I gotTa talk to the producer about this and figure out if this is a normal thing like I need to talk to Kelly about it but I don't WanNa talk to her about it before her set because I don't want to upset her through her off she's trying to get a new tape What am I going to do? I'm glad that he's not here right now. And then Kelly came in and she was talking to me. She looked over my shoulder and she was like is that Harvey Weinstein and I knew it was right away because of what this doctor told me. My heart was in my stomach. I felt very protective Kelly. You know I have four sisters I have a mama bear instinct and I know that she's a survivor as well so we started figuring out what she was GonNa do. We were talking you know. Should she just do her set as it is so that she can get the tape that she wants. Should she call out. Call attention to what was happening and I was like. Yeah I mean it is a comedian job to call the room but also it's not your job as survivor to make this a safe space. So she decided to perform. She decided to call him out and she was booed and told to shut up. She got up stage. We like sort sort of huddled in the corner like half watching half aware of the other performances that were going on then. We're going to leave at intermission and I was GONNA call him out. I was GONNA say something. I had to say something because we pass table on the way out and right when I was about to go up to his table we got into a conversation. She went to producer. What the Hell did you invite? Harvey Weinstein to the show. Is this right. Are you going to kick him out. Shouldn't somebody address what's going on here. I want up to Harvey Weinstein's table. I said you shouldn't be here. This is not your space one hundred percent. This is not your space. This is supposed to be a space for US US and I. I don't remember exactly everything I said because I was a little bit disassociating Because I was scared and tencent overwhelmed. And he had like some people with him at his table yet. A few women and he had some men with them and the men One of the men called me the c Word Food and then the woman that was at his table stood up and She put her hand on my back and I was like you should probably leave and Kelly was right behind all right man so she took us both out and then I wrote about it on twitter the next day and and it went viral. It felt like had reinvigorated. The metoo movement restarted. The conversation like what's what's really going on here and I've been thinking about this and I'm like what can we do. How do we move forward and our society? How do we come to a point in our society where sexual assault is not the norm where a person is not assaulted every seventy three seconds? How do we do that? I think that the area where we could make the most impact is sex education and sexual assault education. I know that there are some mm states that are making moves and and doing that and I think it could be done even more. I don't know what it's like with parents who are involved. I don't know what sort of the conversations they're having with their children but I think someone needs to have a conversation with a kid say you know what if anyone touches you in this way. That's inappropriate it and also don't touch anyone else like everyone else's body is there's so if that is planted a little bit earlier maybe this wouldn't be such a prevalent and something that I've seen that I I think could be talked about between parents and their kids is hugs. Just it's it's a simple way to get into. The conversation of consent is talking about hugs so encouraging them to be able to say no if they don't want to hug someone no matter what no matter what reason they just might be feeling block. They might think that they smell. They might be mad at that person. At that moment. I think it gets really important to have a conversation with them to be like. Hey if you don't want to give someone a hug you absolutely don't have to and nine you can parlay that into your body is yours and the same way. Everyone else's body is there's so like your freedom extends only as far as it runs into someone else's. I don't know if you've ever watched that video. It's like a little cartoon stick figure video of like do you want T- if you're still struggling with consent just imagine instead of initiating sex. You're making them a cup of tea. It explains consent so well. It's like if you can understand if a person wants a cup of tea you can understand if they want to sleep with you if you say. Would you like a cup of tea. No You know I'm not really sure Then you could make them a cup of tea or not but be aware they might not drink it and if they don't drink it then and this is stay important part. Don't make them drink it just because you made it doesn't mean you are entitled to watch them drink and if they say no thank you then don't make them to you at all. Just don't make them. I don't give an unconscious person and a cup of tea even if they asked for a cup of tea when they were awake not wrecked. Yeah they might say yes please. That's kind of you and then when the T- arrives they actually don't want the T at all sure that's kind of annoying as you gone all all the effort of making the tea but they remain under no obligation to drink the tea and if you want to know more about sexual assaults education or you want to look into stories or sharing your story. I Really Love Rain R. A. I N. Rape Abuse and Suss National Network. They do amazing work in sexual education. I liked the Milwaukee. If you WANNA see where I'm joking you can come. I'm to my website Amarillo. Dot Com A. M. B. E. R. R. O. L. L. O. DOT COM or. Follow me on social media at Amber Season Cat Rallo R. O. L. L. O.. Good kids is a production of lemonade. The media it's produced and edited by Andrew. Stephen our executive producer is Stephanie. WHITTLES WAX enter. Music is by Dan. Molad ad sales and distribution by Westwood. One you can find out more about lemonade online at lemonade media. If you liked what you heard share rate review say great things about us.

Harvey Weinstein Kelly Rossi producer New York Michael Palin football Lemonade Amber Rallo Michael Bennett Dallas cowboys Michael Amarillo assault Milwaukee I Journal US Palay Bennett
This Is Your Brain On Cheesecake

Food, We Need To Talk

22:31 min | 1 year ago

This Is Your Brain On Cheesecake

"Hi thanks for listening to food. We need to talk and things also to our sponsor third love third. Love is of course known for their comfy bras but it doesn't stop op there. Not only can they fit bras to your individual body type. They also have a wide range of matching underwear and get cotton lounge sets that you might also like thirdlove knows. There's a perfect bra for everyone. So right now. They're offering our listeners. Fifteen percents off their first order go to third love dot com slash food now to to find your perfect fitting Bra. That's third love dot com slash food for fifteen percent off your first purchase and by Num Num is the Habit Abbott Change Program that uses psychology to help you figure out why you make the decisions you make and empowers you to replace your bad habits with better ones right now. You can go to NEUM DOT COM. I'm slash food to start your trial. What you have to lose? That's neum and am dot com slash food produced by the island. WB WAR BOSTON. We rolling guys. Yesterday today opened a pack of eminent peanuts and it said a pack. It was three servings. It was like small enough that I could eat the whole thing. You sit on the ice cream. Have they've corrected for the size of servings they used to say like it was a quarter cup for serving. No what did he say now now they realize that people like two thirds of a cup. So we're running late so let's go. I heard that all right go. Okay so I I just WanNa talk about this. Blondie from Applebee's that me and my sister have been bellinger. The Old David yourself all right so I WANNA start off describing to you something that I think about. Ever since since I was probably eleven I think was the first time I got your brought out this skillet and you hear the sound. I and it's like six because something is on on it. What can it be you ask yourself? Is it FAJITA. VEGGIES is it a case of DEA. No it's a live total blonde. Cake and honest blonde. Blonde cake are some toasted Pecans and on the pecans is some cold ice cream and then next to it is a little boat of this maple cream cheese glaze. I don't even know what to call it. And then you pour that over and like the ice cream is dripping down but as it hits the skillet ghosts because skill is still super. She could do the commercials for them. I cannot forget the Experience of eating this bloodied so it just sounds like this blonde. The has made an impact on your brain. Yes it has so once again. I'm just Seeing food we need to talk. That's also the name of this podcast. I'm Dr Eddie Phillips Java. And today we're talking about food addiction or for this is your brain on cheesecake more accurately. How food at similarly to drug? which is something? I think we've all experienced. I mean clean for me. It's been the blondie but I mean it's been a million other foods like potato chips where you open the bag and then you eat a chip and then you blink and then everything is is gone like you're surrounded by the Crohn's and a pile of regrets it's interesting which ones bigger depends on how much you ate Eddie. Is there anything that you'd think of when I say food acted so get me a nice bowl of coffee ice cream and it's got to have nuts and little piece of chocolate chips are fine. It takes me back to you know before I got to medical school and I thought that the four basic food groups were crunchy chewy chocolate Clinton alcohol. So maybe like a little Qaluwa to that and some fudge and you really have the kind of thing that that makes my mouth water. Well at least a lot of things you mentioned mentioned like the nets and the coffee and stuff are real food because Michael Pollen the super famous and well published author argues. I use that a larva stuff. We eat today especially by the supermarket isn't even real food. Most people assume everything in the supermarket is food. But I'm making the case that it's is not that there are a lot of things that we should call edible food like substances these are very novel creations of food science that Look like food but aren't really food. I don't think a twinkie really should be dignified with the word Food A soda dignified with the Word Food. And it's not that these foods are just Mr devoid of nutrients so like obviously that. blondie probably doesn't have that many beneficial vitamins and minerals but Michael Pollen says it's at these foods are literally designed to to be addictive like that. BLONDIE has been created to be addictive. Well UH processed food has been engineered specifically to press our evolutionary buttons so for instance the combination of salt fat and sugar in the same food. That doesn't happen that often in nature when it happens we just can't stop eating and so it's designed to be addictive. They use terms in the industry like crave ability. They're manipulating us to eat. More than we should So interesting the words we keep on hearing. I love this like the tick. Shin the crave ability and it really makes it sound like something really really evil about the food industry and I guess I'm getting on my little soapbox here because they say that were all about a nanny state. We're supposed supposed to restrict people from eating the things they want to eat. But you know what. Maybe it's the food industry that's really setting us up for failure. They're pushing our evolutionary buttons. Just like Michael Pollen talks about. That's why I thought I would talk to an expert on substance abuse which we usually think of as drugs of abuse cocaine by someone who who also focuses on obesity. Yeah my name is Paul Kenny. I'm to Ward Coleman professor and chairman of the Department of Neuroscience here at the icon unskilled medicine at Mount Sinai. So I guess the first most obvious question ahead for Dr. Kenny is is food addictive. The diction itself is such an L. defined unclear term. But I do believe is that there's reward mechanisms that motivate food consumption the same way toward mechanisms the MOTIVA- drug use so food and drugs. Have something in common in the way they act on the brain. Here's what he says about why that might be a feature to all addictive. Drugs appear here to share and communist or ability to stimulate dopamine transmission in the brain and eating seems to do the same thing. Of course. There's a ton of things that you could do. Do that would give you a rush of dopamine though right Eddie. So like doing anything pleasurable K.. Have Sex you can exercise his thinks you could do. You could do all those give view dopamine but eating food when you're hungry gives you a huge dopamine hit or eating hyper palatable food which is super tasty tasty junk food whenever if you're hungry if you're not hungry doesn't matter also gives you this giant dose of feel good chemicals in the brain so I asked Dr. Kenya is like Yo if I showed you a brain scan and I was like look at his brain scan. Is it heroin or is it meeting the blondie. Would you be able to tell which it was. It's really really difficult to be able to tell the difference to be able to look at these credibly complex patterns of uh-huh brain activity in real time. There's a ton of information being processed so it's very difficult to make a direct comparison between different drugs or between drugs and food and say this is the pattern of activation. That tells us that this is addictive and look we can see it for food too so someday we'll have the scan that can actually distinguish but for now it's looking like drugs rugs. The scariest part is that Dr Kenney has shown his research that having those types of food actually changes your brain. There's this experiment experiment that Dr Kennedy runs where he'll give mice this really like Standard Standard Chow. That's nutritious and healthy But Pretty Blonde. I presume I've ever eaten it. Looks Pretty Bald. Smells pretty want and the mice do pretty well. When they're eating it good body weight they normally but then he'll give them some some other more tasty food cheesecake or vacant at Cetera? And then basically all hell breaks loose. They very quickly shift preference. And they will devour the high fat high calorie stuff at the expense of the healthier auctioned. So this is really something this hyper palatable. What are we calling? A UNICREVA comes along and now they can't control their weight right and these mice have access to as much food as they want. When it's the healthy stuff they stop at a normal time to stop and their weight stays at a regular healthy range? But when they have unlimited access to the unhealthy. Stuff but hyper palatable. Food Achey cheesecake Mike and Bacon. They basically just won't stop eating and they become extremely overweight and it really doesn't help that. This type of food is everywhere. Exactly that's exactly exactly what Michael Palin says any business meeting. Now there's food that didn't used to be true. You would have breakfast than you'd wait till lunch but no business. Mesnier conference will be a player Bagels and muffins. Oftens left out at eleven o'clock as if people couldn't get from like eight o'clock noon without having Thousand more calories you walk into a store and there's a dish of candy. Not just at Halloween Louis now all year long so we're in a very toxic food environment. Where food is being put in our face constantly and this idea of our food environment being drastically different Fran nowadays is kind of analogous to what happened to Dr Kenny's mice when he introduced the cheesecake as you consume that food? You're basically training the brain and of course. The brain is a quick learner and undergoes pasta. St Such food is what is prioritized so the plasticity unit is actually. Maybe where. There's some hope here. plasticity means that you can change. You can more for your brain and hopefully we can go back and sort of kick the drugs okay. I like that. You're being hopeful on stuff but I don't think it's that easy because let me ask you. Are you ready. Yeah so you have mice. They've become overweight because they've eaten a ton of cheesecake and you only give them access to regular food. Do you think that these mice will continue to over eat food or do you think that they'll start eating normal amounts again. I would hope that they would go back to eventually eating the normal amounts of normal food. So that's actually not what Dr Paul Kenny found. He actually found that the mice will all star. There would choose to literally starved themselves. And the food that they presumably didn't find pleasant and rewarding I interpret finding which we've replicated head over and over again to reflect a beastie being related to really dramatic shift and food preference. You liked the food you like and you wanted at the expense of anything else. So we've just discovered the ultimate mousetrap any way to know that but seriously though being overweight overweight being obese it's not just like food quantity. It's really about food preference. I mean they're showing this as hard science at least in the mice exactly so Dr Kenney says with these choices of cheesecake instead of bland food over and over and over again those choices get stomped into the brain really strongly family. I think that's what we see. In terms of people struggling to lose weight and essentially relapse in their brain tells them this is what you should eat consumed on the idea that our brain is kind of like turning against us. I mean this sounds everything that I know about. Addiction is just sounds like a playback of it. I mean people get addicted they. I know that it's not good for themselves. But it's a it's a neurologic illness. It's your central nervous system is is conspiring against you. It's not helping but your brain needs this you you want this and you keep on taking those substances at your own peril yet. And that's what made me wonder can a neural pattern like this ever be reversed. So I asked Dr Kenny. It's really hard to say. I mean the information is kind of wired into the brain pre strongly but I think that as plastic organisms with the amounts of resources that we have. I think we can learn new behaviors. You know we can adopt and try and overwrite if you will what we've done a good job in learning so I'm going to strike another optimistic posts here to say that as horrific as the opioid crisis is there are millions tens of millions of people who are living living successfully in recovery and as long as you realize this is a chronic illness that these folks are going to be sort of battling forever they can live without the substances which would otherwise be destroying their lives or often leading to to their own demise. So you know what would it take for us to do it with with food You know one thing that I'm always struck with taking care of my veterans in the hospital and time and again when I come up with the subject of you know maybe a little less weight might help your knees help your back. You might feel a little better when I turn to the subject of. What kind of guidance do you want? I could give you a Dietitian Titian I could. I could help you. I could send you books and time and again these guys will try to many. I'm good I'm what do you mean you're good and like I know what to eat. I'm not gonNA eat crap so it sounds like the answer is not easy but it may be simple Yuna Yuna while we let that sink in. Let's take a quick break. Great idea there is nothing worse than a Miss Fitting Bra. You feel self conscious all day long. You think everybody can see it in your clothes. Just don't look as good third uses measurements of millions of women to design bras for all day comfort and support plus they have over eighty sizes so basically the way it works. is you go on the website and you take the sixty second quiz and you answer questions about yourself. So that's always fun and then and you got to find the BRA that will fit you the best plus you have sixty days to wear and wash abroad and if you don't love it you can return it and third level wash it and donate it to a woman in need returns and exchanges are free and easy third. Love knows that there's a perfect bra for everyone and that includes you so right now they are offering our listeners. Fifteen percent off their first approaches just go to third loved dot com slash food to find your perfect fitting Bra and get fifteen percent off. That's third love dot com slash food. I'm sure you've downloaded a million fitness APPs before four and they're all the same but neum is different with neum. You pick your goal and it can be anything from eating better to feel better to having more energy to learning to love the Jim again new users psychology and small goals to help you feel empowered to change for good. Everyone is busy. That's only takes ten minutes a day which I think we can all spare plus your match with a goal specialist and a community of numerous so you have a support system. You're never alone and people are going through the same stuff you're going through. It's the perfect time to make a step towards better habits. Sign up for your child today at noon and oem dot com slash food. What do you have to lose visit? Is it noon dot com slash food to start your child today that's neum and oem dot com slash food. So you know we were talking about how one way to avoid food addiction may be simply avoiding the junk food. It's simple but not easy. I mean yeah simple. Simple and easy is the worst thing you can get because then you know it and you just have to execute. That's Michael Ponds that I asked him like. What do you tell people who are just like dude? Fruits are are not as good as a blondie. Like I don't want free or I don't like vegetables. Give them a perfectly ripe peach in August and I I challenge awesome to think that A soda or a Candy Bar. twinkie is better. One of the problems is that a lot of the protas weed is not a very high quality and we eat things out of season and we'd he'd things that aren't fresh but to the extent that you can expose people to vegetables picked at the peak of ripeness fruits in their season. They're very few people who prefer processed food to that and one crucial thing to add to that is the importance of availability as Dr Kenney says to stop stop yourself from relapsing as it were at Vail. Ability is really a key factor that influences dependencies if the drug is not there. You're you're less likely to use it. And when availability increases we generally see a big increase in drug dependence problems I think the current opioid abuse epidemic is really reflective of that. So this sounds exactly like what you do with someone who's trying to quit smoking. They switch cars with their spouse if the are not used to smoking talking that way they don't drive a regular path home because there's always a trigger to start smoking. They sometimes have to cut back on their alcohol if they always smoke with their alcohol so cutting back on the availability. Not Having that bowl of candy out I could make a big difference and if you WANNA have four IOS well maybe get one of those single packs six of a couple of Oreos and if you're going to have them save room enjoy them and then you know clean up all the crumbs clean up all the how long all the guilt and put it away and and enjoy it so maybe cutting back on the availability switching up. The your routine may be a place to start the other really important thing that Dr Kenney said we have to do is practiced under circumstances when food would be comforting to exercise exercise control over the desire to consume. The food which I know is probably easier said than done but I think it's like any muscle. If you begin to exercise it gets stronger and the ability to control Shaw becomes greater so with any new steel that you're trying to learn to master one of the most important parts actually looking back the most important part that you can do is really practice or we're back to the concert. Pianist practice practice practice exactly. I like another another message that he's giving us which is that. There is an innate sense. Of what good. Yes that we actually can go back to those foods. And what's good is that the culture is starting to shift. Those foods are more available and we just as an experiment if you go into a fast food joint and you ask for Salad. You'll find that these days it's true you can get water and you can also get the salad without dressing on it and I go back to Harvard Square now. All the new places that are opening are all like the healthy build your own bowl type typefaces that make like really big filling salads instead of like fast food. I think vegetables especially are becoming so much. More like ubiquitous goodell and people are making them and really interesting delicious ways. I think they're becoming a lot more available to us and that availability is always a good thing. Yes so you're not having being heard all of this. What do you make of that? Blondie that you were enraptured. By just a few minutes ago starting to see it in a little bit of a different light over here. I'm starting. I think that this entire experience of the sizzling and the hot and cold and then we'll Michael Paul and was talking about the fat with the sugar because it's like there's fat and the cream and cheese and their sugar everywhere and it's crunchy and cold and hot. I'm starting to think that it was all created in such a way that emblazoned in your brain the deal emblazoned to my rain and I think no matter how much blondie I e. It's so hard for me to ever feel full like I can't trust my natural natural signals of fullness because the Blondie isn't a food that my body it's not a poor soldier I'm rea- now it's so sinister and you even if you do take that first bite. Yes maybe just savour that run because that's where all of the the reaction is in your brain and in your your palate but the second one is you're just chasing okay but you're going to have to take it away from let me okay but I can have one and if you if you choose if I so choose right I mean another just kind of reflection is that we've talked about sort of the mindful eating right. Maybe the first thing to do before we go into the mindful eating is look and see as is this food is this a food substance should be the litmus test for every time you eat this food yes or no so I think that leads to maybe the next question for us to wrestle with which is okay so what should I eat need eat real food. Avoid edible food like substances. So we're finally going to get down to the real nutrition aspect aspect work out there. If you're looking for your next fix of food. We need to talk then head on over to apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast and subscribed simple and easy and please. Don't forget to leave us a review because it helps us reach more listeners. And if what you've heard leaves you with a burning questions send a voice memo to food. We need to talk at Dot Com. And we'll try to answer you in future episodes. And if you WANNA see Eddie try TAIBBI infamous. Blondie the very famous that we talked about on this episode off on Instagram at food. We need to talk because we posed all all the time. Thanks to our guests. Paul Kenny Michael Pollen food we need to talk is production of Wvu. Our our editor producer is George Hicks. Our final arbiter and editor is Elizabeth Harrison. Our founding godmother his carry Goldberg. I'm John and I'm Dr. Eddie Phillips see you next time I see you first.

Dr Paul Kenny Dr Kenney Eddie Michael Pollen dopamine Paul Kenny Michael BOSTON Dot Com Dr Eddie Phillips DEA Michael Palin MOTIVA editor Dr Kennedy
Season 2 TRAILER: launching 28 October

How I Found My Voice

03:02 min | 1 year ago

Season 2 TRAILER: launching 28 October

"Aging us do you ever wonder what gave them the confidence to become who they are well tuned into the second season of how I found my voice a podcast by intelligence squared what makes great artists writers and public figures so good at I be now to how I found my voice on Apple podcasts spotify a cast or wherever you listen a UFO also talking to the guilty feminist podcast Deborah Francis White on escaping fundamentalist Christian adolescence in the Jehovah's and Richard Branson faking a UFO landing we built a Ufo as you did and we flew over London at four thirty am on April Fools Day coming down the exit or what the Royal Family is wearing this week and you start to feel mad like what why are we talking about this and MP Jess Phillips swearing and put witnesses the questions not who is susceptible to join a cult the question is win in your life you most susceptible to join a cult and at fourteen. Your brain is very plastic Climate Change activists name he klein on fighting the news agenda a whole lot of people are feeling terrified all by themselves they're reading the the day you had her you tell me to be quiet launching on October the twenty eighth join us by subscribe head to find out I'm Samir Ahmed I'm going behind the celebrity persona to explore the moments that shaped my guests voices and inspired their careers those stories about the loss of Arctic Sea ice or seeing terrifying images of the Amazon inflames and then they turn on the television and all anyone is talking about is like and I'm famous ask you I said I'm very sorry but you'll British I'm in Iran you have no power of new at all no get stuffed each way every single cost stop the police were called out the army were cold they surrounded the field and then they sent a bobby with a truncheon towards secret american-based during the Iranian revolution four o'clock in the morning Mr Stan I need to talk to are you I'm the military attache at at the Bishop's it I understand you have been to a secret place and that you have a very great deal of film corrine and there's a terrific stink to build up that comfy chair to John Snow Finding Michael Palin and his comfy chair certain movements in humor which define how she replay for instance the comfy chair to some assess put her in the comfy chairs shing back I had one administaff taught me like he was my dad like old logo calm down so I just did you say to me.

Michael Palin Richard Branson Jess Phillips Deborah Francis White Arctic Sea Samir Ahmed Iran spotify London Apple Mr Stan corrine Amazon bobby John Snow klein
RHLSTP 282 - Kiri Pritchard-McLean

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

1:18:52 hr | 10 months ago

RHLSTP 282 - Kiri Pritchard-McLean

"Hello everyone welcome to another episode of Raw La recorded remotely from my beautiful attic this week. Where with Carrie, PREJEAN MCLEAN? Fantastic ACTR- tastic person. She's been on before as part of all killer, no filler podcast, but this is just her on her own. She was great. Look. If you enjoy this stuff, there's lots of ways you can get on board if you watch it on tweet Chat Amazon prime. You can link your accounts and give us five pounds a month for free without no custody yourself, it's crazy. You can become a monthly budget. Go faster, stripe dot com slash badges. Get lots of backstage interviews, all sorts of lovely surprises as well in the stand up shows, press emails, giving you offers and. Advance warning guests plus entry into a monthly competition where you can win books and DVDs, and out scripts and other bits of TAT that probably worth a little bit of money on Ebay some of them. You can go to go faster stripe and just by say. The emergency questions books this three for twenty pounds over three different ones that. Would using in. Their ten pounds or three for. Nearly all different questions, eighteen hundred different questions, plus if you buy all three. Couples now for briefly of my autobiography, not grow up of the year. I turned forty and they've all been lovingly drawn with a spanking cock was different every episode endeavoring book and and also signed by me. When they go home, they're my my friends too many of them. Is Downloads and trump cards? These fantastic playable. Spur trump cards all sorts of stuff you can do to help us out, or you can just listen to the podcast with adverts in that will provide us with revenue, or you can just tell me a friend about the PODCAST If you can't afford to pay, please don't let people who can pay pay. Let those who cannot pay. Let them sorry. Those who can pay pay. Pay Let those who cannot pay not pay, and those who can pay and those who can pay. Don't WANNA pay. They don't have to pay either and those who cannot pay WANNA pay they shouldn't pay. Don't pay just listening, just spreading the word If you have any friends who you would enjoy this podcast, let them know about it. It's a competitive marketplace out the Having an okay time in these weird and wonderful times that sick by this is all helping a little bit. It's helped me through. Three months of madness and I'm on twitch. Most evenings twitch dot, TV slash arcade herring. You can watch the relatives being recorded live on Wednesday nights at eight PM. I'm playing new Colonel Dune. I'm thinking of some other things to go with as well so keep an eye, my channel my friends now let's sit back. Relax enjoy Raha last her with Gerry practically McLean McLean McLean. Spelt McLean is pronounced McLean. That's what I think. That's my. That's my take on it. Please welcome a man who is where you swimming trunks steal from yesterday, not pleasant. Is Registering hello welcome to Richard Herrings. Lockdown Shaggy Tedious, podcast. Fat Very very difficult to cope at this stage. Quite a bad week. I was hanging around Professor Neil Ferguson the other day. No, he's the guy just came round to my house uninvited. He's the guy who advised about lockdown. Saying we should all stay in our houses, and then went out or is married. Lover came. Round is married. Friend came over. He went over to her to say she's up there on the front pages of all the newspapers and might she is worth losing their job for. That's all I'm saying. Hi! Five Neil Ferguson very cool. He goes honest anyway. And now he's unemployed. You can do what he likes. But. Yes, it's been. It's been a weird. What have we had one hundred thousand as into this? I've been a bit depressed this week, but also very tired and also having extremely weird dreams. I had during the day. Where I have my son He's my second favorite child. I will say that. But I still like him. Up for some reason I had his hand in one of those old massive paper slice machines. You have at school and I was just trying to. Just, about the cup cut the tip of his fingers often was telling him to position his fingers. A bit will Kathleen. Luckily I woke up because I'm very squeamish like him having fingers, and also the idea of cutting a whole, his fingers is a lot of is I'm love were enactment to cope with that, which would much worse than anything else having to get in the hospital getting collect? Collect all the pits of finger so then back on again so I'm glad I woke up from that, but that's pretty horrific. Then also the other night I had a dream, a really long dream in which had to threesomes, he was incredible. Lightning just went on, and on had a threesome with my wife and someone else and then ended, and then we threesome with someone else as well luckily. Identifiable generic characters, not anyone we know in real life. I told my wife. That I've had two dreams about three. She didn't say nine. Press me, but you know. She was in both the threesomes and buy in the dream skype. I don't have to be faithful to her. She should take that as a massive compliment that she was in both them instead, she was annoyed Matt. Sleep on the SOFA so So, it's been a weird weird dreams of your company. Okay, I, God knows how long this is going to go on. All the people I'm really feeling. Sorry for students who are going to be starting university in September. October 'cause. You've worked hard. You've got your levels too so out now. Somehow, and then be, you're going to university. You'RE GONNA have to sell isolate your lectures on camera, not no freshest week. No meeting up with people on. You know that's what it's about. You've done all the hardware university. You get to have some fun. KNOW IF I. If the first year at my university of been in lockdown, I you know I would have missed out on almost one half of a sex. In the first year and a half I was at university. That's what I had sex half the time. And, that's not because it finished quickly. It's because I had second thoughts during the loss of my virginity at about two months ten twenty and politely withdrew. Before anyone reach any form of endings turning into a very sexy punk custody can set. You can tell the good news for me this week. Is I found a pack of self raising flour? I what I've found. In six weeks, it was in the post office in my village. It was incredible. The guys, obviously a massive bag of self raising flour, and he's made it into little bags and been sending them off at a very reasonable price. I felt like a drug lord bringing that home and also knew how happy ever movie about four rounds of pancakes have a kilo of. Hilo self raising flour, very. Very exciting for me, that's that's what my life become I hope. Your Life is the mine. We I will remind you if you're watching on twitch any even if you're not if you listened to this in the future I, hope things a little bit brighter for you that, but it seems unlikely. Let's sit is probably much worse. I hope nothing is mutated into something much. All I've made it happen now I saying. Please feel free to subscribe to my twitter channel. You can do with money, but you can also do if you're an Amazon prime member for free go to having one nights seven on Youtube, and there's a lovely video explaining how you can do that also if you want to help us out through this difficult period, go faster. Stripe is such. Go Faster, stripe dot com, you can buy lots downloads of lots of Comedians and help out lots, comedians and Chris Evans not that one, but you can also buy all three of our amazing emergency questions books that all displayed upside down for humorous purpose for just twenty pounds. You could buy top trumps. With some of my favorite guests, workable car gave a talk. Trump's go faster stripe dot, com, and you become a monthly badger. Go faster stripe dot com slash badges three. You can pay more if you like to get different badge if you pay more and you get lots of backstage interviews all the the the Fanta. Guests, we've had the one with Michael Palin. Which is coming up next week as I speak. Is absolutely superb, I think it might be better than he's actually inch fee, which is also super. He improvised. To life of Brian in the backstage interview and I think that is worth three pounds a month for at least a year, just to be a chance to see that so Someone saying I'm talking quickly on chat. Room I'm just drinking gin and tonic tonight, and there's nothing else of not been sniffing flowers. You seem to be implying. And apparently up to five hundred years. That's the chat room. Saying that's very good, so that's almost enough to get going. Out next week here, how the both at on twitter and on the PODCAST will be Richard Osmond making his fourth appearance. Very excited about talking to him, I've done another point this. Since! We lost spoke I. Don't think it's not gone out yet, so we can't talk about that with him, but I think he's what the country needs in lockdown. So I hope you will enjoy that. Do in eight o'clock on Wednesdays or anytime with the podcast after it comes out, that's how it works, so let's welcome my guest this week. And making a second appearance as well, she's probably best known for appearance in the short film hungover pregnant, which I watched, and which is absolutely excellent, and what's so funny, even though she said she would never act on the last time I was, she was on. With. Him Kyrie Richard McLean German. History is only cinnabon. There's was on there we go. That was nice. It was like. Data on purpose. Yeah, how you doing here again. Well I'm going into. I'm literally going insane. I'm wearing swimming trunks I'm drinking gin from an economics class. That was full of Gin and tonic before we started is now half empty. and. My Wife's not talking to me because I've had I've been even unfaithful unfaithful to have a threesome with someone if your wife one of the people in the three three to. Dream I think that's the fire. He makes the car of all the people who've been there. I think exactly ready could sign, and I think it's really nice that I was clearly obviously the other person and that's why he wants me to. Could be. is going. Is it getting hot in here? Who? Could jump I'm wearing swimming trunks, I'm. Getting. I'm ready to see and talk. You didn't wait Franson for you go to. Wow. So. Genitals hanging in one of those sexy oranges right now. Yeah, what of nearly in that? They are very large. I have large test scores due to my age and. Very not and so that I didn't quite in right. What largest along? The pendulum. They get longer as you get older, they've always been. They've always been an encumbrance to me. Looking soldier, you just push out. You'd never not. Everyone knows what it's like to. People don't think of it. You GotTa just readjusting bit. It's not that. This is why we haven't had any women so far on the on the remote podcast. Because there's just it's straight away. It's got it's got. BERTHELOT! So. I enjoy your. You didn't say last time you. Wouldn't do acting in the the Games. Sketch Group. Acting was falsely didn't like summit comedians getting into acting, but then you are acting in a bill bits and pieces. You don't think he's acting into. Things were plagued myself on basically the only time I've ever agreed. One was I sky Halloween. She'll a moment for that sketch, and it's when they say. You can't rightness unless you're in it. And that's the an I. always just okay. Okay. We'll be myself because I'm in the sky thing. I tried to write myself as a coal, so the whole thing was happening over. Is that what he can do that? But they have is. They wanted you to be on screen and I just thought that thing wet, you know. Full, but not every there are better actors than me, so if I wrote something I can't do it the best of even if it was just to be made that someone who do better job of being may like actors are good actors Oh brilliant so basically. If you see me acting in something, it means I have been forced to take. Good very good, and it's a very very funny, very funny short. WHO'S FOR THE BBC BBC? BBC I had to really fight for it. Because basic premise is how I constantly think I'm late for my periods, especially, when hung over and I go through the whole thing like I know all the local schools to me are on offset because I. just go down this rabbit hole whenever I think I'm. Pregnant, it's just because they can't count very well. And and so the like the Danielson the end and That right, is it? My party is. Is that words and so I've just gone I think that's what it means an got. Go. Is that what that means after? The end basically the payoff is I just put my posture all the stuff and then m. i.. E. C. by Nicholas bloodshed man. It's just I I have come on. I've just been hung over. And, they had really fucking fight to have that. They've Ooh. It looks like a miscarriage. I'm like not to anyone who. Does. Or Miss Arish and they rely. It's a real cops. She just take a hot washable cleansing chocolate I was like no. Mystic it was one at ten. It was one of the. Says things to like show period bloods grinds. It's all. Who apparently like leak liquid wherever and but I had to read it was also it was. It was notes for coming down through a female commissioner, and I was like come on I. Really thought you'd be so fine with us. Having to fight for a bloody gusset may which. Was the hill. I was willing to die on sends out a good. We're looking at it. Was it was it was a bold move? It is a surprise not now for anyone who hasn't seen it. We got but. But that's not so. Thank you before we started I saw you supporting London awesome Saudi. Do Stand up on your own and Yeah, it's. It's it's. It's is your bold is perform I. Really I really like. You've really got a great style straightway which. You really know who you are straight off the bat from the way you look, and the way you hold that which I think a lot of people coming a long time to get that, but you definitely got A. A definite look and the persona. The I think really cements you the the the minute. You're onstage. It's the deliberates. Thing to do that. was that just how you wanted to? Is that just how you dress anyway? Well, the definitely will look like came first because I. Remember that you know when people go. What kind of comedy Jew and you just want to be like? You unless you can say one liners or just stories is very hard to. Tell people just I don't know I. Just talk about stuff that happens to me like it's. Answer and I just saw since I started doing comedy I'm like I've got nothing that stands out about me and I know I'm not the one who talks about this, so does they? And wasn't quite a quite Welsh enough to say I'm not. To kill, but like oh well, the Welsh comedian so I was like. No one's GONNA. Remember me from material, which is just about like my boyfriend. Had Dogs have an? So I was like we'll just have. Make sure you know what you look like. Because then they might remember so it was is a mix of things. Because I was like twenty three when I started doing stunt up, and before the I'd go out like three nights a week, my goals and get dressed up and then our spending that money on going to Gig so some spending sixty quid. Out in a taxi home in a takeaway spending that to get to Newcastle and petrol to do five minutes stage, and so I had at least close like going out tonight sow, and I wasn't wearing and I was like Hud. Dress like it's an occasion because I don't fuck and go out and also is my wave showing what can audiences like I've made an effort to be hey, like I am pleased to be here, my please. Go Babysitter new spend some money, so it's kind of like my wife shows respect. The I've made an effort and I love anything that's like over the top I love the illegitimate shit is wild like I, always sequence. That's like my role is. Performing an And I just love the idea of drag. Queens, working men's clubs, and it just being so of a bit Grassi a bit glamorous. I just think it's it's a real good mix of like highbrow lowbrow. Kinda, thing and of what I've tried to emulate so I was like would just west sequence because then it's easy to decide what's where because you can stress over. You can over think what you have Gig so I was like well. That's my uniform, and then of had this bit, Mahathir, for Awhile, and then once you got press shots. You gotTA fucking keeping. This is in various stages of falling out depending on how much I bleached it myself or if I go ahead just. Doesn't have I was GONNA. Look like before the rest of it, yeah! SORTA you're owning the something you've come on your own the stage and you very confident, and it's not. It's not just about the way you look I. Just think it's I think for lots of standards. Take sound. I'm not sure I've even gotten. It takes a long time, too. So nailed down here. You are on stage and as opposed coming out. You're talking about that short film. It's just what I like him as an audience member would I so you in an audience of of quite a lot of? Single Venture Women against saying Monday here, US. But even as a fifty two year old man I, mean that's why I feel comedies. People say oh, we'll be ready. You talk very much about your own personal. Experiences which similar to mine the retain about I think he did that. Retain about having sex on the land. And catching yourself in the mirror, which is a great, but you know you. 'cause you wouldn't come up with that, so it's you know. It was observation that I. I wouldn't have thought baton those sorts of things. That weren't Mike Experience in that, but you enjoy saying that in comedy whereas I think a lot of comedy. Commissioners feel people will only want to hear stuff that they will absolute relate to, whereas actually I love seeing people who are doing stuff too i. don't relate to as long as you believe it's true. You know what I mean. There's like obviously. It's it's universal themes, isn't it? It can be different scenarios, but like everyone's had. That stories about high catch myself a sex in rural alumnae, but everyone has had the essence of that. Is you think something incredibly sexy is happening? And then you see it for what is that is fucking discuss. Like I m foul. You buy like a sexy negligee, and you put on your like I. Let like Ham that's been wrapped up in something employment on a counter bike, so I think that's like you things when we will try to be like sexy, swamp as just filtering it through the the story and. It doesn't obviously directly to relate to it to know what that stuff is. But. It was a great gig. Gracie London, who's been a guest on this before as Doing site, Brennan Leeann but it's that's a difficult thing, even as well established comedian to come on as that as soon as the support active I act on on that kind of bill. It can be quite difficult Gig, but you did so. Mona Straight Away Nice. London is really an. London's gray and is the kind of person who she wouldn't do that weird thing of like. She was I. I want a support act to why feel like Oh fuck I don't know if I could follow them. Let you know she's I. Want it to be a great show. Her anyway ultimately, she's going to have the GIG that she deserves so I was like so please just do it, and it was such a fun. Her audience is so fun up for it. But that thing I've done lows of Tolstoi over the various people and I call it comedy called locking 'cause you basically usually solve like shuffle on, and you like hello. I'm something you didn't pay for. Don't one it's not like. Belt. Replaced to see, it's like. This I to win the Mova. Why such good training as a comedian to go onto, and some audience is. Like it clicks, and you're like Oh brilliant, and some audiences you twenty minutes of convincing them. That you'll worth their time, and then you've gotta fuck off again an an and. I was start touring a couple of years ago and actually picking tool support is one of my favorite things to do like and. To. Basically do like. Try and pick newer ox who. Obviously think, when did it help me most? And it was like one I needed the money and I needed the nice cakes so i. just go anywhere between ten and thirty like if you're having fun, do as long as you want like. If you're having shit time, just bail us no good for anyone and I was coming to a bit before them and I was say like I. can't wait to show you this Canadian. My friend is so funny on. You can love them, so it's always. Like acts I think. That my audience would like as well or should be saying, and then hopefully we'll go and see them again, but deciding is really fun to. I've never had. In. Of My toes. Because I'm, too. I think I'm away steaming to pay him I, think it's because I'm always got like a show that to have was I've always got like a nineteen minute shy. Don't need anybody and I kind of think. Yeah, I don't well to begin with. I didn't I wasn't making enough money to be able to pay anyone to come and do that so if you could get support to do the driving and everything. That's the price that they can become. You could just about full, but I wouldn't. Is painted such small audiences. The identity was worth anyway better bath. Oh I always had to like crossing. The bite was was by first solo till Shaw, and that was when we didn't enhancing. We would have some Ip more. Kevin who were in the show that they would do a bit, but they would also take part in some of the sketches and stuff, so it was a bit different, but yeah, it was. It's a very. It's nice to have someone I guess. It was long as you like them. You got to achieve someone that you were going to get on with especially with the long tour if he's, he's always the same person on the whole tour. Try and I try and do so by geography. It's not costing them to get to the GIG. Nights, too. I think it was like six sacks. I basically set What works for you? And fitted in around them and try to get everyone sort of an even mix of gigs, but I. It's not even. Because I drive myself and sometimes I'll pick them up with the commission the in them, but it's not even like. The old gray, but not like my inner circle of mates like the easy thing would be to book like pay outweigh, Oil Duggan, who like some of my oldest friends in comedy and have them do it, and that's not the right thing to do i. mean like say that they're boys who control themselves like it has for me has to be. Someone has been me like however many years ago. I would have been I can. Yes, and I I. Don't think I could really Ford it when I was having people doing it. But and it's always the biggest expense, and it's all because I never really stay over anywhere. But it's just feels like. A try and put money back in where I can do. Like I benefited from coming up through the circuit and I guess I'm just one of the good guys rich. Expose your arm. I'm just sort of the self because everybody. When you're starting out, the experience is not about the money and luckily 'cause. You'RE NOT GONNA get any money when he started touring. Unless you've got if you go on TV, and you can sell a thousand tickets everywhere you go, then that's fine, but if you're starting out and you're selling twenty five th tickets fifty tickets walk then is is about the experience of. Touring and getting a show together and all that sort of stuff. which I presume has been. You're on tour and working up to Edinburgh this year before the. Plane, so that's how you gotta show and gain the system. So I'm in K. Thousand and eighteen. My show victim complex, and then two thousand nineteen I went and did two weeks at the monkey barrel of a work in progress, and I did and I did some extra shows and I did. New Sketch Group Tara. We stuff as they did a month ago. And I was like I'm going to work out in front of the audiences. It's mental and then I was like a fucking of completed comedy and then. In the spring which is why I just started doing and I'm going to. The show's going to be when it gets to add bre. It's like the best traffic obey if the was selling while in spring, it was extended to an old some lag as like this, is it? This is the system and so I, do one year when you're off, the fucking well did. The system work. Yeah I mean you know. I am putting the show together I was just going to go up and do a podcast, so it's not in those terms. It's not a disaster mail though I. Did Pre My prepay all my accommodation. Which I've had some for me and my mother-in-law. WHO's GonNa? Help Mitch? We've had some of it Matt, said the the the the landed. Letting agencies got no money so I'm not sure we'll get our money back. They agree we should get it back, but it doesn't. I think less more knowing. The money would be having worked up a show. I think for me. I wouldn't be at the point where I have a show yet so I just shake. The again, but I know most people now do work like way in advance, so you must a lot. People have been have done for five months on the show even if they hadn't done it into twenty nine hundred and then just got the point where it was just a a brought print. Do Animal and if we're not gonNA, come back for a year. Then it's sort of. Wasted time isn't it. It feels like it's GonNa of whether, even whether it goes to the fringe dot show, I don't know if ever well Yeah, because when you're doing shows. You feel differently about, don't you? Like identify, stop feeling like this is the actually what I want to say about the world, especially after all as like looking at the note pod with all in and be like 'cause it was about sort of empathy, and like you know an living online, and all that kind of fun stuff so I'm like well. This heff field rewrite. Wanting a yet because we don't actually know when it. Will be able to go and dig again, so I'm just GONNA listen to open next bridge is GONNA to be covid nineteen shows. Whoever's got closest to dying will win the win the comedy. going. To just the point you go to bars Johnson. Guess just love oxygen and survive than. Anything comedian is is a good experience. and. How are you coping with with lockdown? I'm doing their K. in Wales. And where we are is like basically Sephardim, so it said. This loads of space. We don't really see the people and I'm hey. We went through my partner, which is great and we on really what lovely when foraging for wild garlic today to make while garlic. And the s one of those counts. Having a really nice time, because I'm. Really quite chronic. Workaholic! Unde is like to the point where my partner sit down about six months ago. You have no days off the ten weeks like this is not tenable like you can't work selflessness, so he put a place in place. That was I have to take two consecutive days off a month. That's my tool as a national. This happened I've been I've been working. Still be doing stuff, but not anyone need to the extent. I used to work on. I've always had a fear of stopping working at. It's actually been really nice to learn that. I was GONNA say the world doesn't end if I start working, but maybe that's why it's like this. That get back out. Comedy. I guess. You. Sort of moderate audiences is the kill. Yeah I. For me personally that? I not working constantly is okay, has been really useful, saying and also like time offer night. You know I like just reading on a blanket in the sunshine is really not, but most so that so many people are living in absolute fucking. And just a horrific second sense is based on their work. Oklahoma situation that you can't like a basis smug about it and going actually guys. I'm to go back and so I I. DO appreciate that we're very very lucky, yeah! Having these stressed other people having very weird dreams of the moment I've been. have. You had any dreams. It's not been hitting you well I. Don't remember my dreams and want yet. So I've been in fact one thing. We're doing at the moment I filming like a little taste of women who interpret streams and a half to be like. Oh, I. Don't have any. I remember. And and she's told me actually how to remember your dream so I'm GonNa try and do it this way and I do have a reoccurred. Won The I remember? which basically is a wake-up doing this? On. This podcast so basically one hand is scratching four on the other hand and vice versa. and. I. My partner will stop me doing wake him up and the onetime agreement would what was going on is insects under my skin and I was trying to scratch out. So I think the reason why I don't remember any drains is because they ask fucking hardly. Ones I remembered of been ones why I've woken up sobbing because i. a family member merges. I. Think it's the true crime podcast. It's all in that. That might be my. It's. The one where I was trying to casually we're bound to. Inflict violence on my son was very. Upsetting can't visualize anything in my. I've discovered this year after this every Polka so far, but I can't visualize objects in my brain. What I'm dreaming can say stuff. I'll have images then I I assume. I'm just putting if I try and visualize an object. I can't do it. Can you do that if you if you close your eyes and use your mind's eye to see an apple? Do you see Annapolis? Yeah so. Glad, to have the concept of Apple, say anything like if I can very occasionally get almost affliction. Like someone's face or something, but it's almost like it's behind. My Mind's is I. It's not even really. Saw Imagine my kids faces. But. I can't see I. didn't realize this was a thing til this year. And I just seemed I could see objects in my brain and I can't. Account visualize anything in my brain, so that must be. That's a diagnosis of some kind of right. We have there. Is this code something like? Zero something like that. Someone will tell me. But. So good with words because because I also shot is the first time I've told you this before, but you'll an. There's the first ever our stunned. APPLY SOUL SO I. Was a student, and must have been in about two thousand, seven eight. And and it was head must've saw. Frog Manchester and basically sulfide university will like Oh. We're going to have a comedy society and there was four of us on this. was to go and see you and student tickets Andan. Standing so it was only three quid which like? Oh amazing is really good, isn't it? Starting to like six didn't concessional frequent and I was like. I'll go see come for that and I did. I was like I could. Not I, wore uncomfortable shoes. That's one of my memories, but that Shit. I never seen anything I've never seen ship. And it was such a brilliant show. I was just like. You know when you're looking around, and you're like guys. You see it was later. He's just any so it's funny and it's. But. It's lot theater. It's not dog. She I couldn't. I couldn't believe it was such a big moment for me to see a show that it was sense. Of Bernez yeah, it was on the national, the other ones. The Fuller Shit known as. I ended. Mustaches. What was that the one after? Yeah and yeah. More or less yeah, so yeah, I do put back. That show. I think I did so right. I don't know whether that's why. I'm GonNa was I sort of feel like I. It doesn't feel like a disability to not be able to see things I'm just I think I think anything really inflicts on me I can't do. Puzzles way go to turn objects around because I think he'd do that in your hands when you make accu- battle with the. To Yeah I can't do conde stuff like that and I'm not great at navigating in. which does not to explain why that might be? Great, so I can see things, so there's always the thing is in front of me. I can see it, so that's fine. I'm sorry. Sorry to interrupt. Brought up your show not. That so just like you off on this but was. The it was in. Christ on a bike where you did the begets beget and I was like the way you were doing it. I was like he must be seeing it written in his head because it was so. I couldn't understand how you could possibly remember it. Remember all your show is so much show. Yeah I think I. Just I don't know really to do I do. I do it is with the words is words though so? There's with Begat one isn't. Seeing visuals of some biblical characters wouldn't help. So it is just just making up links between the words, and then just learning it, but I find some things in when I came back, and did all those shows in twenty seventeen when it was when he sixteen, maybe I did all nine ten shows over a twelve shows twelve shows over six weekends, so I had to relearn all of them, but most of them came back sort of. Quite easily and once you've got like a routine into the beginning of that headmaster. Son is not very verbose me looking back at me burping at the Ascension Day service, but it's quite Ed. Mock roic thing, but yeah I wrote that down and then learn My my met. My memory's not as good as it was now that I do still remember all that Christ nearby. Thanks a lot. I find it much more difficult to learn lines and things than they used to. I used to have have fairly retention, but yeah. I do I read a memory, but when I was a kid where you taught, you have to learn list of things. And I thought maybe I. Use a vessel that way you're late. You basically just have to create a visual link between the tape. Things. You're talking about what I visualize thing so, but it must be me, but I didn't know combat thing so if it was an apple to a panel just I would have that in my I'd have a half an apple half pair my head, but it will be just the words. I guess I don't know it's just like it's not. There's nothing there, but I can still like close my eyes. I'm imagining half an apple off there. What is it nothing but I? Can't say it, but I know what it is. So, yeah, so then, but it is just and sometimes you go wrong with that I. don't the second time I did crush Mike maybe when I did the best show now let a messed out, but. Usually on the cross, the tools I would I would lose my place every now and again especially backwards. Because? It is quite high is quite hard. Thing today you could concentrate I. Guess if you concentrate to argue fuck out because you thinking you've got to concentrate on now, think about. And then you'll find them thinking about what if I don't know what the next one is. You'll be in trouble. Yeah. It's weird, but not I'd rather not I would be disappointed I. Didn't remember I. Don't remember all my dreams by. Be disappointed if I didn't remember recessions with threesomes. The Girls Ages. Usually your brain will trick you guy right Babylon. You've messed up I. Think he did in the end. I'll tell you what happened to the end of that dream. The second goes in the threesome with that was it was turned into net something nearly happened to make something happen, and then we were doing around. And I was interviewing. Boyd Hilton From Heat magazine and one of the gals from girls aloud, and I was really nervous, because I didn't know anybody for them and I haven't researched and I was also worried about the fact that was loads of people in a room and we went south isolate. And then this was there as well and then Russell brand turn and she and Russell Branch really fancied Russell brand went. WHO also print? That's what happened in the dream, so it did go wrong in their. 'cause muscle. She made a matter. My wife and me and my wife to treat her much. Embarrassed and said let's just have a drink. Watch community. That's that's probably what would have done. Good, so, but you're doing. You are doing of online stuff to get you through the Eh through this weird period, so you've been doing. Have you been doing? Stand up in this covert arms? Gigs which are a charity that's it's the trussell trust so a what we do with the first one we did. We just did it for the trussell trust, and then it went so well. We'll like we'll we could. We could kind do this weekly and. Jake, and Jess whose idea it was up with. I I said to them, and luckily they on the same page I was like I want to ask people to work for free when that whole. Hood has been taken away. So the idea is that we basically split the money. To The trussell trust on the comedians on, then they can decide. COMEDIANS can decide and most of them do to deny the fear over, but there's absolutely no shame. If they need that money, they have the big paid for jobs that they did and on some of the comedians like Osuna axiom need as well so this kind of few ways it works, but but I would say. Eighty percent of the money goes to trust wave between that under quiz that we did. We've raised about hundred grand so far. Yeah. It's great and it also means that we can give an. 'cause like say I came up through the circuit and I know these paint pulled up people who love comedy, but only watch on telly or acts who established enough to tool. They won't know about these absolute gems that we've got, and so it's a great way of going I. Know You come here to see Whatever, but you've got to see this person and so that's been a really nice thing. 'cause everyone's like Oh my God. These comedians are amazing. Yeah, because there is much fit is there are going to be? You know normally six days a week and yet just brilliant. They're just not on television, and it's not not being on television is not a sign of not being berlet. And not who I feel most floors. The X. was solely relying on the circuit. It's a bit different. If you have things you have going on, you know you generate so much of your own work and or you? Pop, on, TV or radio. We're all of those things. But loads of people they live hand-to-mouth on the sick. Anyway. People associate slow to pay people. You know you do the job on the night. And then it's twenty eight days botched. Follow that the either have to chase for three weeks. These weren't people who had a safety blanket. Anyway, and now it's just been whipped away the government doing anything till June, so it just felt like the least I could do, and then also doing it I've read is how important it is to me as a human to do something with an audience like how much. Is How deeply flawed I'm really the I need. At least once. A RIFFING! Are you just doing you just figure stunned upsets? People just sitting down the camera this coming up and trying to know what they were in a club or they were a bit of both. It's a hard thing. 'CAUSE I. Put on my facebook page in the day I was like. What do we what we do? This club like great use what we can't keep going forever. I'm not pater out I. Don't get support For the Comedians all the charity say. An so people will sort of chipping was I. Put a new person on an as a thought about that, but then doing is putting on a very inexperienced act into a very unusual way of performing and because I think it takes real like some people nail straightaway, and some people need to sell themselves down in Tokyo. Way into it. But it's some people have just stood up and done this sat and it's like it's a bit like doing radio like you do it down to one person and and it works, but it's amazing. What brilliant amazing comedians get in their head about just doing it on a Webcam. not doing Joel Dome It. I mean like doing this stunned up to a web count so. So I hope it, and because we do on Zoom, people pay for front or ticket, which means I just go right? Let's have a chat to someone, and they can raise their hands, and it's like Natanz Pie. We go into the house. It's so. We also competitions. Every week is great. Right? 'cause we're really lucky I'm leave town via like literally last week when we did the quiz that have really great neighborly Trussell, and they number like we can give you some bid to give away, so it means that we can chat to people and give bear. Why do these competitions because basically trying to make a bit of a community on its work beautifully from so nice and supportive on all the Shit himselves, and then they come off, and they see all these amazing comments on instagram and twitter on you. And you get that validation back, it's so lovely and we have music sought with them. Have I am able to break normally a week because of drunk too much, and then we have two more acts, and and that's it and I just just I usually do immaterial before bringing the first comedian but it is to slightly a bit a couple of minutes long. The rest of is all just crowd wickets comparing Sure sounds great. So where do people see that if they want to Trudy wins Winston extra comedy at the Cova Dot Cova all the information's there. The next one is Saturday in. It's who we go on. We got an let me say his name right. Even spock's who is from the WHO's who like I've been watching the game. Can I come to music? I like fucking lutely, yes, good and Got Russell. Kane, Angela bonds delete search upon debt, so it's a broom rising. Bill I I'M GONNA sort of interesting. Because I I worry. As much about the COMEDIANS which I'm worried about. We try to write some money to help comedians through this, but is the clubs as well so whether they'll be even if there are no clubs when we come back but I wonder whether there's a way fullwood for company cleaner comedy clubs. Can Do same as you and maybe charge people like a couple two or three quiz. If you get, the whole, can get an audience around the world of a thousand or so people. Then you then you can make that work because evening. But then also when they come back, maybe they should be live streaming gigs around the world as well because it is much better seen live comedy life, but I don't think we're going to be able to do it effectively for a year. I would say you know certainly. I mean three months is is the best possible and now looking more like seven right more months I think before we get back and then, if and then whether people will turn up to to see live gigs at night. So I think my online, it might push. It might be a positive thing in terms of pushing promote is in understanding how much they incident could be a positive thing and also comedians as well to understand that they can. GET FOLLOWING POSS- real mine I, it's been a really interesting thing to say, and this isn't like an. Is. I. Think it well. HEADLINE TO BE? It's complicated because I'm not telling anyone how to manage global pandemic in terms of their workload in the house, but it's been really interesting to see how different people and organizations that dealt with it so. Let. The comedy stole will like right when we've got all these shows filled. Let's just that's the acts. Let's put it out. People could buy a ticket to a show, and they get along the comedy experience like they've been pretty quick and responsive with that stuff, which is amazing and it was. I think slowly obviously hot water comedy club that videos so really led the way with that slowly. The iceberg was moving with them of you. Know Comedy Clubs to like what we've done it one way. Of Harnessing the power of the Internet and much bigger audiences think necessity, so it will be a sort of diversify oh die situation in fact one when we did. The domes hosted. Like a world record pub virtual thing I the official title of it, but we got world record hosting pub quiz on one of the things is is supported net and so. That like a big group of charities, they basically go right. Who needs money in this area and it goes locally goes too much charities and the other side of things, if people would pledge a virtual pint to the comedy club pub, which is a way of going. We can't be that now, but like we understand that you still have rights and outgoings and things like that is so. So I think that we probably need to look a way of being responsible to venues who've been good to us in what we can do is definitely a well. There's no that's what I if we can get comedians through how long it is great, but if they come back and there's no gigs, I mean like I was saying to you before, and it's going to be with. Touring show, he's getting pushed back, but so's everyone's. And then you know. HOW ARE WE GONNA fit all the shows. From this eight ten ferried wherever is into into the whenever we saw so it's going to be I. mean hopefully it'll be a boom time, but I don't think the boomtime probably come until maybe the end of next year mouth when when hopefully everything will be more sorted, but yeah. I think it's a thing of trying to find inventive ways to get through it. and it's a depends on I. Guess I mean you and I have both been. Do stuff online for several years. Anyway, so you know we. We have his head start with that. But it's I guess it's sort of. Those possibilities which isn't something that everyone is interested in expose, but I've been really of select Mick Ferrari, who we both know fucking brilliant comedian like one of the best live comics. We have I and one that comedians comedian. Live Act is always nominated in the local club. Comedian cuts agree unusually compares well, and he's someone who would me say. I would have thought fuck. It's GonNa hit hard. 'cause he already populate stuff online on quite the opposite Eastside filming sketches done a two minute podcast recalls. People got loads of stuff going out and you're like that's how you do it you. You go right. Okay. It's a different world. I'm going to adopt to it and that's that's you know that's what he's been on the circuit for years and years and years, and you think what Mitt can do it and gets on this then. Is this you know like? If you're younger comic crews already like speaks the language of the Internet and subscribe to podcasts and speak the language of that. Then you know there's there's no reason why you caught so like harness and hopefully use it to build a bigger audience, because things come out cova domes is like right, well I was. I'm aware of people who like what I do, but for various reasons con attend live events, and that might be child-care, or it might be social anxiety, disorder, or mobility, or whatever why the fuck not been doing a show for them this whole time and also internationally people are like. When are you coming to Australia and it's like? It's so someone who's got fucking loads of money. A festival takes a chance on me. That's not me, but I can still do a show you can. You can see in what we do with the COVID is it goes out live and then you can watch it for forty hours later so. Obscene Interrupt with you if you're watching it later, but it means missing key workers and things like that, and there's something like that to me like a lot of virtual tour day is definitely something I'm going to look at doing. Well you could because. Even doing something in a location. This people who would even in the UK. If you, you do to get to get to show just geographically now you can't cover the whole of the country, but you've got the world he's he's you say you got? People Watch in America who wants to be clear stones at eight o'clock in the morning in the UK I think it's like. Two o'clock in the morning where they are, and they're watching a man Oxfordshire along with one hundred and fifty other people clearly, so there's an audience for anything and them once you've got worldwide when she got up to six billion people. You can get a very small percentage. They want you and maybe donate something then that's great, but it is. It is also terrific. When. People obviously like you're saying people people who need entertainment. who also making any money so I think it's you know it's. It's great that a lot of this stuff is. viewable for free and put the puck customer always free, obviously as well Let's talk about something jolly. I'll ask you some questions. What have I got for you? I'M GONNA. Ask You some of the new I'll ask. This is comes from pitcher. My daughter drew last week which we discussed last week. Would you rather fall into a pool of lava will being by crocodile? That's a good one. Five daughters emergency question accidentally I was obsessive wants to what I was a kid, and there was a monster in Japanese folklore. Thank racists enough said the wrong country. I think it's called a tango E. N. G. at East to grab you by the shoulders drop you into volcano and I used to abruptly compulsively think about how that would be the worst thing in the fucking will. So, but then I was obsessed with crocodiles ready Scott. This is genuinely very hard. Question is I. Think Bringing See. They're not that neither of them a nice way to die. She drew a picture of me falling into some lava because John, annoyed. And then she said holding them, and then she drew crocodile in the lava that was going to catch me. On eat me so I. Don't know I think like in that situation. The crooked house in the lava you probably end up being chewed and then burnt to death as well. Still be alive to fill the being burnt up as the crocodile ends up, but if not. Being eaten by crocodiles probably worse than I think it's good lover is the love. Rapid death of his net well, who who can verify that? I mean my instinct is yes. You hit you and it's done. Let's say. Was headfirst. Into Crocodile. Eighth Yeah over is going to be able to flailing limbs well, if they if they if they get right on the spine done hoffy lengthy. True Okay well, hopefully, that will happen to you if this. if you could have this I, think. I was doing this awesome. If you could have evolved the governor's museums in the world got together and decided they were going to allow you to take anyone item, which could be an artwork could be historical artifact could be anything any museum gallery. Is there one thing you would like to take home and Keith stealing it? They've all agreed. You can have it well. It could be any anything chances are. They stole it in the first place. irately like. Oh. That's such a good question, isn't it? I think it would be announced. Over a picture or anything like that I would assume is fake anyway, because the a dunk, our my house. And artifact. What would have all well? It feels really hack, but the. Come a caucus. Yeah, that'd be nice right. It would be amazing. I went to see that there's an. Exhibition in. London moment in the SARCI gallery. So I went to say that it didn't have that actual that main bit that you all know that you're talking about. Blue and go thing. It was pictures, but there was some amazing stuff, and there's a pair of gloves that have survived the thing I would like is. Basically a pencil case. It was basically his pencil case. But. It was some kind of old in old Oldie will writing implemented. There was just some really bizarre, but really amazingly preserved items that they found in his tomb. is well with going to say if it will soon when they get back heading. It was very crowded. I would like to go now because they wouldn't be allowed. They wouldn't allow anyone in there. It's still going. It was much too crowded, so you couldn't really enjoy it. And, then there's also like this virtual reality thing where you sit in a chair of the new sweep down into the into the tomb, and gets look around the to let that which was pretty good as well. How does that cost extra? But yet could choice to incoming. Class Lovely coffee-table imagine that. There was some there was like some big statues that were that there was some just amazing stuff because she doesn't the. Quite into story I've not added a lot by Egypt but I haven't seen all day. No I was just surprised that will the stuff that was in there, but they were these massive black statues of gods that was standing outside i. think the Tomb as the actual united where he was incarcerated. We wouldn't. He went inside the chain, but they were pretty impressive as well. Something like that you could go. It will be like Oh. Do you not want this is from two Commons to? If if you've got the banking guy yet, we know what it is. You've been you've been wearing that round could do not know what this is This is one of the guards from. A new vessels from. The yeah, that would love Linda Garden, wouldn't it? Would it would, but it's it's. It's an somebody's exhibition. Terrible everyone involved. In that sexy. Believe. Now, don't they so? Common Status Well. Praise at a terrible time. Right, so let's see what else I've got for you. I want to Anglesey I. Don't know if I told you about Anglesey I'm quite obsessed with Anglesey you ever been. On the about it, I've just thought what the hell is. Anglesey of never been tangles. See it suddenly. Strikes Right, is that right? It's straight separate from oils, which is like two hundred and fifty is is. It's like a river. Islands. It's actually you can't really cross couldn't swim it because it's got a swales, so they'll. The wool pulls the under the surface of the wolf, says so pull you under and the University of bond girl in the mainland as really brilliant for marine biology degrees, because it's so biodiverse, so there's like Morales in octopodes octopuses. This riddick site stuff in the streets. This two bridges onto the island is seventy thousand people who live here is the. Second highest proportion of first language. Speakers in Wales, so yeah, I read Kapija in one, thousand, nine, hundred one. This is just from memory. It was ninety one percent, Welsh speakers, and now it's fifty two while present last week. Is I think nine sent? People can speak Welsh, but it was ninety one percent to fifty two percent of people speak Welsh. Is that primary language? Is Still Pretty High, but the people that night no one will be decided. Well I think what happened in that period is caravans. Because It's an absolute hot spot for people from Liverpool Manchester usually had sheltered holidays of here. It's really beautiful. Most people have been here. What should I go and see? If came dangled? See what's the was the main tourist attraction? Okay, right? Okay, so the things I would send you to see. Place the long name. Okay, you'll be very international cooking together. And there's a really beautiful national trust and like House and cold plan snow with this. Absolutely fucking you see, this is on the mainland. It's called an hold on. castle now this is a made by Penrhyn family, and it's a neo Norman Castle is national trust as well so it's basically some rich fucking million from back in the day was like. Yeah. I want to build a Norman Castle I can live in. And Fascinating. If you go round national, trust which I am. A Bellini volunteered on. It's because years ago, the Penrhyn from late fucked over the local slight minds in Bethesda and they really they really treat the workers spot, and not feeling has settled down. Generations on his own people volunteer that really are English people is fascinating. Of. Those loads of like they were really bad for slavery. Of, sugar, as well on slavery on the they pounded loads of a lattice that the people who were enslaved, had satin, and so on nate. Normally people burned in the, but they kept them so there's now this huge history being uncovered. People saw telling that store being in his life pests. In their own words, which never had before because everyone's just hidden it, so that's exciting. Yeah, Pilly Palace, which is. Say When you say on the mainland. Is that Anglesey the mainland and there's other islands random. SPANGLER I! Don't no I'm not going. There I'M NOT GOING TO UP IN BANGOR Okay Fine British up into Banja. So I didn't realize I. was that close? It's ready to close. It's just this queue bridges you should see go over the bridge and Thomas Telford. One suspension bridge. Not who is your favorite celebrity from the island of Anglesey? And don't French. Yes, she reformed. That's my main now. That's the main one and you know. Kate and wills lived here for a while I. Do know that what about my favorite one is Seth Sefton? The Medieval court poet? That's my favorite see. I like could bring any person back to life. It'd be him. Love his poems could stuff four. Session And I would go and see. Paris Paris melting God compromise. It's absolute shuttle. Anglesey edition of monopoly, and it's the one of the Browns squares on it. Yeah genuinely and the the park lane. The is it blue blue purple scratch is just because there's loads bleach tros. So cute! Wow, this is a couple of minor on Paris mountain since the Bronze Age. That sounds pretty good. Don't want to I. Don't WanNa Angle. See Spray new. This stuff. Pick this king off the seat on Save King off the seat. No alleged. Isn't it the King Arthur? Not this bet that yeah, okay all right? So. You. You weren't born in anger to be up. You're on a farm. You grew up on a farm in anger. This this very very far, so I eight months old. When I may okay, he's alive. Yeah Yeah, and I think I saw view A. You're talking about Because, he always got propensity for quite dark subjects in your comedy series of this new comedy in unison, serial killers, and at the shows I would just say, and you talked to Chris Evans before. The before we still have to do is about. Offending P. Small Children Welsh the Welsh. As we call. I'm. I'm Joking Coast Wise I. Love I love the Welsh and. Is that being brought up on a farm. You have to say some pretty. From a young age, you're seeing some pretty dog stuff I guess severe, if you. I'm assuming where you've gone. Amal's Yeah I. Grow Slaughtering Sheep and cattle, and I guess I didn't realize how. Much horrific stuff I was. Not a witness to I guess rather than Lex objected to. So stuff I would talk about. Thinking was completely normal, and the children around me would be crying. Because like the phone, life is very hard, and nature is quite cruel so I coming in telling everyone about a so sometimes when m sheep a you has too many laps. So she's got full anything. She could do a good job of three. And another you as a Islam's of died, what you'll do is you'll take one of the dead. Lum's your skin it and then you take one or the other Lum's, and you put it in the alum jacket, so she smells it and thinks it's Ho one and then adopted and brings up and then event. She is hoax out the dead skin, and I remember telling this was like eight or nine as I so good judge jeans. Everyone's like. Hot Woman East detail, but like when you see all that kind of stuff, and you see you see dynamos and you see. Animals brought back from the brain can. My mom was amazing because she was the farm, and she basically did lots of sort of like rudimentary surgery now in a weird way, she was sewing stuff together. I mean it's like. Adas round where we are, and they would solve a bite sheep's faces if they got too close. Oh, I watch her like I just sit there and watch like irrigate wounds on a on a sheep's face and. Like Scott here that she just so up because she had like. You know one of those things she do on the sheep and. Together and stuff so like I watched, I watched my mom fix a sheep's prolapse with baling twine like you. Just you see all this stuff and you just think it's totally normal because using your announced. Has that childhood and then you go to play the PDF housing like they have a swimming pool and that Dad's a lawyer? Everything's a bit different. So if I was to make a human centipede, your mom would be a great person to help me out with that. And she's got sort of like. You know that sort of The reserves women had during wars where they went to their mouth, shut, and just a crack on she's. Like, mom, I really need you to do so some people together. She'll be like. Okay fine. Make sure your father feeds the dogs. She's incredible, okay? That's interesting. Is that. That was just a journalist thing of that. I've saying those things. You've been in more interested in that kind of dark side of comedy. Would you think it's now? It's more like growing up. There will always books in the house about its and. Weird animals and Critters Wala Ji and things like that, and like I might further who had now used to religiously read hand the bus cables to announce terrified of it and I and I used to books on tape I. Listen to Alfred. Hitchcock today, kids series called the three investigators also, his name was put to it when they'd solve mysteries creepy. I used to that a book on site. At the lost world we should about dinosaurs, Frankenstein and Dracula and so I was just immersed in Scary stuff I think that kind of fear. That's what I get real excited about. Let the duck the your is off. You don't know what stark like. So many times with the sketch great people. It's really dark in like fucking. List of we see if we throw away that this is, this is trying to be light, hearted accessible. And do you think because obviously companies changed a lot in the last decade and that kind of darker side of comedy and I know that the in. Philly, you're kind of you all covering those dunks objects. And in a in a forward-looking way I think, but is it as it becomes more difficult to that dark comedy as tastes have become like a little bit more. Reserved about stuff like that. Yeah, that's interesting and I think we have really have. Generally the benefit of Ocala is that when we're being irreverent doc subjects, they are usually coming out with the backstory of fifty hours listening to us being empathetic, so you can be a bit like you know you come. Be Contrary because you've kind of end it. And I definitely think. We noticed it gains. Audiences were being so of more. I guess not sensitives, not the right word they would just stem. Sydney going. Is this all right to laugh? And we worked so hard on making sure we will always coming down solidly on the right side like I think is fine to me. No play with those edges and push boundaries, but if someone says culture out in a joke, you should always be able to have the courage of your conviction to to say no. No, we I promise. You thought about this or similar if it's about a group of people say. If that group of people are in the room, you should still feel comfortable doing it is always think and and I think now audiences are having that conversation with themselves so I think if you'll being rigorous about your approach Sarang comedy. What subjects you cover? This. How did you feel about because. Back into this stuff I was doing in the noughties was. was. Everyone was pushing things as far as they could. Really, and there's definitely been a you know but I think I always even in the nineties we were still we would always discuss the repercussions of unwanted. What the point of them was! Saying I don I think I think I can pretty much defend nearly everything. As not just necessarily good chances are it's it's gratuitous. GRATUITY is is poverty, I think when I think the thing that's changed is now things get taken out of context a lot more readily easily. And because the social media. Just even like this and I just There's a thing that came up this week, so there's a group of people on twitter. Who Because one day I tweeted? When Sam Smith. Came out saying they wanted to be the. Pronouns and I said Chile justice polite to cool people. Buy Whatever they want to be called. You would just do that as a course of action so this and then a lot of. You know Gremlin. Like people included grey linen. Got In touch me. That was wrong and that would mean people with raping people in toilets if we started doing that. And so I didn't. I replied to two people, and then there was this avalanche people I stopped replying to anyone because. It's not worth I don't like these people I. Don't know where they're coming from I. Wasn't I could understand both arguments that point out of sympathy for? Some of the feminist arguments that that. I did have point actually. These people maybe think now you can all go fuck off. Anything I signed the way they the way they came was just awful, but I stopped. Replying to anyone, but then someone said within that conversation retiring has replied to all the men who've posted a none of the women and so. I don't know what sex they were I didn't check that. But you know. I just stopped replying very quickly and then even now someone put list of people. Who Will Not reply to women about subject nine replacement so this week? Twitter I picked up personal and said this isn't in any way. But the way that like something taken out of context and something that stated by someone, because even grandma and it was gonNA reach Y Y. You're prior to the women, not the men, and then I couldn't reply to anyway because he was a man of I replied to. Separate. But I wasn't doing that, but I couldn't say that's not what I didn't do that because that would be pretty much, but you know it was amazing. How that among some people that is that there's a fact about me. I am a I'm an anti-feminist because I want let me respond to men and not women, which I don't think you. If you reflect twitter, feed would bear even as a regular thing, but you know that if you take one joke, might one joke, and you can take junker Michelle I didn't two thousand seven and putting out on twitter and people go. Oh God. But within the context of the show it would work is you know it? It worked as the journey of the character Richard. Herring check so yeah I. Mean I think things have changed in that way, but I think yeah. I would hope you can still. And I still think for most people I think most. The vast majority of people don't actually give a fuck which isn't a as isn't a positive thing, but makes people think I still bamboozle by most of these these arguments about this, but yeah I mean I think it's not. If! You A- confident that you understand why the the target will joke water is. In in my case is nearly always myself. Then I. It sort of find, but yeah, it is. It is a win. They I'm glad that I'm glad that. Dark humor is not been ruled out in the you know the for example that we start talking about the hung over pregnant sketch of. Film, you know got you say some people get well this period blood in. Is that too offensive and. It's the opposite of that is is actually it's the minute you said that that he. Is Weird, but. People would. Would not want. Yes, that's so that's. You can't take into account every single criticism. You get something you've. GotTa. Come from your own from your viewpoint, but yeah, it's been. Thirty Years Obviously I've seen a lot of changes in. In. What is acceptable, unacceptable company, but I think a lot of the stuff in the ninety s that would not look back and go. That was awful. I felt quite I. Felt I was saying other people doing those things and feeling quantum factor that time, so I think that's probably why I can still wet now because I didn't. Didn't didn't I? Didn't really enjoy. Stand up in the you have. The male dominated lavish. Stand up with the ninety S. I kind of felt really embarrassed about. And I think means to sort of largely that we were in loaded and things occasionally, but we are always embarrassed when we were. It not like all right. Wait loaded. But also that we all like thing I think is important is. Like, don't we reserve the right to grow and changes people like I definitely would understand. I'm show if someone. Went through my twitter that stuff's I'd be like that. It's fucking horrific. I don't know why felt that was funny. That may be some like. Edgy twenty-three-year-old Castle an on an. It's the whole thing like. Especially when you're taking tweets from someone history I'm being like they. They use this word what they was. The I, mean they? Do it, but yet Mari Black the brilliant pay. They'll be like. Oh, look what she said, but Matt's was like. Oh, she's foul mouth and she stupid. No this kind of stuff like but look. She's an incredible impatience. Passion she. Don't get to dismiss her body of work because you manage to find one tweet where she doesn't come out of a brilliant. If you're going to be a pious also so like look at what people are doing what they're putting out in the world, not just what they're saying what they doing like. Will look like with you like. With when you do on, November nineteenth such a fucking thankless bull, like thing to do to raise money for refuge, unlike if you're going to take away from that, you don't care about women like that's not. That's an agenda that someone's bring into to the table. That just isn't isn't true. Yeah well it's. It's interesting to see all that stuff, but yeah, absolutely right and I really high. I hate the idea of anyone making A. So bad that there is no, unless it's then driving a bus through school Yuksel. Bring, you know there's. There's no way back from two sets have an opinion. And then what do you want if they if someone? There's this idea that people are hypocritical if they then changed mind, but that's surely what you want want to. You digging up all this stuff it's it's fascinating. I think that's what has changed as opposing. Comedy is just an everything's on record. Thankfully most of the stuff I did. As a teenager or a young in my twenty s you know is not accessible to anyone. Terrible terrible. Thanks you. Might you know but I think you know? Basically we would write a diary in my diary I've read bits of diarrhea and shows in headmaster, son and A lot of awful stuff in there. That I wouldn't like people think. Belief that. Better anyway, yeah, it's it's. It's interesting, but you know I I. I can't see comedians changing that much that they won't be dark streak. There can be at most comedians have at least a doc streak in them jug, celtel backstage the seldom on stage. And this and I think it's it's about whether you trust the person I surprise. The audience has to trust the, and if they do trust you, you can sort of say anything because they know what the you have that complicity of friends that you can do you do with your friends with an audience, if the audience trust us in that way, they know. That, you're coming from the right place if you're employing irony or if you've just you just pushing things into place to. Because because a lot of companies, surely about That release valve of the world is often awful place. Let's joke about the awful things that happened so that we feel better about as well as well as less. Joke back nonsense in Rosa chair selves while we're in this. In these off. Anyway, we've. We've been so much fun talking to you. We've gone ages already. Combined is unbiased. Fresh congratulations on the Carolina bursary. This year. There's fantastic very glad to see that and it's a lovely thing to get. I'll be on a need. Officials go ideas a little bit dog for them. Well Caroline was had a very dark streak to and we could street, too, so I think I think she would appreciate it when it's, so we'll we'll. We'll carry on seeing the covert arms. For how long this goes on my presume, we'll see yeah. And then one day. Maybe we'll get to kick again. Not Be Nice. Yeah, and so hopefully the tour might might be back in the autumn spring. It's been moved been moved to the and so it's on my website. If you'll come and see me all the research scheduled dates, but we'll just see what happens. I. Ca I mean? I can't wait to start? Continue again, but. In the meantime does. Thank you housing I really appreciate. It's been really great. Thank, you so much for doing it. Good luck with everything I hope we all get out through. Get out the other side live. That's the main thing. Let's gentlemen. Thank you very much success next week for Richard? Osman, thank you for watching. I'll put the actual now goodbye. You have been listening to us with me rich on my guess Kerry McLean. All between you choose the music by. We all know that we. Reminded of that every single fucking week. What's your problem? I would think I'm having a breakdown. What's your problem? The I would like to thank per per dot co dot UK for the. Very fantastic help in. Helping me research guest now before like Jerry, I would like to thank Chris Evans, not that one gum phenomenal work over this period in keeping this show going and getting loaded up. Onto makes more than one mistake week putting video, so you know we should respect to that. I would like to thank my wife Katie. Being fantastic. I am indebted to my decorative produce is called. Nikki Yankovic. We caught him weird young. On that's what we called him. During the recording us because it's like weird Al Yankovic. I mean you might even be pronounce. Yankovitch is young VAC. Bay still works upon is a good one in that. He was a bit weird. Worth from two level. Thank, you depend walkers of course for work instead on this series. This is a fuss. Go Faster, stripe, dot, com and sky potato production. We hope you've enjoyed. Please go to go faster. Stripe comes patches become a fad jet going to twitched up. TV's slash having to watch more content Gotora Hollas CODA VK and if you're a member and a badger in we got. And there's a new one of them as very excited. Thanks, for watching and listening, and or if you are listening, because this doesn't go on the video. Goodbye am robot goodbye I have gone insane. Happened Goodbye.

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365: No Such Thing As Enough Money For Comic Relief

No Such Thing As A Fish

21:39 min | Last month

365: No Such Thing As Enough Money For Comic Relief

"Hi everyone welcome to a very special many little episode of no such thing as a fish. Now if you remember last week we said we were about to do a twenty hour podcast with thirty five incredible guests and guess what we did it. Thank you so much to those people who joined us that crazy people who stayed for the whole twenty hours. I don't know what you were doing but anyone who came to any of those sections and especially anyone who donated thank you so so much so thought we have made over a hundred and fifty thousand pounds for comic relief. Some of the best causes around the world. But we won't do and the way that we can do that is by you guys catching up with all thirty five sections because we are putting them on youtube. This episode. the you're about to hear is a little taste of conversation with richard osman that the host of pointless house of games bestselling author really hope. You enjoy it if you want to hear the full thing. You can head the on a youtube page. Wha- over the next two weeks we will be putting up all of the sections. Maybe three a day something like that. And that will be chats with people like michael palin with people like stephen. Fry's sandi toksvig shop because sandy Carey mulligan who might have heard has just been nominated for a little bit of an oscar this week. Richard curtis. there was an amazing bit. Were tim mentioned did a song for us. Honestly each one of those sections is so much fun in its own way and the way that you can watch any one of those will be to go to q. I dot com slash comic relief. If you're thinking well. I don't want to listen to those incredibly talented and funny people just want to give money to come at relief. Well you can do that as well and to do that. You go to comic relief dot com slash fish that will take you to a just giving page and honestly if you can spare as little as five pounds it will make such a massive difference to people all around the world especially in a year when charities of really really been struggling to corona virus. Anyway i really hope you enjoy this little chat with richard i suppose on with the podcast elegant beca. Welcome back in his time to move on to our next guest and boy. Do we have an exciting one. We have someone who is i. Guess the biggest quizzing personality on tv. You'll name from hausa games. You'll him from pointless but just as a side project. He's also found that the bestselling fictional author debut book out in the history of books of things that he does. You'll know it as the thursday murder club research scientist to happen. Fats number eight. It is mr richard hell you. We are birds. How's it going on right really. We've raised forty five thousand pounds since since going which is very exciting. We had a tornado. Thirty five thousand. So we've exceeded that and yet if you will all your events watching now can contribute as well. We would be hugely grants all on forty five thousand one hundred and fifty. Well let's get. We're decided you pro the fact so soccer fact number eight and that is i have offensive. It's it's he wants to be millionaire related for recently. We'll get on sick but my facts is man who wrote the saints he wants to be millionaire also wrote mistletoe and wine Gentlemen cookie stratton Has been around for years and years musician. Musical director also wrote mistletoe. Wines from musical from a cliff of it one night in the ballot for it but for years also right theme music for senator. Do lots of ill remembered shows like telephone numbers and then you get the cool saying that within the pilot in a couple of times just think. He wants to be millionaire. We not happy with song. We've got which was written by a people still not happy with Is there anything you can do. He sat down with some put. Something together strange and stuff like that Called the days later put that's songs tens of millions in the history of television. They used to say thin. Shoot around the wealthy millionaire and weakest lake one of their services that waste a case. Are you by the look by the set by the graphics by music. She's always case. So yeah. every state in america every time after don piece is the million scene. It's not moloch not that melodic because well that's the thing you couldn't whistle it right now. They that you meant to be able to sing along to it. And i can just about who wants to be whilst to be that little ella see the right bit to the right. We can just make second seven offense. Not hop it is based on the musical sub. Who wants to be a millionaire. I think he that. So when he say a whole the whole blood from the era does from fiddler on the roof. Bus they but someone in the chat will know what. It's obsolete when you live. Normally we have toxic tells us these things. Across the nsa. We shut down our computers. I am to ring up my mom and ask her answer. The question the pilots of Millionaire actually the first episode. That went out. I think the was broadcast. It forty six percent of the title. Tv audience at the time. And i mean it was. It was so huge. Chris town and said the day off to the steps so bent out. Someone shouted him from a passing lorry. Phone a friend and he said that happened every day. For the next fifteen years i host you badly three sites that someone looking at the saint phone a friend is the when you sit in the makeup chair as well as your new contestants chad this if anyone ever quiz every single man notice of course this down says sides space single on call make so many people watching who would have been one of those people crying into that in your nervous and so yeah yeah mentioned. Do you get like people shouting things you in the street like central african republic. Call a one of the things. People always just shout points to the street other people walking posse might of just seeing some point. I get myself appointments honestly. What these days is his house against the thing to get more as much as pointed as as people saying oh count them really was on tonight thanks so much. I think they think until they know reading common council. I think there have been time. So maybe they just leave like that. Episode is hundreds of billions of us we. What's on inflammatory. Introduced hunger on strong. And welcome to countdown. But the reason is because the auditions accounts down and we were generally thinking because you know he was doing quite these view of time and we saw daytime show and then we got info that he was doing an audition countdown and we feel if he's doing that also as glitzy off the back of that we thought let's get him in and he came in and then we had those so we can't countdown. He will do any daytime. What's your favorite unfeatured richard. You must have favorites. Jian is starts. I think from the from the seventies despite is actually quite if they play. Like if you're watching you the best italian just something in this With them but you can. I always think that kicks off but superstars is the one yeah absolutely. It's so brilliant. If you if you haven't hood little that go into show it embassy to island the other day hard actually. This was a few months ago. But that the inspector gadget theme chewed on the mysterious cities of gold thing chewed on the hebron theme. Shane and jason the wheel warriors. Newest people of a certain age will all written by the same guy shuki levy and he also wrote the israeli nine hundred ninety one year vision sub contest entry. Which i haven't heard amazing right because they everyone is absolutely by pentagon. jay is just a big old plagiarism. The same sonic the hedgehog. It's infected goes did it to that. Yeah that's one of the mountain king. Same head show. He's just slightly changed. The timing matin king wasn't based on host the planet's particular stab of brazos. That owns or something that he worked from in coping about this whole society. Today i think it was for net you They had the choirs. That's in the song fade out. They weren't able to faded out properly at the time. So what they did was they had the choir in a different room and they slowly close the door and then once again. If we were editing this this might end up in the final saturday. Not true my favorite fincher because of facts is the seinfeld seeing chain. Now i've always. I've always loved it. Because i love seinfeld and sand up at the beginning so for anyone that doesn't remember is that all baseline but it was done on a sense. What i didn't realize was that. For the first i think it must have been eight series. That scene was re recorded for every single episodes because it makes total sense. Seinfeld is doing stand up different beats to wear. His joke is gonna wind each time. So this guy used to get the footage of the latest stand up in front of seinfeld and he would live jam. The scene shoe for every single episode to all those moments in when because see seinfeld coming to a beat in the something like two hundred episodes that eat regrows it or address try and if that chain could you tell at the end it was losing some of its elected when the circus when used to see danzig hulce's dancing to the music new the hoses to dance to the music. They don't they play the music to match. Whatever the hell hole is doing but seinfeld is the whole. Imagine aria comedy if you've just ruined that magic for children in the nineteen fifties still. My favorite. june is also the most well known piece of music in the uk. Parni according to a two thousand. And i think it was two thousand eight Dundas correct speech understood. God save the queen into number two. But i didn't realize very not satisfied. It has a spinoff called. Julius theme written by one of eastenders creation is not sweating. You know when you get an ending which is a bit more poignant and it doesn't really suit the boom boom boom boom and then julius themed comes in and it comes into but once in year really if you get a the state not must be a big moment as a nationwide a had a big hit by liberty sentence. Anyone can fall in love. Needs dotson is angie Also six back in those days you had besides and i wonder what that must've been used to. If used to watch bolt side in the day at the very end they would throw doubts and try and win the big prize and if they win the prize theme and if they lost the price they would have the same theme soon but in a minor key off the so sometimes they release the teams of made they charge you think of the highest chancing dvd. You never kiss shot right so to be barney or builder seat for you. I here i bet match was number one. Suicide is painless and another number one. But this right that okay. Anyway it's gonna divide a pig this going to divide the rape. Because you've named a lot of songs that went to number what so clearly that tight but a million people in one thousand nine hundred both the teddy tubbies the jud i believe that in the uk them weighing in. I'll see you at the time. That democrat for the sharks but bob. The builder was which i think. Dan mentioned the builder. The builder not only had a huge number. One hitch second East i'm bob. The builder released a version of mambo number. Five which also sold four hundred thousand copays ville the the number five. Yeah and change the lyrics friendly lyrics of the same. it's all about women sexy. Mount baker to say okay so on member no before that was the theme into something else. That was the theme tune. To one of bill clinton's democratic convention home the arena nine hundred and it was it was set to be like the proper walk in walkout music until someone pointed out the last minute that did contain the line. A little bit of monica in my life tonight isn't that lubega is from how he's champion. I mean i just didn't know he was did he did right. Could we count rich it out for a second. Did you guys know he was. Gentleman thankfully is the singer of mumble number five not looking very lasted solve. It doesn't sound like you know. Calvin est rid member number since that. Those names quite dramatic. Monica angela. quentin username helga hill. I think i know the oldest team shown and the world is almost a thousand years old. That's i mean it's correct. He's won the money. What does what prizes tea towels or something. It's the really very old show. And it was a weird question because the joe cancer is the same as the real answer and this is something that was quoted by how google in the story of music and he pointed out that as a twelve th century piece which is a gregorian chant. It was written. We thinking about eleven ninety eight. We their own nasal up and he is right if you listen to. It is very similar to that. It is a little bit more. It's not exciting. And then it sort of stuck around. As a theme in various changed through the centuries up and prokofiev stopped the twentieth century. And then do any of you know what if you this who wrote the theme tune for top ten cops rich. It was one of the cats some of my favorite events. Oh yes so nobody next. It was richard from swayed brothers in sweat. Why don't we get him on code. Isn't it with League strangelove this white house in front in the machine and they put together with it is still money out of it today. Obviously cats does countdown. We find launches. The countdown theme music continues with the cats. But because it continues for that so it's nice now we can make millions millions millions of millions. You know everyone knows. That's the case to write a jingle. That's used as a theme. Shane and no one can ever do. It doesn't always work. So for example in nineteen seventy-three. I love this fact. The theme june lost at the summit wind was released as a as a pop single hop on it was released into the singles chart and i say it horrible Ronnie hazel housed richard. I mentioned you know. His name came up with so many things. It was the bbc light. Entertainment music director So let's be all you being served Reggie perrin yes minister. Some of do have them the to ronnie's blankety blank generation. Can you could spend a whole evening. What should bbc output. And he would have done pretty much the whole thing but after and he conducted the british The british servicemen entry seven times in know great. Great figure musical competition but after he died. Several of his victories mentioned is amazing. Fact which is he also wrote. S club seven's reach. Well hang on dead absolutely didn't because it was just it has been banged up onto his wikipedia page and the the times the independent the guardian. All these papers just sloughs it right there right reach a avon sell their own stuff that they ask them seven allen hopeful countdown to and he. It's really nice when you listen to countdown. The theme tune is the sound of students being given grants because the royalties Go zoo underprivileged students at leeds college of music isn't a cashless countdown. You know the fifty cents. The money is set on the students. Fifty percents his guidance. My brothers what we need to wrap up. Thank you so much richard. We told you the four some a long side so this is this is a for us and can i just say everybody what you're doing sounds oh thirty five minutes thirty five people What you're dance credibly difficult just old through the night and stuff like that. You're brilliant wail nights a week off the weight. You this incredible costs and do study five infused the study. Five mistakes Duff my everybody please these these make this four. Incredible incredible thing couldn't be more capacity invites. Thank you an onerous well and this is good law. Be watching not the whole thing. I thank you so much. Thank you richard guzman. Everyone we will be back in just a few minutes. Signed with our next guest for number nine is sue perkins say okay. That's it Hope you enjoyed that Like don on. Richard said there is a ferry quick way that you can give money right now. Too comic relief nice to go to comic relief dot com slash fish. And that will take you to odd just giving page and if you want to watch all of the sections that we did with all of the amazing people. Those videos can be watched three a day dot com slash comic relief. We'll be back again on friday with a normal show.

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Samin Nosrat: Discovering Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat

Chewing the Fat

45:27 min | 1 year ago

Samin Nosrat: Discovering Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat

"<music> welcome to chewing the fat the yell sustainable food programs podcast that looks at the big complicated world of food and agriculture. I'm your podcast host. Irwin lee our last four episodes that featured speakers. We invited to campus his last fall before moving on spring lineup with guests like farmer and actively perelman. We're taking a brief break but that doesn't mean we're leaving you without an episode from the archives of chewing the fat this week features are chat with chef educator writer and now netflix star so mean nosrat sa- means now a critically acclaimed cookbook salt fat acid heat was still in works in two thousand fifteen curious about what she had to say about her early inspirations for cookbook or what she hopes historians might read her cookbook as timeless well listen on as she chats with the l. sustainable food program alum austin brunelleschi as part of chewing the fats twenty fifteen women in food series hi everyone this is austin denver near ski on behalf of the yale sustainable food program. This is part of a series of podcasts that coincide with our chewing. The fat speaker series which happens throughout both semesters but this semester were focusing on the theme of women in food. It is my pleasure to introduce some enough asrat. <hes> who is a chef teacher or should i say cook you can say what she is a cook teacher and writer from from berkeley and she has a forthcoming cookbook coming out called salt fat acid heat due out march twenty seventeen. Tell us a little bit about how so you sort of came to <hes> wanting to read a cookbook. Oh wow <hes> well. I've always wanted to write a book. I've always wanted to write an so cookbook sort of naturally came out of my cooking career. I i always <hes> i've always pursued both simultaneously and even as they they started cooking. I was already writing <hes> and this particular book has a good story because i started cooking at a restaurant called shape and niece in berkeley which is a beloved restaurant. That's been there for a long time in one of its hallmarks is a changing menu daily changing menu that changes with the seasons and i i when i started cooking. I knew nothing and i was coming into these menu meetings every single day with the chefs and two pm we'd sit down and the chef jeff who'd written the menu would sort of go through his vision for all of the dishes and then just assign a dish to each of the cooks and the restaurant sort of has its tradition shen culinary traditions <hes> in all of all of the mediterranean coast all the way from spain through oh provence and niece down the coast of italy and then sometimes things appear on the menu from northern africa or from iran or india or even mexico and so every single we'll day we'd be cooking all of these different things and i couldn't believe that all of the cooks knew how to make everything no matter what it was and most of the stuff at that point i was nineteen years old. I hadn't even heard of yet and so i just sort of had this perpetual headache and i felt like i was always behind treading water trying to figure out what they were doing and it was really mind boggling ogling 'cause they would be assigned a dish and then go into the kitchen and start cooking it no one ever asked what temperature the oven should be sat or how many minutes something should cook for or all of the things that are specified in recipes. We never used cookbooks and so i just i didn't understand kitchen. It's always moving so quickly. There isn't time for some nineteen year old kid who knows nothing to ask you questions every five seconds and so i just always i was compiling all this information i am. I didn't understand how it all fit together and after about a year of really just working hard and paying attention. I started to see a pattern in the everything we cooked. No matter what cuisine it's food was inspired by <hes> we'll really had four things in common and the cooks were always paying attention to salt fat acid heat as in the temperature temperature and so that could boil down to just two temperatures high and low there were really super even on the ovens we use most of the specific numbers on the temperature richer dial had been worn off so we would just tell the temperature in the oven by sticking our armin seeing how hot like the air the air was hitting it but i i yeah and i remember this moment. I had sort of this like you know lightbulb moment and i went to one of the chefs and i said oh. I think i figured something out. I think i figured out it's all about salt fat acid and he isn't it and he just looked at me and he was like duh like everyone knows that and i said no. Everyone doesn't know that nobody told me and no one has ever told home cooks and i was just like i'm going to write a book. This is so simple it really clarifies. Everything and i'm going to teach people how to cook and then <hes> even like got out. Illegal patent started writing and then i was like okay i'm nineteen. No one's gonna listen to me. So probably i should put this aside so that sort of the system became the system that i used used to sort of file all of the information that i learned over my cooking career and then eventually i started teaching other younger cooks and then other cooking classes classes and in two thousand and six i asked the writer michael palin if i could audit his class and he resisted at first but then he let me in and and eventually he asked me to teach him how to cook <hes> as a part of the research for a book that he was writing about sort of the history of cooking and human nature and culture and <hes> very quickly after i started teaching him he picked up on my obsession with salt fat acid and he and he would sit down on record with me every once in a while so he'd have <hes> quotes for me and my own words to use in the book and at one point like in one of our first interviews he was like what what is the deal like you're so obsessed with saul facet and he and i was like oh yeah you know that's my system and i always thought i'd write a book about that but i don't know i just never did that and he was like there's is your cookbooks. I mean like turn this into a book. Make it a curriculum and turn it into a book and so and in the meantime had been bringing him every week an idea for a different book and every idea brought him was horrible. He was always telling me it was terrible and i should not pursue those which i think having someone who really at its ideas for you as a great gift but he also also really supported this one and so i did exactly what he said i turned it into a curriculum and i taught it for three or four years and then i really sat down and turned that curriculum into into into a book which has been a big project. It's been three years now. I've been working on. It and i have another about another year. So what's format. Is it mainly recipes yeah. It's different which i'm really excited about because i think for me i feel like we're typical cookbooks which are often very beautiful wonderful and inspiring on on certain sort of sensual levels. Don't often teach you the actual mechanics of what's going on and cooking and so there's sort of this broad spectrum of theirs herald mcgee who is sort of my idol who wrote this amazing book on food and cooking which is just this like science encyclopedia of what's happening happening in the kitchen and then at the other end of the spectrum there is the most beautiful you know books that are mostly pictures and maybe have recipes but maybe not or or or maybe the recipes are tested but maybe not and so it's really more that you're drawing inspiration from the way things look and and i just felt like neither was sort of the most useful for the everyday home cook and i wanted to try to figure out something where it's beautiful will and useful for everyone or for as broad of a range of people i've noticed and learned over over my over my experience of teaching people that <hes> people learn differently you know i'm really visual learner people a lot of times learn by making mistakes in the kitchen and learning what not to do the next time <hes> <hes> and and also people learn by seeing and so i have tried my best to figure out ways to incorporate visuals and stories of my own aha moments a lot of mistakes that i made and learned from <hes> there is some very basic science definitely not a scientist but i've i've done my best to sort of understand the chemistry of what's happening and explain it in in plain and kind of fun english and working with this illustrator who i adore who i've like ice doctor dr for years. I've just been such a huge fan of hers. Her name is wendy macnaughton and <hes> she i think is really special and talented in part because because of her own background part of which is a social work background and so she has this incredible way of organizing and presenting information in really we hilarious and hopeful and informative ways she sort of human live info-graphic maker with a really good sense of humor and so and so even though she hadn't done a ton of food related illustration when i came across her work. I just knew something about the way she presented. Things visually would would really work with the way. I was thinking of telling teaching people how to cook so for example. We're going to have flowcharts that helped us help you figure out how to make decisions while you're cooking in the kitchen and we're going to have an x. y. Axis of solids from salad dressings from crimea to lightest and things to dress from crunchy as to most tender you can start to see how things work because just like with salt fat acid and he you know where my point is. If you can master these four things you can make pretty much anything taste good. I want to get things across in the recipe section of the book that you really. You don't need to know fifty million recipes. If you know a few basic recipes just a few tweaks can get you really really far so two very long answer to your short question but the book will be organized. It's almost two books. The whole first part is a narrative <hes> about salt fat acid and he and the whole second in part is a little bit more traditional recipe section but definitely with a lot of amazing visuals from wendy. So what are your thoughts on baking. Which is oh gosh ashby. I'm a horrible well. I'm not a horrible baker. I'm not a natural baker. I always say people either born savory cooks or pastry cooks because you definitely like can be off the cuff improviser or you are born the type of precise person who will make all of your museum pause and have all of of your your little bowl of like measured out chocolate chips and you're measured out everything and put it all in the right order and follow the recipe exactly word for word and only league through years of messing things because i was trying to improvise them or because i assumed that i knew better than the people who had written the recipes have really come to a place where i really do follow pastry recipes faithfully and i'm trying. I'm trying really hard to convey that in my book as well that there are certain places for improvisation improvisation where it's natural and other places where i think really following recipes until you become very very familiar with them and understand what you can change is important <hes> mhm so you sorta <unk> skill at chez panisse which is the sort of food movement mecca under the auspices of alice waters. How does someone who just graduated from college with a degree in english. Get their foot in the door. At this sort of holy ground holy holy land. I wrote a letter so my stories. It's a good one. <hes> my college boyfriend was from the bay area and he he really was who i learned how to eat with. I mean i grew up eating delicious food. My family's from iran and my mom is a great cook but <hes> i grew up in san diego where there isn't huge restaurant culture and absolutely my family like the food we eat at home was a million times more delicious than anything we could get apart from like fish tacos or chinese food in san adia go so i didn't even know what shape and he was. When i came to college and you know that was in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven i started school and that was sort of like the food network was still budding um and young there wasn't there weren't food blog celebrity. Chef culture really didn't exist yet and the idea even of a famous restaurant which someone my orientation week said like there's a famous restaurant here in burke to me that seem so foreign and but once i met my boyfriend he really we spent a lot of our time together eating and since he was from san francisco he took all of his favourite like his favorite ice cream place in this favorite pizza place and he had always wanted to go to shape unease so we saved our money for nine months answers seven or nine months and we save two hundred and twenty dollars which like you know when we bat each other the loser would put the money in their the laundry change or whatever and and we decided if we're only going to shape in east once we would like go on the fanciest night downstairs in the in the more formal restaurant and the day came and we put on her nicest clothes and we went there and you know it was really magical experienced dining there partly for me because i'd never eaten in a fine dining restaurant before four and so just to have so many people attending to us and making sure we had everything and the bread was never empty and the butter and the water in the wine and everything thing it was really it was really magical. The food itself was great but to me. Absolutely it was just like the complete experience was what blew me away and for a desert we had chocolate souffle and when the server brought it she asked me if i knew if i'd ever eaten earth i knew how chocolate souffle if i'd ever had it before and i said no please show me so she showed me how to poke a hole with a spoon and pour the like accompanying raspberry sauce in so that every bite would have some of the sauce and so she waited and i took a bite and she said how is it and i was like oh gosh it's so good it's so good but do you know what would make it even better and she said well i said i was a glass of cold milk and and she started laughed and she went off to get me milk and she also brought us a glass of dessert wine because when i didn't know in that moment and i think she she must have just found it so sweet because i was like nineteen years old was that improper fine dining and once i moved to italy this became abundantly clear to me that really really only children drink milk. After ten like you never even have a cappuccino or like a catholic to after ten a._m. Is considered kind of disgusting by anyone who like with european background who knows how to properly so that i was asking for milk with my chocolate souffle it was it was just plain charming to her like that's all i think it could have been so so it was just really sweet and i was so inspired by that dinner that i i was i worked through college and i was like wow maybe i could work at this place. So so i wrote a letter to alice waters saying had this really inspiring dinner and could i please get a job as a buzzer and i would do anything and brought it in and they directed me to give my resume in this letter to the floor manager and so when i turned the corner into her office the floor manager was the woman the server who had brought me the milk and the souffle and so she recognized me the and i think it was just good timing or something because i think they were really short staffed and so she hired me and i started the next day and just walking through the kitchen. You know my very first job my very first day they walk you through the kitchen which is all lined with copper and the cooks are in their in their beautifully pressed white coats and everything and there's just displays displays of fresh fruit and vegetables everywhere and my memory. I'm sure it's like exaggerated but the cooks like i would walk by them and they would smile and their teeth what spargo like it was just like a cartoon version of beautiful perfect kitchen. It was just so enchanting and so you walk through the kitchen and your first job bob is they have you vacuum the floor and i just remember being like i can't believe they're trusting me to vacuum the floor. Police like from the first second. I worked there. It just felt like such huge honor it was really really amazing and and very quickly that sort of enchanting experience of being around the cooks and admiring them turn n- into me wanting to be a cook so i just started begging them in and eventually convinced them that i was serious and they allowed me to be an intern and then finally they hired me so how did what would what would your story sort of look like if you did that at any other restaurant. How do you think shape sort of central to your wow. That's a great question. No one's ever asked me that before a chili's and you know shape and uses a restaurant that sits at at the foot of the temple of the senses and everything about it is there to serve heightened sensory experience for everyone everyone who works there for everyone who dines there for everyone who has anything to do with it and i there are so many amazing things that have happened in my life as a result of sort of funny dinner and working there <hes> but one of the most valuable is that i got an esthetic education that i don't i think i could ever would have necessarily gotten anywhere else and even if may i mean and maybe some part of the story is me the and the ambitious and work hard so maybe even in a chili's i could have found something beautiful about working there but i think it was more of like a sensory assault like working at chez panisse where everything taught me something about how to live a fuller and better her and more vibrant life and i don't think that could have been the same anywhere else. What do you think of celebrity chef culture as it exists today like you are a professional cooker chef sort of in the in the limelight in the public sphere <hes> along with you know all of these other sort of great minds. Wow that's a big question and i think i would be hard for me to have a completely one sided response. <hes> i think on the one hand <hes> it's been amazing for cooking for the food movement and for cooks to have <hes> sort of greater visibility via the celebrity chef phenomenon but i think that it perpetuates actuates a lot of mistrust moves or yeah just miss truths about what it means to be a cook and and what's the most important parts of cooking and food and being a cook and i think one really clear symptom of that is <hes> there are no cooks. They're sort of this thing happening and a lot of restaurants and i know it's not unique to the bay area and it's really true here new york too. I get an email at least once a week. If not more or text or phone call from chefs for who a- who my friends and some with whom i'm not even i have never met people i've never even met before for everyone's looking for cooks. Everyone is looking for good cooks. There's just a drought of good cooks and or really of any cooks people people more people than ever before i think are going to culinary school <hes> but they sort of immediately graduate and want to be a celebrity chef. They want to be a chef or have their own restaurant and i think one of those sort of magical and very lucky things for me was the timing of my quicken career that that i got in at the last minute before when when still i was i was being taught by people who'd been cooking for twenty five years or longer. I had a lot of incredible credible people to look up to and learn from and i think that's changing a lot. I mean cooking is a really hard career. It choose people up and spits them mount physically and emotionally and financially and there's only so long you can really work in restaurants before you have to go be something else or do something else and for me me. I'm really glad that i've always had writing as my other another really lucrative career but at least something else to do to other things which i can intertwine but <hes> but there there's just a lack of people who are willing to the hard work. I was always a smart kid all of my friends in in school alongside me. They were all the smart kids everyone went to ivy. Leagues you know and i was sort of and i went to cal and people i was around. I was always around intellectually motivated peers and it was this kind of really strange <unk> detour that i took into a kitchen and i had a lot of embarrassment about that in my twenty s because i was making ten dollars an hour and i was mopping the the kitchen floor and i was doing all the hard work and i was you know had my elbows up to whatever in pigs blood or whatever it was and people that i'd known since middle middle school were now like supreme court clerks and going on into medical school and how you know making hundreds of thousands of dollars a year after business school and i didn't didn't have any of that i didn't have any outwards sort of obvious signs of success and that was a really big egotistical pill for me to swallow but i'm also immigrant kid and for me. I really came up in a kitchen and a time where like there was no other thing. Of course i was going to start at the bottom and work my way up because everyone there had also done that. People had started as dishwashers or bussers or whatever and there seems to be something that's disappeared about that readiness to to start at the bottom and to do the dirty work and and do that hard work and now and i don't know what percentage of is celebrity chef culture. That's like glamorized didn't promoted this thing and made it seem like oh. This is completely attainable but you know how many celebrity chefs are there twelve you know and there's hundred there's hundreds hundreds of thousands of people cooking and restaurants in this country so it's just it's not real. There's not really it's not there's a there's a lie being perpetuated and that's something i i really don't appreciate about celebrity culture. Is this like glamorization of job. That's never been glamorous. So i think a lot of things in food you could argue. <music> are sort of <hes> glamorized fetish is on <hes> we were talking earlier about this sort of like buzzfeed affiliation of food <hes> <hes> <unk> you know who what can get the most hearts on instagram as opposed to like what can you know nourish the most her. I dunno satisfy the most senses dances. Let's find we'll find an apt metaphor but yeah i'm wondering to what extent is that sort of interest helpful fool end to what at what point is it hurtful or at what point does it does not make sense. I that's so hard. It's really hard for me to sit here and comment on because on the one hand you know i just i can speak to my own experience. I use instagram lot sane and guilty. I have a really tortured relationship to social media and sometimes i love. I love the idea the dea the i can just be cooking a lunch at home and it's an avocado smeared on bread or whatever and i can find a beautiful moment about that and share that with people and maybe maybe that'll make them want to go and make something for themselves and they love that that can be transmitted through the ether <hes> but i also am at the same same time conscious that every single photo take i move everything just so and i'm like part of the per- the glamorization machine. I'm not proud to do it. I i i always joke that i should start a hashtag called full disclosure friday whereas like show like take two steps back and show the entire rest of the kitchen but <hes> but so i think that there's good parts about it and end less healthy parts about it there there was that great <hes> instagram take the sociology barbie. Did you see that it was it was like hipster. Barbie who sort of just was this amazing parody of every sort of <hes> trope on on on instagram and on social media of like glamorizing the coffee and glamorizing every sort of aspect of everything so in some ways i feel like the <hes> the appreciation of the senses and putting the census i and the prioritizing of the senses that shape has been so such an important <hes> <hes> force in promoting has sort of been distorted via instagram and via social media and via this glamorization on tv and so people people at home are almost these. It's almost like they're they're. What's the word. I don't wanna say fake but it's more like they're it's like a costume version of you know you see some chef doing some grand like making a puree and whistling it on the plate using a whatever and and so you somehow think that that's what you're supposed to do at home or that'll make your home cooking better or more special but really it doesn't. It doesn't make you know those things. These are based there for any chef. Who's doing those things. There's a reason why he or she has chosen to cook foods and present them in a certain way and and i think part of what that glamorization and chef culture has done is it's confused. The general public you know dinner at home can just be dinner at home it. Doesn't you have to be some grand thing cooked out of a cookbook with forty five ingredients and there's sort of this conflation of even. I find i do it. Sometimes i worked so so hard to my own had to stop to stop doing this and to convince other people stop doing this but i'm just so used to writing three or more course menus and eating in restaurants where it's like three or more courses that to me like dinner has come to symbolize three courses minimum but at home it doesn't need to be at home. It can just be rice and chicken and so there. Is this idea idea. I think we're a lot of people have tried to like up their home cooking game or or whatever and and it just gets. It's it's intimidating like like ends up demoralizing. You don't cook anything you just want to go out so in my my hope is like we could just reclaim dinner reclaim home cooking. That's a hatch salman. It's just like a fine line to toe. How does your book maybe aim to do that. How how is information mission presented differently in a way that gives the reader realistic expectations about what they're supposed to be doing. What a lovely question. I love it. Just it's not about the i think about that. A lot and there is for me. <hes> dot was something i struggled with. Actually a lot in the beginning was as an i've learned in this as a person writing a book absolutely if you need to create the momentum for a reader to want to finish the whole book there has to be a sense of authority in my voice and it took me a long time to really <hes> circle around and land on that on that voice appropriately i remember the moment happened the draft where it happened. My editor was so happy because she had been really wanting me to take take ownership of what i was saying and i kept wanting to like refer to the outer outside outside world and say well some cooks this way and some cooks to it this way and <hes> but with authority you know comes uh-huh part of taking a stand is saying yes to doing it. One way is to say is saying no to doing all these other ways and <hes> hum dot com seem harsh and part of what i'm trying to do in all of my work is just to engage encourage people to start cooking more and have more more engagement on their own sensory level in the daily in their daily lives with cooking and with food and so i've been maybe overly sensitive to to what my yes to all those that are the partner to my yes and so it really has been a mental thing that i find it took me so long to figure out how to do it in a way that encourages people and inspires them but never puts down any of their choices and so yes definitely of course as like the child of of alice waters as a cook who came up shape as the daughter of a woman who spent forty percent of my childhood driving all around southern california looking for the best most delicious organic ingredients of course have beliefs about what i hope <hes> how i hope people will shop and how i hope people will choose their ingredients but never in a million years. I put that on someone what i say to someone oh well your way isn't good enough or if you can't do this organic don't do it at all or or or any of those things and it took me a really long time to figure out how do i do that authentically as myself and not hide my own beliefs but not shame other people so one big choice and job and part of this writing this book doc has been finding a place in that voice of encouragement and and inspiration and the other part. I think a big part of it for me. Whenever i pick up any food book is is visually how it feels and and like how it inspires me with the way it looks and most often <hes> that comes in photos i love. I love photography of all kinds. I love beautiful food photography but very early on i realized that photography wasn't right for this book because as of the sort of place where i was. I'm the note i'm trying to hit is i can teach you how to make anything if you can just figure out how to use these these few things these four things and so if i had photos if i had a photo of like a perfect pork dish with potatoes and greens the the message that dots photo is sending is make this if you're pork dish doesn't look like this pork and potatoes and greens exactly and it doesn't the things not brown in this way and you don't use these greens and this pork cut then it's wrong then you're things not hitting the ideal note and so by having illustration one of the i wanted <hes> <hes> <hes> that visual message of what the right at or perfect dish looks like i just felt like illustrations could could loosen that and soft and soften often that a lot so wendy is a great representational artist and there will be obsolete beautiful food <hes> drawings but i think the sort of benefit fit of not having photos is that i'm not sending the message that you have to have the precise ingredients or cook it exactly in this way or that it needs to look look exactly like the photo to be to be deemed a success and so that's one thing that i think i put a lot of thought into and then also using wendy's amazing talents in in terms of infographics and <hes> mm x explaining things visually i think will be helpful to <hes> yeah so there are a couple of classes at yale that are focused on food and food history and culinary history. <hes> i think the cookbook is often seen as this really rich primary source that cannot only be read sort of as a as is a text you know standalone what these recipes are but also the sort of margin alia and like all of the funds formats come in <hes> what sort of choices is and you've discussed a little bit about those illustrations but <hes> maybe what are some some cookbooks out there that have really inspired you. <hes> i know your your approach is relatively novel to <hes> and then also what do you hope what do you hope comes across in the sorta between the lines of oh. Oh wow you recipes if someone yeah if someone were analyzing salt fat acid heat in say fifty fifty years what would they can really good questions. I will say i the one of the choices that i've made both in my like as i write in my language and in in like deciding what <hes> references we make to culture and also also in terms of stations is i hope this is sort of like pasted at above my computer is i want this book to be timeless. Listen and not timely and so. I feel like an in fact i was another sort of vote for illustration rather than photography was i feel like photography and book doc design very often data book and you can look at a lot of cookbooks no like what decade they were published in based on the design and the cover and the photos and stuff and i think about books that have lasted the test of time and a lot of them are illustrated or are just words. You know um. I'm that dr cooking has great sort of pencil drawings. <hes> you know i'm f- fisher who is just like the one the one beat. Has you know there's nothing thing but words in there and so <hes> in a way. I think my hope is that we will strike. Some sort of know that really is is speaks much will last much longer than me. I want my book to lost on the shelves. I want because hopefully when i'm saying i think what i'm saying is universal universal truths and so they they aren't specifically about a style of cooking or certain kind of food that that will date it in that way so that's one choice <hes> i don i am. I hope that that's visible in fifty years. Maybe this podcast will still be around in five years. Someone will hear it and go check the little citation then <hes> and what was the beginning of your question. Could you remind me <hes> yes us. I think i oh i was just wondering <hes> will you sort of answered. It sort of what are the inspirational books. I mean other books. I think that are that have been really inspirational to me. I mean in terms of illustration patricia curtain who's who has the a great artist who's illustrated all alice not all but almost all of alice waters cookbooks she does beautiful beautiful line drawings and i think <hes> and lithographs and her her line-drawings in the art of simple food are just so so beautiful and it's all black and white and to me that's even more masterful you know to not even to get to convey do so much without even in color <hes> but and the list of cookbooks that i love is so long that i'm not even ensure we should get into it but but i will say i am really excited to be working with both wendy and are we are working with the book designer who's so brilliant and i think that working with people who can think about information and and laying information out in the most useful and beautiful way is so fun and cool inspiring and it's one of the best parts of making a book. I don't know a ton about design. It's not you know but i have always been interested in it and in some ways hope that that what you know i feel like what good designed nine does is. You don't even notice good design right just accomplish his task and hopefully in a way if people like can absorb the lessons of the book. You won't even like at some point thinking about salt fat acid heat. We'll just always be on in the background of your mind so ideally if we achieve what we want to achieve it'll come through on so many levels on the way the experience of the book of holding reading it and then of the message of the book as well and what does that collaboration look like i think when we think of someone that reading a novel for example it's a very like solitary experience but what is the sort of meeting meeting of the minds that have oh. It's pretty awesome. Well i am already. I'm a collaborative. I like tend toward collaboration and writing has been for sure really solitariness -tarian times really difficult but <hes> all throughout i've checked in periodically regularly with both wendy and alr- or designer they both live locally in the bay area so we see each other pretty regularly or we're just always checking in and i remember the first time albro came and we came we brought him in a little bit later but wendy and i had <hes> made a what's called a two page spread so both pages two page 'lustration where you open it up and it's both pages of the book and we had made this one that was sort of an instructive spread about brazing and it's super beautiful and so we tried to figure out like should it be horizontal. Should it be vertical and how should the information go and we figured that out and then we're thinking about it both in terms of the book and then what if the book it gets printed into a larger poster and then what would that mean for the illustration and finally she decided to write brays at the top across the middle so she wrote that and then when we later a couple months later met with our designer and we brought him in we showed him the the <hes> the brace thing and he sort of jumped jumped back horrified. He was like what's wrong. We thought it was beautiful. Everyone we show it to all. I see is bra is because for him he's looking looking at it as a book and so he could see the gutter and he was just like bra is across the top and so it's that kind of thing of i love bringing him in and i love having him in from and it's a luxury i think a great sort of rarity that the three of us get to work together from the beginning because every time i have an idea about how to organize or i can sort of distill information into groups but i might not have the best idea about how to represent it visually and the two of them <hes>. That's exactly what they're really good at so i can bring them this stuff and then together we can figure out. Should this be a diagram or if this is going to be a circular diagram graham. How do we fit it on the page the best and what's what's going to you know what's what what do we do so information doesn't get lost in the middle gutter <hes> just yesterday when we're talking about a kind of chart that i've seen a lot of cookbooks and i was like gosh it is really useful but i just don't wanna do that same chart again and we were and i was like could we do it as event diagram and she said no. I just think it's too much information is too complicated and then we realized that the classic chart actually makes the most sense but that we could also adding another layer of information by organizing the produce on their by season and assigning indifferent watercolor to each season so that it will be like a beautiful color watercolor spray you. You know this kind of stuff. That's so fun and amazing and also i think an incredible her. It's a lot of work so much work. It's probably adding six or eight months install process to work together in this way and it's a lot more expensive to bring to humans for whom this is like a big part of their career for almost a year but but <hes> but you know when you have photographer cookbook usually all this photos are shot in four or five days when it's done and so this is kind of been this amazing ongoing collaboration collaboration for which i'm really really really grateful so and it's cool to just have people who have different priorities because we we're always bumping trumping up against each other and we're just trying to make the best possible thing together yeah so in college as i'm sure you know there is a heavy emphasis on network networking as this sort of formal ritual that i think <hes> a lot of people think they're success depends upon and it sounds like obviously you've made some pretty great connections and in who you work with but how did you make those connections well. I would say my my like goto. Thing is writing the fan letter like i wrote a fan letter to wendy. I wrote a fan a letter to michael palin. I wrote a fan letter. Alice waters like i've written a fan. When i was nine years old. I was writing fan letters to my favorite authors. I think there's nothing nothing nothing and in fact when my book was up at auction the editor i chose wrote me like most craziest fan letter ever received a worked i i got a dose of my own medicine and so and so there's just something i think about really getting to know an appreciating associating someone's work and then expressing that to them that makes a big difference. I have i have i. I wouldn't call myself the most personally resilient person you know i. I'm really sensitive but somehow i have a great professional resilience like i will ask for anything and be okay with being rejected and i'll ask for it again and again and again and so that's i think that like the just the like readiness to ask ask and to introduce myself to someone or try and meet them or write them a letter. That's gotten me really really far. Another thing that i think makes a huge difference. That's is something i've been thinking about a lot over the past. Maybe five years a lot more is that <hes> i really wanna work and surround myself alf with nice people and people who are kind to the people around them and generous and giving and so sometimes you meet people who are really well known on for what they do or really great at what they do and they're just not that nice or not that nice to you and to me maybe a different point in my life i would have just sacrificed unlike done whatever it took to work with them or be near them but now i think there's nothing more important than being a kind person and being generous and being nice and so i think that's like maybe the number one rule of who i choose to be around and who i would recommend that you choose to be around so it's nine p._m. I'm in in my kitchen. There's nothing crazy in my fridge but i wanna make some dinner. Would we make <hes>. Do you have eggs i do okay. Do you have pasta yeah okay. Oh that sounds delicious you would either make or do you embrace okay yeah. There's some okay well. There's i would say number one choice. I well my my number. One go to your house is rice like leftover rice with fried egg ingredients eight that probably three or four nights a week but <hes> you could make a delicious for todd. You can make pasta carbonara you could you. I ask for me the thing i always recommend just having une hand because they we are so versatile and yeah i mean you could make pop overs and eat them with jam pancakes. You could eat bacon and eggs a- an egg. A dinner makes you know a thing i always have frozen chicken stock at home and so a lot of nights. I'll just put like spinach in the bottom him of hop into the bottom of a bowl pour hot stock in and then out of poached egg and you have delicious like soup with spinach and stuff and lime or ginger. It's so good we're just raja so oh god yeah the other thing i always have in the fridge parmesan cheese that pretty much will make anything to live from the yelsin food program. Oh graham this has been chewing. The fat salt fat acid heat is in bookstores today and is also a series on netflix to hear more from you can follow at chao simeon in on instagram or visit chausson dot com where simeon has announced her new book what to cook this episode was originally produced by bella napier in austin brunelleschi editing by myself and thomas hagen mixing by ryan mcevoy the yell broadcast studio music by eddie joe antonio and luis state police podcasts artwork by logan howard program support <hes> by jacklyn mono jeremy oldfield mark bomford. If anything said today gave you something to chew on leave us a comment or email set sustainable food at yale dot e._d._u. We're we're always excited to connect with our audience near and far for now wishing you good bye and good eats.

wendy macnaughton instagram writer netflix alice waters michael palin italy iran berkeley editor headache africa Irwin lee chez panisse spain jeff austin brunelleschi