23 Burst results for "Michael Morale"

"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:34 min | Last month

"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Michael morale. We've been waiting waiting for covert 19 vaccines to be developed now waiting for him to get to us, But you can do more than wait. You have powerful ways to help slow the spread right now and protect your family and loved ones too. Here's how Watch your distance. Stay at least 6 ft. Away from folks you don't live with. It's risky to be indoors with him, too. And, of course, avoid. Crowds also wear a mask. CDC reports masses protect the people who wear on pan folks around him. And wash your hands using soap and water for 20 seconds and do it frequently. Vaccines won't make covert go away overnight, but they give us a real chance to finally overcome it. As long as we keep watching our distance, wearing our masks and washing our hands. Learn more about vaccines at CDC dot gov slash coronavirus brought to you by the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services for the one Standing Guard for the eagle eyed for the Knights in shining armor, and for all those who support them. We are Granger, You're experienced safety partner offering supplies and solutions for every industry committed to her. Hoping Keep your facility safe and your people safer. Call click ranger dot com slash safety or just stop by Granger for the ones who get it done. Are you curious about who offers the best deals.

"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:04 min | 4 months ago

"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Is intelligence matters with former acting director of the CIA. Michael Morale. We're back with more intelligence matters. I'm Michael morale. Our guest is Christian, would found herself at the center of one of the greatest analytic questions in SIA's history. What was your assessment of the link between Zarqawi, you know, now firmly in Iraq and quite active his his relationship with the Iraqi government. Great question. Please. Saw reports related to this, but we never saw what was great evidence. We judge that the I asked the Iraqi intelligence service was so good that they had to know all Zarqawi was there. As we said it was a reasonable place to them to be because, like a less access in Mosul was so diverse We also know that he saw it after the heroic bombing. He had some injuries and he needed to seek medical treatment in Baghdad for several months and that some of his fighters were there with him. So many of the administration thought this was proof of Saddam's complicity, but We never saw evidence of the complicity. And I think back and you did not yet when you did not stay. There was complicity in the paper that you wrote. So what happened? Kristin? When this Iraq and terrorism paper was disseminated, it was fairly ugly. I'm as I'm sure you remember. Scooter Libby called Jamie Mystic and demanded that it be Rescinded. I thought it was not helpful, and it created quite a storm on the seventh floor because Jamie stood by the analysts and said, I'm not going to rescind this paper and I believe she talked. Tio John McLaughlin, who at the time was the deputy director And They called a doctor. Right instructor. Hadley, do you remember so I think it was Steve Hadley and told him, the paper was saying. And what I thought was interesting is we never heard the end of that on in the Iraq branch because we kept getting so many Taskings. An information that was classified was leaked. And then we're asked to write papers on what we assessed on the leaked information. It was a very frustrating circle. But I understand or at least I recall that President Bush had a different take. Yeah, he want he wanted. He wanted CIA to stand by what? It believed to be the truth. And I think when we heard that In some of the people on my team, actually more in tears because we were so exhausted and just trying to do the best job we could to play the information show the information as It Wass and not as anyone wanted it to be that it just felt like An incredible validation of understanding that we weren't trying to play. Politics were just trying to play it straight. And it was all honestly nice to able to move forward to focus on force protection because U. S troops were there and the current terrorism threats. This is intelligence matters. I'm Michael morale. You're listening to Christian would a former senior CIA officer and the latest guest in our continuing Siri's of episodes? On really spy stories. So, Christine, I'm gonna ask you two more questions. The first is Secretary Powell's presentation to the United Nations. You know, most of what people focus on in that presentation was Iraqi weapons of mass destruction. But there was a small part of the end about Iraq and terrorism. And I just want to read you a couple of sentences from it and then ask you a question. Eso quote. But what I want to bring to your attention today is the potentially much more sinister nexus between Iraq and Al Qaeda. Iraq today harbors the deadly terrorist network, headed by Zarqawi and associating collaborator of bin Laden and his Al Qaeda lieutenants says Zarqawi traveled to Baghdad in May of 2002 from medical treatment state in the Capitol for a couple of months while he recuperated. During his during his stay, and there was a bunch of his his associates there with him. And then it says, we are not surprised that Iraq is harboring Zarqawi and his subordinates. So that gives a completely different shell right between the relationship between Zarqawi and al Qaida. And then the relationship between Zarqawi and And the Iraqis then was in your paper. Yes. So how did that happen? That is such a good question. So as he was giving the speech we in our branch, we all had copies of the approved draft. So as Many of your listeners may know Secretary Powell came to the agency to sit down and go through sentence by sentence and intelligence report right intelligence support each aspect of the speech, and certainly the focus was on WMDs that should have been, but that also applied for the terrorism story. And so we had the last draft. Of the speech, and as we're listening to it and looking at the draft, they didn't match. And we all were just dumbfounded by this description. So Something happened between us. And The speech being presented. I don't and I'm glad I'm exactly I'm exactly the same place. I don't know. I don't know what happened. I don't know. How that happened. Another question. I'm I'm wondering how you and your analysts felt when you turned on. The Sunday The Sunday shows and on the Sunday shows, where senior administration officials talking about links between Iraq and Al Qaeda that were simply inconsistent..

Iraq Zarqawi CIA Michael Morale Secretary Powell Baghdad SIA Iraqi government Steve Hadley acting director Mosul Jamie Mystic al Qaida Scooter Libby President Bush Saddam Kristin
"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:09 min | 4 months ago

"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"We're back to intelligence matters. I'm Michael Morale. Today we are with this Christian would a former senior CIA officer She is joining us as part of our Siri's on really life. Spy stories. What about what about a group called Ansar? Also, Islam tells about that group and tell us about that story. Absolutely so answer all of Islam. Our eyes we call them was a Sunni extremist organization in northern Iraq. There was Macy made up mostly of Iraqi Kurds. With the goal of creating one true Islamic caliphate. There were consolidation of various regional tariff groups, and they really concluded that they needed to work together to give them greater strength and to widen their recruiting network. There's no question they found safe haven in northern Iraq, and they welcome fighters fleeing Afghanistan because by 2002 there been any number of bombing attacks in Afghanistan. Among those who found safe Haven was Abu Musab al Zarqawi. Who became a prominent figure for us as a senior associate and collaborator, who was loosely affiliated with Al Qaeda. Answer All Assam was one of the that that relationship on sorrel Islam's ties to Al Qaeda. We're a big question in terms of Al Qaeda has ties to Iraq, so I think we looked at Aunt's are awesome from In terms of its activity there in Iraqi knowledge of in cooperation with it in a lot of different ways, so Christian things like the Prague story, and the story ended up Generating an awful lot of questions from both the vice president's office and from the Department of Defense about a possible link between Iraq and Al Qaeda. And let me ask you two questions of you. The first is How well do you think we as an agency? A CIA didn't answering those questions? That's that's my first question. Okay, um, so the answer and I'm just being very honest is not well. I think we As we were learning Maura about each story we would publish. More on each story without giving a sense of why the story had changed. And then there were two major offices that reported on both sets of things and depending on which office had the pen, so to speak. The tone of the material was different, and so as a brief for at the time, and I'm remember you experience this as well. It was a little bit like it was a little mind twisting because the things were so different depending on how you got written and so for policymakers is there reading this? It felt like we were not being consistent. With what we're having to say, so I think it caused them to focus in and dig in a lot more to ask very specific questions as a result. This is intelligence matters. I'm Michael morale. We're talking with Christian would who is talking to us about one of the most crucial issues leading up to the Iraq war? Was there a relationship between Iraq and Al Qaeda? So christen? My second question is, Do you think the policymakers, particularly in the vice president's office, and and the DEA, D We're intellectually open. To the answer being no. There wasn't a relationship or do you think they wanted the answer to be? Yes. And if so, why? What's your sense? No. And yes, I I think In the they believed from the beginning that there was a tie between the two organizations. And this is where I think this vice president's office was quite different from many that preceded it, and that some of his staff actually acted as intelligence analysts in within the office of the vice president. And so what happened? Wass? Information came to them from duty and their own. Officers acting as intelligence officers to them, and it was cherry picked. Which, by what I mean by what I mean by that is that they didn't look at the whole of the data. They were looking for parts of the story of reports that confirmed what they believed was true. Worse is looking at the data and aggregate to say what story was that he was going to tell us. So, as you know, intelligence analysts to the ladder all the time. It's what is the data on? What story? Does it tell? And I think, by the time this story about Iraq's Roland terrorism govern fairly far down the road they believed based on the cherry pick data that they had a They had the right story. So tell us about something called the murky paper. What was it? Where did it come from? Why did we do it? And what did it say? Oh, the murky paper that came out at the end of my tenure is a briefer. And it was written. In the context of some of the administration, using questionable intelligence reports to justify their views that Iraq was somehow complicity in the 9 11 attacks. So then, Didi I Jamie, a mystic. The Didi I know. The deputy director for intelligence is the agency's most senior analyst. She ordered us to write the most forward leaning paper We could Based on the intelligence that hand meaning if we were to apply serious analytic tradecraft to the data set How far could we push ourselves towards the case that Iraq had been involved in 9 11? It's known as the murky paper because it was titled Iraq and Al Qaeda, interpreting a murky, murky relationship, and I want to just briefly read the scope note because it's important Because it was such a different paper. The scope, note says. This intelligence assessment responds to senior policy maker interest in a comprehensive assessment of the Iraqi regime links to Al Qaeda. Our approach is purposefully aggressive and seeking to draw connections on the assumption that any indication of a relationship between these two hostile elements could carry great dangerous. To the United States. So when I delivered this paper, Tio Scooter Libby, who had been asking for it on a daily basis for weeks, it was on a warm Saturday morning. On his back patio in McLean because his family was inside and they weren't cleared, So it was Very well written, and I felt that it wass The agency had done a very good job. Using analytic tradecraft and Moving as far as they could on the analytic line. Unfortunately, that day as I handed him this paper with that as a tee up a bird pooped on it. And he looked at me deadpan and said, Well, apparently there are other opinions. So write who haven't even happened. So I took that copy of the paper myself and handed him my copy. But I kept that bird poop copy for quite some time because I thought, well, you know, Maybe this was a sign of things to come. But comic relief was always in short supply at that time. So what did the murky papers say about the relationship between Iraq and Al Qaeda? So did it say there was a relationship? It did not. It's said that there were contacts. And there perhaps had been some training, but there was no direction. There was no operational control. And that we'll answer all Islam and others may have found safe haven there. It was not Um, a.

Iraq vice president Abu Musab al Zarqawi CIA Michael Morale Macy Siri senior associate Tio Scooter Libby Afghanistan officer Wass Assam Maura christen cherry Christian
"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:09 min | 6 months ago

"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Is intelligence matters with former acting director of the CIA. Michael Morale, the National Security Agency has given CBS News rare access to its secretive Pacific Data collection center. It's the first time outside cameras were allowed inside the Hawaii Cryptologic Center as it's officially known, intercepts, communications and monitors, a region that includes China and North Korea. Just beyond this military checkpoint is the most powerful surveillance organization in the US Have your and cameras usually aren't allowed where we're going. This is NSA Hawaii. Captain Curt Mole leads the top secret facility and took us inside. When have you had civilian cameras in this building before? Well, this is absolutely a first for me. However, We recognize that transparency, Breech trust. Still, we had to blur the pitcher here because everything in this room is classified. It's where specialists listen in on foreign communications. Anything that travels over the radio frequency waves air inside the electromagnetic spectrum. It could be collected. We have the ability to pool items that have been collected worldwide. Much of our reporting even ends up on the desk of the president Thie president has has a harsh words for the intelligence community. What does that do to morale here? Nothing. We're not paying attention to that. We're focused on mission. What you saw was our 24 by seven operations center. There's so much information coming in, though. How do you even begin to sift through it? All humans can only do so much. And so we're looking at ways to where we can utilize a A and machine learning. Teo be able to get the right data to that right analyst. We're back to intelligence matters. I'm Michael Morel. Today we have with us and Newberger, the senior officer of the National Security Agency responsible for cyber security. So focusing on the Russia small group for just a second. And what was that? What was the What was the mission And what were your responsibilities with regard to the 2018? Elections. To the extent that you can talk about that. Absolutely so The mission was in showing the integrity of the 2018 midterm elections, ensuring that we first understood the threat second that we appropriately tipped. All the information we had about that threat to keep partners across the U. S government, sir in the FBI from a counter influence Perspective digest from a cyber security of elections infrastructure perspective. And then finally, that we would support Sabac man, if if authorized to impose costs if there were attempts to disrupt disrupt the election, So after the 2018 elections, president Trump publicly confirmed that cyber command played a role in deterring The Russians in 2018. Are there important lessons from what happened? In 2018 about how we as a country can defend ourselves against this this insidious threat. Yes. So you know, across the government we look at to keep holes of election integrity. One is attempts to malign the influence of population. Whether that is to highlight social discord to highlight issues that Divide the population or to, you know, happened up share inappropriate, You know, share information as part of shaping individuals, ideas and then the second is potentially interfering, hacking into elections infrastructure as part of efforts to change the vote. I think the first piece is the value of resiliency. The sense that you know, once trust is lost. It's very hard to regain. So the knowledge for the American public that there are hundreds of people across the U. S government committed to and working to ensure the integrity of our elections. Um, when it comes to counter influence, though, the biggest resilience is each of us a cz Americans when we're reading something asking, who might be trying to influence me? What is the source of that information? Am I fully confident in that source of that information? Um and then, finally, the role of the role of technology and the role of public private partnership. Um, and as part of elections, integrity, so for us in the intelligence community were constantly watching for which adversaries may be seeking Teo to shape. Populations, thinking to shape an election and then rapidly tipping that two partners or to the private sector to ensure that they're both aware of techniques and are countering them on their platforms. So we've since learned. In fact, last week, the updates from the DNA that the Russians continue to engage in election interference, the Chinese, the Iranians and the punch line of all that for me. Is it's really hard to deter. Foreign interference right? And I'm wondering if it's something special about foreign interference or if it's more about cyber, earthy end of the day, and the difficulty of Seeing cyber attributing if you see it, How do you think about that question? Absolutely. I think it is more about cyber than about elections from a cyber perspective when we look at Feli, both protecting cyber infrastructure and then to your second point about attribution There's complexity, allaying what we call the red. On top of that we may see threats that are talked about at a strategic perspective. And then we and partners across the U. S government are looking to see where does that present itself. Where are the given vulnerabilities in a given infrastructure? Power is when you can leave the two together and say here is a nation state that has intent to interfere in whatever that is an election. Critical infrastructure I p theft. And then translate that to the tactical level to say that network scanning or that vulnerability and hardware or software may well be used to achieve the objective, putting that in place and the most importantly, preventing it. Because at the end of the day, writing a report about a victim and notifying the victim is far less satisfying than being able to put that together and prevent the adversary achieving their objective..

president National Security Agency Teo Hawaii Cryptologic Center Captain Curt Mole Michael Morale US CIA acting director CBS News Perspective digest China Michael Morel North Korea FBI Pacific Data theft Newberger Russia
Intellectual-Property Assets Are Getting More Valuable

Intelligence Matters

37:14 min | 7 months ago

Intellectual-Property Assets Are Getting More Valuable

"As a foreign intelligence agency were responsible for understanding a broad range of threats. Presented by governments to the United States, one of those threats include our cyber threats how nations may be using cyber to achieve their national objectives that might be intellectual property theft for example, to counter department offensively valid by accelerating foreign governments ability to actually productized particular RDA for weapon that may be targetting critical infrastructure of a country. As part of threatening that country or as part of putting pressure on a given country. How are we doing against the cyber threats are we? Barely keeping up, are we catching up? Are we getting ahead of the game or? Is it always going to be hard for the defender. Overall technology is getting more secure. Technologies Belt more securely today. So. The fundamental resilience is is improving known. You have open source products. We have lots of is looking at a given technology and helping find vulnerabilities and address them. That being said for an ever-more connected economy in ever more connected society, and as we build more connections, sometimes systems that were not necessarily built for those kinds of connections we bring and introduce new risks on the third poll the positive side there's far more awareness about those risks and how to approach addressing them identifying what are the most important assets to protect. Seems to be an effort on the part of NSA to kind of open up a blackbox and Kinda shut the reputation no such agency we want to be trusted to achieve or we believe we can uniquely contribute to team USA on either the first step. Is conveying who we are conveying the culture. That's here the commitment to American values. Certainly. When a part of our mission is an intelligence mission in a democracy, you have an obligation to ensure that the Americans. We serve feel they understand the values by which we live. And neuberger is the current director of the national security. Agency's Cybersecurity Directorate. She has held a variety of jobs in both the public and private sectors. We just sat down with an to talk about her career, her and her director. It's multiple responsibilities and how she sees a cyber threats facing our country. I'm Michael Morale and this is intelligence matters. So an welcomed to intelligence matters, it is great to have you on the show. It's great to be here. So I think the place to start and is with your career before you joined the national security. Agency. You had a career in the private sector. Can you tell us about that and tell us what you did in the private sector and then what drew you into government, service. Sure. So I was in running technology at a at a financial services company during that time period when financial services companies really moved off mainframe environments to the Web. Decline server technology. So that piece of both taking an operations and emission and its associated technology and people and culture really Shaked shaped the way I approach a lot of those problems today. And I was raised in in a family where my dad came as a refugee all my grandparents came as refugees to the US and they just. Constantly instilled in US how grateful we should be for the opportunity to be born in America and raised in America, with its freedoms with its ability to pursue one's dreams and and that we owed it for that and. I was driving home from from work in. In two, thousand six, we just done a large acquisition of. Companies of banks, custodian operations. And on the radio, they were talking about the bombing of mosque. Samara Moscow in smaller rock and just the. Soldiers dying civilians dying and the troubles there and I I still don't know why but I thought of my dad and. That's myself. Perhaps now's the time to repay a little bit of of that in some way and. I've been a graduate student at Columbia had a I had a professor tell me about the White House fellows program and encouraged me to apply and I kind of I have to admit was a bit of the New Yorker Countless New York ever. kind of put that aside and for whatever reason I just felt that calling at that moment called him and said I'll apply and fast forward I was assigned to the Pentagon. With zero military background. And you learned a lot about the culture very drawn to that shared commitment and spent a year in the Pentagon worked for the navy and then came to NSA. Couple years later. What did they doing at the Pentagon and the Navy? So I was the deputy chief management officer, the Navy essentially, the Navy had a number of broad enterprise wide technology efforts which they were working again, bring that you people mission. Technology Triangle. And they asked me to help work on a couple of working directly for the secretary of the Navy figure out why a of them were struggling and then help them get on track. So I worked on that and I often get asked by people. How did YOU END UP AT NSA? A pretty funny story in that I had a seventy six year old and I was commuting from Baltimore and the. The work life balance was a bit tough and I met somebody and he asked me about. How he was doing and I commented that I really love the work but it was a little hard for me to do the juggle. And he said, you know I happen to know that NSA standing up you director NSA standing up cyber command and I know they need people with your kind of of background. So how about if I make a phone call there? And I went for an interview commute was thirty minutes and it sounds so foolish but. That was pretty much what it took. Interesting interesting. So the private sector and then the Department of Defence which is as you know this huge enterprise and then NSA and this is a this is not an easy question I know about kind of the similarities and differences of those three different experiences. It all begins with people. In every organization missions have to adapt and change They adopted change in the private sector because perhaps you have a competitor, perhaps the customer spaces adapted. Certainly financial services saw that we're the scale of data was just increasing the scale of trains was increasing and the traditional manual processes couldn't keep up. So we automation with needed to reduce errors and help us keep on track with we're trading was going. Technology could deliver on that, but the the business of the organization had to change to fully take advantage of the technology and the way people did that mission and use technology had to change along the way. So I think in each of those organizations that taught me that for that, that triangle has to be kind of guided together to get to an outcome mission technology and people if you really want to be able to fully. Whether it's take advantage of a market or stay ahead of an adversary in our own mission here in the ICU dod that triangle has to work together and you have to communicate every those three planes together when talking about why the changes needed. So an in your tenure at NSA, you've served as its first chief risk officer. The assistant deputy director of operations, the head of the Russia's small group, and now the head of the Cybersecurity Directorate. Can you take us through your trajectory there how did your responsibilities differ from roll to roll? Absolutely, and so I came into an Santa's small team part of a small team that was standing up cyber command, the chief risk officer role was. was created after the media leaks period of two, thousand, thirteen where we learned that. Really appreciating risk mount looking at in a holistic way across partnership risk operational. Risks Technology risks. We learned that we needed to adapt the way we looked at risk and then change according to that. So I think in each of those roles. Either, the adversary was changing around us a threat was changing around us. We. Wanted to take advantage fully of an opportunity and I was responsible for taking the big picture strategic goals, translating those two measurable outcomes and objectives and helping you know contribute, communicate the why and then bringing the team of people along to get their each other's efforts was a bit different. But you know. We talked about the risk of doing the risk of not doing weighing that appropriately we talked about the insuring that as we approached new missions policy and technology move together, and certainly when we looked at the elections work in two, thousand, eighteen, the Russia's small group work we saw we're adversaries of have used influence operation since the time of Adam and Eve perhaps would have changed was again the ability to use social media to both focus and directed to have larger impact. So focusing on the Russia's small group for just a second and what was that what was the what was the mission and what were your responsibilities with regard to the two thousand eighteen election's to the extent that you can talk about that. Absolutely. So the mission was ensuring the integrity of the two thousand eighteen midterm elections ensuring that we I understood the threat second that we appropriately tipped all the information we had about the threat to key partners across the US government. Certainly, FBI from a counter infants perspective digest from Cybersecurity of elections, infrastructure perspective, and they finally that we would support Cyber Command. If if authorized to impose costs, it's were attempts to disrupt. Disrupt the election. So. After the two thousand eighteen election's president trump publicly confirmed that cyber command played a role in deterring the Russians in two thousand eighteen are they're important lessons from what happened in two thousand eighteen about how we as a country can defend ourselves against this this insidious threat. Yes. So you know across the government, we look at two key polls. Integrity one is attempts to malignly influence population whether that is to highlight social discord to highlight issues that divide the population or to. Hand up sheer inappropriate. You know share information as part of shaping individuals ideas, and then the second is potentially interfering hacking into elections infrastructure as part of efforts to change the vote and I think the first pieces, the value of resiliency. The sense that you know once trust is lost, it's very hard to regain. So the knowledge for the American public that there are hundreds of people across the US government committed to and working to ensure the integrity of our elections. When it comes to counter influence though the biggest resilience as each of us. As Americans when we're reading something asking who might be trying to influence me what is the source of that information I fully confident in that source of that information. And then finally the role of the role of technology and the role of Public Private Partnership. In as part of elections integrity. So for us in the intelligence community were constantly watching for which adversaries maybe seeking to to shape a populations thinking to shape an election and then rapidly tipping that to partners or. To the private sector to ensure that they're both aware of techniques and our countering them on their platforms. So we've since learned shocked last week the updates from deny that the Russians continue to engage in election interference, the Chinese, the Iranians, and the punchline of all that for me is it's really hard to deter. Foreign interference right and I'm wondering if it's something special about foreign interference or if it's more about cyber at the end of the day and the difficulty of seeing cyber attributing it if you see it, how do you think about that question absolutely I think it is more about cyber than about elections from a cyber perspective when we look at fully both protecting cyber infrastructure and then to your second point about attribution, there's complexity laying what we call the red on top of the we may see threats. That are talked about strategic perspective and then we partners across the US government a looking to see where does that present itself? Where are the given vulnerabilities in a given infrastructure? The powers when you can lay the two together and say, here is a nation state that has intent to interfere in whatever that is an election critical infrastructure. I Pete Best and then translate that to the tactical level to say that network scanning or that vulnerability in hardware or software may well be used to achieve the objective putting that in place, and then most importantly preventing it because at the end of the day riding report about a victim and notifying the victim is far less satisfying than being able to put that together and prevent the adversary cheating their objective. So we've already started to shift now into your new role, right which was relaunched in October I believe. So be great if you could, and if you could explain for our listeners I, what NASA's two main missions are. Again and then cybersecurity and the difference between them just to give folks here level set absolutely. So Ns as a foreign intelligence agency were responsible for understanding a broad range of threats. Presented by governments to the United States, one of those threats include our cyber threats how nations may be using cyber to achieve their national objectives as that might be intellectual property theft for example, to counter the department defensively Thallady by accelerating foreign governments ability to to actually productized particular rnd for weapon that may be targetting critical infrastructure of a country. As part of threatening that country or as part of putting pressure on a given country. So that is the threat information on the second side. And say has cybersecurity mission. We're celestial known We build the keys codes and cryptography that's used to protect all of US government's most sensitive communications thinking nuclear command control weapon systems, the president's communications with allies, and we provide technical advice to mitigate those same threats that I talked about. So the really the he integration of the two missions where we think the magic is where we can say here's what we think adversaries are seeking to do, and here's how from a cybersecurity perspective we recommend you protect against. So so what motivated and the relaunch of the directorate and has its mission changed at all really good question. So we recognize that we were at a crossroads with national security as both technology and society ships were happening. We saw only kinds of technology that people want to from small satellites to Internet of things and each of those presents huge advancements. But they also present cybersecurity risk. Along with that, we saw various nation surtees. New Technologies think North Korean crypto currencies to get around sanctions to achieve their own objectives and we said we really need to up our game to more quickly be understanding those threats and ensuring that. We could both provide advice to build new technologies as early as possible, but also to counter adversaries use of those same technologies to achieve their national security. We're GONNA take a quick break to hear from our sponsor. Dumb. We'll be right back with more discussion with an neuberger. At Lockheed Martin, we're on a mission. Your mission. Not just the next mission but the one that's two steps ahead. That's why we've not only taken the lead in hyper sonics, but we're helping you integrate technology faster than. It's why we're not only developing the laser weapons systems you'll need but deploying them in the field. Our mission is to build the integrated solutions you can depend on because the world is depending on you. So and what are the what are the primary areas of Focus for your directorate? What kind of people work there? What's their skill set and what kind of customers do you serve? Questions. So the first parties. Operationalizing Intelligence. How do we ensure that from the intelligence that we see we took anything that's unique. And timely quickly so that we can prevent the victim. So that's the first, the first piece of of work, our areas of focus are. Both understanding that giving guidance encryption, we believe encryption. A key protection particularly in telecommunications environment that in many cases is entrusted. So both in building the government's special encryption, modernizing that as well as providing advice and insights on how to best use. Encryption the text of people who work cure are like we see him any organizations abroad gamut we have intelligence analyst. We have country-specific experts have a broad swath of technical experts, encryption network technologies, hardware, and software vulnerability analysts as well but the power is weird that can be integrated where you can say. How do you build on route of trust all the way through to an end point? Had you properly defend network and take a step back and do risk analysis to say? We are the gaps in your resilience and we're should your next dollar investment to closest gaps Right, and then what about customers is your is, is it just the Department of Defense? Is that the US government is even broader than that? How do you think about who it is you're working for? Yup Great Question. So there's a specific set work we do for what we call national security systems systems carrying classified information national security information the director. Vanessa is also the national manager for National Security Systems, that's the authority under which as I mentioned, we have we build the keys codes and cryptography responsible for distributing threat information as well. So those are across the US government with a particular focus on duty. Weapons Systems. And Related Systems. A second set of key partners and customers are dhs I. D. H., S. and its role supporting critical infrastructure. And, the sector specific agencies, and like I said the the real magic of understanding the critical infrastructure, we're it's key gaps and vulnerabilities are and being able to marry that up with what a foreign government may be intending to do and providing focused insight. Across the US government, there is broad use of commercial technologies, particularly duty and and national security system. So you may have seen when we're issuing advisories were also issuing advice on how to secure and configure those commercial technologies well because we see that. Those are used all across. Sensitive, systems as well. Your director has issued I think a dozen or so. Advisories about cybersecurity threats. Can you talk about why you guys do that? What the criteria is for quitting one of those out and then how do you think about the impact they have? Do You keep metrics on that? How do you think about? Advisories absolutely. So. Our advisories other way we really do them for three reasons. One is if we see a nation state actor using a particular vulnerability against the system care about we find that it really drives urgency of action people run faster when they're pursued, and if we can say, this nation state actor is using this vulnerability. Here's the mitigation advice to protect yourself against that we see impact and I'll talk about that how we measure that impact at the end. The second thing is there's a deep expertise here because we build and we break encryption. So encryption related technologies like the peons like you. You may recall the windows ten cryptographic vulnerability in January. Those are areas we focus on because we know those are sometimes hard to understand technically hard to implement. So if we can give very practical advice, them will issue those as well to help that be put in place, and then the third would be where there's a timely need and we're getting a lot of questions and we feel that putting out a product helps guide people and thinking about how to think about security I'll give an example. As. As covid. Pressed a lot of organizations across the US government particularly duty as well to move to telework. We started getting a lot of questions about secure collaboration. which commercial tools were safe to us and our goal was teaching people how to evaluate what safe to us. So we issued a product we're laid out the different attributes like. Code is available for review its end to end Krypton and a few other such attributes, and then we rated different secure collaboration publicly available tools against them and the cool part was we had companies call and say, well, you didn't get something quite right or can we be included as well and we said absolutely, we issued a second version and then we have another one coming out next week because our goal was making it as useful as possible and also helping teach people. How to assess. Different. Products for security. You ask the question about how we measure impact. So there's three different measures we've been using. The first is, do we see patch rates go up? They'll do we see for vulnerabilities that we've talked about here is a foreign actor might be using a boehner ability to achieve an objective. Can we watch those patriots go up and it was really cool to see. And a number of cases we've we've watched that increase. The second piece is there is a very capable and active cybersecurity industry has the information shared enable them to better protect. Sensitive US government national security systems networks, and you know in the case of the Xm vulnerability that we issued, we're advisory where we talked about the particular unit of Russian intelligence using the XML male vulnerability. It was really great to see five different cyber-security entities using that to identify other. Russian intelligence infrastructure and then take that down. So that was success for us that we made it harder for that adversary to achieve its objectives, and then the third one is really the feedback on the number of downloads and the feedback from administrators saying this was useful. This was unique timely and actionable could act on it, and then in May you guys took what I thought was an unprecedented step of actually openly attributing the exploitation of vulnerability to the Russian, Gru. and. That seemed to rare to me and I'm wondering why you decided to actually name Russia in this instance. So I it is rare because as you noted earlier, implicitly attributions hard. You may have seen a prior product where we highlighted one st state using another country's. Infrastructure to achieve its objective and then highlight he just hard attribution is. So when it's done, it needs to be done with precision to be confident. In that and we chose to do it because. We see that it makes targeted network owners more quickly patch and secure and build the resilience of their systems network administrators have way more vulnerabilities to address than they have time for or frankly money for and way more alerts than they can act on. So we can say this particular vulnerability is being used by a nation State Intelligence Service. We see them we see network administrators moving quickly and addressing it, and that's a fundamental goal. Fundamental goal is improving cybersecurity. If you kind of step back and look at look at the big picture here, you know, maybe from a thirty five thousand foot level how are we doing? The cyber threats are we barely keeping up? Are we catching up? Are we getting ahead of the game or? Is it always going to be hard for the defender. In this game in because the guy on the offense can always come up come up with something new how you think about sort of where we are in the history of of the threat of cyber and defense against it. I think we points overall technology is getting more secure. Technologies built more securely today. So the fundamental resilience is is improving you know when you have open source products, we have lots of is looking at a given technology and helping find vulnerabilities and address them. That being said were an ever more connected economy in an ever-more connected society, and as we build more connections, sometimes two systems that were not necessarily built for those kinds of connections. Data Systems. In that way, we bring and introduce new risks. On the third poll on the positive side, there's far more awareness about those risks and how to approach addressing them identifying what are the most important assets to protect and ensuring good practices are in place and it's far easier than ever to put that in place. So I think it's a mixed story on the one hand more more technologies built more securely, and there are communities of individuals working together to ensure their secure on the other hand far more. Technology some of which. Is connected in ways that bring risk in ways that we always have to and I guess the third part, which is where we started adversary seeking to take advantage of those risks to achieve their objectives. So. If you if you were standing in front of a large multinationals board of directors in you're talking to them about cybersecurity. What's the one or two things that you would absolutely want them to take away from from your conversation? What is the tangible thing you most want to protect and what's the intangible thank you most want to protect. So if you're drug company, what is the intellectual property that's going to be your next potentially big drug big driver of economic growth, big driver of healing, and then second what's the biggest intangible? Thank perhaps, that's your reputation. The way you treat your employees, the price, the prices that you charge and what you're, what you're. How much you mark that up. Make sure that you're protecting both carefully make your your cyber security commensurate with with the risk presented to you if you lose either one. And you mentioned you mentioned Skater Systems and I'm not sure that all my listeners know what those are just explain that and then is there something? Is there something special about protecting data system from protecting? Normal network absolutely. So Skater Systems are essentially control systems for the core areas of infrastructure in a given country in a given company. So think power systems clean water drug manufacturing. and. Those are. Those are often complex system. So what's unique about them is you know those systems over the years were often built four reliability in the event of a bad storm that power system would come back online with confidence as. More technologies got connected. So for example, the ability to measure. Use of power the ability to measure confidence in in water and chemical level. Some of those systems got connected to network systems that provide a way to access them. One of the joint products we recently issued between Ns. WAS An ICS product because there had been some public articles about. a given attack against skater systems in the Middle East, and we wanted to ensure that we together with. One of our closest partners was providing technical advice to. Skate entities in the US based on what we were learning about those attacks. So interest, a couple more questions you've been terrific with your time. Seems to be an effort on the part of an essay to kind of open up the black box and showed the reputation no such agency right. Your conversation with me thinking example of that why is that a priority for for the agency and for General Nakasone? I in the cybersecurity mission fundamentally if we're not trusted we can't achieve our intact. People take advice from those they trust and the power of. Across the US Government Team USA work cyber. There each organization plays its position within that role. You Know My counterpart at Digest Chris Crabs often talks about them being the national risk managers. At an essay, we believe what we can bring uniquely is that integration of intelligence series of seeking to do what their capabilities are, what their infrastructure looks like and how to defend against cyber security advice to counter that, and that's always continuing because technologies change adversaries, goals change, and the resilient always has to be increased to meet that. So we want to be trusted to achieve what we believe. We can uniquely contribute to team USA on cyber. The first step to doing that is conveying, we are conveying the culture that's here the commitment to American values, and certainly WanNa part of our mission is an intelligence mission. In a in a democracy, we have an obligation to ensure that the Americans we serve. Feel they understand the values which we live. So your your former colleague and my really good friend Glenn Gerstl road. Op Ed about a year ago about what he saw the. Profound implications of the Digital Revolution on national security, and he raised a lot of concerns and among those was the sheer pace and scale and volume of technological change and. And data that's GONNA force intelligence agencies including NSA to fundamentally change how they do business I was GonNa say thinking big picture about those kinds of challenges. What are you trying to tackle I? Would've the adjustments look like, how do you? How do you think about the challenge that Glenn laid out? Absolutely, so I from the perspective of large amounts of data and ensuring, we can make sense of them. Ensuring that we can do big data analysis to help. Triage the information we identify and determine what are people are big assets put their time on to determine he's and how to act on them. So for example. We we're looking at machine learning to classify malware and we're certainly looking at. Machine learning potentially to help us identify vulnerabilities scale particularly when we look at systems that represent thirty years of technology like muffins systems, how do you secure a weapon system? That's been out there and represent each phase of technology and have confidence in its resilience and in command and control. And then finally. We have an obligation to both bring those technologies to be on our mission and understand how adversaries might use that and manage that accordingly. So for example, as we think about artificial intelligence and the potential to automatically. Direct weapon. In the United States we have strong values around how we would think about automation versus human control. In other countries around the world, there might be different ways that those kinds of decisions are approached. So how do we ensure that we both? Bring that integration of. Compliance and technology to the way we pursue it but also be aware of those gaps and keep an eye on the risks of those gaps. And you mentioned you mentioned people and you mentioned people a couple of times and and just took two questions about that. One is given the competition that you face with all of these cyber security firms and. Your folks must be very attractive to them, and their skills are quite valuable in their private sector. How how difficult is it for you to recruit and retain talent? Really thoughtful question because you asked two questions in their recruit entertained. So. From the recruit side, we get really great people. On the routine side. We have a really compelling mission. and. What brings keeps people. Here is the sense that they're contributing to something bigger than themselves. That is challenging fulfilling. It's on us as organizational leaders to ensure that each person has that opportunity to contribute what they can uniquely bring chew to that mission. And one of the one of the cool aspects of the Cybersecurity standup has been people who have left to call in and say, Hey, I'd like to come back I learned a lot. In the private sector, the missions, calling me and like to contribute again, and we've hired a number of them back and continuing to increase that and part of the message we have when people if people do decide to leave is to say that is great. You will continue to contribute to the nation's security. You'll learn a lot in the five at sector, and if you ever want to come back the doors open. What do you? What do you want the American people to know about the women and men who work for you. That, they're committed to the values. That this country was established for. That there are significant threats to the United States, our allies and to those values, and that not always can we talk about those threats because? By impact sometimes intelligence community, even the security mission has to operate in those shad in the show does so. Trust our values, trust that we are proud Americans. We swear an oath to the Constitution of the United States, and if you do question it or if you want to learn more roll up your sleeves and come into the for a few years and get to know what yourself because each person has unique abilities and a unique ability to contribute to their to their country in whatever way they choose whether that's government are in the private sector. But if you ever doubt it come on in and work here and and raise your voice and be a part of it. It sort of takes you back to what your parents taught you to. It really does it my dad grew up in in communist Hungary and In the beginning when I came into government, he would call me on the phone sometimes and switched to a foreign language and. I realized that for him growing up in another country. Is that complete trust of government that I American born? You know have that doesn't mean it's trust and verify it's from verify but there are things that I take for granted growing up in this society that I don't know if he ever will. So being able to look at things through his eyes and through mind make me realize how fortunate we are to be here and how much we have obligation to. To ensure it stays that way. And thank you so much for joining us and thank you for your service. Thank you so much for your time.

United States Director NSA Cybersecurity Directorate Russia USA Theft National Security Systems New Technologies President Trump Navy Michael Morale Neuberger FBI Pete Best Nasa Department Of Defense Lockheed Martin Chief Risk Officer
"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"michael morale" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Back with more intelligence matters I Michael morale our guest is David Ignatius a writer of a regular column on foreign affairs for The Washington Post and author of multiple spy novels so David you're also a fiction writer and a very good one you've written ten books eleventh is on its way I must tell you that I get asked frequently by young people who are interested in CIA particularly operational CIA about what book should they read what book comes closest to what what it's really like and without hesitation I tell them agents of innocence which was your first box of flattered thank you it's an amazing book a couple of questions how do you find the time to be a novelist and also to be a journalist at the same time well obviously the wonderful thing about about writing novels it gives me a chance to take things that interest me in the world of fact the as I report my columns I travel around the world and then X. explore them on a much broader tableau in infection so in a sense the two worlds inter penetrate I try to avoid either contaminating the other I was gonna say you know this is this is for fiction existence made up and I hope my columns or fact fact only but the the two ever since my first novels published in nineteen eighty seven at that back then I I said to myself mmhm okay that that number was well received and people said you ought to be a novelist and I remember thinking I have to make a choice I'm gonna have to decide when to this novel served with the subpoena journalists but can't and I didn't I just didn't make the choice I never could figure out what the right way to go was I I thought the kind of novels I wanted right would never have a big enough readership that I could really make a living so my kids to school and do all things that we want to do psych I want to keep my day job art for financial reasons but it's one of those moments you know sometimes the best choice to make is is not to choose and that's what that's what I did to continue to do both you do both at the same time ready to take a break to rise so what when a novel is this like a physical thing that is growing in your imagination you know if you're building a world characters of the whole world of the the begins to become religious takes up more space so when I'm beginning work on a book or product two days a week maybe three by the end when the that's right I fall asleep thinking about I dream about I wake up thinking about it I don't have a set time from six to nine it's just every minute I can I can grab in my seven day a week that novel wants tickets like a hungry baby it's just once all the electoral nourishment so it's always a rush part of part of what's fun about this is when the when the book just as it just takes takes it it's it's living you are supposed to you living or writing it just the whole the whole on arc of the story laid out in your mind or does that evolve as you I usually start with an idea of what yes where I want the the storied and up that changes as you get to know the characters better as you understand better the the world they're living in the dilemmas some of the particular twists and turns a change but I I think it's important to start with with some some basic tracks laid down and then and then let yourself know sweat shirt and a mansion reimagine give a favorite of my books well in a second screen which child is your favorite you will love a mall the the first knowledge mentioned agents for the since it was but it was based on on real life it was based on a story I used to sales all made up but it wasn't it was based on real events and one of the most amazing intelligence operations innocence ever ran where we recruited and ran as an asset of the chief of intelligence of our leading terrorist adversary at the time the Palestine Liberation Organization he we was for ten years operating as as our our guys in the Kelowna the people who did that the way it was done just you know what over overwhelmingly interesting to me I want to find a way to tell the story of fiction was was was the only way so that that that book where I can talk myself out a reading of the first the first draft of that was rejected by every publisher America with me often Dino derisively wow Mr Daschle so interesting that you would think you could write a novel they don't see you later but finally somebody took a risk and then I re wrote it a couple times but it it's just you know is I think writing fiction is an inter disco you you learn to do it by doing it and elisa just glad I had the chance and then the light that I let myself keep doing it and you know I've parts of all my books site but your at the the new one the pallet on the parts of it I just I love you know but I've I wouldn't I wouldn't say that I don't my my first first born novelist and whatever this is intelligence matters I might come around to listening to David Ignatius and award winning columnist for The Washington Post on foreign affairs and a New York times bestselling author of spy novels so the paladin what's it about Calton is about the CIA officers he's on the kind of blue collar side of the agencies he's a technical officer guy you know plants bugs hacks systems whose life is destroyed it is his career at the agency is wrecked his marriage is shattered he loses family loses everything because as we discover through the through the novel he's been assigned to conduct an operation which it's decided is it legal he is asked to invade the computers and space of an American journalist in quotation marks overseas and he is abandoned by the people he thought had promised him that he'd be safe during this but as the novel progresses we learn that he in some ways is the architect of this difficulties that is the rage that he begins the book with others is in part directed toward himself he he this characterises name is Michael Dunn was interesting to me because if Mr serve of read the the book hillbilly elegy angry person from industrial heartland of this book Schurter Michael Dunn is is very much that kind of person is from McKee's port Pennsylvania old Steeltown I mentioned earlier in our broadcast lists are a biker covering the steel industry so it's part of America that I know pretty well and I am not the angry people there like Michael done my character those are the people who elected Donald Trump so there's a way in which this is a kind of allegory about what we're living through I will tell you where Michael Dunn ends up but you can you won't be surprised if he doesn't end up with a make America great again hat on so I got an early copy and I read it this weekend and it is absolutely terrific and I won't give away the ending either can folks pre order it now it's on Amazon now and they're they're welcome to go on pre order it and you know if if Amazon delivery doesn't work if you live in any zip code never mind all hand David thank you very much for joining us thank you Michael.

David Ignatius writer The Washington Post Michael
Iranian backlash feared after killing of top general

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

07:01 min | 1 year ago

Iranian backlash feared after killing of top general

"President trump says the Iranian military commander killed by a U. S. airstrike in Iraq on Thursday was plotting to kill many Americans it was in a tweet marking his first comments on the targeted killing of general Qassem Soleimani the head of Iran's elite Quds force selling mainly made the deaths of innocent people is sick passion contributing to terrorist plots as far away as New Delhi in London today we remember and honor the victims of solemn manias many atrocities and we take comfort in knowing that his reign of terror is over solid Mady has been perpetrating acts of terror to destabilize the Middle East for the last twenty years what the United States did yesterday should have been done long ago you would be hard pressed to find any disagreement in this country that sold the money had the blood of Americans on his hands but there is plenty of discussion over whether the death is worth the escalation of tensions between the US and Iran we are in depth on the story and we start with CBS news intelligence contributor the former acting head of the CI a Michael morale at stark words on CBS this morning Qassem Soleimani was an evil genius he had a lot of American blood on his hands he was the mastermind behind a Ronnie and malign behaviour in the region the world is a better place without him the problem is that comes at a very high cost number one there will be dead Americans dead civilian Americans as a result of this possibly over the next few days in any place where a Ron has its proxies a rock is the most likely place but also Lebanon Bahrain other places in the Middle East number two this sets a precedent that that senior officials are fair game in this hybrid not yet at war kind of scenario that were in with Iran and that's a dangerous precedent to set number three this is like actually going to enable the hardliners strengthen the hardliners in Iran as we heard earlier Qassem Soleimani extremely popular in Iran and that is going to actually strengthen those people who follow him yes it's good that he's gone but it comes in an extraordinarily high price and that's why the bush administration and the Obama administration chose not to do something like this joining us now is CBS news face the nation moderator and our senior foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Brennan Iran is outraged they're showing some rare unity and some other circles in terms of wanting you know Americans out of the region and that sort of thing and I heard you use the word seismic this morning it absolutely does for president trump who has said he does not want wars in the Middle East assassinating we're targeting one of the top leaders of Iran's military one of the most influential people in Iran who is also considered by the U. S. to be a terrorist blood all over his hands of but taking Qassem Soleimani off the battlefield while he was in neighboring Iraq creates so many different domino's geo politically strategically and questions about okay what's next because this is arguably an act of war this is a really significant decision and we don't know yet no for the trump administration why they acted when they did their been believed in kind of mysterious references to threats and it imminent attacks but no details of what that was Qassem Soleimani he's been planning attacks for two and a half years pretty rapidly a decade before that but pretty pretty steady pace of attacks against US interests in the Middle East since he was pulled out of that nuclear deal so what happens next is such an open question it's got allies it's got adversaries verbas Russia calling it reckless there was some thought that I had to pass through my brain this morning you know in terms of ran threatening to strike back in and seeking revenge and we know they have operational capability not just in that region but they have assets around the world they can rely on they could strike just about anywhere there are powerful organization and and almost brought me back to the days of post nine eleven when your wondering what shoes were gonna drop next well there is this sense of how does this and does David Petraeus a former commander of US troops the Middle East raise then and with Sir only raise now Qassem Soleimani was an enemy of the United States he killed at least six hundred US service people from two thousand three on where he has thousands of dead up to his name across Syria Iraq Lebanon the entire Middle East he has been at odds with the United States no U. S. president has chosen to assassinate him or to execute him were to target him however you want to deny us because it is an act of war arguably this is different than taking out the leader of a terrorist group that isn't directly linked to a nation state Iran is a state whose nuclear program has been stalled because of this diplomatic deal that is in tatters but the rest of the world is still here too the question now is how does Iran respond to this do they restart that nuclear program are they cyber attacks are they retaliation in some way Iran is not a super power the way the United States is they are financially on the ropes the regime is certainly dealt a big blow by this but their desperation has not led to greater stability and that is the challenge with the trump administration's policy does decapitating the I. R. G. C. their revolutionary guard corps mean that they stop all this bad acting around the world or does it just mean somebody steps up to Sony's place we've seen reaction from Republicans like Lindsay Graham who say this guy was a bad actor we've been at war with Iran for years technically a you got Democrats are saying that no making your point that this is different this is like almost taking out a head of state if you will well look we knew that the U. S. was careening toward to national security crises at the same time one with Iran which has a a nascent nuclear program but that the remnants they can quickly start up if they want and then with North Korea which has nuclear weapons now and is quickly developing them this right this diplomatic effort so present from going into an election year has these two national security crises only increasing every candidate running to be the next commander in chief needs to be asked so what do you do the answer cannot just be let's go back to where we were because this has changed completely the atmosphere and the arguably the battleground in the in the

Donald Trump Commander Iraq President Trump
Supporters of Iranian-backed militia end siege of U.S. Embassy in Baghdad

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Supporters of Iranian-backed militia end siege of U.S. Embassy in Baghdad

"The embassy siege is over but the situation in Baghdad remains tense U. S. Iranian and Iraqi interests are all at stake at the center of this is the so called shadow war between Iran and the US and the Iraqi government is caught in the middle the attack on the embassy was bad but now this is moved to the Iraqi parliament where could be even worse angered about the U. S. airstrikes against an Iranian backed militia the Iranian supported government could call for U. S. exit from Iraq CBS news senior security contributor Michael morale it matters because we are still fighting ISIS and it would be akin to U. S. pulling out in two thousand eleven which gave al Qaeda and Iraq which ultimately became ice is a

Baghdad U. S. Iranian Iran United States Iraqi Government Michael Morale Iraq U. S. Iraq Cbs
Why did Venezuela become such a high priority under the Trump Administration?

Intelligence Matters

14:48 min | 1 year ago

Why did Venezuela become such a high priority under the Trump Administration?

"At the national national security council a position during which he played a key role in designing u._s. Policy toward venezuela one spent most of his career in various government assignments related to latin america. I had a chance to sit down with one to discuss the crisis that has unfolded in venezuela and what it means. We'll be right back with that discussion. After a quick break i'm michael morale and this is intelligence matters one welcome to intelligence matters. It is great to have you on the show and most importantly. It's great to see you again. Thank you michael good morning. I remember having the best mojto of my life with you in a bogota restaurant. I don't know probably six or seven years ago. It was served in a bowl is but i don't think we can talk about the rest of the story. No no it's <hes> yes <hes> andrei race d._c. I remember that place a large board yet lawrence gordon yes yes so on. You've retired from government sir. You spent the last part of your career at the the national security council in the early days of the trump administration. How did you end up at the <hes>. Fortuitously it was the front office. <hes> the state department was looking for somebody and as was the white house the predecessor in the position <hes> had parted after a very brief time they're less than a month and and i had been interviewed previously for the job general mcmaster at her to me. I thought it was going in for a for an interview and instead he pitched me and i ended up there i and in less than thirty days. He's a great guy. Isn't he. Yeah i i respect him. A lot. Gentlemen master didn't know me from adam gave me great opportunity in in his style. He recognizes ignites talent and brings it and let's flourish. Let's dig into venezuela. Which is the issue that i really wanna talk to you about. Wailer was not a high priority. I already for the obama administration. I was there i know but it became one for the trump administration. Why did that happen. How did that happen. How did it go from fairly low priority to high priority. You know it's an interesting question. I would say that we almost went almost two decades of uneven attention to venezuela even before the obama administration but i have no idea why president trump chose venezuela as an issue. It's authentic. It comes from him. It was not something that was briefed or coach to him by a member of his foreign policy staff. It's something he believed in. There are some issues like that. He's that he absolutely is high hi to and is authentic immigration drugs and venezuela. Is it the humanitarian peace. Do you think he was was struck. When during syrian president assad used serum gas in the president was so taken with the pictures of the dead children if it was humanitarian piece in venezuela or if somebody eighty had talked to him about it. It's just it's interesting to me. They don't want almost came out of nowhere. I don't wanna be trite but he did know venezuela from before through through is connections to the miss universe pageant tree and venezuela of course being a producer of miss universe's and takes pride in in the pageantry and so he had been there before and had a connection through that maybe he saw the slow deterioration of the conditions of venezuela so one. How would you describe u._s. Interests in venezuela. Why should americans care. Is this just a humanitarian issue you or is this a national security issue as well and i'll tell you i was at a dinner last night where we were talking about venezuela and one of the people they are said and i disagree with this. I'm interested to know what you're gonna say that. This is not a national security issue. This is only a humanitarian issue russian. What's your sense well. I'd say there's a what i call the trifecta of interest in in venezuela by the united states. I it very much a human rights rights issue. He goes to the heart of what we believe in and these issues of human rights violations or the violation of democracy is what drives a lot of the u._s. Interests and then finally it is security issues a national security issue from the point of view of stability in the region and the inviting those actors from outside of the region who have been involved all the issues of venezuela for a long time russia china ron come to mind and so it's very much of interest to us as a student of democracy. I'd point out that when i started in the region in the eighties most of the countries were dictatorships mostly right wing dictatorships except tellingly venezuela venezuela was a very stable democracy in a dedicated indicated self for a better part of a decade or two to help other countries reached democracy so to see venezuela a slip back into a dictatorship is particularly hurtful. Can you describe the situation inside venezuela today. Absolutely it's a failed state. That's that's the best way to put it. It's a place where nothing functions and what little functions does so through corruption. It's a place where almost everything you can point to his failing. That means means the banking system employment pollution. If you wanna talk about something that most people have a focused on but tremendous environmental effects of what's taking place in bend swell shortage of drinking water of course <hes> energy security public security almost everything you can point to them as well as an example of the collapse of that is you hear about it as a shortage of medicine and the impact that has as well what about refugees talk about refugees a little bit. I'm really paying to see the number <music> of swans and have leftover period of time that only the recent migration issuer <hes> of venezuelans but it actually predates predates that about four years back. We have a little over four million venezuelans living outside of as well as <hes> a result of that initial movement and in columbia in particular. We have almost one point eight million venezuelans invu- in columbia. If you wanna talk about what kind of stress at places on a neighboring country entry just think that's about three times the population of washington d._c. And that's not to speak of the populations of the venezuelans in panama on of course brazil and ecuador approve chile argentina primarily and those who departed earlier to places like italy and spain portugal it says refugees ages in the immediate neighborhood that creates risks does other countries right and then a stress on their ability to respond imagine if you're columbia's already a tough for you to provide <hes> education medical services to your own population just coming out of sixty year civil war than have to extend that even more to an an additional one point eight billion people so one. Let's keep the discussion going on current situation. Why do you think maduro has survived. You know when you have an economy cratered people fleeing the country by the millions as you noted and what seems like a vast majority the country actually despising him. Why is he been able to hang on. I think that's the definition of of a dictatorship there through an abusive power our and the use of might to stay in power and of course using the instruments that government to suppress democratic expression interestingly enough maduro enduro comes to power tapped by his predecessor hugo chavez to replace him handpicked successor. Here's an individual who did not have the grassroots support for a position like like that and and certainly not within the leadership chavez mo so it's a little bit of an aberration and his inner circle is quite small tight and so part of the reason he's remained ain't empowers because others permit him to remain in power. He's got a number of rivals and there is this very delicate balance that allows <hes> individual like madrid to stay in there and let's not forget of course it madero has a very close relationship to the cuban government that allows him of course instant area of support and legitimacy that substitutes the lack of support within his own party cuban support matter to him. How important is that. I think it's invaluable to him. It's not it's just not giving him advice. He takes advice from the cubans and a little bit of a security blanket and of course they're critical members of his security team bodyguard force in palo security. If it weren't for the cubans i think <hes> madero would be <hes> further weakened gained and it's not just him it's him and his inner circle have been born of cuban influence maduro studied in cuba ideological studies if you will and he does have a base of support curious because well. He is very tight with the cubans. He's not especially close arro- castro. I don't think that personally like each other but there's you you know there's a big splitting cuban right. He's more aligned with the further. Hardliners graduated school. What about the russians and what role did the russians play how important you know it's a curious role that the russians play in venezuela it there is no there are no historical ties between venezuela and russia this. This is a relatively recent phenomenon invited through chavez's desire to to have a counterbalance to the u._s. Influence so he bites the russians he invites the the use the purchase of russian military equipment communications equipment doctrine and something that is really a a foreign <hes> import into an sweater he he does that also as a way to provide some regional balance and the russians love it right the russians come in and they get to put their thumb in the eye of the united states a little bit of a counterbalance to the u._s. His interest and involvement in issues like the crimea for example or even syria one. I wanna ask you about <hes> one guido the the opposition leader what can you tell us about him and his movements and where that stands today. One wando is recent phenomenon in politics in venezuela in a welcome one. Here's an individual that's the opposite of a lot of other venezuelan and figures. He's not a tired figure. He represents a youthful outlook. He <hes> i would say that even a socio economically and culturally he reflects likes war of the venezuelan typical venezuelan and he's got a great story behind him so he he's selected to be the president of the national assembly early and he shows up and all of a sudden he takes all that energy youth enthusiasm and commitment and he turns it into something and be between that and the support of the other opposition parties. He's able to really change things around. We were in a in a low point and trying to encourage the regime change change its ways it's behavior and to move towards democracy and he he <hes> rather quickly moved in there got the support of the other parties became a tremendous this natural leader and galvanized the country and so what we have here is a surprise. I don't think anyone expected this sort of thing. He's come through strong and he's gotten the support of. I guess it's fifty four countries now and that's not an insignificant thing so one we we seem to be stuck at the moment. The kind of picture i have is that both madero in and guido hanging by their fingernails. How does this standoff end. And what role do you think the u._s. Should be playing well. They're they're few options and even fewer options after the failed. Let's call it coup attempt of thirty the april i think most everyone was a loser as a result of that event and now we have talks promoted by norway away taking place in barbados. I think that they're only a few ways out. It's got to be negotiated way out and i don't. I don't think conditions are are ready for something like that. The regime has become quite good at using talks and mediation negotiation to simply kick the can down the road to perpetuate themselves in power and and in the case of the opposition <hes> quite frankly. They've <hes> in these negotiations. They've gotten a short end of the stick time and time again so the regime is pretty practiced at eh abusing the issue of negotiation now. Thankfully norwegians have a long long experience in this but i don't think the conditions are there yet. You've got to provide the right confidence-building building measures so that you know that this time the re- regime really is serious and will abide by negotiations things they have proven to do in the past and <hes> at at the norwegians agents can nudge them in the right direction so one options negotiations a second of course is something that is unstated a largely which the international community probably would prefer a some sort of coup something like the failed thirty april event something that allows faction the military two in a bloodless suffered push away the toughest aspects of the regime and create a transitional government where everyone gets sit at the table and move the country back into democracy. The problem is at thirty april. The fact that it's a failed event probably makes that less likely and what makes it more likely as probably a palace coup the only winners on thirty april the military and they've probably now in a position to stage a coup or they could remain in power without inviting important members of the opposition or really only the ones that they would like to co op the thirdly something that's had a lot less talk lately and is a

Venezuela United States Hugo Chavez Obama Administration President Trump Bogota Madero Michael Morale Russia Guido Norway Lawrence Gordon Wailer Maduro Adam Columbia Washington
"michael morale" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"michael morale" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"D._M._Z. With Kim Jong UN yielded no results today the A._p.. Reports that North Korea suggested they may call off their suspension of nuclear and missile tests because of upcoming military terry drills between the U._S.. In the South Koreans as we've talked about before North Korea's always hated Israel's that trump has to decide if he's going to suspend them again which would be giving a big Chit to Kim Jong Un but as we talked about with our friend Danny Russell who's a career expert these drills this training. It's really important and we would probably get to a place where no one <hes> in the Korean military or you know in the U._S.. Service members who are deployed to the region had really been trained in what to do if there was a North Korean invasion so you know yeah great progress. Let's keep him on right like since trump had the first summoned Singapore. What have we seen? We've seen all this praise from him. We've seen this quote unquote historic handshake at the D._M._Z.. Meanwhile they built more nuclear weapons and they've tested some weapons threatening tests more weapons. They've extract concessions with us on military exercises. That doesn't show a lot of respect for trump. No you know I mean trump is lavish respect on Kim Young`UN. Look at Kim England's act first of all Kim young endeavor reciprocates have we seen trump always says he actually has beautiful letters. We've never seen the letters we we've never heard him. Say these things about trump and meanwhile has actions seem to show no respect for trump right. If you look at the Iranians increasing Richmond I'm Kim young men making these threats and continuing to build nuclear weapons. This isn't working this whole madman diplomacy unpredictable America first guy so it's very important reminder cells at like check the results here the way these these leaders act shows how much respect they have for trump interestingly. I noticed over the weekend. I think our former colleague former deputy director and acting director Michael Morale wrote an OP ed about how a freeze for freeze proposal with North Korea yeah basically where we'd give them some sanctions relief for them to freeze their program where they are now is a good path forward. Michael Morale is no softy when it comes to North Korea or you know the reality of threats generally so I thought it was interesting to see him right that piece. I think it is a good path for it. I just wish that we'd started there and Singapore you know so what's interesting is not like unlike Iran where we started this conversation. They're winding their way around back to like this fairly incremental deal when they came out saying that they're going to achieve denuclearization and get rid of these nuclear weapons and three years later Lo and behold you know now. They're trying to settle for half a loaf..

trump Kim Jong Un North Korea Kim England Iran Kim Kim Young`UN Michael Morale Danny Russell Singapore America deputy director Lo Israel Richmond acting director three years
"michael morale" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"michael morale" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"With me is Michael morale, former acting CIA director and CBS news, senior national security, contributor, you just heard David Martin described what the Pentagon says is not a fight. They're looking for diplomacies the first foot forward. So how much risk is there of this becoming a military conflict, Margaret? I don't think the United States will respond militarily here because we were not attacked directly, and I think that would be predicate for the president to respond militarily, but I think the risk of conflict is growing, and I think it's growing dangerously. And I think the. Way play out. Is that one of our allies, the United Arab Emirates or Saudi Arabia would respond to this attack, or another attack like it to deter the Iranians and that would escalate into a broader conflict that could draw us in today, Iran's top diplomat called the timing of this suspicious trying to distance themselves from it. So why would they go through with an attack? They are under a tremendous amount of pressure because of the sanctions that we've put on them their economy is suffering their response here is to try to get the rest of the world to put pressure on us to ease up. And they wanna do that by raising oil prices in creating an atmosphere of a risk of war. I think ultimately backfires on them, Margaret, and they end up more. I saluted morale, thank you very much for your analysis. Another big story that we are following late today. Sarah Sanders said she's leaving the White House and going home to Arkansas. Aw. Sanders has been a fierce defender of the president and often sparred with reporters. Ben Tracy is at the White House. She's a special person a very, very fine woman this afternoon. President Trump spoke warmly about one of his longest serving advisors. I wanna thank you for outstanding job. And thank you. Thank you. The president called Sarah Huckabee Sanders, a warrior, perhaps, because during her two years as press secretary, she not only spoke for him addressing. Engaged with. And she often spoke a lot like him to. It's frankly, I think sad and pathetic that adult adults anonymous source could receive so much attention from the media Sanders could be combative in Kurt. She rarely hit her feelings for some members of the press corps and their questions. Everybody in this room is trying to do their job. I disagree completely during her tenure the podium in the briefing room gathered dust Sanders, ended the tradition of holding daily White House press briefings, it's now been more than ninety days since the last one Sanders truthfulness, has also been questioned when President Trump fired FBI director James Comey Sanders was pressed by reporters who said, Komi was well liked at the bureau heard.

Sarah Huckabee Sanders president President Trump James Comey Sanders Sanders White House Margaret Michael morale director CBS news United Arab Emirates CIA David Martin United States Ben Tracy Pentagon Saudi Arabia Kurt
"michael morale" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on KCBS All News

"In New Zealand after two mass shootings at mosques in Christ Church. I'm Rebecca chorale. You may think you're careful about medicine in the house, but your toddler might prove otherwise, I'm John Evans. Thanks for joining us tonight. KCBS news time eleven thirty one CBS news special report, this is one of New Zealand's dacas te dice that's New Zealand's Prime minister Justin to our journey. She is speaking right now and says forty people have been killed at least twenty injured from two shootings at two mosques. The government live on social media with his rampage. Michael morale is CBS news senior national security contributor. My first impression is that this is ultra right-wing. This is fascism. This is designed to attack an immigrant community religious community because it is a hate crime. Reporter Scott Maimon New Zealand police have confirmed. There are multiple fatalities at two mosques in Christ Church. One gunman is believed to be from Australia the shooting livestream on social media. As one of the gunman went room to room cross church remains as city on the edge and a city in lockdown. Four suspects have been arrested again forty killed CBS. News special report, I'm Matt piper. KCBS news time eleven thirty two Beto or roar got off to a fast start today. After a pre-dawn announcement that he's in the race for the democratic presidential nomination. CBS news correspondent, Ed O'Keefe. And Gayle king report from Iowa. Like he did in Texas federal O'Rourke kept a small footprint on his first day on the presidential campaign trail, even driving his own cars. Why did you choose to start in this corner of the state? This is very important. Part of America. That isn't listen to often.

New Zealand CBS KCBS Christ Church Ed O'Keefe Rebecca chorale Michael morale Beto John Evans Matt piper Gayle king Scott Maimon Prime minister America
"michael morale" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"David frum and michael morale and bill kristol and robby mook and all those they have more in common with each other than they do with the voters in their respective parties you know and and the sort of reorganization of this atlantic council german marshall fund type crew as a single political entities is a fascinating crazy story i don't know what do you think i mean i i'm amazed by it yeah well it would be one thing if you sort of said well on on this issue we you know we have a strategic sort of alliance with these people but we are completely clear on who they are and what they stand for and that this is about unseating trump which which some of them will say if you push them and push them and push them but you do see the neocon worldview seeping into the hillary clinton echo chamber of defending the it was her turn light of thinking and then attacking the left for continuing with it's consistent opposition gina hassle thing is an interesting occasion you have all these former cia people that are constantly on msnbc who were obama administration people and they're they're the liberals from the intelligence community they're totally in agreement with with bill kristol others who say she is gina hassle is the perfect person to be heading the cia to me that is the the best example of what this leads to is that bill kristol and steven hayes and the weekly standard they're winning that game with msnbc they're pulling those people further to the right.

hillary clinton cia bill kristol steven hayes David frum michael morale robby mook atlantic council obama
Jeremy Scahill on torture and Gina Haspel

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

01:35 min | 3 years ago

Jeremy Scahill on torture and Gina Haspel

Hillary Clinton CIA Bill Kristol Steven Hayes David Frum Michael Morale Robby Mook Atlantic Council Barack Obama
North Korea, South Korea agree to end war, denuclearize peninsula

24 hour News

02:14 min | 3 years ago

North Korea, South Korea agree to end war, denuclearize peninsula

"Kyw news time nine oh two north and south korean leaders are hopeful yesterday's historic summit is the beginning of a process towards peace most north koreans just now are hearing for the first time about the friday summit between kim jong un and south korean president moon jae in laura bicker of the bbc reports the count's of the meeting lack many specifics young young has insisted it would never give up its nuclear arsenal which it claims it needs to defend itself against aggression from the united states seeing even a small mention of denuclearization any public newspaper will be perceived as a breakthrough by officials in seoul cbs contributor michael morale former cia director says the meeting is an obvious precursor to the forthcoming meeting between kim and president trump this was all about setting a tone and a message to the white house for the importance of going ahead with trump kim summit which is the really important one president trump says he has responsibility to resolve the korean conflict dating back sixty five years gary nunn cbs news kyw news time nine oh four now that bill cosby has been found guilty what's next for the eighty year old entertainer kyw suburban bureau chief jim melwert looked into it bill cosby's defense team promises and appeal norris town based defense attorney henry hill says well that's to be expected the percentage of appeals that are successful is quite rare hilas says the top of the list of issues to raise an appeal will be the five prior bad acts witnesses who testified particularly in light of the fact that at the first trial most of those witnesses were not permitted to testify so i would be quite surprised at that was not their primary issue on direct appeal as for sentencing hilas says the defense will likely point to cosby's agent health reality however is that he was convicted of serious crimes and these are crimes that typically call for a substantial prison sentence sentencing has yet to be scheduled jim melwert kyw newsradio the story of the average sexual assault victim they never get hurt or believed even now but those who advocate for survivors are looking at the bill cosby guilty verdict as a beacon of hope more from kyw community fairs reporter cheri gregg survivors that are out there this is victory for that howard.

Assault Cheri Gregg Reporter Attorney Bureau Chief KYW Gary Nunn CIA Michael CBS Seoul President Trump Howard Kim Jong Un Hilas Henry Hill Jim Melwert Bill Cosby Donald Trump White House
"michael morale" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

WMEX 1510 AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

"I just can't see this sort of thing happening turn say like reagan you know it just or or maybe is tainted they fought back door but not to this extent seems like i mean is it just the technology that's made it get to this point because you know with twitter one of new technologies like social media internet and all that stuff is that has it just made it that much more i guess obvious well i think there's a lot more information on alex like okay michael moore i was watching this and i hate michael morale walked that guy i i really can't stand a it's him true american aid he was on tv against the night of the state of the union and he was addressing white people was the yeah oh boy we will enter white privilege it wasn't me saying something he was saying how disappointed he is with white people hayes is disappointed in the is apparently to a summit first and foremost i am getting really tired and hillary clinton did it as well when she was meeting with the people from black lives matters and said don't worry i'm going to meet with the white people hub like first do that first and foremost how stupid ishita say but how stupid today to believe with you she was going to meet that what what like there's one white guy in particular that we all have to listen to all the honky is listen to so you meet with him and then he'll get the out he sends us all a text to be a good cheer going to go meet with the ladies these few got glad somebody who's going to do because i did we can't go on like this just going to talk to the way the i don't i don't get it and i think that's ridiculous but then when you have you know a movie stores and wrapped stores all these people talking in saying and to the white people you know something is up with that well this is the style and the against the way this country's been gone it's been going down this road for quite some time i mean we mentioned earlier when you have websites black people meet dot com when you have be et black entertainment television it's like i the sort of things than happening was called segregation i thought eh the.

reagan alex michael morale hayes twitter michael moore hillary clinton
"michael morale" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"To that that initial surveillance was only good for ninety days then they the justice department enough the i had to come back to the court and they had to not only plead that he was an agent of a foreign power they had to say that that surveillance was productive and dancing their investigation every time they came back to the court they had a show it was productive and they were learning more about his activities visavis russian mike was this them all as damaging as some had feared and if the democrats release their version is that also damaging short think there's kind of two points to set this up margaret the first is that this didn't have to happen right now the release of this metal did not have to happen there was nothing the worst it which should have happened here is that this be part of the final report of the committee with the facts laid out here's with republicans think here's the democrats think that's the way it should have happened right that's point one point two is there is classified information in this document in those four pages entree gotti acknowledged some of it there's there's material in here that the fbi would have removed had they have the opportunity put those two points together you get three damages the first is it undermines the credibility of the fbi in the public's eyes on and with no justification in my view i share all our friends use on that point too is it undermines the oversight process how's it under undermined oversight process government agencies are not gonna wanna share sensitive information with congress early believe the congress can release it on their own without going through the rejection process and then the third is it undermines intelligence collection because if you're a source of the united states or a foreign government giving us information they're going to think twice about doing that mike with its going to ends argue that fought in the other side of just break stay with us and we'll be right back with more from our panel this the 'cspan radio and face the nation from cbs news continuance welcome back to face the nation on margaret brennan we'll continue our conversation now with national security panel as fran towns and michael morale and tori at newlyn mike let you pick up the sought you left us on uh if.

justice department gotti fbi congress united states mike cbs margaret brennan fran towns michael morale tori newlyn ninety days
"michael morale" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"The dossier was pain russians for their information and used intermediaries former acting cia director and hillary clinton campaign surrogate michael morale said this was discrediting that i ask myself why did these guys provide the information what was there our motivation and i subsequently learned that he paid them uh other things here the dossier was used as the basis for wiretaps i'd american citizens in march the washington post use anonymous sources to report that the fbi obtained a secret warned uh to spy on us citizen carter page and unpaid an informal adviser to the trump team camp pain as part of an investigation into links between russia and the trump campaign cnn used anonymous sources to report that the infamous dossier was used in part of the justification to win approval to monitor the trump associate the fbi also paid for the dossier uh last week donald trump tweeted fusion gps was working on behalf of the russians while working on the dossier but they claim without providing evidence said they kept their other russian work separate from their trump russia dossier worked democrats rule of released or involvement too friendly journalists at the washington post last night when a trump asked about the fbi many political journalists a journalist faint shock and outrage that he would make such a claim they should not have their outlets have already reported that the fbi had tried to pay for the dossier and had in fact reimbursed expenses for the dossier something that we hit on last night uh that that the the president was on a wild back and also a couple of two three weeks ago you know basically saying that the the fbi needs to open up about all this and here's another point that you and i brought up months ago um um that we do not know of those expenses included the payments to the russian officials for salacious stories on republican nominee for president trump the fbi has resisted all oversight by congressional committees looking into the fbi's role in funding and use of.

director michael morale fbi us russia cnn donald trump washington post president cia hillary clinton washington carter two three weeks
"michael morale" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Fbi and the us intelligence community according to these people who spoke on the condition of anonymity the dossier is shocked full of discredited information journalists who are friendly with fusion gps and opponents of the trump administration claim without any evidence of any kind beyond anonymous sources vag say so that the dossier has parts that were verify that could mean something as simple as well parts about russia trying to find information about trump or about trump affiliates having friendly business relations with russians we have no evidence to suggest that anything significant from the dossier has been verified and we don't know how much it any was actually deliberate disinformation jim on the russian government sources of you and i've been talking about for months right we do of reports that a freelance spy who put together some of the information in the dossier was pain russians for their information and used intermediaries former acting cia director and hillary clinton campaign surrogate michael morale said this was discrediting that i ask myself why did these guys provide by the information what was our motivation and i subsequently learned that he paid them uh other things here the dossier was used as the basis for wiretaps on american citizens in march the washington post use anonymous sources to report that the fbi obtained a secret warned uh to spy on us citizen carter page and unpaid an informal adviser for the trump campaign as part of an investigation into links between russia and the trump campaign cnn used anonymous sources to report that the infamous dossier was used in part of the justification to win approval to monitor the trump associate the fbi also paid for the dossier uh last week donald trump tweeted fusion gps was working on behalf of the russians while working on the dossier but they claimed without providing evidence that they kept their other russian work separate from their trump russia dossier work democrats real a release their involvement for friendly journalists of the washington post last night when a trump.

Fbi russia director michael morale us cnn donald trump washington post cia hillary clinton washington carter
"michael morale" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on WTMA

"So they approached him yet and knowing that there were remember the the vision gps resolve also working with the russians and the working with the russians in order to soften united states sanctions against russia so mark elias alert represented the clinton campaign the dnc retained fusion gps washington firm to conduct the research effort that fusion gps hired dossier author christopher steal a former british intelligence officer with ties to the fbi and the us intelligence community according to these people whose spoke on the condition of anonymity the dossier is shocked full of discredited information journalists who are friendly with fusion gps and opponents of the trump administration claim without any evidence of any kind beyond anonymous sources vag say so that the dossier has parts that were verify that could mean something as simple as well parts about russia trying to find information about trump or about trump affiliates having friendly business relations with russians we have no evidence to suggest that anything significant from the dossier has been verified and we don't know how much it any was actually deliberate disinformation in on the russian government sources of you i'd been talking about for months right we do of reports that a freelance spy who put together some of the information and the dossier was pain russians for their information and used intermediaries former acting cia director and hillary clinton campaign surrogate michael morale said this was discrediting that i asked myself why did these guys provide the information what was there our motivation and i subsequently learned that he paid them uh other things here the dossier was used as the basis for wiretaps on american citizens in march the washington post use anonymous sources to report that the fbi obtained a secret warned to spy on us citizen carter page and unpaid an informal adviser to.

russia dnc officer fbi director michael morale us mark elias christopher cia hillary clinton washington carter
"michael morale" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on WCTC

"Of anonymity the dossier is chockfull of discredited information journalist were friendly with fusion gps and opponents of the trump administration claim without any evidence of any kind beyond anonymous sources vag say so that the dossier has parts that were verify that could mean something as simple as well parts about russia trying to find information about trump or about trump affiliates having friendly business relations with russians we have no evidence to suggest that anything significant from the dossier has been verified and we don't know how much it any was actually deliberate disinformation jim on the russian government sources of you when i've been talking about for months fight we do of reports that a freelance spy who put together some of the information in the dossier was pain russians for their information and used intermediaries former acting cia director and hillary clinton campaign surrogate michael morale said this was discrediting that i ask myself why did these guys provide the information what was our motivation and i subsequently learned that he paid them uh other things here of the dossier was used as the basis for wiretaps on american citizens in march the washington post use anonymous sources to report that the fbi obtained a secret warned uh to spy on us citizen carter page an unpaid an informal adviser to the trumpcare pain as part of an investigation into links between russia and the trump campaign cnn used anonymous sources to report that the infamous dossier was used in part of the justification to win approval to monitor the trump associate the fbi also paid for the dossier uh last week donald trump tweeted fusion gps was working on behalf of the russians while working on the dossier but they claim without providing evidence that they kept there are other russian works separate from their trump russia dossier work democrats were released their involvement too friendly journalists of.

russia director michael morale fbi us cnn donald trump cia hillary clinton washington carter
"michael morale" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Republican funded separate up opposition research on trump dealing with his business interests but as the washington post itself reports the dossier did not exist until after the democrats hired fusion gps mark elias a lawyer representing the clinton campaign and the dnc retain fusion gps a washington firm to conduct the research now uh the daily mail uk say fusion gps approached him so they approached him yet and knowing that their d remember the diffusion gps resolve also working with the russians had been working with the russians in order to soften united states sanctions against russia so mark elias lawyer representing the clinton campaign the dnc retained fusion gps washington firm to conduct the research after that fusion gps hired dossier author christopher steal a former british intelligence officer with ties to the fbi and the us intelligence community according to these people whose spoke on the condition of anonymity the dossier is shocked full of discredited information journalists who are friendly with fusion gps and opponents of the trump administration claim without any evidence of any kind beyond anonymous sources vag say so that the dossier has parts that were verify that could mean something as simple as well parts about russia trying to find information about trump or about trump affiliates having friendly business relations with russians we have no evidence to suggest that anything significant from the dossier has been verified and we don't know how much it any was actually deliberate disinformation jim on the russian government sources of you and i've been talking about for months fight we do of reports that a freelance spy who put together some of the information on the dossier was pain russians for their information and used intermediaries former acting cia director and hillary clinton campaign surrogate michael morale said this was discrediting than i asked myself why did these guys provide the information what was there our motivation and i subsequently learned that he paid them uh other things here of the dossier was used as the basis for wiretaps on american citizens in march the washington post use of animus sources to report that the fbi obtained a secret warned ought to spy on us citizen carter page and unpaid an informal adviser to.

dnc russia officer fbi director michael morale us washington mark elias christopher cia hillary clinton carter
"michael morale" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"michael morale" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Here in southern california it's a pleasure to be talking to you all i found this story very interesting i don't know if people will blight act cia director is stepping down as a fellow at harvard because he has a problem with university offering a fellowship to chelsea manning for those of you do not recognize name chelsea manning was the soldier who was convicted for leaking sensitive information to wikileaks and other sources then was commuted by president obama after seven years of her of her tom and it was like something like over 35 years that she was originally sentenced to once you sentenced she was he chelsea manning who is now ms manning was was man she's transgender and it's pretty like this if for something that is in the world of completely sensitive information and believe you me transgender issues is right at the top of the list of just minefields um there's really no way of even addressing it sometimes without being told that you are offensive um but by michael morale is resigning because he says i cannot serve alongside or serve at the at the request of an organization that will celebrate someone that put american soldiers lives in danger so i i don't i don't see this heating up the anti transient he lgbt any it'd be this is one of those stories that i think is pretty important because you're talking about someone that the president of the united states at the time brock obama personally let out of prison so you're saying and he you.

california cia director harvard chelsea manning wikileaks michael morale president united states brock obama ms manning seven years 35 years