10 Burst results for "Michael Lipton"

"michael lipton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:53 min | 6 months ago

"michael lipton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today, the 26th Day of Meghan's always have you along, everybody. This is a corporate news kind of day. Some days. You get economic indicators to start the program. Some days you get market news today. We got companies big companies to so let us just tick through the list here, shall we? Energy leads the way kind of surprising news out of ExxonMobil's annual shareholder meeting today took her symbol x O. M, by the way, turns out a hedge fund, a relatively small ish hedge fund. It called Engine number one. Which holds a very small slice of Exxon Mobil stock has convinced some other much bigger shareholders that they should put a couple of engine number one's candidates on that company's board of directors candidates that would, and this is the important part. Force Exxon to cut back on its fossil fuel strategy and investments and doom or about climate change. It sounds inside re I suppose a little bit of corporate governance, but it is a very big Deal also and related to court over in the Netherlands today ordered Royal Dutch Shell to cut its carbon emissions by 45% within the next nine years, which is basically like tomorrow in corporate time. All right. Moving on Big Wall Street Bank CEOs Wrong Capitol Hill today, virtually, of course, that is. It was about what you'd expect from one of those five witnesses, a dozen or more senators asking questions kind of hearings. Inflation is on their minds. It turns out nothing new there housings in a bit of a bubble, Nothing really new there, either That kind of thing, although should be said Elizabeth Warren, senator of Massachusetts did give JP Morgan CEO Jamie Diamond good going over about overdraft fees and the $1.5 billion J. P. Morgan collected of them in the past year and at Amazon's annual meeting A M. ZN, of course, Jeff Bezos said July 5th is going to be his last day as CEO. That was trick headline because it is not the Amazon News. Oh, the day after a week or two of rumors, the company said today it is going to buy MGM Studios for $8.5 billion that's all in with debt. Yes, it is a big ish mergers and acquisitions story. But as with so much other news of late, this is at least as much a tech story. So we have gotten Hollywood on the phone. She's the host of marketplace Tech when she's not busy doing my job when I'm sick. Hey, Molly. Okay, Well, you know, I appreciate you. I appreciate you coming in. So long, man. Yeah, it is a tech story and Tech and Amazon. It's got to be Amazon Prime, which is at the root of this deal, right? Absolutely. I mean, I think we would be mistaken. If we said this is Amazon's attempt to beat Netflix right or become Netflix. Certainly streaming video as a business model has more than proven itself. It's been interesting for a while that Amazon has made good shows clearly and created its own content for its Amazon video streaming service, but hasn't Tried to acquire a big library until now, And I think what this ultimately is is a very expensive way to get people in the door and want to pay for that prime subscription, which is where Amazon makes a lot of money and also maybe pay a little bit like we talked about on make me smart pay a little bit here and there to subscribe to other services like Showtime or Cinemax. I mean, Amazon doesn't tidy little business as almost a Leeds generator for other streaming services to write, Make me smart, Of course, the podcast that we do together should you be in the mood for a podcast listeners out there. We talked about the story of the morning meeting this morning, and I think Michael Lipton, actually, your producer said. It's about Stickiness for Amazon Prime, right? They want to get people in and give them just another reason to stick around. Forget the free delivery. Forget all that stuff. And maybe that 100 or so dollars a year ain't so bad if you get all these movies, too. Exactly And you have seen people sort of start to grumble about the price of prime going up as it has over the couple years. Then, if you on Lee, think of it as paying for free shipping, it does start to feel like well. Is this really worth it? I can get free shipping from target. It is not about e commerce. Prime is about the idea that once you have subscribed in your part of this ecosystem, you get all of these different benefits. And, you know probably yes, there's a little bit of Hollywood dabbling here. Also in the Amazon shareholder meeting today, Jeff Bezos, in addition to announcing his retirement date, said that they plan to use this MGM catalog and developed You know, intellectual property. New shows around it extended into new entertainment. Yeah, which is which is the name of the game. The AIP. So you said they're not competing with Netflix. Right? So, so Reed, Hastings and Ted Sarandos aren't necessarily nervous about this deal. Bob Iger, the executive chairman of Disney, but really functioning mostly is the chief executive officer is probably not nervous about this deal. What if you're like Peacock, who? Lulu Yeah. Then I think you really have to worry unless you can get a great deal for placement within Amazon Prime, you know, subscribed to Peacock Er, Hu Lu through Amazon Prime, and that is one of the ways that I think Amazon is trying to deflect some of the antitrust worries about this is by saying, Listen, we're not that big and streaming. We don't intend to be You know the only name in video streaming and look it of all of the ways that we offer consumers to subscribe to our competitors through our service. As long as they keep doing that, I think they hope they can keep the antitrust boogeyman off their backs. Molly, would she of many hats in this production shop? Thanks. Milly will talk to you soon. Thanks. God this afternoon, In fact on podcast Anyway, I'll be very good. Me too. All right. Moving on. You want to be an entrepreneur? You want to start a new business. You gotta have some guts and in no industry right now, I think you can fairly say are more guts required. And in commercial aviation. Which is why it's interesting..

Jeff Bezos Michael Lipton Elizabeth Warren Disney Bob Iger Royal Dutch Shell ExxonMobil Netflix 100 Exxon Mobil JP Morgan Ted Sarandos $8.5 billion $1.5 billion Today MGM Studios Cinemax J. P. Morgan Molly MGM
"michael lipton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:40 min | 6 months ago

"michael lipton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Always have your long, everybody. This Is a corporate news kind of day. Some days you get economic indicators to start the program. Some days you get market news. Today. We got companies big companies to so let us just tick through the list here, Shall we? Energy leads the way kind of surprising news out of ExxonMobil's annual shareholder meeting today took her symbol X O. M, by the way. Turns out a hedge fund, a relatively small ish hedge fund. It called Engine number one, which holds a very small slice of Exxon Mobil stock has convinced some other, much bigger shareholders. That they should put a couple of engine number one's candidates on that company's board of directors candidates that would, and this is the important part force Exxon to cut back on its fossil fuel strategy and investments. And doom or about climate change. It sounds inside of me, I suppose a little bit of corporate governance, but it is a very big deal also and related to court over in the Netherlands. Today ordered Royal Dutch Shell to cut its carbon emissions by 45% within the next nine years, which is basically like tomorrow in corporate time. All right. Moving on Big Wall Street Bank CEOs Wrong Capitol Hill today, virtually, of course, that is. It was about what you'd expect from one of those five witnesses, a dozen or more senators asking questions kind of hearings. Inflation is on their minds. It turns out nothing new there housings in a bit of a bubble, Nothing really new there, either That kind of thing, although should be said Elizabeth Warren, senator of Massachusetts did give JP Morgan CEO Jamie Diamond a good going over about overdraft fees and the $1.5 billion J. P. Morgan collected of them in the past year and at Amazon's annual meeting A M. ZN, of course, Jeff Bezos said July 5th is going to be his last day as CEO. That was trick headline because it is not the Amazon News. Oh, the day after a week or two of rumors, the company said today it is going to buy MGM Studios for $8.5 billion that's all in with debt. Yes, it is a big ish mergers and acquisitions story. But as with so much other news of late, this is at least as much a tech story. So we have gotten Hollywood on the phone. She is the host of Marketplace Tech when she's not busy doing my job when I'm sick. Hey, Molly. Okay, Well, you know, I appreciate you. I appreciate your coming in. Um so look, man. Yeah, it is a tech story and Tech and Amazon. It's got to be Amazon Prime, which is at the root of this deal, right? Absolutely. I mean, I think we would be mistaken. If we said this is Amazon's attempt to beat Netflix right or become Netflix. Certainly streaming video as a business model has more than proven itself. It's been interesting for a while that Amazon has made good shows clearly and created its own content for its Amazon video streaming service, but hasn't Tried to acquire a big library until now, And I think what this ultimately is is a very expensive way to get people in the door and want to pay for that prime subscription, which is where Amazon makes a lot of money and also maybe pay a little bit like we talked about on make me smart. Hey, a little bit here and there to subscribe to other services like Showtime or Cinemax. I mean, Amazon doesn't tidy little business as almost a Leeds generator for other streaming services, too, right? Um, uh, Make me smart. Of course, the podcast that we do together. Should you be in the mood for a podcast? Um, listeners out there? Um, we talked about the story of the morning meeting this morning. And I think Michael Lipton, actually, your producer said it's about Stickiness for Amazon Prime, right? They want to get people in and give them just another reason to stick around. Forget the free delivery. Forget all that stuff. And maybe that 100 or so dollars a year ain't so bad if you get all these movies, too. Exactly And you have seen people sort of start to grumble about the price of prime going up as it has over the couple years. Then, if you on Lee, think of it as paying for free shipping, it does start to feel like well. Is this really worth it? I can get free shipping from target. It is not about e commerce. Prime is about the idea that once you have subscribed in your part of this ecosystem, you get all of these different benefits. And, you know probably yes, there's a little bit of Hollywood dabbling here. Also in the Amazon shareholder meeting today, Jeff Bezos, in addition to announcing his retirement date, said that they plan to use this MGM catalog and developed You know, intellectual property. New shows around it extended into new entertainment. Yeah, which is which is the name of the game. The AIP. So you said they're not competing with Netflix. Right? So, so Reed, Hastings and Ted Sarandos aren't necessarily nervous about this deal. Bob Iger, the executive chairman of Disney, but really functioning mostly is the chief executive officer is probably not nervous about this deal. What if you're like Peacock or Lulu? Yeah. Then I think you really have to worry unless you can get a great deal for placement within Amazon Prime, you know, subscribed to Peacock Er, Hu Lu through Amazon Prime, and that is one of the ways that I think Amazon is trying to deflect some of the antitrust worries about this is by saying, Listen, we're not that big and streaming. We don't intend to be, you know, the only name in video streaming and Look at all of the ways that we offer consumers to subscribe to our competitors through our service. As long as they keep doing that, I think they hope they can keep the antitrust bogeyman off their backs. Molly, would she of many hats in this production shop? Thanks. Milly will talk to you soon. Thanks, Captain this afternoon. In fact, on the podcast anyway. Yeah, Good. Me, too. All right, moving on student numbers. Now Industrials.

Jeff Bezos Michael Lipton Bob Iger Elizabeth Warren Disney Royal Dutch Shell ExxonMobil Exxon Mobil Netflix 100 JP Morgan $8.5 billion Exxon Cinemax $1.5 billion MGM Studios Molly J. P. Morgan Netherlands Today
"michael lipton" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

07:52 min | 2 years ago

"michael lipton" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Triple eight five five three seven two six two let me run down some of the topics we're gonna be covering on the show today this should be of interest to you I shortly here we're gonna talk about why it is that women who take birth control pills need to think about it related to a no no the older out it's obvious the reason why women want to take birth control pills generally it's to stop from procreation it's to not have a baby they don't want to have a baby so they take birth control pills no others do it for reserve the other reasons some doctors place went on birth control pills to control the try to control their periods others a variety of reasons that's the most common is just not become pregnant but I wonder if they were told what it's doing they would even take him in the first place we'll get back to that but we're also gonna be talking later on in the show about the meaning of life scientists reveal this a big new study out of the university of California San Diego researchers believe they discovered the meaning of life you may agree or disagree with our findings but there none the less fascinating and we'll share those with you coming up we're also gonna be talking about prostate issues later how eight standard American diet can fuel prostate problem particularly the worst type of prostate problem you can possibly have and I mean the big C. big study harder one hundred and seventy five thousand men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year in the US it's the fifth highest rate on the earth we have the hot fifth highest rate of prostate cancer on the planet why is that when we're supposed to be a superpower they're the best economy in the world we're supposed to have the best sick care system in the world but yet we have the fifth highest rate of prostate cancer on the planet gonna be talking about a big study out of make gill university also bring up something that you should know more about hair dyes seventy percent I just learned this recently seventy percent of women adults use some form of hair dye dye their hair they have a grain or these once streaks or whatever it may be seventy percent I don't know the numbers that high and a lot of men die they're here as well we're gonna talk about how here dies and chemical straighteners may up the risk of the big city and I do mean cancer that's coming up but we're gonna be in with the discussion related to women who take the birth control pill each day not realizing that there is a brain region a part of the brain that when a woman takes a birth control pill it shrinks when many women would take birth control pills of a doctor told them ahead of time that it's going to adversely affects that affect their sex life it may adversely affect your sleep it may adversely affect their mood you still down for this women who take the P. hill the hill the birth control pill each day have a key brain region which is smaller it shrinks that's what the experts have found for the very first time this was discovered no we've known for a long time about birth control pills and how they can cause an increased risk of gallbladder problems in women how they can cause weight gain in women how they can increase the risk of blood clots in women that that's well known but to shrink the brain with birth control pills the hypothalamus is crucial for the normal production of hormones and plays a very important role in mood in appetite sex drive and even sleep well researchers at monta fori Medical Center in New York City scanned the brains of women who are on birth control pills and not to make the conclusion they saw a dramatic difference in the size of this part of the brain called the hypothalamus in women who took birth control pills other preliminary evidence from the same team found a link between the smaller size and anger and depressive symptoms so look if you have a wife or a girlfriend or a sister or a mother or somebody you know who's on birth control pills and their anger you notice that they're angry all the time you notice that they have depressive symptoms they have mood changes up and down their appetites thrown off maybe their sex drives down and you know but they're not sleeping you want to be thinking about the birth control pills are taking the lead author of the study Dr Michael Lipton said and I quote there is a lack of research on the effects of oral contraception or oral contraceptives all this is such a part of the living human brain think about how long birth control pills have been on the market and we're just now learning that they have the capability of shrinking the brain and creating all these problems that we didn't know prior this is the slippery slope that happens when you start swallowing a risky pharmaceuticals that we know little or nothing about with the leap of faith there without full disclosure because we don't know what the hell they're doing he also added that the team can confirm for the very first time the using the pale the birth control pill is linked with a smaller hi Paul thalamic volume oral contraceptives are among the most popular forms of birth control and are taken by millions and millions of women in the United States around forty seven million women between the ages of fifteen and forty nine in the U. S. reported use of contraceptives over a period of time leading up to the latest statistic measurement up to two thousand seventeen SO for women taking birth control pills depression is listed as a side effect in the warning label the leaflet in included in every packet along with symptoms such as blood clotting problems weight gain pain reduced love beetle but with all these other symptoms were learning about a loss of brain volume and they don't even talk to folks about the nutrients that are lost in women who take birth control pills how their body is deficient as a result taking birth control pills and vitamin B. two vitamin B. six vitamin B. twelve folic acid vitamin C. vitamin a vitamin D. magnesium selenium zinc you get the idea birth control pills are you when you take one you'll hear this giant sucking sound room where your nutrients are just leaving your body and all the adverse effects that go with that it doesn't happen overnight it happens over time and then nobody nobody related back to starting the birth control pill suddenly I mean your brain doesn't shrink overnight where your sleep is impacted you think it's the caffeine you think it's the stress it could be the birth control pill you're swallowing everyday you wonder why you're alone and you have these mood swings up and down on a bi polar because of the birth control pill you wonder why your immune system doesn't.

"michael lipton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"michael lipton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Trademark office. So nobody can steal it. But what if you want to call your new enterprise something that we can obtain the radio under a law known as the Lanham act the patent and trademark office could reject such a name yesterday. The US supreme court heard arguments saying that that law, violates free speech genie frommer is an NYU law professor and wrote and the make us brief supporting the business owner challenging the law. Good morning. Good morning. So can you briefly explain the Lanham act in what parts of it are being challenged? What are the basic rules here? So the Lanham act provides federal protection to trademarks to symbols. And it protects those marks against use in ways that are likely to confuse consumers in what does it say about bad words? There are a number of grounds in the land. Amac that provide a basis to refuse registration one of those grounds is that immoral or scandalous marks cannot be registered. Now. This case involves Erik Brunetti who owns an apparel company whose name sounds just like the F word, but the last two letters are CT the federal trademark office denied him trademark protection for that business name. So what's the arguing? He's arguing that this provision in trademark law is contrary to the first amendment protections for free speech. Now, you make the argument that this rule is not necessarily applied consistently. Can you give us some examples from your research, my collaborator Barton, baby? And I we dug into the millions of trademark registration. Applications that are filed at the patent and trademark office over a period of about thirteen years. We saw is that the patent trademark office's doing this in quite inconsistent way at the same time, it'll refuse certain Mark applications for trying to register marks that are immoral or scandalous and also say that they are confusingly similar to the same goods or services that they just registered. I mean, I can imagine very easily people saying, well, these names are just inappropriate why should the trademark office? Give protection to such business names. It's a great point. And I have to say some of these marks that we went through our indeed ones, you might not wanna let us in polite company. Others wanna be more provocative you see things like cocaine for an energy drink, and maybe that helps them in the marketplace. For the government to be intervening here is problematic. If only because of the inconsistencies, we're finding because it's just that the trademark examiners are not able to do a good job consistently sorting out, which are the immoral or scandalous marks which ones are not. And if that's the case, maybe it's not great policy to be preventing them in the first place from registration in what you law. Professor genie. Frommer? It was a pleasure speaking with you. It was a pleasure. Thank you. Producers are Victoria, Craig Michael Lipton. Candice Monique as Ren Danielson and Sasha withdrew in New York. I'm Sabrina short with the marketplace morning report. For P m American public media before eight o'clock and with more about the area traffic..

frommer professor Erik Brunetti NYU US Craig Michael Lipton Victoria business owner Candice Monique cocaine Barton New York Ren Danielson Sasha thirteen years
"michael lipton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"michael lipton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The footsie in London is up six tenths of a percent down s and p futures are down less than a tenth of a percent. The Dow futures down eighteen points, NASDAQ futures up about a tenth of a percent and the ten year treasury yield is a two point five two percent. A jury has decided that one man's cancer was caused by Monsanto's roundup weed killer Monsanto and parent company, Bayer's liability is being decided in a separate case. But the trial has put a spotlight on how courts assess complex and unsettled scientific questions. Marketplace's Michael Lipton has more does roundup caused cancer. Scientists disagree on that regulators in different countries disagree. But jurors in San Francisco had to decide as weird as this case might seem there's really nothing unusual about it. Jennifer Lawrence is professor at the university of Texas school of law. There is debate over whether courts are equipped to handle complex or murky scientific questions. Judges usually decide which evidence is admissible, but they depend on lawyers arguments to do. So you don't have anyone in court whose actual function. It is to present evidence in an objective. Lightning and courts. Do get ahead of the science example involving silicon implants. In the nineteen ninety s David figment is dean of the UC Hastings college of law five hundred thousand lawsuits were filed alleging silicone implants caused a tissue disorders when research finally caught up. It turned out that it did not cause connective tissue disorders and the cases ended up being dismissed, but that can take years after a case is settled signs and the law are on very different timetables in New York, I'm Michael Lipkin for marketplace. Marketplace morning report is supported by constant contact their automation features like customers automatically send welcome and birthday emails as well..

UC Hastings college of law Michael Lipton Michael Lipkin David figment university of Texas school of Jennifer Lawrence Bayer San Francisco London professor New York five two percent ten year
"michael lipton" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:22 min | 3 years ago

"michael lipton" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Of veterans that are committing suicide every day is alarming. Men and women taking their own life their own lives. Why? Why are we not hearing more from doctors like you speaking out and sharing this information? I think it's because of the amount of doctors who deal with traumatic brain injury. There's only eight to ten percent of all healthcare providers across the board in our nation who deal with individuals with traumatic brain injury. Okay. So I think that is a major problem. The other thing is it wasn't really until around the time of the war in two thousand five two thousand seven where we began developing the technology to actually look inside what was going on in these kinds of injuries, and that was with very specialized MRI's like diffusion tensor imaging which is who we utilize Dr Michael Lipton at Albert Einstein. College of medicine, there's only a handful of docks at that time neuro radiologist who were looking inside the brain. So okay. We're now ten years later, though, I would expect a little bit more participation of the VA and the civilian world the civilian world. We're ninety nine percent of the resources. You know, we need to be -cluded. India question of taking care of our veterans on a much larger scale than just the choice act. So you had you lost the ability to speak simple sentences. Tasks you couldn't dial a phone. I couldn't. Yeah. Am I am or I was normal? The conventional MRI was one man. And I was just very blessed. My colleagues realized if I wasn't speaking that was an issue. Our poor young veterans coming back did not get that same response. Do you know what I mean? And we as a nation to stand up and say, no, they do have issues, and it is our responsibility to help reintegrate them. And let's get clear here in order to rehab a brain with mild traumatic brain injury. It may take three to six months on the average of your kind of retraining the vision retraining their ability to balance retraining some of their thought processes, but then they're often running. I mean, why do we not invest that up front? That's what I'm saying. I'm very blessed to be working with a group of software engineers in in a company gray matter innovations, and what we are working on is kinda digit suitable response. Like, we're going to treat our veterans with virtual reality. Where they will be able to utilize a headset in a computer at home multiple times a day. We cannot expect our young veterans to travel thirty forty fifty miles to VA center. Three times a week. You know, it is ineffective. It's expensive and ineffective. So what I am advocating. That's why I really cannot. Thank you enough. Is that we need as a nation to abrasive and give them technology to rehab there. Right. Because let me tell you all of these young men and women are used to strapping on a helmet and taking orders, you know, let the warrior being charge of their own care. And that's what we are advocating and the book was kind of like, the the the tipping point. I if I can get this word out there and enough of our young veterans and their families can read it and get to the proper sources, and we get our legislators to read this and understand it. So that we can literally open up some of these services in the civilian world tour veterans, we would be a lot stronger. Nation. I'm listening to you doctor, and I'm just seeing all of the hope and the enthusiasm and what you're bringing to the table this book turn the lights on. Is really powerful. And if you didn't have this experience, you probably could not related understand what our vets are going through. Absolutely. I consider. It was the the universe drafting me at that moment and. The most important thing that happened is eyeballing tiered a couple of days a month at the VA to do their traumatic brain injury screening, which was fat enough in two thousand and eight meaning that there were no other physicians who want to okay. Doctor. I'm going to have you back with gives us the website of how people can find out about the documentary about the book in the work that you're doing surely, our website is resurrecting lives dot org and on there. You can click and watch the forty three minute documentary. You can also see a link for Amazon, which is where the book is being sold both in favor of back copy and in kindle copy. So I will tell you that a lot of people we've had in the month of December alone, like eleven emails of young veterans who were struggling as you said and said, you know, this book really did give me hoping got me. Thank you so much. We'll be back in

Frankie boyer Franken Dr Christiaan Gordon Ohio College of medicine United States Columbus VA India Dr Michael Lipton Jonathan wells Afghanistan Iraq
"michael lipton" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:22 min | 3 years ago

"michael lipton" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Always want to be the best. You can be the Frankie Boyer show. The lifestyle show bit. So show about living in today's world famous happening Franken you brings an amazing mix to the airwaves got that. Right. One of the reasons she's earned legions of loyal fans is very simple. When you listen to the Frankie Boyer show. You just never know. What's going to happen? Listen. Frankie boyer. Well, committed so nice to have you with us today. Another phenomenal program. This. Kicking things off with our first guest. Dr Christiaan Gordon has. A very interesting background because she has experienced in internal medicine emergency room medicine, occupational medicine, rehabilitative medicine board certified by the American board of physical medicine. But it's her own. Story as a veteran. That we need to talk about. And she's written about it in her new book. Turn the lights on a physician's personal journey from the darkness of traumatic brain injury to hope healing and recovery. And Dr Gordon welcome to the program. I'll Franken thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate this opportunity to speak to our veterans our military members and their families about the signature wounded war, which is traumatic brain injury and how they can get some help. So I really appreciate your stepping up to the plate and allowing me to speak today. Okay. Tell us a little bit about your own personal story. Okay. I will. I if I want to clarify, I am not a veteran. I am not nearly brave enough to do anything. But I am a position who as you say has had kind of an eclectic background, which with your particular program. I love all of medicine, but my favorite is rehabilitation medicine, and I shall live in traumatic brain injury. Okay. This was great until I had my own traumatic brain injury, and what I found out as a patient. It's what we were doing positions with really not helping I could not even drive even though I had a normal MRI. I got it because I couldn't even judge distances or left hand turns or any of the above. So I literally had to kind of rehab myself at home, thanks to my Apple computer and fast forward. Ten years later. I began working with veterans coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan with the improvised explosive device blast terrible problems with cognition with memory with processing vision and yet normal. Is as my life. And instead what we did as a nation to say. You know, you guys are crazy. Medications to kinda keep you quiet and calm you down. When in reality. Our returning veterans or out of their brains not out of their minds. So it is so amazing. I was able to then take my story. And the reason why I wrote it down in this book, and it's intermingled with stories of veterans who've come back from the war, and how they have sought rehabilitation and in the midst of Frankie while I was writing this. I get a call from Jonathan wells from Columbus, Ohio, the Ohio State Buckeye national championships because you know, I played for a wish you, but I played an anti fell. And I have a TV. I can I tell my story. I mean, I don't even know how he found out. I was writing the book, but it shows the broad base of individuals who are undergoing primarily young otherwise very healthy people who get into a situation with our young keyboards. It's primarily the blast huge explosion that literally rattles their brain and breaks connections in. Multitude parts of the brain. And we need to do something about it. We needed first to get a public awareness about it. Which is why I strove to to produce a documentary called operation resurrection, and that is available on our website at resurrecting, livestock dot org. But it is an explanation to the United States here. We are we have these folks back here, and we need to do something about it. So let's talk about your your particular injury and the injuries that many of our veterans that are coming back with tell tell us exactly what TBI stands for. Okay. It stands for traumatic brain injury. And that means any injury to the brain from an outside force. So it's different promise stroke where there's a bleed or there's something internally going wrong. This is something that strikes the brain from the outside. A fall. Banging your head. Yes. Exactly. Exactly. Okay. Why this is this has been something that that I don't understand. I have not understood why we're not under. We don't get what's happening with our veterans. I don't understand this piece. And I have a very hard time. Because the number of veterans that are committing suicide every day is alarming. Men and women taking their own life their own lives. Why? Why are we not hearing more from doctors like you speaking out and sharing this information? I think it's because of the amount of doctors who deal with traumatic brain injury. There's only eight to ten percent of all healthcare providers across the board in our nation who deal with individuals with traumatic brain injury. Okay. So I think that is a major problem. The other thing is it wasn't really until around the time of the war in two thousand five two thousand seven where we began developing the technology to actually look inside what was going on in these kinds of injuries, and that was with very specialized MRI's like diffusion tensor imaging which is who we utilize Dr Michael Lipton at Albert Einstein. College of medicine, there's only a handful of docks at that time neuro radiologist who were looking inside the brain. So okay. We're now ten years later, though, I would expect a little bit more participation of the VA and the civilian world the civilian world. We're ninety nine percent of the resources. You know, we need to be -cluded. India question of taking care of our veterans on a much larger scale than just the choice act. So you had you lost the ability to speak simple sentences. Tasks you couldn't dial a phone. I couldn't. Yeah. Am I am or I was normal? The conventional MRI was one man. And I was just very blessed. My colleagues realized if I wasn't speaking that was an issue. Our poor young veterans coming back did not get that same response. Do you know what I mean? And we as a nation to stand up and say, no, they do have issues, and it is our responsibility to help reintegrate them. And let's get clear here in order to rehab a brain with mild traumatic brain injury. It may take three to six months on the average of your kind of retraining the vision retraining their ability to balance retraining some of their thought processes, but then they're often running. I mean, why do we not invest that up front? That's what I'm saying. I'm very blessed to be working with a group of software engineers in in a company gray matter innovations, and what we are working on is kinda digit suitable response. Like, we're going to treat our veterans with virtual reality. Where they will be able to utilize a headset in a computer at home multiple times a day. We cannot expect our young veterans to travel thirty forty fifty miles to VA center. Three times a week. You know, it is ineffective. It's expensive and ineffective. So what I am advocating. That's why I really cannot. Thank you enough. Is that we need as a nation to abrasive and give them technology to rehab there. Right. Because let me tell you all of these young men and women are used to strapping on a helmet and taking orders, you know, let the warrior being charge of their own care. And that's what we are advocating and the book was kind of like, the the the tipping point. I if I can get this word out there and enough of our young veterans and their families can read it and get to the proper sources, and we get our legislators to read this and understand it. So that we can literally open up some of these services in the civilian world tour veterans, we would be a lot stronger. Nation. I'm.

Frankie boyer Franken Dr Christiaan Gordon Ohio College of medicine United States Columbus VA India Dr Michael Lipton Jonathan wells Afghanistan Iraq
The veteran suicide rate is alarming. Why aren't we doing more?

The Frankie Boyer Show

05:12 min | 3 years ago

The veteran suicide rate is alarming. Why aren't we doing more?

"Of veterans that are committing suicide every day is alarming. Men and women taking their own life their own lives. Why? Why are we not hearing more from doctors like you speaking out and sharing this information? I think it's because of the amount of doctors who deal with traumatic brain injury. There's only eight to ten percent of all healthcare providers across the board in our nation who deal with individuals with traumatic brain injury. Okay. So I think that is a major problem. The other thing is it wasn't really until around the time of the war in two thousand five two thousand seven where we began developing the technology to actually look inside what was going on in these kinds of injuries, and that was with very specialized MRI's like diffusion tensor imaging which is who we utilize Dr Michael Lipton at Albert Einstein. College of medicine, there's only a handful of docks at that time neuro radiologist who were looking inside the brain. So okay. We're now ten years later, though, I would expect a little bit more participation of the VA and the civilian world the civilian world. We're ninety nine percent of the resources. You know, we need to be -cluded. India question of taking care of our veterans on a much larger scale than just the choice act. So you had you lost the ability to speak simple sentences. Tasks you couldn't dial a phone. I couldn't. Yeah. Am I am or I was normal? The conventional MRI was one man. And I was just very blessed. My colleagues realized if I wasn't speaking that was an issue. Our poor young veterans coming back did not get that same response. Do you know what I mean? And we as a nation to stand up and say, no, they do have issues, and it is our responsibility to help reintegrate them. And let's get clear here in order to rehab a brain with mild traumatic brain injury. It may take three to six months on the average of your kind of retraining the vision retraining their ability to balance retraining some of their thought processes, but then they're often running. I mean, why do we not invest that up front? That's what I'm saying. I'm very blessed to be working with a group of software engineers in in a company gray matter innovations, and what we are working on is kinda digit suitable response. Like, we're going to treat our veterans with virtual reality. Where they will be able to utilize a headset in a computer at home multiple times a day. We cannot expect our young veterans to travel thirty forty fifty miles to VA center. Three times a week. You know, it is ineffective. It's expensive and ineffective. So what I am advocating. That's why I really cannot. Thank you enough. Is that we need as a nation to abrasive and give them technology to rehab there. Right. Because let me tell you all of these young men and women are used to strapping on a helmet and taking orders, you know, let the warrior being charge of their own care. And that's what we are advocating and the book was kind of like, the the the tipping point. I if I can get this word out there and enough of our young veterans and their families can read it and get to the proper sources, and we get our legislators to read this and understand it. So that we can literally open up some of these services in the civilian world tour veterans, we would be a lot stronger. Nation. I'm listening to you doctor, and I'm just seeing all of the hope and the enthusiasm and what you're bringing to the table this book turn the lights on. Is really powerful. And if you didn't have this experience, you probably could not related understand what our vets are going through. Absolutely. I consider. It was the the universe drafting me at that moment and. The most important thing that happened is eyeballing tiered a couple of days a month at the VA to do their traumatic brain injury screening, which was fat enough in two thousand and eight meaning that there were no other physicians who want to okay. Doctor. I'm going to have you back with gives us the website of how people can find out about the documentary about the book in the work that you're doing surely, our website is resurrecting lives dot org and on there. You can click and watch the forty three minute documentary. You can also see a link for Amazon, which is where the book is being sold both in favor of back copy and in kindle copy. So I will tell you that a lot of people we've had in the month of December alone, like eleven emails of young veterans who were struggling as you said and said, you know, this book really did give me hoping got me. Thank you so much. We'll be back in

VA India Dr Michael Lipton College Of Medicine Albert Einstein Amazon Kindle Ninety Nine Percent Forty Three Minute Ten Percent Six Months Ten Years
"michael lipton" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:42 min | 3 years ago

"michael lipton" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Own. Story as a veteran. That we need to talk about. And she's written about it in her new book. Turn the lights on a physician's personal journey from the darkness of traumatic brain injury to hope healing and recovery. And Dr Gordon welcome to the program. Frankie. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate this opportunity to speak to our veterans our military members and their families about this signature wounded war, which is traumatic brain injury and how they can get some help. So I really appreciate your stepping up to the plate and allowing me to speak today. Okay. Tell us a little bit about your own personal story. Okay. I will. I if I want to clarify, I am not a veteran. I am not nearly brave enough to do anything. But I am a physician who as you has had kind of an eclectic background which fits with your particular program. I love all of medicine, but my favorite is rehabilitation medicine, and I live in traumatic brain injury. Okay. This was great until I had my own traumatic brain injury, and what I found out as a patient. It's what we were doing decisions with really not helping I could not even drive even though I had a normal MR. I got it because I couldn't even judge distances or left hand turns or any of the above. So I literally had to kind of rehab myself at home, thanks to my Apple computer and fast forward. Ten years later. I began working with veterans coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan with the improvised, explosive device blasts terrible problems with cognition with memory with processing vision and yet normal MRI. As my life. And instead what we did as a nation to say. You know, you guys are crazy. Medications to kinda keep you quiet and calm you down. When in reality. Our returning veterans are out of their brains not out of their minds. So it is so amazing. I was able to then take my story. And the reason why I wrote it down in this book, and it's intermingled with stories of veterans who've come back from the war and how they have sought rehabilitation. And in the midst Frankie while I was writing this. I get a call from Jonathan wells from Columbus, Ohio, the Ohio State Buckeye national championships because you know, I played for a wish you, but I played in the NFL, and I have a TV. I can I tell my story. I mean, I don't even know how he found out. I was writing the book, but it shows the broad based of individuals who are undergoing primarily young otherwise very healthy people who get into a situation with our young ki- rose. It's primarily the blast huge explosion that literally rattles their brain and rakes connections in. Multitude parts of the brain. And we need to do something about it. We needed first to get a public awareness about it. Which is why I strove to to produce a documentary called operation resurrection, and that is on our website at resurrecting, livestock dot org. But it is an explanation to the United States here. We are we have these folks back here, and we need to do something about it. So let's talk about your your particular injury and the injuries that many of our veterans that are coming back with tell tell us exactly what TBI stands for. Okay. It stands for traumatic brain injury. And that means any injury to the brain from an outside force. So it's different promise stroke where there's a bleed or there's something internally going wrong. This is something that strikes the brain from the outside. A fall. Banging your head. Yes. Exactly. Exactly. Okay. Why this is this is been something that that I don't understand. I have not understood why we're not under. We don't get what's happening with our veterans. I don't understand this piece. And I have a very hard time. Because the number of veterans that are committing suicide every day is alarming. Men and women taking their own life their own lives. Why? Why are we not hearing more from doctors like you speaking out and sharing this information? I think it's because of the amount of doctors who deal with traumatic brain injury. There's only eight to ten percent of all healthcare providers across the board in our nation who deal with individuals with traumatic brain injury. Okay. So I think that is a major problem. The other thing is it wasn't really until around the time of the war in two thousand five two thousand seven where we began developing the technology to actually look inside what was going on in these kinds of injuries and that was with very specialized MRI's like diffusion tensor imaging which is who we utilize Dr Michael Lipton at Einstein college of medicine. There's only a handful of docks at that time neuro radiologist who were looking inside the brain. So okay. We're now ten years later, though, I would expect a little bit more participation of the VA and the civilian world the civilian world. We're ninety nine percent of the resources. You know, we need to be -cluded in the equation of taking care of our veterans on a much larger scale than just the choice act. So you had you lost the ability to speak simple sentences. Tasks you couldn't dial a phone. I couldn't. Yeah. Am I m r I was normal the conventional MRI? And I was just very blessed. My colleagues realized if I wasn't speaking that was an issue. Our poor young veterans coming back did not get that same response. Do you know what I mean? And we need as a nation to stand up and say, no, they do have issues, and it is our responsibility to help re integrate them, and let's get clear here in order to rehab a brain with mild traumatic brain injury. It may take three to six months on the average of your kind of retraining the vision retraining their ability to balance retraining some of their thought processes, but then they're often running. I mean, why do we not invest that up front? That's what I'm saying. I'm very blessed to be working with a group of software engineers in in a company a gray matter innovations, and what we are working on is kind of a digit suitable response. Like, we're going to treat our veterans with virtual reality. Where they will be able to utilize a headset in a computer at home multiple times a day. We cannot expect our young veterans to travel thirty forty fifty miles to VA center. Three times a week. You know, it is ineffective. It's expensive and ineffective. So what I am advocating. That's why I really cannot. Thank you enough. Is that we need as a nation to a abrasive and gives them technology to rehab there. Because let me tell you all of these young men and women are used to strapping on a helmet and taking orders, you know, let the warrior being charge of their own care. And that's what we are advocating and the book was kind of like, the the the tipping point. I if I can get this word out there and enough of our young veterans and their families can read it and get to the proper sources that we get our legislators to read this and understand it. So that we can literally open up some of these services in the civilian world tour veterans, we would be a lot stronger nation. You know, I'm listening to you doctor, and I'm just seeing all of the hope and the enthusiasm and what you're bringing to the table this book turn the lights on is really powerful. And if you didn't have this experience, you probably could not relate or understand what our vets are going through. Absolutely. I consider. It was the the universe drafting me at that moment. And I assist. The most important thing that happened is eyeballing tiered a couple of days a month at the VA to do their traumatic brain injury screening, which was fat enough in two thousand and eight meaning that there were no other physicians who wanted to okay. Doctor. I'm going to have you back with gives us the website of how people can find out about the documentary about the book in the work that you're doing surely our website is resurrecting livestock org and on there. You can click and watch the forty three minute documentary. You can also see a link for Amazon, which is where the book is being sold both in favor back copy and in kindle copy. So I will tell you that a lot of people we've had in the month of December alone, like eleven emails of young veterans who were struggling as you said and said, you know, this book really did give me hoping. Thank you so much. We'll be back in just a moment. This is Frankie Boyer. You're listening to us on biz.

Frankie Boyer VA Ohio Dr Gordon United States Dr Michael Lipton Columbus NFL Jonathan wells Amazon kindle Iraq Einstein college of medicine
"michael lipton" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:43 min | 3 years ago

"michael lipton" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"It's a show about living in today's world famous happening Frankie inclusion brings an amazing eclectic mix to the airwaves got that. One of the reasons she's earned legions of loyal fans is very simple. When you listen to the Frankie Boyer show. You just never know. What's going to happen? So. Here route Frankie Boyer. Welcome. It. Today. Another phenomenal. Really? Kicking things off. With our first guest. Dr Christiaan Gordon has. Very interesting background because she has experienced an internal medicine emergency. Remit? Listen occupational medicine rehabilitative medicine board certified by the American board of physical medicine. But it's her own. Story as a veteran. That we need to talk about. And she's written about it in her new book. Turn the lights on a physician's personal journey from the darkness of traumatic brain injury to hope healing and recovery. And Dr Gordon welcome to the program. I'll Frankie thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate this opportunity to speak to our veterans our military members and their families about this signature wounded war, which is traumatic brain injury and how they can get some help. So I really appreciate your stepping up to the plate and allowing me to speak today. Okay. Tell us a little bit about your own personal story. Okay. I will. I if I want to clarify. I am not veteran. I am not nearly brave enough to do anything. But I am a physician who as you said it's had kind of an eclectic background, which sits with your particular program. I love all of medicine, but my favorite is rehabilitation medicine, and I shall live in traumatic brain injury. Okay. This was great until I had my own traumatic brain injury, and what I found out as a patient. It's what we were doing as physicians with really not helping I could not even drive even though I had a normal MRI got it because I couldn't even judge distances or left hand turns or any of the above. So I literally had to kind of rehab myself at home, thanks to my Apple computer and fast forward. Ten years later. I began working with veterans coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan with the improvised explosive device blast terrible problems with cognition with memory with processing vision and yet normal MRI. Is as my less. And instead what we did as a nation to say. You know, you guys are crazy. Medications to kinda keep you quiet and calm you down. When in reality. Our attorney veterans or out of their brains. Not out of their minds. So it is so amazing. I was able to then take my story. And the reason why I wrote it down in this book, and it's intermingled with stories of veterans who've come back from the war, and how they have sought rehabilitation and in the midst of Frankie while I was writing this. I get a call from Jonathan wells from Columbus, Ohio, the Ohio State Buckeye national championships. 'cause you know, I played for a wish you, but I played in the NFL, and I have a TV. I can I tell my story. I mean, I don't even know how he found out. I was writing the book, but it shows the broad based of individuals who are undergoing primarily young otherwise very healthy people who get into a situation with our young ki- roses, primarily the blast that huge explosion that literally rattles their brain and breaks connections in multitude parts of the brain. And we need to do something about it. We needed first to get a public awareness about it. Which is why? I strove to to produce a documentary called operation resurrection, and that is available on our website at resurrecting lives dot org. But it is an explanation to the United States here. We are we have these folks back here, and we need to do something about it. So let's talk about your your particular injury and the injuries that many of our veterans that are coming back with telex tells us exactly what TBI stands for. Okay. It stands for traumatic brain injury. And that means any injury to the brain from an outside force. So it's different from a stroke where there's a bleed or there's something internally going wrong. This is something that strikes the brain from the outside. A fall. Banging your head. Yes. Exactly. Exactly. Okay. Why this is this is been something that that I don't understand. I have not understood why we're not understood. We don't get what's happening with our veterans. I don't understand this piece. And I have a very hard time. Because the number of veterans that are committing suicide every day is alarming. Men and women taking their own life their own lives. Why? Why are we not hearing more from doctors like you speaking out and sharing this information? I think it's because of the amount of doctors who deal with traumatic brain injury. There's only eight to ten percent of all healthcare providers across the board in our nation who deal with individuals with traumatic brain injury. Okay. So I think that is a major problem. The other thing is it wasn't really until around the time of the war in two thousand five two thousand seven where we began developing the technology to actually look inside what was going on in these kinds of injuries, and that was with very specialized MRI's like diffusion tensor imaging which is who we utilize Dr Michael Lipton at Albert Einstein. College of medicine. There's only a handful of docks at that time neuro radiologist who were looking inside the brain. So okay. We're now ten years later, though, I would expect a little bit more participation of the VA and the civilian world this. World where ninety nine percent of the resources. You know, we need to be a -cluded. India question of taking care of our veterans on a much larger scale than just the choice act. So you had you lost the ability to speak simple sentences. Tasks you couldn't dial a phone. I couldn't. Yeah. Am I am? I was normal the conventional MRI with. And I was just very blessed with my my colleagues realized if I wasn't speaking. There was an issue. Our poor young veterans coming back did not get that same response. Do you know what I mean? And we need as a nation to stand up and say, no, they do have issues, and it is our responsibility to help re integrate them, and let's get clear here in order to rehab a brain with mild traumatic brain injury. It may take three to six months on the average of your kind of retraining the vision retraining their ability to balance retraining some of their thought processes, but then they're often running. I mean, why do we not invest that upfront? That's what I'm saying. I'm very blessed to be working with a group of software engineers in in a company gray matter innovations, and what we are working on is kind of a digit suitable response. Like, we're going to treat. Our veterans with virtual reality where they will be able to utilize a headset in a computer at home multiple times a day. We cannot expect our young veterans to travel thirty forty fifty miles to VA center. Three times a week. You know, it is ineffective. It's expensive and ineffective. So what I am advocating. That's why I really cannot. Thank you, a not is that we need as a nation to abrasive and gives them technology to rehab, right? Because let me tell you all of these young men and women are used to strapping on a helmet and taking orders, you know, let the warrior being charge of their own care. And that's what we are advocating and the book was kind of like, the the the tipping point that if I can get this word out there and enough of our young veterans and their families can read it and get to the proper sources that we get our legislators to read this and understand it. So that we can literally opened up some of these services in the civilian world tour veterans, we would be a lot stronger nation. You know, I'm listening to you doctor, and I'm just seeing all of the hope and the enthusiasm and what you're bringing to the table this book turn the lights on. Is really powerful. And if you didn't have this experience, you probably could not relate or understand what our vets are going through. Absolutely. I consider. It was the the universe drafting me at that moment and. The most important thing that happened. I volunteered. A couple of days a month at the VA to do their traumatic brain injury screening, which was sad enough in two thousand and eight meaning that there were no other physicians who wanted to. Okay, doctor. I'm going to have you back that gives us the website of how people can find out about the documentary about the book in the work that you're doing surely, our website is resurrecting lives dot org and on there. You can click and watch the forty three minute documentary. You can also see a link for Amazon, which is where the book is being sold both in paperback copy and in kindle copy. So I will tell you that a lot of people we've had in the month of December alone, like eleven emails of young veterans who were struggling as you said and said, you know, this book really did give me hope and got me. Thank you so much. We'll be back in just a moment. This is Frankie Boyer. You're listening to us on biz talk radio..

Frankie Boyer VA Dr Christiaan Gordon Ohio NFL United States College of medicine attorney Columbus India Dr Michael Lipton Amazon Jonathan wells kindle