31 Burst results for "Michael Lewis"

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

07:52 min | Last month

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"The podcast that you and I did together aired a little more than a year ago. And the truth is that the point of that whole exercise was it so we could become friends because it's been great. I love that we use that as an excuse to have a friendship. I do too. And I have to say, you were such a great student and when someone is inquisitive and then really works at it. And then expresses positive feeling towards what's happening to their voice. Well, you can't ask for more than that. And you checked every one of those boxes. So the whole thing was such an incredibly positive experience. So how did you in the very first place get involved coaching or teaching anybody how to sing? Well, it's such an odd story. I think that people just roll their eyes and think I'm crazy when I say this. But the truth is it goes way back to when I was in grade school. And the teacher, my elementary grade school teacher was a horrible piano player and somehow I got up the courage one day to welcome over and say, if you want, I could play those songs for you. And she was like, what? And I said, yeah, I can play Star-Spangled Banner. America, the beautiful, whatever. So I sat down. I play to my shoulder and that was it. From that day on every morning, I played the piano when the kids would sing. So then she started saying things like, hey, you know, Jack is having a little trouble singing this song. Could you help him with that? And that's when it started, I started coaching kids. And then a couple of them, I took home with me and would, you know, teach them after school. And I didn't think of it as me being a teacher. I just thought of, oh, okay, I'm going to help this person do better than they were like really grateful and really happy and we'd become friends. And so I think early on, I learned, oh, I have something special here. I have something I can give to people and they like it. You know, such a great story. You didn't know it at the time, but your gift had been identified in a shockingly young age. That kind of gift usually doesn't get exposed until much later. So it's cool. It's a great story. No, I'm so grateful for it. And, you know, most of the people I work with knew from a pretty early age and we talk about that. We're so lucky to have known what it is we wanted to do. And then we're really, really lucky we get to do it every day and make a living at it. And then even lucky are still if you get to be a success at it. That's like, you know, the Pinnacle. What I remember is when we met, you expressed pretty strongly the urge to somehow document your existence your career. You were aware that what you did was interesting and you were just wondering like, how to get what you did across to an audience. When did you first feel that urge like maybe write a memoir or whatever form it was gonna take? When did you first have the sense that that would be a cool thing to do? Well, I guess I've thought about that for years, but I've always said, I can't write a memoir because if I was to write one about the people I work with, no one would ever trust me again. I mean, I even if I was telling good things, I don't think people I just don't think they want to be talked about whether it's good or bad. I think they love the idea that it's very private between us. But this, it's them saying, oh, no, I'd be willing to talk about this. Oh, yeah, I don't mind if everyone hears this. And so this felt really good to me because it's like, all right, well, this is definitely with their blessing because it's their words. They're sharing, you know, with the world. And so I thought, oh, this is the perfect vehicle then for me to do that. Have the people who have who are going to be guests on the show, responded kind of uniformly positively or have there been there been bumps along the way. No, it's been really, really unbelievably positive, which really makes me happy. I mean, here's the thing too. I feel like it's not just about voice teaching. Like, I think people listening are going to hear how these people maintain their voice and how they improve it and how they keep working at it. But I think the more important thing would be that people get inspired because, you know, it's not enough just to be born with a great talent or to be born with a great aptitude about something. It's how hard you work. How much you work at learning about the craft of whatever it is you're doing, how you keep up with all the new advances that keep happening. Like if I go to a doctor, I want a doctor. First of all, who has empathy who wants to, you know, keep me healthy because they care about me. So I think that it really important for people to have a passion and to care about what they do. They want to help the other person succeed, whether it's your accountant or business manager or doctor or sports culture, whatever it is. But I think also I want people to hear that, yeah, even the most talented people really work at it. They're constantly trying to improve or something that's really important that no one ever thinks about is maintain, maintaining their voice. And I think that'll be inspirational for whatever field you're in. This is gonna put you in an uncomfortable position, but I don't do it. No, I still no, no, no. But I want to know why you think. You're good at what you do. That's kind of an easy question, actually. I think there's two reasons why I'm confident that I'm good at what I do. One is that I didn't really feel like I had the greatest support system or the greatest teachers when I was younger. And so I'm determined to be that for all the people I work with now. So I feel like I'm kind of making up for what I didn't get. I'm going to give these people that I'm working with. Whoever is in front of me is going to get the very best of me. So that's the first thing. And then the other thing is that I've really found that if you really put yourself out, if you work really hard at doing the very best job you can and come from every possible angle to make someone better, it fills you with so much energy and so much joy. And I get so much out of it that the more I give to them, I feel like I'm getting that back. And so I'm always trying new things are always, you know, experimenting. Try this. Try that. Let's see if this works. I never stick with the same thing because everybody is so different and people react differently to different exercises, different thoughts. You know, different techniques. I think that makes me a pretty good teacher. I agree. Do you feel like you could teach anybody to sing? You know, I get that question all the time. And what I say is I'm very confident that I can make anybody sound better. I can make improvement on anybody. Can I make them sound great? I don't know. That's all that's up to the gods and the potential of those vocal cords, you know? But I do know I can improve anybody, but I can't turn anybody into the greatest singer on the planet. Because there's limitations. How much of your job feels to you more like therapy than vocal training? 90 ten 90 90 in the therapy. Well, you know, our mind is so powerful that what you're thinking really affects your voice. It just does, just like any athlete will tell you it affects their body, or a dancer, tell you affects their body or I assume a surgeon, you know, it affects how they do their surgery and how steady their hands are. I think, you know, mentally is it's so important to help people get into a really good, strong, healthy mindset. It's essential because all the vocal technique in the world can go out the window if your mind isn't in the right place. So I really work at both..

Jack America
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:55 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Red bin space <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> behind him. I'm sit <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> down washing them. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Come in about <Speech_Male> right behind them. Another dude <Speech_Male> comes. He's kind of <Silence> young ish guy. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> He <SpeakerChange> looks up at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the phone books and he <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> looks at me and he smiles <Speech_Male> he goes. <Speech_Male> He goes <Speech_Male> not much <SpeakerChange> of a story. <Speech_Male> But it's got lots of characters <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and it was. 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My first <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> book came out. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I was all over <Speech_Male> national television like <Speech_Male> david letterman <Speech_Male> in national television <Speech_Male> and all of a <Speech_Male> sudden is being recognized <Silence> all the time on the <Speech_Male> streets and <Speech_Male> i spent about a week <Speech_Male> or so. <Speech_Male> Doing having <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this happened to me. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> When i went home <SpeakerChange> to new orleans <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and i got to my parents <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> house <Silence> <Advertisement> still in the book tour <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> disdain <Silence> with him <Speech_Male> and my <Speech_Male> mother says could you run <Speech_Male> lagging. Steen's to <Speech_Male> get this jan me grocery <Speech_Male> list and so i went <Speech_Male> over the grocery store. <Speech_Male> It's a little <Speech_Male> local grocery store. And i <Speech_Male> got a car pushing <Speech_Male> it down. The aisle <Speech_Male> and there was a little <Silence> old lady. Come in the other <Speech_Male> way and she <Speech_Male> starts to point. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I didn't recognize <Speech_Male> there. And i thought she <Speech_Male> saw me on letterman <Speech_Male> or whatever and <Speech_Male> she comes up right <Silence> <Advertisement> up close to <SpeakerChange> me. And she <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> says <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you're malcolm monroe's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> grandson. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And i said <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> yeah <Silence> <Advertisement> i do know she said <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i saw <Speech_Male> it in your eyes. <Speech_Male> Those eyes or your grandfather's <Speech_Male> is <Silence> and that <Speech_Male> recognition <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and it's the recognition <Speech_Male> at the <Speech_Male> famous people. Get a cheap <Silence> way with their celebrity <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> new orleans. Get <Speech_Male> in a very deep way <Speech_Male> because of the <Speech_Male> smallness and interconnectedness <Speech_Male> of the society <Speech_Male> like everybody's <Speech_Male> a celebrity <Speech_Male> everybody's <Speech_Male> kinda onstage <Speech_Male> and that being <Speech_Male> on stage all the <Speech_Male> time that's <Speech_Male> another muscle <SpeakerChange> <Silence> that's useful <Speech_Female> well. <Speech_Female> May you always stay <Speech_Female> on stage. <Speech_Music_Female> And the <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> michael lewis's <Speech_Female> new book <Speech_Female> is called the premonition. <Speech_Female> You can <Speech_Female> buy it. Wherever books <Speech_Female> are sold <Speech_Female> season. Three <Speech_Female> of against the <SpeakerChange> rules <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> will be out in the fall <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> against <Speech_Female> the rules as a production <Speech_Female> of pushkin <Speech_Music_Female> industries. <Speech_Female> Sign up for pushkin's <Speech_Female> newsletter <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at pushkin dot. <Speech_Music_Female> fm <Speech_Music_Female> defined. <Speech_Female> More pushkin podcasts. <Speech_Female> Listen <Speech_Female> on the iheartradio <Speech_Music_Female> app apple <Speech_Female> podcasts. Or <Speech_Female> wherever <SpeakerChange> you get <Speech_Music_Male> your podcasts. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's carlos watson <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> carlos watson <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> show from is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> back with the brand <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> new season. The la <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> times called an anderson <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cooper meat so <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we have real conversations <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with the voices <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that man of flake cardi <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> b. And our friend. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> John legend <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about this part of my <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> life <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and gabrielle <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> union <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> exists <Speech_Music_Male> billy crystal <Speech_Music_Male> ali <Speech_Music_Male> that whispers <Speech_Music_Male> birth. <Speech_Music_Male> And <SpeakerChange> that's what. He called <Speech_Music_Male> me for forty. Two <Speech_Music_Male> carlos <Speech_Music_Male> watson show watched <Speech_Music_Male> by over one hundred million viewers every weekday on youtube. And wherever you get your podcast.

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"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

05:43 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"We ride because we know the end of the story that we know the end of our own story. and i'd like you to revisit. The michael lewis who at princeton was writing about donatello in the antique. You got from there to here well It wasn't till i was writing that thesis that i thought i love doing this thing call writing and had never any notion of myself as a writer. I didn't write for school papers and no english teacher ever thought i was especially able Just the opposite. But i got absorbed with this particular project and i confused that as a desire to be an art historian art history books and my thesis adviser actually said to things to me said one. You're not going to be historian That you you because there are going to be hard at story ends is basically what he said there were going out of business. Here is no. They're not gonna be any jobs. And i but i asked him during my thesis defense. What i what he thought of the writing. Because i was vain about it. You know i. I've gotten so absorbed with it. He was a perfect princeton professor at a tweed jacket with patches on his elbow in a pipe and a salt-and-pepper mustache and he pulls down his pipe and he says put it this way. Never try to make a living out and he didn't. He didn't dissuade me shows. Just how much energy. I had at that point that point. I just went off willy nilly after i graduated from college and i didn't care much about what job i had. I just was trying to have experiences and write about them and submit them to magazines and it took two years before anybody published anything They were lots of rejections. I didn't know idea what doing i didn't know any writers basically i mean. I didn't really have any kind of reason to think. I should be doing this. Except i liked doing it. My favorite rejection was. I went and spent some months ladling soup at the bowery mission and young men's home. I'd do that after. I got off of work and it was just a volunteer job and i got to know homeless people. They were clearly like different types of homeless people. And i thought how interesting it was. Just how kind of cool and smart. Some of them were. And i started writing thinking about the homeless and about destitution on the bowery. And i look through magazines about where you could submit things. And you might get published if you weren't a published author and apparently at that time in flight magazines like for delta an american airlines that it was like that was where you went so i said this thing about destitution and poverty in new york city and i got these letters back from like editor of delta inflight magazines saying you know. It's it's really interesting but we're trying to get people to go to newark. Not so we really isn't for us. You know experience you went and set. Some was also and yeah. So that's the was kind of. I think there was an accident. In a period of few years that ended with me with his job at salomon brothers and on wall street. And i started writing about wall street and that delta inflight magazine want to hear about that So that was the beginning of the career. I mean that really was the beginning of the career. Well i'm very grateful to you for having a long discussion with my son. Warning him not to go to it. It only sort of worked. Yes we saw second.

new york newark michael lewis delta donatello english second wall street american two street years delta inflight salomon brothers princeton one nilly
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

05:31 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Think this is all donald trump and mike spurious ended up telling me no. My brain is wrong that this is actually much more complicated than donald trump. so when asked how much is to blame. I think that's that's about the right number. That leads to the question of was this bad enough to teach us the lessons that we needed to learn before i answer you answered. I didn't think it was because of the nature of this society needs to change i. I mean charity dean doing level. Best canadian kate. One guy in corinth shame. Now i think we i think we need re education camps basically. I'm kind of with you. And i have an idea what they might look like. They're going to have to be kind of four-star reeducation camps the nephew comfortable. But it's I thought weirdly. I was asked right before the pandemic buyer reporter. So it's imprint. What i thought it would take for the society to change his attitudes and weirdly. I said a pandemic in which the rich were exposed equally where rich and powerful people saw their children died dislike poor people and that it would take that kind of existential threat for people who actually have you know some say in how the society's organized realize the doom. They've signed up for if they keep going the way they're going so this thing happens and it rhymes with what i said but it's not the same thing because the rich got to take out basically a pass not everybody but it was not terrifying all that terrified. If you could hold up in your mansion and let people go to their jobs expose themselves it was had it been threatening to children that might. That might have done it right. Sandy hook. Yes it's different. It's easier for people. Tell themselves a story that happens to other people if you had a disease like nineteen eighteen where it's sweeping through the population and everybody's exposed and young people are dying. I think you get a different response out of the society. This is not the inning you would wish for. But i think it's true that i think two things at once or true one. It wasn't quite what you would need to change the society did. It wasn't quite the trauma on the other hand. It was sufficiently traumatic. I do see some change. I think enough people have had a brush with tragedy. There is a different full feeling in the air. And you're seeing it in the way biden's dobbins able to move the world in sort of the nature of the resistance on the other side feels a little different to me than it did. During the obama administration he think it's the end of grover norquist shrink government decides that you can drown it in a bathtub era. I do. I do think that i don't think that's gonna play anymore. I think enough people had.

donald trump two things nineteen eighteen four-star One guy kate mike spurious hook one obama canadian
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:27 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Right now you can try ziprecruiter for free. Only at the special place ziprecruiter dot com slash rules. Which sort of hiring superpower is ziprecruiter. Have well instead of fighting. Crime like other superheroes ziprecruiter fights time by helping you find qualified candidates fast. I when you post your job. Ziprecruiter sends it out to over one hundred top job sites with one. Click talk about being in many places. At once then ziprecruiter's matching technology scours thousands of resumes to identify people with the right skills and experience for your job and actively invites them to apply. No wonder four out of five employers. Who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day. Ready to conquer hiring. Make sure you go to the special hiring superhero headquarters website ziprecruiter dot com slash rules. Let ziprecruiter save the day. Just go to ziprecruiter dot com slash rules. What if there was a superhero. Who had the amazing power to make hiring faster smarter and easier..

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

04:50 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"And he's probably not the only one is kind of amazing he did it that the transmissibility and the lethality of this virus in wuhan with its implications for the united states population. But it's not until a month later on february twenty third did the cdc acknowledges it and in those five weeks l. ottawa. Wise were lost down the road. Because of that inaction that inability to stand up and start to explain to the people. What's going on so it's a messy story because you got the cdc's natural inclinations compounded by donald trump. It's not just you know. They do have a bit of an excuse but it's not. It's not a good enough excuse jaw dropping. Examples is the people who were evacuated. We'll hand the americans who are evacuated hat last some beliefs. Unbelievable right. I mean and i left out stuff in. It's also damning so so Who are repatriated. There repatriated omaha nebraska. Which sounds strange except the federal medical facility. That is specializes in handling weird and terrifying illness. So if you get a bowl on his affair chance that's where you land so there i don't have any of them eighty of them or whatever it was there were a bunch of them. And they're housed in the national guard barracks near this facility. The man who runs this facility is a wolverine is one of the wolverines. His name is james lawler and lawler reasonably wants to test these people for covid. He says there's like no chance is not covert in there and reasonably all of these americans. Want to be tested for covid but lawler has to ask. The cdc cdc has the test. The test that they're going to distribute foreign wide is doesn't work but you could samples to atlanta and they could give you an answer so he asked the nearest cdc guy who bounces it all the way up the chain of command this request to robert redfield himself director. The cdc who apparently goes ballistic and says under no circumstances are they detest those people and lawler says what do you mean like why and the answer gets.

donald trump robert redfield james lawler wuhan lawler february twenty third atlanta eighty a month later five weeks omaha nebraska united states one cdc covid one of the wolverines ottawa americans
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

04:24 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Dna and then he pulls out he puts it on his chip and he finds o lo and behold. Oh my god. These bo is have this other thing in them. They both have this other thing in them. That could quite possibly be causing incredible illness. It's an edina virus in my biology is shaky but it's a virus that he says is an ancestor of a bola. It's got a bowl in it. It's kind of a curious thing. He said it's actually been detected in dinosaurs so stat old a virus so then he asked to prove that this is. What's killing the bowers. And the way you prove that a virus as at chris creating the disease is you get a healthy animal and you inject it with the virus. So he distills the virus and he goes with three post. Docs into san francisco is getting absurd. I know but this against better did a san francisco aquarium when he's tell us says you know how you inject a snake with the virus and i know says well you after inject them in the heart because the veins either don't exist they're hard to find and the heart. The problem with the snakes is it moves up and down the body. So you need a doppler radar. You need one post. Doc holding the doppler radar other ones holding the snake which isn't happy and someone else did plunge the needle into the snakes heart so they do this with pythons and with bows and sure enough. The bo is get ill and died. Just as they're they're doing around the world but the pythons survive even though they've got signs of the virus in the money. I tested them. Well that's where it gets really interesting because he now tells zoo zoo directors when you get a new beau you've got to isolate them and testing for this virus but the question is why are these pythons surviving their older species and has the idea that oh my god. They're surviving this thing. That's very like a bola. We've never found the reservoir species of a bola in the way that the like covert has a reservoir species of bats in the reservoir species. The species in which the thing replicates doesn't kill so it it happily survive. He says they've they've they've exported. You know zoos of animals out of africa and tested them for a bowl to see if they can find this species. That's.

africa san francisco both three post one post
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

05:02 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Has been very important. The second thing that happened was when our our kids got tossed out of school. And i realized this is like something i need to pay attention to. I called my jungle guide for the previous book. The fifth risk his. Name's max star. And he's he should be the most famous man in america but he has eight hundred and thirty two twitter followers. And i can't i can't figure it out but he is engaged in this quixotic passionate quest to fix the federal government from outside the federal government and as a result of this quest. He gotten to know more about the federal government than anyone on the planet. And i called him and he said if you're going to write about this you gotta talk to my uncle who your uncle names richard danza. He was a former. Us navy secretary. He said my uncle's just passionate on this subject of pandemics and he knows more about it than anybody so i called him and richard. Dan's says no. no no. No it's not me you need to talk to. You need to meet the wolverines who the hell of the wolverines and the walgreens turn out to be this like secret group of seven doctors who've known each other for fifteen years we've worked in the white house and position all over americans medical society who turned out to be the single best group of people whose is to watch the event through so that that gets me carter measure. Who's the kind of the savant in the wolverines group and at this point it's sort of like maybe this is a book like i've got wolverines. I've got joe teresi. I've got a back story about how pandemic preparedness came about all this stuff. They all jody c. Three wolverines and a former member of the obama administration who i was talking to two who is helping gavin newsom. Build a computer model to analyze. What was going on in california. All said you gotta meet this. Woman named charity dean. Because she's she's like the she's the one who knows the whole state of california. So i sent an email to the california state government and they wrote back and said charity the and.

america richard danza richard fifteen years california Dan joe teresi fifth two Three wolverines seven doctors second thing single eight hundred and thirty two twitter government gavin house followers each
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

04:20 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Pretty pretty great quote. You haven't yet given us the saga of this day. Beloved that you have had a protean range in your ruck from money to politics to spot to fatherhood to science and daughter analytics and now the pandemic but all of your other books have been looking at events that have already occurred. And this is the best time that you've written a book where the events were crashing. Down around us as your. What was that like fun. Like totally exhilarating. And i know. I'm not supposed to say that but let me just say that it required the only reason i did. It is i'd founded. I took just a different approach. I usually take. And the only reason i took a different approach than i usually take is. I was ready to write a book with a different approach when the pandemic happen and the approach was i have this character. He happens to be college football coach. But it doesn't matter i. I haven't written the book. But i have this character that i'm so interested in. I don't care what happens. It whatever happens happens. And i'm going to run a very character driven work of nonfiction narrative and left the story sort of unfold as happens in whatever it is it is and the car and distrust the character so the pandemic happens. Just as i'm getting going on that and i wasn't thinking oh just just port that approach onto this. But i was thinking that look. I wrote this book. About how the trump administration's gonna muck up any kind of management problem. They have because they don't care about the federal government as a management tool. This is the bad thing that happened. They have to manage. Maybe i should look into it and like into my lap drop. I think the best characters i've ever had. So i thought that co- that thought that i can just follow these characters and let the characters. Just take me wherever they go followed by another one that the characters are already given me my ending and that was because around june they basically said it's over here that you know this thing is that we we. We failed and the story of the beginning of the pandemic was in a way the story of the pandemic for them and that the end of the story for them was..

government trump administration june pandemic
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:25 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Pushkin the future driving is electric. And it's coming fast. That's why general motors. Ev go are adding more than twenty seven hundred new fast chargers across the country through two thousand twenty five for the benefit of electric vehicle drivers on the road and best of all. These stations will be one hundred percent powered by renewable electricity. It's all part of our commitment to make convenient fast charging accessible for everyone learn more about how gm is developing an all electric future at g. m dot com. Everybody in this is a metaphor for your business joining. Sometimes it feels like the world is throwing everything at has.

"michael lewis" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:53 min | 6 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"I am so pleased to welcome. Michael lewis to the broadcast to michael is the bestselling author of books ranging from liar's poker moneyball the blind side the big short and the undoing project. His latest book which was just released is the premonition a pandemic a pandemic story he's also the moderator of a podcast called against the rules. He's the rare author who has defied being pigeonholed and is in the enviable position of allowing his experiences. And meetings he has with interesting. People suggest the topics that he covers one of the most noted storytellers of his generation. John williams interview the new york times book review said. I'd read an eight hundred page history to stapler if he wrote it. I think i would do. Frankly michael welcome. It's great to see you as always so you can always tell when someone doesn't actually mean what they say when they say frankly you would not. There's no way on earth you would read eight hundred page history stapler. If i wrote it. And i wouldn't read it either but thank you thank. You might give it a try though michael just to see if you can pull it off the fact that you made credit default swaps so interesting that it was made into a movie. I mean that's that's really mind. Boggling argus i put it this way if somehow someone contrived to use a stapler bring down civilization then yes i would write in eight hundred page history of the stapler. That's fantastic well. Good well i do want to get into the thick of your new book The premonition a pandemic story your last book michael. The fifth risk was about the transition from the obama administration to the trump administration and the premonition began in the last year of the trump administration. And i must say given the title and given the topic clearly a pandemic story. I thought that trump would likely be the the antagonists the villain of this as he was One could certainly argue in the fifth. Risk and i. It was fascinating though you mentioned him and you don't don't certainly don't give him any credit That you don't believe to be deserved. But the villain in this one really is the center disease control if anything and a lot of institutions that were have not been operating as they should. I wonder if you could start here at the outset of our conversation with some of the main sins you saw that the cdc undertook. So i don't think my book the way you think of my book i think so i think of the the the villain the antagonised to the to the protagonists is is the system of which the cdc plays a very important role. But it's the the three main characters are operating in a world that screwed up it's screwed up in a whole bunch of ways and one of the ways that screwed up is the incentive structure in the cdc and and and y you know if you ask me after the.

Michael lewis John williams michael three main characters eight hundred page fifth risk trump fifth obama last year one earth new york
Michael Lewis on 'the Premonition'

The Book Review

01:35 min | 7 months ago

Michael Lewis on 'the Premonition'

"Lewis joins us now from berkeley california. A repeat guest. He is here to talk about his new book. The premonition a pandemic story michael. Welcome back to the podcast pleasure to be here so we spoke not so long ago about your last book. The fifth risk which was all about risk surely global pandemic was one of those risks. What did you learn from reporting napa. That maybe informed. This book didn't just inform this book and led to this book. The premise of the fifth risk was that. Stop thinking about the federal government. However you think about it if you think about it and think about it. As a manager of a portfolio of risks many of them existential that has been left to degrade and under the trump administration was actually kinda bashed around the head. A bunch and one of those risks is the risk of pandemic disease. The fifth risk was asking the question. What happens if people neglect these risks and actually spent more of more of the time just pointing out the risks. That i won didn't really know existed that you could go into any department any agency in the government. The commerce department the agriculture department departments that you think maybe they don't do very much and find just terrifying things. They're managing so. When i was thinking about what bad might happen. That the government might mismanage pandemics. Were on that list. But i thought it was. I gotta tell you. I thought it was such an obvious risk that that's not one that i want to write about in the fifth apper. Surely they're managing

Pandemic Disease Berkeley Lewis California Michael Federal Government Agriculture Department Commerce Department
Eliminating Marketing Guesswork with Mike Lewis from Click 360

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

02:08 min | 8 months ago

Eliminating Marketing Guesswork with Mike Lewis from Click 360

"Today i am joined by michael lewis co founder and cro at click. Three sixty. mike. How you doing man doing really well. Thanks for having me appreciate that. I'm excited to have this conversation. We're talk a lot about intent and figuring out which visitors mattered and where they're coming from but before we get into that just tell us a little bit about yourself and about click. Three sixty yeah. It's what i never know. How far back to these kinds of questions like do i go back to the time or do we just start with the company I'll tell you what i think is super interesting. It's sort of it'll bring us into this. Conversation is the way in which ended up with the party or click through sixty is throughout. My career started very commoditised sales space. Where you know. There's really no way to actually know what a qualified lead is a numbers game or pubic contacted. Hopefully converts and then from there actually moved into more of the world of marketing where we're putting signs on wall and hoping people call And there's a problem with hope in marketing right. There's really no place for gosh. I hope they calls me And so i've been whittling down the ability marketers. The information needed to know where their budgets are allocated. So when i originally bumped into my partner who is in the process of learning about or anti building out this marketing intent machine That's really saw that there was an opportunity to give marketers that immediate feedback on. What's working and what's not so what the click three sixty platform really is its customer journey. Optimization by far is the form of deep learning to recognize that behavioral intent that says this person is more likely to confer rather than this person so that marketer can actually reach back and say these marketing channels actually source those people mostly to revenue. So we move away from that dreaded guests in tests where i go back that sign on wall do a bunch of marketing. Hope somebody calls to being able to measure in real time that behavioral intent that says there's there signaling in patterns of behavior that says this person's going to buy marketer can actually affect that deal by seeing that

Michael Lewis Mike
"michael lewis" Discussed on Disruptive Adventism

Disruptive Adventism

03:06 min | 9 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Disruptive Adventism

"We are to be agents of the holy spirit to solve problems. You may not be able to do something great initially but we have got to decide in the last days of this earth that we're going to get engaged that are going to we're going to be. We're going to be incarnation. In the way that we engage our communities and our communities are waiting for the church to take its rightful place and be that liked on a hill and be light of the world. You've been listening to disruptive adamant we hold that too they stop it. Help you to think and change something about your practices about your faith about your asthma dozen if you want to subscribe. Make sure to apple podcasts. Spotify.

"michael lewis" Discussed on Disruptive Adventism

Disruptive Adventism

03:13 min | 9 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Disruptive Adventism

"Incarnation. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> In the <Speech_Music_Male> way that we engage our communities <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and communities <Speech_Male> are waiting for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the church <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to take <Speech_Music_Male> its rightful place <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> be that <Speech_Music_Male> light <Speech_Music_Male> on a hill <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> be light of the world. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You've been listening to disrupt <Speech_Music_Male> of adleman. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We hope that too. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They stop it. Help <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you to think and change <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> something about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your practices <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about your faith <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about your advent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dozen. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Make sure to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> apple podcasts. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Spotify <Speech_Music_Male> google play over <Speech_Music_Male> ever. You get your podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> We'll be <Speech_Male> there. Make sure <Speech_Male> to give us a review. If you're like <Speech_Male> what you're listening to. <Speech_Male> If you want <Speech_Male> to support make <Speech_Male> sure to go to <Speech_Male> patriots <Speech_Male> dot com slash <Speech_Male> disruptive adventist. <Speech_Male> It helps us <Speech_Male> <Advertisement>

Camila Russo: The Defiant  Laying Bare the Story of Ethereum

Epicenter

06:17 min | 1 year ago

Camila Russo: The Defiant Laying Bare the Story of Ethereum

"Lows two jobs. When did you first hear about a theory? In twenty seventeen Crypto for Bloomberg the first time was when I grow kind of one of the first stories on ICO's for Bloomberg and I remember just like trying to wrap my head around what these things were. It's like Bitcoin, but it's different vigil currencies on Anyone can issue them on. They're on top of the other blockchain cerium and you know I was coming at crypto coverage from. A markets perspective. So I didn't have a lot of technical knowledge about how blockchain's worker crypto were or anything I. I understood the value proposition of bitcoin from having a cover like Argentina land but that was my extent of knowledge of it. So it was like writing that first. ICO. Story was I think when I, I started looking at a theorem for the first time, and then just like as I kept covering the space is for the rest of two thousand seventeen I started to learn more and more about understood. Okay. Syria is team like. But whites valuable. It's because it's it tries to be more flexible than than Bitcoin, and that's why it's easier for people to issue all these different tokens on top of it and so. That's kind of seeing all of this kind of frenzy around ICO's on these tokens on this like millions of dollars worrying in I was like there's something here you know. This kind of decentralized way of raising money and ethereal kind of the platform ebeling this. Back. In January, we interviewed Steve Kokinos and Sylvia mccully of Al and during our conversation, we talked about how unique design makes it easy for developers to build sophisticated applications on their platform. So what's great about Algorithm beyond the fact that it's fast, it's secure it scales and it has instant finality is the fact that they've designed Allaire one protocol with primitives that are purpose built for define. So what that means is that they've taken some of the most common things that people do with smart contracts and they've embedded them right in the system right in the layer one. So things like issuing tokens atomic transfers, these are built into the layer. One spark contracts are first class citizens on all grant. So with these essential building blocks at your disposal, you can build fast insecure defy APPs in no time. To learn more about what Al brings to the table and how to get started, I would encourage you to check out algren dot com slash epicenter that lets them know that you heard about it from us and it takes you where you need to go to learn about their tech. And what that we'd like to Algorithm for supporting the PODCAST? What point do you does one? Say I'M GONNA write a book about something that's never something that's ever crossed my mind or I think a lot of people's minds. What point you do you decide to write a book and then what is the process I mean forget about the process of writing the book. But like what's the process of figuring out what kind of book you WanNa Right because you could have written this book in all I mean it's very. Descriptive account of what happens it's mostly in the third person, you could have written a fiction you know you could have written. First hand account of your interviews what was the process for the creative process? I guess figuring out the of book you wanted to write. For background I always wanted to write a book like that's been kind of a goal of mine forever I got into journalism because I like writing I guess like growing up. One of my favorite books was in cold blood by Truman Capote and I think you know that was the first time I realized while you. You can write about real life like nonfiction in a way that reads like a novel and that to me was really powerful because. To journalism and especially business journalism, which is usually so dry. I found that okay stories can make vs very kind of complex dry concepts come alive if you tell them in the right way and so getting the the example from. Truman capote and then especially Michael Lewis exile. Kate while like this is a really powerful way of speaking about nonfiction and obviously I love fiction it's it's what I personally read the most. I disliked you know if I was ever to write a book, I would want to provided like value to readers by bringing something from the real world and making it. And read like story because I just thought you know there's like so many interesting stories in the real world you know that needs to be highlighted. So why should I like go on invent another story for my own imagination they're already so much to tell in real life at some point. I think it was probably when you get into the Bloomberg internship, they give you like of recommended readings and one of them was Michael Lewis Books I think it was liar's poker and so when I read that book, I, was like, okay like I need to find that story that I can pick up until like Michael. Lewis. His folks. So I was like always on the lookout for that like what can the story that I can tell in this way like in a something I can make into a nonfiction novel. And I think with Crypto was kind of the first time that I thought. Okay. This is this is where I needed to find my story to tell. I meant to say fictionally, I'm interested like a dramatized version like something a little bit more like. Of course, you could make fiction of the story of a theory, but like a something akin to the bitcoin billionaires book right whereas like this kind of more dramatized version of the facts. But like the way you wrote the book is like this very kind of factual account. It reads like a novel it does read like a story, but it's like very factual thing based on your interviews based on your conversations. When you're reading it you really get the idea like this is how things happened.

ICO Michael Lewis Bloomberg Truman Capote Allaire Blockchain Syria AL Steve Kokinos Argentina Kate Sylvia Mccully
"michael lewis" Discussed on Relentless Geekery

Relentless Geekery

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Relentless Geekery

"How did they do with? No men on second against lefthander. Their average on and then that some places started to use APP for WHO's really the clutch hitters here you know if you're going into October just Mr for that, you know about they had a real good idea for when two platoons somebody wonderful somebody because they were going to get tired, etc. so the manager of the Oakland A.'s took that information and said I'm going to do that from the Star I'm on a limited budget because baseball salaries have shot up how am I gonNA put together a good ballclub? Be, a winning ball club without having to compete for the hundred million dollar players and stuff. And so the the movie. Portrays it really help? WHO GETS ON BASE? You know if a guy draws a walk because he is very conscious of his strikes on a very good batter at protecting it and stuff like that. It's just as good as guy hits singles and has a three hundred thirty which or something like that, and also put together a whole bunch of players that other teams have maybe released a were or weren't giving them an A. Flame time, and so forth he was able to get them for a bargain and comparative trades and stuff like that, and then the Oakland ways they did great lately on dependent I think even won the world series but at a way that the the criteria for choosing those guys wasn't, it's all got to be heroes who hits a lot of home runs. It was all these high value players relative to others. So sorry to give you the whole description but I thought the movie was fascinating well done and Michael. Lewis. wrote it about because it really revolutionized the industry that all the ball clubs start to say you know we don't need these scouts with their you know nicotine stain hands we need a data analyst in the back room this sifting through all this data. So that would were being traded with we're not A. Disadvantage of will we didn't know that guy was that good. We discussed with a you know such a great guy that had three good seasons still in him. You don't necessarily to fifteen season player, but you WanNa make sure that you get people you know for the right amount of money at the right time if you will. He also wrote a book called the big short and that also got made into movie i. Remember you know we had Terrible scandalous treatment in the financial industry back when the housing industry collapsed, a whole bunch of people had done collateralized debt obligations that really had no value. They found a way to what a wrapper around crap investments that made it an got it rated. So the rating industry was complicit it to make it so that they seem like they were triple eight bond level type things instead of being crap shiny new rapper while you know he did the entire investigation into just how did this happen and not only did did happened in and ruined so many people's lives who had overbought house. They were given such easy terms that they really what house more than they should have been able to afford..

lefthander Oakland nicotine analyst Michael Lewis.
"michael lewis" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Regard as your core principles and you remember fun. Which tells you lebel. Who's her executive producer and has been the executive producer of malcolm show since the beginning. She's someone who came with us. From from the old company Is very important person and establishing our culture but she talks a lot about kindness as a as a principle of the company and It's really it's really true. And i think she's been the kind of guardian of it but it's the way people think about working together and how they help each other and support each other and the ties into i think a bunch of other ethical principles not just about integrity journalistic integrity business integrity But you know Diversity the kind of workplace we want to create the kind of society. We wanna see bottled in the company. So people have a lot of feelings about it. And when you have a young workforce those getting that stuff right and having that all relevant meaningful people to people. is crucial in recruitment and retention. Because you've got not just be a place where people can do interesting work. I think you've got to be a place where people want to work. How do you get across your values to someone who's coming into thinking of working for you. I think they have to. I think that they don't hear from this. I'm hopefully they do hear it from the ceo. But i think people only believe when they hear it from peers and see that peers are having that kind of experience in the place they work and kind of. I can't hide. You can't hide who you are especially as a company. Right is a person so maybe a little bit but as a company you know word will spread and what it's like their values come they they do come through and i think it's especially true with start up companies because they grow up so quickly that they end up being kind of projections of the values and beliefs of the of the founders. And you know. I think that's trick facebook and one way uber another way but it's it's even more true at a smaller business. Everything that you you believe gets reflected in some way in the in the company. Thanks again to jacob weisberg and malcolm glad well of pushkin industries you can hear more of dell small business pod by searching dell technologies small business pot fronts on radio dot com spotify or apple podcasts special. Thanks to emily. Ross dhec carly migliori. Julia barton heather fain and jason gambro. I'm michael lewis..

executive producer malcolm dell facebook carly migliori jacob weisberg Julia barton michael lewis emily ceo jason gambro Ross pushkin industries apple
"michael lewis" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate <hes>. but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history <hes>. With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under <hes>. Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

publisher
Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jacob Pushkin Industries Malcolm Zone Dr Lori Jacob Malcolm Pushkin Santos Italy Jacobs
Georgia grand jury to consider charges in shooting of unarmed black man

BBC World Service

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Georgia grand jury to consider charges in shooting of unarmed black man

"In the US state of Georgia the case of an unarmed black man who was shot dead while joking is set to go to a grand jury Ahmed Obree was killed in February his family and campaign as a furious that the two suspects have been arrested or charged sonic Annika reports graphic video footage has emerged which appears to show the moment almost all breed was shocked at the twenty five year old can be seen joking they're white pickup truck and two armed men there's some kind of confrontation and three gunshots can be heard the two men have been identified as Gregory met Michael a former police officer and district attorney's investigator and his son Travis they say they believe the victim was a burglar and say he attacks Travis met Michael Lewis a missed obvious family say he was murdered and targeted solely because of his race and killed without justification after the video emerged around a hundred people protested in the neighborhood where the shooting took place public figures have expressed outrage including Joe Biden he says Mr Aubrey was killed in cold blood now the prosecutor assigned to investigate the case wants it to go to a grand jury who will decide if the suspects are charged but with colts not set to reopen until at least mid June it could be months before decision

Georgia Gregory Officer Investigator Travis Michael Lewis Joe Biden Mr Aubrey Prosecutor Colts United States Ahmed Obree
Solvable Presents: Help in a Crisis

Solvable

07:38 min | 1 year ago

Solvable Presents: Help in a Crisis

"Hi It's Michael Lewis here. I'm nearly finished with the next season of against the rules. It's like last season in some ways. I'm talking with people about inequality in American society and what it's doing to our idea of fairness but this time only telling the story through the Lens of coaching and coaches the edge that coaches can give people and who doesn't get that edge in our society as we all know things are not normal right now. That's why we're bringing you this extra bonus episode. I guess I should. I say I'm still alive and so far disease-free but I've been doing a lot of interviews lately with people who dedicated their careers to helping other people. This is an especially good time to be talking to people like this. So you're GONNA get to hear a couple of their conversations right now. Here's a guy whose work is also really relevant right now. His name is Jimmy Chen and he left behind a fancy career in Silicon Valley to build an APP which is called fresh E. bt it helps people on food stamps. Well let's actually formerly known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program there about forty million Americans who accesses program. They get funds once a month on a car that looks more like a gift card than an ATM card. And most of the state programs don't have an easy way to let people know how much is left on their car. They don't even know their balances. So it's it's hard to budget and make smart decisions. That's a problem at anytime but it's a huge problem right now with so much food insecurity in our economy and Jimmy's got a solution. Jimmy thanks for joining me so Are there peculiar anxieties? That you sort of saying in response to this virus in the population that you serve. Well we've seen a lot of people concerned about not being able to purchase more toilet paper and I think that's the thing that You know people are often cracking jokes about in the general population. Why are you stocking up on toilet paper right now but when we talk to our users about that specific situation they actually have a very real need there for a lot of our users. They can't afford to purchase things like toilet paper in bulk and so they are purchasing toilet paper every time they go grocery shopping or on a very frequent cadence and so if the grocery store is sold out of toilet paper. That's a real problem because they don't have a backup supply that they can use and so a lot of people are really worried about that. So it's interesting because no one has explained to me why the that shelf and no other shelf in the grocery store. Except maybe the disinfectant shelf is empty. Yeah I mean. I don't know which way the flywheel started on this particular one but I know that for low income folks who maybe haven't had the resources to go out and stock up on Toilet Paper. It is a different level of scary. Okay so let me back up a minute. Let's just start a little bit about you and what you do like what your company is short. So I'm the founder and CEO of propel were technology company that aims to help people who are low income. The United States to navigate safety net programs like the food stamp program to improve their overall financial health. We build a free smartphone. App called the fresh UBT APP. That helps somebody who gets food stamp benefits or snap benefits on an e bt card to see how much they have left in benefits but also to connect to a variety of different social services to save money and to find different ways that they can earn more cash. Are you already seeing an uptick in users in response to what's going on in the economy right now we are seeing about thirty percent more usage each day than we normally do and to be clear those are for people who are already using fresh bts so we have also seen a lot of stats about how enrollment in the food? Stamp Program has gone up dramatically over the past week but the weight of the Food Stamp Program has actually structured. Those enrollments don't become actual cases usually for about a month and so we would see that a month later as people enroll in the program. So you're always seeing. What are you imagine is going to happen over the next few months? Well I think there are a couple of different populations that are worth thinking about here. The first are the people that are already getting food stamps. Now so you know there are forty million Americans priors took ovid and all of this crazy pandemic stuff there. A forty million Americans that were already struggling to make ends meet in a normal economy These are the folks that are already using the food stamp program. The majority of them are working and have children Just trying to pay the bills so those are the people who use fresh. Et now and they're facing a very specific set of challenges as this is kind of the financial shock that is really putting the behind. There's a separate set of Americans that we can also talk about the the people that are probably one or two tiers of income higher than that Maybe have a little bit of savings cushion but not a ton and as a result of the economic shock. Here they're the ones who are newly applying for the program so I think those two groups are GonNa have different types of outcomes but face the same challenges but how big is that kind of food stamp adjacent population. Well there's that popular stat. That forty percent of Americans can't afford four hundred dollars shock right now. These are all of the Americans that are living paycheck to paycheck. And it's not necessarily the case that those folks are all very low income you could be making seventy or eighty or ninety thousand dollars a year and still be in that population of not being able to afford a four hundred dollar shock as we've spoken to our user base about what the past week has been like We have heard from people that eighty eight percent of people who get food stamp benefits. And we're working have had their hours cut or lost their jobs entirely and of those eighty eight percent the average amount in job earnings. That has been lost is five hundred dollars. So we're talking about this. Four hundred dollars shock. That was going to send people over the cliff. That shock has happened right so it makes what you do even more important. Yeah that's right I think broader than propel the reason I started propel. Was this notion that we have a safety net here in the United States. That people who go through financial hardship have a variety of resources provided by the public sector and the private sector and those resources are aimed to help people in financial need to get back on their feet and more broadly. I think you know this whole Kobe. One thousand nine mass is a real test of our safety. Net in the United States of NACHOS programs like food stamps or programs like Medicaid and unemployment. And so on that also have to pick up the slack and are seeing tons of more traffic these days as people are looking to these safety net programs to help them to get through this really unusual time. Alan good you start the company. I started the company about five and a half years ago. How did this happen? Well I grew up in a loving and supportive family that also experienced a financial shock and had trouble putting food on the table. I think most American families we were sort of on the edge financially and then when my dad lost his job when I was about ten we had a few years of just really tough Financial Times. I was fortunate to go to college on a full scholarship on financial need and then spent a few years working in different software companies in Silicon Valley after I graduated from college and one of the things that just really struck me after spending years working in Silicon Valley and these companies. Just how people solve the problems that they understand. And that's by enlarge the reason why so many products that come out of Silicon Valley are solving the problems of twenty to thirty year. Old Men. Yes who live in cities and have gone to College? Are there's a demographic biased to the software that we create due to the problems that tech entrepreneurs

Silicon Valley United States Jimmy Chen Michael Lewis Founder And Ceo Supplemental Nutrition Assista Ovid Old Men Alan
From the Archive: Michael Lewis and Tana French

The Book Review

11:16 min | 1 year ago

From the Archive: Michael Lewis and Tana French

"Michael thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. So you've covered very exciting topics before. Wall Street is exciting. Sports is exciting. The Department of Agriculture is not generally considered exciting. How did you decide to to turn to this? So it wouldn't have been exciting before trump. I think trump electrified all the material. So what happened. Several things at once happened. I just finished a book about Danny. Common name is diversity to Israeli psychologist who Study the way people Miss Miss Value. Risk price risk and one of their insights. Was that if you take a catastrophic risks. I mean it's like a one in a million chance of happening and and make it a one in ten thousand still very remote increase the likelihood one hundred times people don't feel it and I had this sense. When trump was elected in the way he was approaching governing that he was he was doing that across a big portfolio of risks that. I thought that the one way to think of the federal government is a manager of giant portfolio of risks many of them catastrophic and that people weren't feeling it exactly. I was doing on this in about how to write about it when he made Rick Perry the Secretary of Energy of Course Rick. Perry had said that he thought the Department of you should be eliminated when he was on stage in a debate but he couldn't remember even the name of the place and once he collided with it he realised. Oh maybe it shouldn't be eliminated because the departmental has nuclear weapons in inside of it and I thought well maybe this is the this is the way maybe actually kind of want follow it follow ric currency what it means for. Rick Perry to be running this place and then somewhere in all this. I learned that the Obama Administration partly because they're required to by law partly because Obama was a responsible person had essentially Had BEEN AT WORK. For a year to create these briefings for the whoever was gonNA roll into the federal government and run it and there was a there have been thousand thousand people across across the government who had spent the better part of a year creating these briefing books thinking about how to present the government to someone who didn't know anything about it and these briefings were supposed to happen the day after the election. I mean they're gonNa roll and that's what happened. When Obama rolled in to replace Bush and the trump people hadn't shown up at all so then I had a hook but now I do too in the hook was I'm GonNa go get the briefings. Briefings and trump people never bothered to get and kind of learn about this portfolio of risk and try to get a sense of what we should be worried about why that was the start and then you ended up covering not just the Department of Energy but also the Department of Commerce and the Department of Agriculture. You know I had a selection problem that reminded me a bit of the selection problem. I had with the big short and the big short there was a pool of kind of fifteen Wall Street guys who had seen the crisis coming or thought they'd seen it coming and made a fortune betting on the collapse of either Wall Street or the housing market and I wandered around a long time on a casting. Search figure out which ones were the best to tell the story through. Who are the other contenders? There were a lot of them. I mean they were. They were hundreds of them but they were fifteen of them and and all were willing to let me write about him. It was just who could kind of teach the reader the most important things what was the best way to dramatize this. And in this case I had actually fifteen cabinet level positions fifteen departments to choose from and I had a narrow down. I couldn't do the federal government. I wasn't gonNA keep the reader for more than a couple of hundred pages. I knew right away it was going to be three or four and I thought I had some criteria I thought one. It's gotta be something that I suspect. Most readers have no idea what it does and I just. I would just market test this. I'd be at a dinner party and say they might tell me what the Department of Commerce does and nobody had any idea that half the budget went to weather collecting weather data. You know or in the department energy most people didn't like Rick. Perry as opposed to the Treasury Department of the State Department of people have some vague idea. What does it? I wanted to be out of the public eye because I thought among other things I think. The risks are greater when public not watching the trump administration and finally. I thought they started to be very important so the Department of Education. I mean it's nothing's not important in the federal government but some of it's more important than than others so i. I spent time in most of the departments. I mean are talked to people from most departments and eliminated things along the way and then figured these are the three I wanted to do. Having said that I mourn not having written about the State Department and more not having read about the Department of the Interior. I think you could drop a writer into any one of these places and he would come away with a really. There's a wonderful stories to tell I mean. The Department of Education Is One. That's been written about a lot because of that. The high profile of the appointee to a lesser extent repairing sort of when he came in there was a flurry of attention and then kind of died away. So what is Rick Perry doing at the Department of Energy and what the Department of Energy supposed to be doing? It's a really good question what he is doing what. I dipped out of this story. I mean the last time I interviewed someone at the department injuries. Maybe six months ago and what I'm told. Is he set himself up as a kind of cheerleader ceremonial head of with the. Who isn't all that interested in the place? So you seem tweet a lot about it but we never got the briefings presumably. I know more about it than he does. Because I sat down with people had them walk me through the whole department. Maybe by now. He's accumulated some information. But what does it do? It's a vast science project what it is and part of the science project is tending to testing assembling nuclear weapons. That that's a big part of the budget. Another big part of the budget is cleaning up nuclear. Waste their sites in this country. And you wouldn't believe it. It's sort of like green type. Post-apocalyptic PLACES PAN for Washington. The Department of Defense three billion dollars a year trying to clean up the remains of the plutonium factories that that generated the atom bombs for World War. Two you ask the people in the department energy to give you an honest estimate how long it's GonNa take to to clean the place up hundred years one hundred billion dollars. I mean that's not trivial. And and what is at stake is there is a giant plume underground of of nuclear waste. That's slowly drifting towards the Columbia River which is not that far away said up on the Columbia River because they need the water to cool the it was there for a reason but if it leaches into the Columbia River. It's a catastrophe the for the Pacific northwest and it's managed in a very short term way. Things happen there. That are very alarming but does that predate trump or is it always been managed in a short term way although trump was the trigger for my story and trump is by far the most negligent manager of the federal government. We've had my lifetime Fisher probably forever. I never thought of his story. Just about trump. I thought of it. A story about the narrative we have created has poisoned or at Lea- screwed up the relationship between the society and government. That that this whole notion that the government is filled with lazy stupid. Bureaucrats who were kind of dead weight on society is a really dumb story. It's not true story. Department energy actually illustrates this. There is within the Department of Energy and his science project a seventy billion dollar loan portfolio and a few hundred million dollar venture capital fund. That is responsible for the entire. Solar power industry is responsible for Tesla. The first that were given to Tesla it is. It's it's the only place where dollars will be allocated to long term innovation. Industry doesn't do this if you she track back. Where the the innovations that led to the current American economy came from almost always it started with a government some government investment the Internet. The iphone wouldn't wouldn't exist without govern investment. When I think about the government I think of it as this. This exquisitely important exquisitely complicated machine that. We've let rust for decades telling ourselves a story that we need to basically just kick it every now and then it keep it from being too lazy and this guys come along and got sledgehammer. Trump has come along and he's getting this is getting you. He's going to do really mortal damage to it all right. So here's a short term thinking way of looking at this if you have things like nuclear cleanup. That are one hundred year. One hundred billion dollar projects is this potentially four year maybe eight year term of neglect. Kind of benign neglect. Because it's just GonNa it's all moving so slowly anyway or is he actively doing something in these departments. That is making it far worse. We have to worry. I think we have to worry a lot in. That's not me saying there's there are people who were kind of professional watchers of the federal government who are independent reps of the situation and then they're terrified for a few reasons. One is just the people who were in the federal government in the first year. The trump administration twenty percent of the top six thousand managers in the government civil service senior executive types left Biz. A hollowing out of the talent. And there's real talent there. These are not trivial. People people who were there in a lot of people federal government could be being paid a lot more money in the private sector and they've been drawn to some mission whether it's school nutrition or tending the nuclear arsenal or the weather service. They're there because they love the mission in because they know how important job is and we've mistreated those people for a long time. But now the level of mistreatment got very high and the dispersion of those people is a problem but then there are lots of things that are not so long term. I mean the trump budgets zeroed out both the loan program and the investments in the Department Energy Department of Agriculture Department. Agriculture has a three billion dollar research. Budget typically always overseen by a scientist and agricultural scientist. And if you talk to the woman who previously occupied the place Kathy Woteki a re a one a distinguished agricultural scientists who've been in government. Thirty years really knows what she's doing. She's all of his budget right. Now is one way or another being directed to research tied to climate. Change that we're to feed ourselves we're GONNA have to think differently. Be where how and where we grey sheep and cows and grow wheat and the climate change and have a big effect on the food supply trump appointed to this job right wing talk show radio host from Iowa who happened to support who knew who has no science background whatsoever named Sam Clovis now he has recently been removed from consideration. And there's nobody on his anybody in the job right now but the neglect of investment right now in the government will have consequences down the road. The bright spot is make it so bad and this is the point of the book. It make it so bad that people may wake up and we'll have a different narrative about our government.

Federal Government Donald Trump Rick Perry Department Of Energy Department Energy Department O Department Of Agriculture Department Of Education Department Of Commerce State Department State Department Of People Department Of Defense Columbia River Barack Obama Treasury Department Danny Michael Obama Administration Department Of The Interior
Princess Diana's Niece Kitty Spencer Converting to Judaism for Soon-To-Be Husband Michael Lewis

Unorthodox

03:08 min | 1 year ago

Princess Diana's Niece Kitty Spencer Converting to Judaism for Soon-To-Be Husband Michael Lewis

"Lady Kitty Spencer. Princess Diana's niece who apparently according to various British reports is going to convert to Judaism She's marrying a Jewish fashion tycoon. More than twice her age. According to The Times of London Lady Kitty Spencer. A twenty nine year old model. GotTa give to Michael Lewis. Sixty one year old chair of the Foscarini group in December. Not The author. Michael Lewis not who leaving Tabitha Soren former MTV news for percents. Don't even say that pooh-pooh Kim Hoorah for very specific subset of royal watchers. Who are Jewish like. This is like catnip. This is the perfect thing. It's sort of like how Meghan Markle's I wish there was a whole thing of like is Meghan markle Jewish that was like a few days of of speculation on the Jewish Internet. Yeah I mean. I don't really care about this. I'll be perfectly honest. I just think that it's I liked marvel at the fact that like this is the stuff of headlines. We don't really run this kind of blog at tablet anymore but like there is a world in which this generates headlines for like at least three days. I'm well on the record over the years I've written about his royal watching especially for an American proud citizen of a country that fought a war to get rid of royals and to not have to bow and shit before them. Royal watching an American is sad to begin with Amen. If you'RE GONNA watch if you're going to be obsessed with them out of some sort of weird deep Anglo Philip Pathology. We want them to be sort of like dysfunctional church of England like like drunk in dysfunctional wasps. Like I don't want I want there to be no Jews in the royal family. I want them to be this like fabulous train wreck of what happens. Through centuries of high church Y Anglo Inbreeding you see kids. That's why we fought a war right the idea that we want them to kind of that. We Ju- sort of want to sneak in through marriage through conversion on no way this like we will be off running. Hollywood and the media and electing Bernie Sanders President or having jared Kushner baked peas or whatever we do in America. Were Jews. Get to do it up. We that. That's our bag. The royal bag is being like stiff. Upper lipped GIN tonic addled extramarital affair having Weirdos and I want nothing to do with that exact these I think might be your most controversial take yet or the one that's GonNa get you into the most trouble and I look forward to it but I don't think I wholeheartedly. I hate you. Fine Century MELTSA Leila Mark. But I don't think people wash because they like want to be I mean there's a fascination we watch and we watch from a distance from an ocean away Understanding that this is not our culture but just finding a fascination in the pomp and the pageantry and. I don't think there's anything wrong with that. I think you're inferring. A lot of weird things onto people who just like to watch a pretty wedding fine but then it's not a Jewish wedding that that's not the wedding we want to watch. We've seen enough Jewish weddings. We've been to Leonard's of great neck I disagree they do a great Bat Mitzvah. The thing about the royal family over the years is that like it's basically become a reality show right like all day thing about William and Kate's wedding. We can watch it. There's no reason why we can't see ourselves in that world because they're they become so much a part of our world so I think it's I'm all for it. I love my Jewish relatives too much. I love the Big Jewish family too much to wish any of us into that family but all the sparkling thing into the most useless family on the face of this plan south. No

Meghan Markle Michael Lewis Kitty Spencer Princess Diana Anglo Philip Pathology Tabitha Soren MTV England Jared Kushner Bernie Sanders Leila Mark JU The Times Hollywood Leonard William President Trump America Kate
"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

"It's too dangerous because he sometimes here you heard it around Brexit in this country that have the ignorant people had voted for the thing. They didn't understand no one understood. That's true but it's much more dangerous when the president in the face of ignorance behaves. Let your does that seems to be well put. There is a dangerous narrative at work here. which is the electorate is divided Eddie between ignorance and knowledge? And I don't think that's the I agree. I just want to pick you up on something you said earlier in that respect as well as you said we all needed you needed to civic education. I send if you like that in this country I feel like we've been put through a civic education over the last three and a half years because of what happened after the referendum. I don't think in this country understood our own constitution listen. I don't think we understood what was happening to. Countries politics understood many of the social economic problems in this country in that sense. I think that what's happened is being a wakeup call to his was all of facing ignorance so I think this is the silver lining of trump is that I think that versions of that has happened to a lot of Americans the awareness that I need to start paying a different kind of attention to this process so I think that's true and I think that you know this political moment is a byproduct of of a very long period of not exactly peace and prosperity there. Obviously you know America's been at war in its own way forever and not everybody what he is experiencing prosperity. But there's been an absence for a longtime of an existential threat of the sort that like the Cold War provided World War Two or the depression or the pandemics that happened in the early twentieth century. So there's this less less of a need people feel less. They can afford Ford to ignore. This thing is a nineteen centers off. I think into this the luxury of stepping back from things that should we needed to be much more engaged with out of taking it back a little further eighties but yes. I think that's right. It's a luxury to be able to afford. Donald Trump in the White House and I think a lot a lot of people who will pay the biggest price for him being there people who voted for him and they'll realize at some point that this was it was one of the really striking things about the trump support was that consistently across the country. The more rural the person the more likely they where to vote for trump the fewer people in their town the more likely they were for trump. And it's also true. The fewer people who are in your town the more utterly dependent that you are on the United States government for the firehouse that schools the hospital and that people didn't make that connection that they're handing over essentially initially the instrument for their salvation to someone who doesn't care about it is breathtaking. It's it's beyond like not voting for your economic interest. It's like you're voting waiting for someone who potentially could just crater your entire existence. isn't an also then a breathtaking of what came before that it got to this point. Yes it is is that I think that's absolutely true when I was going to ask you about the connections between this and all the other things you write about from sport to behavioral economics exit everything else. I will not do one on finance. We'll street at a question about ignorance. So the people who ran those banks that nearly took us all down did not know what was going on inside inside those banks. Clearly the chief executives did not understand what they were selling and the consequences were nearly work catastrophic for some of them and Nettie catastrophic for all of us here. We are ten plus years on so they had the ultimate Waco. We haven't had that yet in politics and God knows what it would look like if we did. I mean it doesn't bad thinking go away but other people who run those banks. I mean if we took that as the modal did they learn the lesson. Do they now know what they're are doing when they saw the consequences of their ignorance or they back in the place where we started this conversation. which is ignorance is actually strategically useful? So if you want to be in this business so knows a big question. I guess my crew that the the society has forced them to behave differently than they behaved leading into the crisis so for example they all are better capitalized than they were. All the American banks much much better capitalized than they were. Before they got a cushion that they didn't have. I think it's also true to say that the CEO's are all if I had to bet warier carrier of their employees more aware of their ignorance. People might be doing things inside the bank so that they know that if if they didn't know before it's hard to believe they didn't know before they must know that these institutions are too complicated to manage j. p.. Morgan is smart as Jamie diamond is and his as well. Run as it is compared to all the other ones. He can't know everything that's going on inside JP more. It's just too complicated. These things are many times the size and many times the complexity of the Solomon Brothers that I once worked in and there was no way the head of Solomon Brothers knew what everybody was doing it I could. I could prove it to you because I was doing stuff that that was kind of crazy that he didn't know about and I was a million so I think what they counted on going crisis was everybody had the same incentives everybody had the same interests inside the bank and everybody was kind of smart and selfish so it would result in US making money. They didn't realize that they had people who could make lots of money doing things that would in the end torpedo the bank. So I I bet they have reacted to that. I don't I don't know for a fact that I I bet that they've reacted in any case. We all know the same crisis never happens twice. Whatever happens next? It's look like the financial crisis and it looks like something else and if I had to predict what's going to happen in the financial sector is it's it's not going to start in the financial sector will start with the government. I mean Donald Trump does something that calls into question say the trustworthiness of the US government to repay its debts. That's kind of thing that could trigger the next financial crisis and the other things command like Donald Trump would never end up running a bank because he they wouldn't let him anywhere near it. It'd be when you back when he's real estate developer that he was dishonest and he is an idiot by the time he was done with the New York. Vecsey wouldn't lent him so they have very low opinion of him but he's president but he's president we will tweet the League's not just a Michael's the most recent book the fifth risk but will the other ones too. They are all worth reading studying this weekend. We're going to be putting out. The first in our new series of episodes about the history of America can teach us about American politics now. We're starting with impeachment impeachment of Andrew Johnson and the impeachment of Donald Trump. My Name is David Cement and weeping token policies.

Donald Trump US president America Brexit Andrew Johnson Ford Solomon Brothers Nettie New York David Cement Waco CEO League White House
Gut bacteria prefer to chow down on certain dietary fibers

Generation Bold

07:45 min | 2 years ago

Gut bacteria prefer to chow down on certain dietary fibers

"Now speaking of the field of aging we have a leading scientists in research in the field of aging are with us right now a doctor Michael Lewis garden and I just want to give you his website before we do anything it's Michael well the normal way am I CH a E. L. L. U. S. T. G. A. R. T. E. N. dot com and we will also have that on our website of course and he is a scientist a Tufts University and the human nutrition research center on aging so his research when it comes to an interest in is specifically about aging and that he sees a problem the problem is our guts he's written a book about it I'll tell you all about that in a minute but I want to go to the doctor right now. why are you concentrating on microbes in the god of microbial health and what does that have to do actually with the science of better H. R. two so to jump into that I should say that about five years ago I didn't care about microbes bacteria viruses on that I didn't care about any of it he didn't walk in on my radar at all I started off studying blood predictors of muscle mass and function in older adults and when I was doing that I published several papers that identified bacterial metabolites in the blood that were either positively or negatively associated with muscle mass and function in older adults so that led me into the idea of well maybe the cop microphonics playing some role on stark Pina and based on that I was able to get some studies funded and as you saw at the conference I publish that recently published some of that data on the role of got microbiome on muscle strength but there are a bit in emerging field right now the will of the gut microbiome on the government's lack of muscle mass and functions where three papers and mine support paper so far this year have identified microbes for real for the gut microbiome on muscle mass and functions so it's an emerging a rapidly emerging feel dope now in terms of nutrition that potentially can optimize that the most obvious place to start would be with dietary fiber in the reason for that is because our humans don't have the enzymes to digest dietary fiber dietary fiber passes into your large intestine and then bacteria in your large intestine convert those those fibers into short chain fatty acids so basically very short little fat but you don't you don't normally get from diet with the exception of something they like water which may have small amounts of the short chain fatty acid butyric but very low amount compared to what you could convert from five or so then once these bacteria make short chain fatty acids does ready I go from the inside of the intestine into the intestinal cells which can aren't test motels the mitochondria particular use those short chain fatty acids to make energy that energy is used to improve got barrier function which is important for keeping stuff that was in the inside of the intestine from going into the blood and that's important because during aging that that. got here actually decreases so if you have a low fiber diet your body will be able to have optimal intestinal barrier function more stuff that inside the intestines will leak into the blood potentially activating information information of all kinds of nasty things sore muscles are green all the issues in our blood so again port place to start in terms of optimizing our health and longevity is optimized dietary fiber intake that's the core theme of the book and I should also I didn't start off with that idea and that approach the idea and the that is default through the literature I basically changed my diet after going down this road do you have a super high fiber diet rabbit close to a hundred grand five a day triple the RDA so that I can optimal got very function and you know improve systemic functions. so you thought your listening now and you know that there's a tremendous amount of information both technical and practical and I won just give you the website again that that is the doctor or scientist website Michael lust Garten L. U. S. T. G. A. R. T. E. N. dot com and it again this is not coming from the world of selling supplements this is coming from the world of science research both in the laboratory and personally so now let's get practical for a second I every morning I take my flax seeds and I put them in my yogurt alright I take my chia seeds and I put it in my smoothie but I don't think I have anything compared to the amount that you're putting into your body and is there anything country indicating them and these are the ways that you're suggesting people get the dietary fiber. so flak he can be a great way to get increase your fiber but the foundation of my diet is a few festivals not in terms of fiber content per calorie nothing beats the fiber density vegetables and a happy post on this on my blog by compared the fiber and not just five or ten nutrient density of vegetables compared to all green calorie for K. per calorie per calorie nothing beats vegetables opt for fiber and nutrient density so when I eat vegetables I'm not eating a few for the broccoli and meeting a pound or more actually sorry. Graham a more actually yesterday I had eleven hundred grams broccoli morning in addition to other stocks so a meeting if you divide the best schools to get this fiber goal but I should mention I'm not vegan I'm not a vegetarian I do eat the meat ID with some dairy I can be to make but at the end of the day for me it's more than just a simple dietary ideology way say go high fiber for me back to work and I know that because like I said I track my diet in a truck my circulating biomarkers it'll lower fiber diet was able to optimize my biological age then I I promote that too but for me what works best for me is a very high fiber diet in terms of optimizing got help and biologically. so let me just tell everybody that. when tell and Mikael when Dr Michael it's gotten speaks people listen so are also remember these scientists and part of his experiment is himself which is what makes him so unique in the scientific world and I will tell you that his overall and I'm reading his book and you should always book microbial burden a major cause of aging and age related disease easy to get on Amazon I put on my kindle it was a pleasure to read on the plane all the other day and I learned a lot but the fact is that his over arching words are no that I self sees very much like the oracle at Delphi no they sell and he knows himself because he keeps testing and so this doesn't mean you go out and and you do this but I tell you what I did do doctor I went out and I would have had to carry. you said so that was the only way yeah. we're gonna come back in a couple of seconds and I'm I do want to talk about that how we can as a practical matter could some of what you have learned and you learn things that are very impressive and work for most people to different degrees out into our diets properly and that were also does look a little bit about the idea of nutrition as we get older because they're even changing that concept when it comes to surgery used to tell you not to eat that's changing we'll be back in just to get you

Amazon Graham Dr Michael Mikael Delphi Eleven Hundred Grams Five Years
Andrew Luck's retirement shocks football fans

Hugh Hewitt

02:26 min | 2 years ago

Andrew Luck's retirement shocks football fans

"And we were shocked by the stunning retirement the age twenty nine Andrew luck the Indianapolis Colts quarterback one estimate I read it a half billion dollars in four gone earnings your reaction might going to made it your top ten but your personal reaction to this young man saying I've got enough I'm not going to risk my health my personal reaction is that this present a massive issue to the NFL how dangerous indeed bill attending the sport can be hold it takes on top talents agenda and I were talking about this last night you reminded me of one of the great Green Bay Packers Brett Farr battled addiction to pain killers the talk about taking fifteen by the bike it in at one time taking a month's worth of pain killers in two days and so I think that the lock during the war you said that the joy had gone out of football the you're stuck in a cycle of the injury rehab injury we have the New York times on football a comma convulsant writing players of locks generation now make a loop whose calculation between help Christmas money and that's going to put them in conflict with team owners who always want more football not what and if you did a little more digging tomorrow you'll see that Andrew luck got crushed his first two seasons with the colts because they had a terrible offensive line to go back to Michael Lewis is great but the blind side and I'm watching Baker Mayfield were on the cover of the brands on the covers SI Odell Beckham junior Jarvis Landry and behind the Baker may feel and Nick Chubb we're gonna have a great year we had a very good offensive line after job attorney I was at left guard and I'm beginning to think that reading that Andrew luck story the brown should start trading draft choices to get in a line to protect their asset which is Baker may feel he's the whole club these everything and the reason Andrew luck is quitting with half the career of Roethlisberger and and one two fifths of the career of Tom Brady is because you don't have an old line it be it Michael Lewis is frightening still right this is a brown story is proof that all politics is local the the the ill the triumph of hope over experience has led me to have season I have my four on the fifteen people want them and I'm so excited about Mike Allen always a pleasure good Monday

Attorney Jarvis Landry Green Bay Packers Indianapolis Colts Andrew Mike Allen Tom Brady Roethlisberger NFL Nick Chubb Baker Baker Mayfield Michael Lewis Colts New York Times Football Brett Farr Billion Dollars One Two Fifths
Aleksandr Kogan: The link between Cambridge Analytica and Facebook

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

06:39 min | 2 years ago

Aleksandr Kogan: The link between Cambridge Analytica and Facebook

"I wanna start this episode by telling you just the very beginning of a story. I recently heard about a guy named Alex Cogan born in nineteen eighty six into a Jewish family in the Soviet Union. After the collapse in nineteen ninety one. The government loses control and Jews or even less safe than before Alex's dad's starts getting death threats. So he up and moves his entire family four generations of Cogan 's to New York City. In nineteen Ninety-four, Alex enters first grade in Brooklyn public school, he's conspicuous way taller than the other kids. He speaks no English. He's also got a talent for math and science. Once his teachers can understand him. They think he has the makings of gifted physicist. Life's not hard for him. But as he grows up he begins to see that. It isn't always easy for everybody else. Six months after they arrived in the United States. His great grandmother had jumped from their apartment window to her death. His parents the loves of each other's lives. Split up Alex cries every night until they get back together. He enters high school in one of his close friends attempt suicide another becomes clinically depressed. Alex begins to read psychology. He's a math and science kid, but he's getting more and more curious about human nature. And the first time I met him. And I really remember very distinctly because he almost always wore these giant basketball shorts. No matter what the weather is terribly dressed like a lot of Berkeley undergrads, and you know, basketball shoes that's decker Kellner the psychologist at the university of California. Berkeley who runs something called the greater good science center, where they study human emotion. We heard from him in episode one. Alex Cogan was a shambolic six foot four inch freshman back in two thousand and five when he knocked on daggers office door instead he'd like for decker to teach him. Emotions fascinated him. It come to cal- to study physics. But he'd been thinking about love about the distinction between loving and being loved. He wanted to study it the way it study a quark and now came in. He said, you know, I have seven kinds of love that I'm gonna put people into like. Wow, that's interesting. And there are twelve variations of I forgot what the other factor was that are set of conditions that he wanted create and there were eighty four different conditions in his study. So he's gonna study seven different kinds of love. And he's going gonna stay all these different variables that would would maybe predict right? The force of the love power of the low. Exactly. So he's about to make love more complicated than it's ever been. So sounds like right. He was going to confound our understanding of love decker talks Alex out of that idea. But this kid is so smart and original and full of energy. So decker takes him in. And it isn't long before Alex's finding things to do that. No one else is doing for instance, the thing that he does after they discover a gene it's associated with human kindness, and Alex did this cool paper where he showed if you present videotapes of people who have that, gene. Or this variant of gene that makes them kind. And I am an observer. And I see one of those people for twenty seconds on video. I trust them. Right. I'm like this guy. I go to battle with this guy ride. I trust this guy by the time Alex graduates from cal- he's established himself as the most promising student in the entire psychology department, and the most unusual just this big sweet natured guy with a serious talent for math and statistics and desire to study huge questions like what is love when he left and he so unconventional, Michael. He coulda gone to any graduate program in the country, and he chooses the university of Hong. On what? Because he met this woman or got engaged fell in love. Yeah. Fell in love but decker and Alex stay in touch. They collaborate on a few papers. They're both interested in big questions about human nature at the same time. Social media has started to create a new way to study those questions. In late two thousand twelve Facebook invites decker to visit and asks him to create a bunch of new emojis ones that better convey actual emotions when Dacca sees would Facebook knows about its users. He's blown away. This could be the greatest data source it will ever exist. And it would help us answer questions from the scientific perspective. Like, how does disease spread in some neighborhoods, but not others what predicts heart attacks where does hate crime, whereas it likely to happen, right? That was all tractable the data. The had meanwhile, Alex had moved to England to teach a Cambridge University. He was still researching the same stuff the positive emotions, and he too was saying possibilities in the new social media data, and I was at Facebook doing my consulting work. And I saw there. What are you doing here? And he's everywhere, you know, like, I'm working on this other project, and he told me about it. Alex Cogan told decker that he wanted to use Facebook to study things like love and happiness, for example. You might be able to take a fairly small sample of data say the likes of ten thousand Facebook users to make discoveries about those emotions in entire countries. The math was complicated enough the decker himself didn't fully understand it. He then forgot all about it until one day a year or so later when Alex Cogan called him up. He calls me after Trump's elected. And he says, I think I've done something that was part of this election as like, okay? Well, let's stock. What is it? And he said I created this mechanism that was purchased and used in the Trump campaign. Here's word of the actually it had some effect or that he'd be perceived heads affect I don't think he made that distinction. I just think he thought out now Alex Cogan sense that he might have a problem. He just had no idea how big it was going to be.

Alex Cogan Decker Kellner Facebook Soviet Union New York City Basketball United States Physicist Brooklyn Public School Berkeley Donald Trump CAL University Of California University Of Hong Cambridge University Michael Dacca England Twenty Seconds
Who should take the hit when identity theft occurs?

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

07:05 min | 2 years ago

Who should take the hit when identity theft occurs?

"I live in Berkeley, California. It's a peaceful place for an American city in twenty years. I've never so much notice the police station never occurred to me that I even needed to know where it was. Yes. Zoe. But now here I am inside the place surrounded by cinder block walls, in pictures of legendary police officers in across the table from me, there's a living legend officer Joe do. So I'm going to tell you what happened to me. Okay. And why I'm here so beginning last year, we started to get calls at eight in the morning from CitiGroup big back. And I was getting the kids out the door for breakfast in the phone ring. And this happened ten times twenty times three times fifty times. I mean, it was just like harassment, and they said, I the money, and it was absolutely bizarre. Because I didn't never any any business with CitiGroup. I mean, no credit cards. No, nothing. But he said we had like fifteen thousand dollars of outstanding loans. I just wanna say that again. So you hear it city group said I owed them fifteen thousand dollars. And so Finally, I said look quit calling us just driving crazy in the mornings, and whatever they stop. Calling. Okay. The next thing. That happens is I got a note from American Express saying my credit score has collapsed because I have Wellstone a debt to city group. So American Express call me and says we're gonna put a limit on your account because you're like, oh, scores declined. And I call them and said, well, how's this happen at a, you know, this a credit aggregate name experien- has sent a report saying you've got some bad debts. I didn't even know what experience was or what it did as it turns out there a bunch of companies that make their money by gathering up, whatever anyone Bank or credit card company has to say about you. And then spreading the word to the others. So that if one Bank thinks you owe them money all the others. See you as a problem? Experience one of those companies and odd become one of those problems someone claiming to be me opening a credit card account with CitiBank in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. And he gave as his address street in Miami. But it's a street that doesn't even exist credit. Limit was fifteen thousand somehow he managed to borrow sixteen thousand four hundred and six dollars and repaint. None of it fifteen thousand four hundred and six dollars when I called experience to say how come you have this on my credit report? They said, well, we can't do anything about it to city group said you of this money. So I called city and city roof said they didn't know who I was and at no record of my social security number. We was just a mass. I was I was in stuck in on hold for hours. And they gave me no joy. I mean, no joy at all. Finally, experien- tells me that I need to file an identity theft comp-. Plate with the FTC the Federal Trade Commission, which I did. And they said I had to go come to the police station and file report for them to take seriously my claim that my entity had been stolen. So to summarize myself, just they're a big New York Bank hands fifteen sixteen grand to someone pretending to be me. Michael Lewis, then some credit agency broadcasts, a total. I about my behavior. And now I need to drive down to my local police station and bother a local cop. So that's why I'm here. I wanna file a police report for identity theft. And I wanna ask you a couple of questions about before. I do it. The first is how often do you all have people filing identity reports with the police very frequently. Also, it's not this is not where it's not completing common owner. But that isn't the question. I most wanted an answer to I'd been doing another question for so long. It's almost hard to put it into words. I mean, just as a lot. Horseman officer. Does it not strike you as strange that? I've never had any do with either one of these parties, and they wrote me into this. And and it's my problem. All of a sudden, it seems to me that CitiGroup should be filing some sort of complaint with the police, not me, and I shouldn't have to deal with this at all. It's very odd that its frame this way, the whole notion of identity theft noticed I'm still me for the first time officer la- do is looking a little dubiously. Like, I'm crossing some wine. Like, I'm gonna start asking him for his opinions about animal rights or about the local native American burial ground, somehow wound up under the parking lot of a fish restaurant cups. Don't control the rules of the game. They just enforce them. The very idea that I should have to spend a minute having to deal with this seems just a little odd. I mean, if you take it out of the financial sector, and you say I managed to persuade Zoe that I'm Audrey in. I get her lemme ten grand. Arteries, my producer on this episode Zoe is my associate producer. They're here at the station with me recording just standing there in their headphones. Expressionless dead. I'd. Is always not gonna have any ability to disrupt my life or get me. I mean, it's an odd thing that the financial system has now put this sort of strain on police resources. It seems to me. So let me put it as a question. If people are coming in filings reports taking your time and all the rest is never struck. You that seem to little crazy to have the police in the middle of this to answer it. It's interesting in the fact that it's a different type of victimization, right? I don't think of myself as a victim. But if you want me to be one, I want you to be. But it turns out I have to be the victim. At least if I want him to file his report, if I'm not a victim that I'm to blame for whatever fake Michael Lewis has been doing at his fake address. Here's the funny thing I feel victimized not by whoever that guy dude wasn't Miami. But by city Rupe like they present themselves as someone who has been victimized by essentially, my of inability to prevent anybody from stealing my identity. But really if they'd never done the dopey thing in the first place, we wouldn't even be here. And that's the thing that that kinda gets under my skin is that the financial sector has figured out a way to shift the burden of this problem onto people who have nothing to do with the problem. Let me get you a casing, right? I've never had a case number. Can you put me on the boarding generate numbers for thirty five to nineteen? Numbers me talk. Just like another language. Six zero one six. Thank you. Like, I. So I'm gonna give you a business karma the case number and also many give you a victim of identity theft family. I already said this, but I'm the real Michael Lewis, and this is against the rules a show about the decline of the human referee in American life, and what that's doing to our idea of

City Group ZOE Michael Lewis Officer Experien Miami Berkeley American Express California Federal Trade Commission Joe Do Harassment Citibank Sioux Falls South Dakota Producer Wellstone New York
Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:28 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"It started with feeling some nagging worry about this world. We find ourselves in. Deep Curtis through the clipboard. Steve Kerr has got teed up. Steve Kerr has got a jacket. A world where everyone hates the referee. Those who could kickable playful bone does account referee. Heels like someone keeps poking you in the back of the shoulder. And then saying foul foul foul. I would never say the things that I do to referees to a person in normally. I'm Michael Lewis, author of the blindside moneyball the pig short the fifth risk. This is my first podcast. It's called against the rules. This season taking you to all the poorly refereed corners of life. Look where we're sitting right now, Michael we're in a crappy parking lot across the street from one of the most important capital market building on the globe on the globe. I just have some simple basic questions through my trash people. Do it questions about what's happened to our idea? Fairness when you first float this idea. How's it greeted? Okay. So when I first float this come on. This is the early two thousands. And I'm talking about new government agency. Oh, just what everybody's looking for right? Here's what I think we still need our referees someone to make the call someone to protect us when lice unfair. But these days, it's not easy. Why would anybody want to be ref seriously? I wonder that too man. And they're not allowed to say anything. They're not allowed to explain themselves not allowed to defend themselves. So I'm going to defend them. It starts April. Second against the rules is the new show from Pushkin industries. You can subscribe now for free wherever you get your podcasts. So do you have anything you'd like to say to the referees of the world before we turn this recording off don't pick sides, unless it's my son?

Steve Kerr Michael Lewis Pushkin Industries Curtis
Blue Origin Launches Its Space Tourist Rocket For A 10th Time

Gary and Shannon

03:25 min | 3 years ago

Blue Origin Launches Its Space Tourist Rocket For A 10th Time

"Real revelations in that book, and you spoke with Michael Lewis. I did about his book and about these revelations even some revelations that he had that weren't included all people you're going to have your mind blown if you're wondering what's going on in the Trump White House in the transition team. And within the Trump administration's how decisions were. Were made. It's really revealing. And we'll get into a lot of those details when we come back, Jane wells and Mark Thompson for Gary and Shannon, KFI AM six forty. Here's Monica Rix and drama teacher at Costa Mesa high school has been arrested in a child sex case police say Brandon niece was busted on suspicion of committing several lewd acts on a thirteen year old boy starting in twenty eleven these has been involved in community musical theater and taught dance at a camp in Newport Beach. He also taught dance at the boys and Girls Club in Tustin and fountain valley cops say because of nieces access to children. They there may be more kids out there who had inappropriate contact with him. A jury has awarded three hundred sixty thousand dollars in damages in an excessive force lawsuit against an Orange County sheriff's deputy Connor Zion. Had slashed at his mom roommate and a responding deputy before another deputy showed up and Saddam to death in two thousand thirteen lawyer for the family, Dan Stormer says the death was found to be lawful. But the jury decided the emotional distress as the man was dying was not fracturing his skull stomping on his head three times. And they put. A value to it lawyers for the defense say it's hard to second guess an incident that only took twenty three seconds. The deputy is now a sergeant and received a medal for his actions at the US court house in Santa Anna, Corbin Carson KFI news. Brought to you by reborn cabinets. A political opposition leader in Venezuela has declared himself. Interim president swellings have been protesting since the dictator. Nikolai doodle was sworn in two weeks after possibly unfair election. Vice president Pence posted a video message yesterday, nNcholas Maduro is a dictator with no legitimate claim to power. He's never won the presidency in a free and fair election. And he's maintained his grip of power by imprisoning. Anyone who dares to oppose him pen says the US supports the opposition leaders moved to assume power and challenge by the widow says he is breaking off relations with the US a nurse in Phoenix has been arrested because his DNA matched that of an an of a baby that was born to an incapacitated patient police chief Jerry Williams says the nurse was responsible for the women's care at the time of the alleged sexual assaults. Road this arrest to the veteran, we owed this the rest of the newest member of our community that innocent baby medical staff say they were surprised when the twenty nine year old woman gave birth last month because she's been in a vegetative state for twenty six years Johnson and Johnson has agreed to pay one hundred twenty million dollars to settle deceptive. Marketing claims general of forty six states accused Johnson and Johnson of misleading. Metal on metal hip implant patients to think the implants would last at least five years people. Also have claimed the metal implants can cause internal issues like groin pain, bone, erosion, and tissue death. The company faces more than ten thousand lawsuits in connection with those claims KFI traffic there is some police activity now happening in bellflower on the Ninety-one. What's the liquid boulevard? Looks like the right lane has been coned off. Things are really busy coming up at six. Oh, five thanks to Becca who called Ralph's saving you time traffic line. Triple eight five hundred five thousand three eastbound side slows down just before you get to the seven ten still this

Nncholas Maduro Johnson United States Trump White House Trump Administration Michael Lewis KFI Orange County Costa Mesa High School Interim President Monica Rix Jane Wells Nikolai Doodle Tustin Newport Beach Saddam Dan Stormer Connor Zion Fountain Valley Brandon Niece