29 Burst results for "Michael Lewis"

Camila Russo: The Defiant  Laying Bare the Story of Ethereum

Epicenter

06:17 min | 5 months ago

Camila Russo: The Defiant Laying Bare the Story of Ethereum

"Lows two jobs. When did you first hear about a theory? In twenty seventeen Crypto for Bloomberg the first time was when I grow kind of one of the first stories on ICO's for Bloomberg and I remember just like trying to wrap my head around what these things were. It's like Bitcoin, but it's different vigil currencies on Anyone can issue them on. They're on top of the other blockchain cerium and you know I was coming at crypto coverage from. A markets perspective. So I didn't have a lot of technical knowledge about how blockchain's worker crypto were or anything I. I understood the value proposition of bitcoin from having a cover like Argentina land but that was my extent of knowledge of it. So it was like writing that first. ICO. Story was I think when I, I started looking at a theorem for the first time, and then just like as I kept covering the space is for the rest of two thousand seventeen I started to learn more and more about understood. Okay. Syria is team like. But whites valuable. It's because it's it tries to be more flexible than than Bitcoin, and that's why it's easier for people to issue all these different tokens on top of it and so. That's kind of seeing all of this kind of frenzy around ICO's on these tokens on this like millions of dollars worrying in I was like there's something here you know. This kind of decentralized way of raising money and ethereal kind of the platform ebeling this. Back. In January, we interviewed Steve Kokinos and Sylvia mccully of Al and during our conversation, we talked about how unique design makes it easy for developers to build sophisticated applications on their platform. So what's great about Algorithm beyond the fact that it's fast, it's secure it scales and it has instant finality is the fact that they've designed Allaire one protocol with primitives that are purpose built for define. So what that means is that they've taken some of the most common things that people do with smart contracts and they've embedded them right in the system right in the layer one. So things like issuing tokens atomic transfers, these are built into the layer. One spark contracts are first class citizens on all grant. So with these essential building blocks at your disposal, you can build fast insecure defy APPs in no time. To learn more about what Al brings to the table and how to get started, I would encourage you to check out algren dot com slash epicenter that lets them know that you heard about it from us and it takes you where you need to go to learn about their tech. And what that we'd like to Algorithm for supporting the PODCAST? What point do you does one? Say I'M GONNA write a book about something that's never something that's ever crossed my mind or I think a lot of people's minds. What point you do you decide to write a book and then what is the process I mean forget about the process of writing the book. But like what's the process of figuring out what kind of book you WanNa Right because you could have written this book in all I mean it's very. Descriptive account of what happens it's mostly in the third person, you could have written a fiction you know you could have written. First hand account of your interviews what was the process for the creative process? I guess figuring out the of book you wanted to write. For background I always wanted to write a book like that's been kind of a goal of mine forever I got into journalism because I like writing I guess like growing up. One of my favorite books was in cold blood by Truman Capote and I think you know that was the first time I realized while you. You can write about real life like nonfiction in a way that reads like a novel and that to me was really powerful because. To journalism and especially business journalism, which is usually so dry. I found that okay stories can make vs very kind of complex dry concepts come alive if you tell them in the right way and so getting the the example from. Truman capote and then especially Michael Lewis exile. Kate while like this is a really powerful way of speaking about nonfiction and obviously I love fiction it's it's what I personally read the most. I disliked you know if I was ever to write a book, I would want to provided like value to readers by bringing something from the real world and making it. And read like story because I just thought you know there's like so many interesting stories in the real world you know that needs to be highlighted. So why should I like go on invent another story for my own imagination they're already so much to tell in real life at some point. I think it was probably when you get into the Bloomberg internship, they give you like of recommended readings and one of them was Michael Lewis Books I think it was liar's poker and so when I read that book, I, was like, okay like I need to find that story that I can pick up until like Michael. Lewis. His folks. So I was like always on the lookout for that like what can the story that I can tell in this way like in a something I can make into a nonfiction novel. And I think with Crypto was kind of the first time that I thought. Okay. This is this is where I needed to find my story to tell. I meant to say fictionally, I'm interested like a dramatized version like something a little bit more like. Of course, you could make fiction of the story of a theory, but like a something akin to the bitcoin billionaires book right whereas like this kind of more dramatized version of the facts. But like the way you wrote the book is like this very kind of factual account. It reads like a novel it does read like a story, but it's like very factual thing based on your interviews based on your conversations. When you're reading it you really get the idea like this is how things happened.

ICO Michael Lewis Bloomberg Truman Capote Allaire Blockchain Syria AL Steve Kokinos Argentina Kate Sylvia Mccully
"michael lewis" Discussed on Gangster Capitalism

Gangster Capitalism

07:02 min | 10 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Gangster Capitalism

"I'm really excited to tell you that Michael Lewis's against the rules. Podcast is back for its second season. You've likely read one of Michael's books or seen one of the movies like I definitely have moneyball the big short and the blindside among them. He's a fantastic. Storyteller against the rules looks at fairness in every aspect of American life this season. Michael Examines Coaches. I love this. They used to be confined to sports. But now they're everywhere. Writing coaches business coaches life coaches coaches and it begs the question who has access to these coaches. And who doesn't this question is particularly important when it comes to college admissions. In our first season. We investigated the college admissions scandal that rocked the world in this excerpt from a recent episode of against the rules. Michael's looking at the other side of the coin. We meet a homeless straight as track star Inner Ad Hoc College application coach. Why is it so hard for qualified kids who are poor and from rural areas to get into the good schools? I think you'll want to hear more. And you can find against the rules wherever you listen to podcasts. Now here's Michael Lewis. All sorts of people are getting paid to be coaches in places that never used to have coaches big corporations Wall Street trading floors fire stations people are declaring themselves coaches. Not just of skills but of states of mind and getting paid to do it now or noticeable when you come across situations that cry out for coach and no coaches around when total amateurs you don't think of themselves as coaches are forced to coach for free because no one's doing it for money like this woman. I am Marissa Barada on Author of several books and articles on banking and inequality Racial Wealth Gap etc Marissa came to the United States from Iran. As a child her family were political refugees. He's now a professor at the UC Irvine Law School. But it's not her job that matters here. Maris's brother-in-law is the sheriff of a small town east of Los Angeles. He called her one day to say taken in a high school student. She was his sons classmate and track team teammate and she was homeless her name is Kayla Kayla kept getting kicked out of her home like on and off and finally permanently last year and so their son told his parents and they just said come live with us. Right Marissa found Kayla totally striking six feet tall self possessed but she's a seventeen year old African American girl in poor white town not just homeless but working two jobs just trying to figure out how to survive. I don't know exact date but I think maybe around September. My mother kicked me out of the House. That's Kayla. It was something that it happened before but this time it was a permanent one so I just tried to be prepared but I mean there's not much you can be prepared for when that happens. Why did she say she could you out of the house? This recent time I think it was just maybe a lack of appreciation. Maybe she didn't think I appreciated what she's done for me because I think she felt that I was only there to finish my education. I was Using everything she gave me just to go to school so yeah I think that's probably the main reason why she kicked me out. Are you still in touch with her? No I don't talk to you at all. Okay so I asked Kayla a bunch of questions but her new friend. Marissa had asked her more. She learned that Kayla was a star long distance runner a great student to who somehow maintain a grade point average. Four point -O Caleb managed to take the sat to. She just walked into an sat center and taking a cold without any idea of what it was. She got a score of twelve sixty which was better than eighty three percent of the other people. Who TOOK IT? Marissa could see how badly Kayla wanted to go to college and she knew from her brother-in-law that college not the obvious next step for kids from Kayla school. I mean this. This is a high school and I went to one of these high schools. Where the only recruiters that come to campus are like military and community college if that so most of these kids are not you know. Four Year College when she first tells you what she's doing in to to apply to college the first time you sit down and talk to her about it. What does she say. And what is your response? She says I well what colleges are you planning to? And she says well. I applied to a couple of UC schools. I think she'd applied to three schools at the time she actually applied to four schools state schools. Because you could do that for free never mind. The eventual tuition killer couldn't afford the application fees scientists. Ask Kahlon like you mind if I look. I'll pay for the application costs and we'll just do it together. Would you be into that? And she was super into it right so she was absolutely. I want to do this anyway. That's how Marissa remembers it Kayla recalls hesitating before she said yes. She's like. What colleges you playing for you? Only pine to four will. You didn't apply to more and I was like well. I can't pay for this and she was like well. You don't have to worry about it. I got it I got it covered and at first I was really like. I'm not the type of person that accepts money from other people. It was the first time that anyone had offered to help her. And the situation was as new Kayla as it was Marissa. You know you could tell that. She's hungry for the coaching and she. She wanted it and I could just see that and I don't have a lot of time either right like I have a fulltime job and kids and all the other staff but when you see someone like that you're like okay. Whatever it takes. I'm going to help you with this. Because who else is going to exactly right. Who else is going to kill? Assessors the kind of kid. Every league school in the country claims to be looking for Marissa had the same thought. She also thought. Oh no I'm too late I'm Michael Lewis and this is against the rules. A show about various authority figures in American light. This season is about the rise of coaches and this episode is about a place in American life where there should be coaches to hear the rest of episode four of against the rules. Go to apple podcasts. Or wherever you like to listen brought to you by Pushkin Industries..

Kayla Kayla Marissa Barada Michael Lewis Kayla school UC Irvine Law School Los Angeles professor Maris Pushkin Industries Caleb UC United States Kahlon apple Iran
"michael lewis" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

14:37 min | 10 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Masters in Business

"And they've been kinda fascinating like most Michael Lewis topics you find the corner of this that other people are either overlooking or having dove as deeply into it and then you reveal something interesting. The first one you wrote noticed. Gee We really don't have a lot of data about the effect of social distancing what it means for the spread of a of the coronavirus watt made you start doing these weekly columns well. It was the ineptitude of the response was the first thing also the size of the problem but it was. I was just struck that we live in this society that has led the world in exploring the importance of data we coined the phrase Dana Scientists. We revolutionized sports by using data and analytics in new in different ways. Every business in America has been swept up in this data revolution. We faces existential threat. And we lack data because we're not collecting enough of it. It's the most amazing thing. I you know the the the initial failure of the of the Center for Disease Control Tests and then the seeming lack of enthusiasm interest in the trump administration at in in in in rapidly figuring out that problem and testing more. Got Me Interested in the first place and then the question became like I mean I still think this is an opportunity. I still made try to do this with the pieces. I think you could take some of the best like baseball. Stats Geeks the guys who are in front offices. Now guys running teams and throw throw them into this problem. Because like where do you? What's the data you want right? Now is all data. That really really help us with this. One is like one is data in in. Who's got about? How many people have the disease and how it how it spreads. Living in this is this is knowable We don't know it but it's knowable some you mentioned in one of the columns that we haven't really explored why churches and synagogues seemed to be focal points. Is it something about singing as opposed to working with a family member? Who has it that you don't get yet a church or synagogue seems to be a giant hot spot? Yes I mean. Nate places where people are in each other's presence and breathing heavily For a long period of time seemed to be a big big problem whereas you don't really doesn't I mean it's all anecdotal right assessment so it shouldn't be anecdote I don't get the sense in anybody's getting it by from jogger. Who's passing by from a surface of a table or I don't know that it's true but we should know this already and we don't let me ask you a question when when you go shopping and or with your food delivered from the supermarket. Are you wiping everything? Down with the clorox wipes or something like that or is it just get thrown right into the fridge and freezer. It's thrown right into the fridge for really yes. Yeah but I but I would not go to a restaurant right now. If they were not new he's GonNa be. I don't know how restaurant before this vaccine treatment. But not seen GonNa restaurant is have you. Have you been following this about the Llama? Antibodies much smaller than human. Anybody's that seems up. log onto the Spiked projections of the outer. Part of the coronavirus. Pfizer is testing that with their German. Part in the downside. Is You get a very long neck? And you start spitting everything but otherwise you won't get the corona virus that's and that's a fair tradeoff totally so there are so the day date you asked me. Why interested because it seems like we figured out how to value baseball players. But we haven't figured out how to measure how how how the coronavirus works and we have we and there's there's social data like the movement of people. It's being collected routes being analyzed. It's but I get the sense being done in the kind of very crude ways that baseball staffs were looked at nearly seventy and I think I think there's just like that's threat of the columns is very interesting. Dana store so before we leave data the Google Apple Project to trace people who were moving about through their mobile phones. That seems to be pretty detailed data set. Although we don't really know of that data who adds it? We could just tell how much people are moving around the country so all I actually written about this yet but but there's also the fake facebook dinner and it's being essentially laundered through epidemiology departments at universities. Senator as these companies can't give their data to the government this privacy issues but they can give to academics who can analyze it in and give it in a different package to to policymakers and I do know that they've been able to determine that the just increase increases in human movement mean. This is kind of mind blowing but increases in human movement. So let's say Gavin Newsom in California says okay. It's okay to go to the beach. And then all of a sudden you see an uptick in actually how many how many yards people are moving every day. There's a direct correlation between that and deaths from corona virus. Yes a couple of weeks later. If already figured that out and think about how many steps there are in there. You know you can imagine a world where everybody's moving around a lot more but they're just in their cars and they never get out of their cars and they would have no effect at all but actually movement is pretty good proxy for Spread of disease And and so that data is GONNA BE USABLE. If they get their minds around it all kinds of interesting ways they'll be able to see the effect of the policy on movement and you know the effective movement on the spread of the disease That I think we're headed in a direction where data is is going to be our solution short of a vaccine or trip day. That offers the most hope. What do you think about these? Anti lockdown protests that. We've seen in places like Wisconsin and Michigan. I their horrible I if you it's not just yourself you're affecting when you wonder when when you decide to get together with lots of other people you're making it more likely. I get this thing ran and All of them have gotten it is as from what we've read since those events it's symptomatic of a bigger problem in this circles. Back to the podcast we are. We are an uncoached team right now. We're team we're a team. We're a team where everybody wants. The ball the shoot team. Where does not playing together? It's a really. It's IT'S A. It's a moment where we really need to act as a team and and play together so we need to have a strategy and everybody everybody buying into the strategy. That is going to be the title of this. We are uncoached team. If somebody is to write a book about this era and I have to imagine wicked. See dozens of them Who should write that? Is that a Michael. Lewis spoke or is out a somebody else's book. I I have an idea but I'm not. I'm not running talk. I'm glad to hear that because anytime you get a an idea other interesting things come about all right. Season One was referees is into is coaching. What is season three going to be about? I don't WanNa say yet because that because I'm not quite sure whether I'm gonNA keep it in the arena early the arena right but if you do seven. You're going to keep the original concept. Was Everything sports related? Within that everything the roles are all roles. You find inside of a stadium inside of inside an arena ambition But but it may I may. I may break that rule and just and it just may be. There may be other roles. Just outgoing to explore. I have not figured out with the third season is yet and I have to ask about the book coach. You wrote about coach fits. That's a deeply personal book. You reference yourself in Liar's poker but I don't think I've read anything of yours. That looks as deeply personal as as coach appears to be and the podcast. So this is right. Now there's nothing. I don't think I've ever written any quite like that. Just because I'm generally not my material this usually it's generally something else but this was just odd moment where I was useful. Let's talk about podcasts? And streaming video. What are you watching during lockdown? And what are you listen to? I have been working. So hard on the podcast. I've been watching very little but the one thing I have been watching his Foutah So stressful it's it is stressful. But it's unbelievably goes great So thousand is the only thing I've been watching regularly. In fact I think I learned in one of your columns on remember this. Was you or somebody else that foudy was originally written for an Israeli audience and it's watched throughout the Arab world which is sort of surprising when you consider the subject is Israeli intelligence officers going after terrorists. It's the narcos story. All over get narcos. Narcos was written for an American audience in. It's all over the south all over Latin and South America so I think I asked you this last time and I don't recall much of an answer. I asked who who your mentors were and I don't remember you saying coach fits but now I have to re ask the question. Hinton's who are you're meant to ask you have you know they're meant your mentor is different stages of your life right. He's probably the most important certainly the most important because he caught me at that stage. My father's always been a mentor mentor. To instill is the Tom. Wolfe was a mentor to me when early stages of my writing career my editor star Lawrence at at Norton who has been a really important vegetative those I think those are the main ones. That's good list Favorite books what are some of your all time favorite books? And what are you reading now if anything I've just started in on it on a Hillary Mann tells trilogy will hall is was the first style and I never got around to it. S just started to read that I just finished the single best pandemic novel it's called the gentleman in Moscow by Amer tolls and it's it's the it's the novel the rating pandemic because it's about a Russian aristocrat whose locked up inside of a hotel for fifty years. He can't he can't leave. And it's this. Is this wonderful exploration of of a of a mind adapting to a smaller specs Anyway so that I love that book. I'm reading novels angry. I haven't been reading any nonfiction. Give us a third one. Why can't read more than one at time? So the the give you you. One I'll give you one that I rented a while ago but it's sort of like it. It should have been. It should have occupied the place in the American Curriculum Catcher in the Rye does is called Red Sky at Morton and pick that up. And you won't be you you will. You'll be happy fantastic and our final two questions. What advice would you give a recent college graduate? Who is thinking about writing as a career? It's really simple and that is make sure that you actually WanNa right. Rather than being a writer. There always people who want to be writers but they actually don't want right and if you don't actually love it you're not going to be good at it. It's GonNa be miserable and you spend all your life posing and pretending to have written and it's just it's just it's a horrible horrible path and something about the because nobody can you know can really call you on it for a long time. You can spend all life pretending to be a writer that actually writing so So just right and then the second is what you write about right when you come out of. College is usually. Don't have that much in the way material. Go do stuff. It's just interesting. 'cause maybe you can write about that so don't just be a writer. Rut right and be something else. Hemingway right and the two will eventually the to will find each other and our final question. What do you know about the world of writing and investing and risk today that you wish you knew thirty years or so ago when you first getting started so when I was first getting started at Salomon brothers when I was first getting started as a writer well I love the story about you writing it sally and having them call you into the office and you had someone figured out was a chevy? Chase's dad figured out writing under a pseudonym in Chevy Chase's Dan editor Simon and Shuster. He didn't want to put my hand. Write a book store at that era. What are you? What are you know today? You wish you knew back then about the writing process. I I don't think I would. I liked the way I I learned about the writing process. I wouldn't I wouldn't want to put a lot of stuff in my head when I'm starting out then. I didn't have to earn the knowledge. You know I I. I think I was less than I didn't have any writers in my life that I didn't know any writers that I didn't know anybody who only riders making it up all I would hate to have gone at it in a more knowing way. A made lot dumb mistakes by like those mistakes by I. Don't I don't rewind the tape and say oh I wish I'd known that it would have been worse anything. I would've known what it made me worse. That was conversation with Michael. Lewis always a delight. We decided to release this as a special bonus. Podcast for memorial weekend. I hope you found it interesting All the usual thins apply..

Michael Lewis writer baseball Dana Scientists Center for Disease Control editor clorox America Pfizer facebook Gavin Newsom chevy Narcos Salomon brothers South America California Google Senator foudy
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

01:50 min | 10 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Now I wanNA tell you. My second story about coach fits or second incident. It's nineteen seventy six nine months after I've established myself as a hero in my own mind. I'm now a high school. Sophomore pitching for the Varsity baseball team early in the season during Mardi gras break. I leave New Orleans with my parents. Were going on a ski trip. And I'm GonNa miss a week of practice. There's no written rule that says you can't do this at school break but I sense an unwritten. One coach fits is not pleased. The day I return he throws me right into a game against a really good team. The look on his face he hands me. The ball says I hope it goes wealthy out there but it really shouldn't. It doesn't go well. I can't find the plight up to that moment. Fits is not said one word to me about my ski trip but as I throw ball three. I hear his voice. Where was Michael Lewis during Mardi gras raw the voice booms from our dugout? I try not to look at him but out of the corner of my eye. I can see him pacing Jangling the keys in his pocket. I walked the first batter and the second now. He's really hollering. Everyone else was at practice. But where was Michael Lewis? The other team can hear him. The people in the stands can hear him more to the point. I can hear him and all I can think is. Please don't say skiing please. I'll tell you where Michael Lewis was skiing. He packs into that single word and idea that usually requires an entire speech for him to convey privilege corrupts..

Michael Lewis skiing New Orleans baseball
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

07:45 min | 10 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"You don't understand one. How crucial a one really good person. It can transform an entire aspect of your business or one. Bad person can be disastrous. I was always that have been different to those questions. I thought. Oh you know because I had these kind of arm's length dealings with editors copy editors or whatever who you could always get rid of if you didn't want our team has been so so strong that it's almost made us afraid to hire people because we haven't we haven't got a dud yet and it. The team worked so well together and I do have this kind of Phobia. That were eventually eventually. We are going to get a bad apple or not even a bad apple just someone who's not great and I just worry when that happens it's going to change the dynamic and You know it kind of raises the stakes on every person you hire because they you have to think they are going to be as good as all the people you've already hired and you're right the you are you. Maybe is this. This is what you see when you're when you're starting out you're a small business that you might start to lose sight of when you're a giant business and you've got tens of thousands of employees is just the effect of a single person. I finally understand after observing for years with some mystification. The obsession entrepreneurs had with hiring. I now understand it. I'm like Oh get it now. I don't know why this was a mysterious mystery. You never had to hire anybody right. Hey Mike let me ask you a question. This the seasons about coaching. And you've been talking to some of the best coaches in the world. You've been thinking a lot about what? How good coaches think. What do you think a really good coach would tell us about having a company like ours and what we should be doing or thinking about. I mean if if those like an entrepreneur coach who could who role they probably office there is. I don't know if talked about person yet. But I'm sure there are coaches for startups and entrepreneurs. But I haven't talked to any of them. I challenge you now to name any activity for which there is someone who calls themselves a coach roaming around selling their services. That's the thing that's been amazing to me. Is that we we actually start with. What's the activity when we wanNA write about or talk about and go find the coach? Because you know they're they're now what would a what a really good So the I'm not persuaded that so it is true. I think that the best place to insert coaches is your kind of situation. Where Transitional States and I Bet I bet the the the key with the coach would a coach would do with. You is just ask you lots of really difficult questions that even I don't want to ask you And and take you try to figure out where you might go wrong like. I bet if I was guessing with the risks you guys run our or we run as I'm part of Your Business Is that the death of your friendship is so deep that it's hard to me for me to imagine You choosing the success of the business over the success of your friendship and if there is ever a moment with those two things conflicted the friendship would survive but the business would take a hit which I love but I think that's true so that's how it should be. I think we I think we all feel that way. Hopefully we won't face that conflict you know. I don't think you will but I think when I think about I think coach would come in and say you guys are doing great right. This is an awesome. It's awesome startup all. Everything's going. Well I think the coach would come in and say what's the risks. Let's see if we can analyze what what we should be thinking about. Might come down the pike and and and sort of prepare you for them Do you have anybody like that in your life. Who's WHO's kind of coaching you on the side is Michael Lynton it. I don't you chill friend of all of ours. Michael Michael Lynton who was CEO of Sony and has a lot of experience working in a lot of different kinds of businesses and He's both very much available for for advice for for me but also offers it unsolicited. It really good times including when this crisis head you know he. He served called me up and said you know. He wanted to make sure that we were kind of thinking about these questions about our cash position and our resiliency and also about you just want to ask me about how it was communicating with the staff and making sure people knew what was going on. There weren't rumors going around and it's a. It's great to have someone like that. I re- I rely on him a lot. Both both the advice he gives me and that I know he's thinking about the business and has experience. I don't have with small businesses so Michael's kind of your coach. Yes yes he is for me he is. He's definitely my Ceo Coach. I'm curious I meant to ask you when you went off on this retreat the retreat at which Malcolm introduced the idea of fun is a founding principle Which I totally agree with if we'RE NOT HAVING FUN. The audience is unlikely to have fun. Either is what were the other principals that were sort of your core that you regard as your core principles and you remember fun which tells you let me a. Lebel who's her executive producer and has been the executive producer of Malcolm. Show since the beginning she someone who came with us from from the old company is very important person in establishing our culture but she talks a lot about kindness as as a principal of the company. And it's really. It's really true and I think she's been the kind of guardian of it but it's the way people think about working together and how they help each other and support each other and then that ties into I think a bunch of other ethical principles not just about integrity journalistic integrity business integrity. But you know diversity to Kinda workplace. We want to create the kind of society. We WanNA see bottled in the company So people have a lot of feelings about it. And when you have a young workforce those getting that stuff and having that all be relevant meaningful people. People is crucial in recruitment and retention. Because you've got a not just be a place where people can do interesting work. I think you've got to be a place where people WANNA work. How do you get across your values to someone? Who's coming in and thinking of working for you. I think they have to. I think that They don't hear it from this. See I'm hopefully. They do hear it from the CEO. But I think people are only believe it when they hear it from peers and see that peers are having that kind of experience in the place. They work and kind of hide. You can't hide who you are especially as a company right is a person so maybe a little bit but as a company were just will spread and what it's like there the values come they they do come through and I think it's especially true with startup companies because they grow up so quickly that they end up being kind of projections of the values and beliefs of the of the founders. And you know I think that's true. Facebook AND ONE WAY UBER ANOTHER WAY. But it's even more true to at a smaller business. Everything that you you believe gets reflected in some way and the and the company.

Michael Michael Lynton CEO apple Malcolm executive producer Facebook Mike principal Lebel Sony
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

11:42 min | 10 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Michael I think there are too big impacts. I've been thinking about on. The company wants cultural and one is more sorta substantive around what we may but the cultural point is that a company like ours. People are really close and they get very close making creative work together and we just moved into this new office in in New York like literally a week before it was closed and we all had to work work from home. Be Socially isolated physically isolated. And that was the bummer. I mean we were. This office is really great like everybody was really excited to be there. It's cleaned knew there was really good coffee like we couldn't wait to get to work and see each other in the morning. Both of us who are New York which is most of the staff and suddenly. That's denied to us. Everybody's worried about everybody. Everybody's got a whole new set of problems. People have to figure out how to take care of their kids home school. Their kids worry about their parents. Some people are feeling physical symptoms. Are People getting sick so you have suddenly instead of this kind of convening? You're you're separated in worried. And the opposite of the cultural observation is the people then. Become Really Habituated to and really enjoy in a way the forms of digital connection having a zoom meeting once a week. Where everybody's on it. You just see where everybody is. And you see the backdrops. One of our employees Sophie. Mckibben is up in up in New Hampshire. And she you know. She calls in from her car because that's where she gets the best phone connection you see her in her car and you see people in their apartments. Some have kids running in and out of the frame and it's just I look forward to that so much just seeing everybody I think other people are having the same feeling and As you know CEO. I just feel so grateful to these people who've got all this stuff. They're having to deal with in their lives that they weren't expecting but they're you know they're doing their best work the same time and. I think that's partly because work is a refuge in a situation like this Jacob question for you you spent most your life sympathetic to and surrounded by and being one of them kind of journalists who never have to take any responsibility for anything and you've you've managed to become pretty naturally like an executive like a person who runs a thing and sounds like you to sounded And like like you could be secretary of the Treasury and I I. I'm wondering where you pick this up like are you reading on the sly like in the middle of the night reading these horrible corporate management books or are you do you have somewhat little secret source of wisdom you go to. How'd you figure out how to do this? How TO RUN? A business You know I was watching people Do it and I and I think I've learned a lot from people who weren't so good at it as well as from people who are who are really good at it but you know Michael. I was always really interested in the problem of how you could pay for. High Quality Journalism or media We both came out of the magazine world and it was just this fundamental issue even before the Internet and things got challenging. You know was how do you? How do you make money on magazine journalism where someone spends months doing a story and I sort of went from being interested in now problem to kind of taking on the problem when I was at slade and as part of that we ended up selling slate and I ended up being responsible for it and it was an evolution but I did go kind of in stages from being a fulltime writer editor to being the head? The business and I don't know I think you know. I think you've both reflected in this conversation that it's fun to try new stuff when you're in your fifty s a lot of people in their fifty S. Don't get to do that. People just want them to keep doing the same thing they've been doing. So if you get an opportunity to try something new at this stage of life you can jump at it and you should jump at it for me. That's the business stuff amalgam out. I hope you feel this way. It's weirdly still fun. I feel a little guilty about it being fun. Now how not fun? The world is and businesses for for a lot of people. But it just seeing how. We've we've heard incredible people and seeing their resilience and how they've adapted to it You know it's it's it's kind of joy and it's It would be very different story if it wasn't working but it feels like we're GonNa get through it and I feel pretty good about at the moment all right so you guys Temiz. You guys have never had a spat or a disagreement. But maybe you have and you've got since gone into business together Have you have there been any sources of disagreement? Well if anybody's thinking about doing this it is. It is riskier in a slightly different way. Starting a business with your best friend. There's there's a lot more upside because it's it's a delight to do it But you know it's who gets to decide I mean you're you have dynamic that's not always a friend dynamic. I think it's been pretty seamless and easy for me and Malcolm. He can tell you what he thinks. That I don't think we've had any any meaningful or significant conflicts. But the you know the one dynamic that I'd point to which is not my favorite but it's the reality is that I've got to say no more than Malcolm does he's. He can come up with with all these ideas and I've got a little more of the responsibility for figuring out how we can get them done or which ones we can get done. And sometimes I've just got to say Malcolm that's just like one idea too many. We can't do it. Give an example. Malcolm like meet someone on a plane and land in email about why they should have a podcast and I've got it and say okay. Well let's you know love to talk to them and let's hear what their voice sounds like and you know have they ever done in the audio before. And you know he's he he's very good instincts. And it's I guarantee those people are interesting but whether they're going to be the right person to do a show for a whole bunch of reasons is something we kind of have to figure out. But that's what I mean. Malcolm this is the president of Pushkin. That's the role of the president of quicken is to be constantly pushing us to do more. Come up with ideas to be kind of the the creative lead. And then there's I've I've got to be the filter but I think that's working out okay. So far we do you know. What percentage of Malcolm's ideas bear fruit? But it's It's it's more than zero and less than all of them. I tried to get us to buy as opposed to rent an office. That was one of my ideas. We went so far as to actually look at some offices with to buy with real estate agents and ended at the end. Jacob said you know not sure we really want to be spending our time and attention managing real estate which is absolutely correct but again left to my own devices I would have been you know careening around New York with real estate because I got it in my head that. Why wouldn't we own our own play and I get why? That'd be fun just like we have a clubhouse you can like we can we can own edit can be podcast. Pushkin Central. You know but it's was one it was already starting to be you know we'd spent a couple afternoons looking at real estate. Which wasn't which we're afternoons. We weren't spending on making podcasts or other parts the business and also it's sort of occurred to me. Well if you buy a place it really is can a limit your growth potential. I mean what if we do want to double in size next year and the office only holds twenty percent more people than suddenly we have the problem of subletting a space. And we're in the real estate business. So yeah I think that was one of the cases where maybe had to gently. Talk Malcolm down from a fun idea. If you if you had to go back and Redo the first year of your existence what would you do differently? I'd be one of these. I've been pushing from. The beginning is to think of ourselves as more than a podcast company and I still. I don't know still legit concern but I still worry. I don't want to have as a staff too many eggs in the podcast basket. Because I think of that world is It's too unstable from tastes. And I. I've actually Gotten Dickens. Been been uneven stronger proponent of this idea than me. I think this point But I wondered. I don't know if we were doing the first year was would there have been away to start more aggressively on that travel the beginning. Maybe maybe not when you say. Diversify out of podcasting pet food. What were you going to do on your book? Books Books Events you know Producing things for people where you're not depend on advertising all those kinds of things just diversifying where the money comes from right. So you're not you're not slaved the AD market right That was that's really but actually think I actually think we've done a really good job of doing that. Yeah I mean I think we. I think we bit off about as much as we could have chewed in the first year and a bit one thing I would have done is I would have got the nice office sooner. I mean we. The Nice Office will be for me. The fourth office. And if you count my Home Office where I'm coming from right now. This is my fifth office in about a year and a half and you know I thought he could save money. Someone gave us free space for a couple months the beginning we didn't have that many people but it does take a little bit of a toll on your you know your mail never quite all gets forwarded to the right place so. I think I would have said you know what we're GONNA we're we're we're thinking big. We're going to need the nice office. Let's just get it now even if it's a little empty for a while are you in the Nice Office now. Well theoretically we are. We moved into a we a week before. covet head but With yes it will we. We're looking forward to getting back into it. You don't think there's any risk if you started in the Nice Office you wouldn't think of it as the Nice Office you think. This is the starting office. I I now need a better office in Idaho. He's been haunted by the phenomenon in the media world where the company goes goes to hell as soon as they get the nice office and I think there's a real reason for it to which is that. Everyone gets distracted by the like the decorating. And the WHO's going to sit where and suddenly nobody's doing what they're supposed to be doing instead. They're all thinking about the office so I always thought don't make the office like the last thing you worry about. But you know what it's part of providing great place for people to work and it affects the work. If you've got a place. People want to come to the coffee. Can't be too good. I mean you think about how. Good the coffee as it affects. How much you want to be in the space. And that's you know how much you WanNa be in kind of creative conversation with your colleagues. Another example of this is I never thought about the import. You know until you are actually part of this old half to anyone. Who's part of this? So you're part of the business or starting a business. You don't understand the importance of hiring in quite the same way as you.

Malcolm New York Michael Jacob president New Hampshire Treasury Pushkin Central Sophie Mckibben CEO Idaho quicken writer Dickens Pushkin secretary
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:49 min | 10 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Maybe these could be better this way. Well I tend to share your view that the constraint provokes creativity and that you often end up with something that's better and more interesting than what you would have had otherwise but not always you know. Luckily I think for a number of our shows. We had a lot of the field reporting the interviews under our belt. And so we're more at risk of losing like twenty percent of what we wanted. If we hadn't done any then it's would be harder to make these shows you'd have to conceive them in a different way. They're dependent on vivid scenes. Where the where were you as? A journalist is physically present. Do you think it's going to change the way when this is over and you can go back to doing it. The all way you think you'll go back to doing the always think you actually learn things that you're gonna you're GonNa work into your into your routine with my my my big goal in it at one of our earliest meetings. We had a retreat very early. On at Pushkin. We have sat down. Tried to figure out. What are the principles that we believe in his accompany sounds very pretentious? That actually wasn't and I the one I was encouraging people to accept less and we did was that we should always remember that this should be above all else fund for not having fun. We shouldn't do it. It shouldn't be drudgery so I always think about my big worry when all the lockdown happened was will it still be fun if we're all working from home and we can't hang out with the sort of wonderful collection of invest way misfits and Weirdos that we have gathered maybe podcast. I never myself among them so I was like. I can't hang out with these weirdos anymore. This is not going to be fun and so I think what's happened is that we've just discovered new ways to hang out with my senses. We're building a new muscle and that or that. We're kind of a A resilience so that you kind of know you can do it knowing you can do it. Another way is enormously freeing. We'll be right back as I mentioned earlier. This episode is just one of many podcasts. Included in the small business pod ference presented by Dell Technologies podcast conference to get inspiration on topics like fundraising building teams or managing a business in our current environment. From Top podcast. Like against the rules with me. Michael Lewis Rise with Rachel Hollis Rhett and link from ear biscuits for the complete lineup of episodes visit Dell Technologies pod dot com. Welcome back. Here's more of my conversation with Jacob Weisberg and Malcolm glad well from.

Dell Technologies Jacob Weisberg Pushkin Rachel Hollis Rhett Michael Lewis Malcolm
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

11:36 min | 10 months ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Two of my oldest friends. Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business Malcolm Jake or now. The CO founders of Pushkin Industries the company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way Pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like Malcolm Zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with Dr Lori. Santos I've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as Malcolm and Jacob started the company so I was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause I don't actually know the story so I would love to know how you decided to start Pushkin shake right it was Jacob's doing star. Well I'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate But as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought I was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started was revisionist history With Malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under a CEO. I'd hired who I thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that I said. Hey maybe it's time. That doc nice started our own company and only do what we WANNA do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where I was somewhere in your Italy. Admittedly and Jacob in some I think if I can tell the truth truly horrible live the villain said and he said he said on that he he summoned and instead we do something crucial need to talk about says I. You don't drove halfway across Italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he re like sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said I want to start a company that began. What did you say yes right away? Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that Jacob has been. I've known Jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say Jacob. I don't know why you want the journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. If you just became a business be you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jamir forgotten. It's but I always worry that if I said that I was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was doing a bad writer and I thought it'd be an even better business fan so I remember you saying this thirty years ago And so. Jake is a wonderful journalist but agreed it. He's they sort of a natural for this sort of thing. He's got the temperament for it. Unlike your do but you know what would surprise me. The thing that can take you back even a little further. It surprised me that you to went off on this podcast jagged first place you both had very happy successful careers in the world. Why did you decide that you wanted to do something different? You know Michael. I'd gotten the bug really in the early days of podcasting at slate were sort of because of a random connection with an NPR show. Slate had been working on. We started making some of the first podcast. Anybody listened to and everybody at slate all the journalists love doing them and there was this little audience small at first but growing that. Just love them and the giveaway was that everybody at slate who didn't have a podcast one of the podcast and they were just a joy to do. So you know. I'm a little evangelical about things I get excited about and I tried to talk Malcolm into doing one and I tried to talk you into doing what and Ultimately talk both of you into doing it. I talked to at first and then I think The fact that he was doing it may have helped to persuade you. It was worse than that. You Got Malcolm to lie to me and say it was easy. You lied but that's all right. We'll I forgive you so you're too old friends. Go into business together. How's it working out? Like how do you find working with each other? You surprised by anything. You finding things out about each other that you didn't know that you wish you didn't know we'll I I. I'm reminded of years ago. I wrote a piece. That was a really about my friendship with Jacob and it was about the idea that I'm what's called Collective memory which is that we outsource a lot of the things we know to our friends and family and I was reading about this. Because the Jacob Jacob who respect and trust so much that significant parts of my knowledge and cognition are simply outsource to Jacob. I was saying I knew longer. Read anything about politics or try and figure out simply ask Jacob what he thinks and adopt those ideas as my own. That was my position and I was sort of joke but it's actually true. It's just a way better way to live your life to make to appoint experts in your friendship circle and outsource everything to them. I do the same thing with my brother and wine and this so this is in business. I've just applied this principle. Which is just let him do all the things that I know. He's better at me. And since that's a rattle longlist means my life is very easy so this is that. True Jacob is there. Are you basically running the business in Malcolm's decoration? No I wouldn't say that I mean I handle more of the day to day. Say but Honestly at this point more the ideas come from Malcolm. And that's that's a bit of an adjustment because I've always thought of myself as the idea person but I'm like a good idea week person. Malcolm's like a five good idea. Day person and so big part of my job now is just like being. Malcolm's filtered try to talk him out of some of the ideas and then try to figure out how some of the others can can happen But these are ideas for shows these ideas for shows these are ideas for new businesses Malcolm. A lot of ideas and the typical day is you know at about eleven. Am He'll call me and say this is so much fun we really don't WanNa get too big too fast. Let's keep it just like it is and I say Malcolm I totally agree with that. This is the good parts. Let's not grow too fast. And then after lunch he'll call me and he said all right. I've got three ideas and each of them would involve like adding like ten new staff members and so if we if we pursued all ideas we'd have six hundred people right now instead of twenty five and that's kind of tension. There's not attention in that. Malcolm I disagree about. I think we're both pulled in both directions liking having a small business. Where were we know everybody? And it's sort of close like a family and we control everything but then all this opportunity and all these good ideas we want to pursue. I'm in these conversations that are you able to see the possibility of a really big business or everything is naturally better as a small business. You you've hit on the the hard part you know. I think we see that we do see the opportunity to be big. I mean I don't know you know when you say really big I mean now it's not. I don't think it's I don't think it's Google did. I don't think facebook big. But in the world of podcasting I think it has the potential to be really pay-setting and dominant But we also want to really really choosy and have everything we make really represent what we're interested in and the quality level. We've set so far so you know I think it's just kind of working out of those. Two things will result in the right size. I honestly don't know what the right size is. We're going to get bigger. It's just a question of how fast we'RE GONNA get bigger Malcolm. Yeah I think would occur to. I think all of us very quickly in this project is experiment. Is that We're not really in the PODCAST business. We're you know it's a cliche. We're in the storytelling business. And we happen to want us to tell stories to audio but that means you can compete against all kinds of like we re. There's no reason why we can't behave like a book publisher in many respects Is just that our books are on our audio not on page but once you realize that well look at book. Publishers there really big I mean. They have thousands of employees. They have so you know concede that way. If you think of yourself being into podcast world you you might think of yourself as being pretty small but if you think of yourself is just as using a different medium to tell stories that there's no reason why you can't be really big so to all appearances. This thing has been an incredible success. And it's been really fun to make a podcast for you I'm curious what troubles you've had especially like Given the pandemic how you had to adjust and respond and and How much difficulty is introduced into Your Business? Well we're we've all been improvising in various ways. I think we feel very lucky in that. What we make is is make a ball. Under these circumstances people set up recording studios at home and we have meetings virtually. I don't know that we could have done this with the digital tools that existed ten or fifteen years ago I mean things like zoom and then Slack and Google hangouts and shared drives Seem so essential to long distance. Collaboration in a way they've arrived just in time and it's sort of the moment for those tools we can make our shows and luckily we work with writers of caliber. Starting with you and Malcolm who can use their writing to adapt with what they're doing if there's an interview that you were going to do for your season this year Michael and you can't do it. You can write your way out of it That's not a position. A TV producer is usually in. I mean if you have physical production that requires people to be in a group and a place. It's just gotTa be suspended. Podcast we can. We can still make it. It's not Albanesi but people have been incredibly flexible and Nimble about how we're still going to get the show's done with this new challenge. So it's funny I'm about to. I've got five of my seven episodes for this sue. The the second season done. But I've got I've got one that really did require me. I thought require me to go out onto the road and I'm not able to do it and you said to me you know you can write your way around this and this weekend. I'm about to find out whether Dan and and I'm kind of wondering if you think that's really true. I mean what do you think? I what I'm thinking is just generally when you're thrown this kind of This kind of curve ball Look her ball and you hit it that you that you try to turn it into a strength and you see what you can do given that given the constraints but but there's apartment here in my voice. The podcast producer saying we need scenes. We need scenes and now you can't really get those scenes D does it for trouble that trouble you at all. You think..

Malcolm Jacob Jacob Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jake Malcolm Zone Jacob Slate writer Google Pushkin Pushkin Industries Michael CEO Santos Italy Dr Lori facebook producer
Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 10 months ago

Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jacob Pushkin Industries Malcolm Zone Dr Lori Jacob Malcolm Pushkin Santos Italy Jacobs
Georgia grand jury to consider charges in shooting of unarmed black man

BBC World Service

01:20 min | 10 months ago

Georgia grand jury to consider charges in shooting of unarmed black man

"In the US state of Georgia the case of an unarmed black man who was shot dead while joking is set to go to a grand jury Ahmed Obree was killed in February his family and campaign as a furious that the two suspects have been arrested or charged sonic Annika reports graphic video footage has emerged which appears to show the moment almost all breed was shocked at the twenty five year old can be seen joking they're white pickup truck and two armed men there's some kind of confrontation and three gunshots can be heard the two men have been identified as Gregory met Michael a former police officer and district attorney's investigator and his son Travis they say they believe the victim was a burglar and say he attacks Travis met Michael Lewis a missed obvious family say he was murdered and targeted solely because of his race and killed without justification after the video emerged around a hundred people protested in the neighborhood where the shooting took place public figures have expressed outrage including Joe Biden he says Mr Aubrey was killed in cold blood now the prosecutor assigned to investigate the case wants it to go to a grand jury who will decide if the suspects are charged but with colts not set to reopen until at least mid June it could be months before decision

Georgia Gregory Officer Investigator Travis Michael Lewis Joe Biden Mr Aubrey Prosecutor Colts United States Ahmed Obree
"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

11:58 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Point presumably. They ought to be a tension between the ones who know they depend on government and okay they gain to stifle and prevent people getting information so they can be the conduit but they need the information they need information and a president who doesn't give a shit now so you. I think the stories that will be told of what people thought and DID AROUND DONALD TRUMP. Who happened to have been put in the positions people who knew a little bit or a lot to either offset him stymie him or just swallowing their their concern. Again be great. There's no way we know but a fraction of the horrifying things that might have happened. Had there not been someone there to like nut? Let him sign the paper or not. Let him issue the order or just ignore the order and the bull would gave a bit of that but it was the level of as it were the West Wing you know is the people who could get into the Oval Office and remove the piece of paper from his desk right but this is something completely different. This is all you know. The administrators actual government. Not just the executive that's right and there are thousands of people grappling with this everyday. Yes that's right in. If it were a private enterprise the government well it would have emptied out by now probably but in addition is such an impulse to go and make all the public. The problem is trump has walked in new environment. It's perfectly it's ideally suited for him to get away with this as an army could be because the civil services taught you obey the president. You're here to serve at the pleasure of the president and when I was working on his book the single biggest problem was getting inside the places and people who were still working there felt that was almost treasonous to talk to me unless trump wanted me to talk then they trump didn't want me to talk to them so that I had to get what I got all kinds of tricky ways but I wasn't really inside the places and you just know inside the places there is a story that's breathtaking. What am I literary? Fantasies is if trump loses the next election would be to take twelve writers. I just great and drop them inside the various departments of government. Just tell me what happened because you know you. Could you go to the department transportation? I bet there's a a novel to be written and not. Nobody's paid much attention to Tokyo. Politics is brought to you in partnership with the London review of books. That is you see this all this fifteen with democratic politics because the way that read the book and it's hard to avoid the conclusion that you've joined that the man shouldn't be president that a man it's not it's not actually so much ignorance as you said because everybody in the face of the scale of the federal government has to be ignorant to some degree is the absence of any humility in the face of the ignorance in an an unwillingness to take responsibility for it learn. I think yeah. Oughta OUGHTA learn or to find people who know things but he's also elected president of the United States and that he will be up for reelection. So what do you do in democratic politics when somebody who is so unfit for office and your sense is elected to the presidency? What do you do Y? You're what am I supposed to because we have a parliamentary system and if a certain point if it were the case that a pulmonary colleagues of a prime minister reached that conclusion removing. They remove him or her rifle office. But that isn't the same not so can be done in the United States. Dust this off. Because at the beginning of his administration there was talk of it. The cabinet that amendment cabinet can remove him they. Congress can remove him. They're going to impeach him. They're not going to remove him. It doesn't look like so that he could be removed. That doesn't appear likely so. They can impeach him for being the just bad for being the problem that you spoke you read the fifth risk and you think this is not good and this is incredibly dangerous that the risk because he said the fifth risk is the big one and so it cannot stand and yet this book is not an impeachable offence. You're not no you're right here but the the the material might be treasonable of that but as you present this in the United States Congress and this is not evidence for impeachment. Now that's true so so there is this I mean do you know what do I do? I write. What is your country's Politics Team? All right so it's a curious thing because you would think that the president's unwillingness to manage the two million person workforce he's supposed to manage would be an issue. It's part of the issue that you know all the people who hate him have with him but it isn't the main issue and his supporters. Don't seem to care at all so it hasn't surfaced in a funny way in that so far in the election. I thought when I started in on this when I started to learn all the things the government did and how it was now being managed. I did think like this is a huge issue waiting to happen. That's someone is going to campaign positively selling the government rather than attacking at some point and questions like what triggers that would cause it to surface and this will happen is some catastrophe that is clearly the result of government mismanagement will make it possible for someone to start to sell the story like. We need to do this better because look what just happened on the order of. I don't know the Bush with Katrina that that particular instance wasn't enough at the time to inspire some Democratic candidate to say you know what this thing does is so important. Here's you need to understand it but the fact is it is and I think it's just like one day we'll look back and say how did it take so long to figure out that there that they could sell their government to the people. Couldn't you argue? That Katrina actually was the point from which the Bush presidency. She didn't recover. It's true but what was surprising. Is that the way. The way was framed was Bush doesn't care about ordinary people. Oddly I think he actually did care about ordinary people. It should have been framed as this is. What happens when the government's not managed properly but it it wasn't so there was an opportunity missed their from the point people who think that we need to reengage with the government and figure out how to run it better. Elizabeth. Warren seen from the outside could have been that candidate might still be might be and yet there seems to be there. Is this thing in democratic politics of people obsessed with the? What what she going to do what she's GonNa plan for this but not the how you'll book is about the how young from the outside. It doesn't seem like she's articulating. The it almost doesn't matter matters the planet but it doesn't matter how brilliant the plan is. What really matters is how if we don't have the capacity. Just how good the plans? But she's not saying that she so if you want to regulate Wall Street properly and you have an inept consumer financial protection bureau because we've intentionally mated inept. It doesn't matter how much you regulate. How Great Your Plan. That's right doesn't matter. How great your plan is. This is totally right. I think it's more likely than Elizabeth. Warren is going to engage early on with the how because anybody who particularly wants to use the government to do something is going to need to get to that quickly and their mechanisms the trick. Is there a couple of things that need to be done? That would need to be done in this society. The minute you have the nomination is when you really engage with the help because you have to have you need to go to the Senate before you even get elected and say this is going to be the raft of people I wanNA put in. I want to put him in quickly. That's one of the big problems is getting people into jobs quickly but also making sure all those people are you know can be confirmed. They're confirmable and they're they're the right people for the job all that it's a management problem management of big organization problem which is sounds like a boring subject in some hands. It would be a boring subject but doesn't have to be a boring subject but this is the the not that needs to be cracked is how you manage this enterprise better and someone who doesn't care what the enterprise does or doesn't care if it's run badly is not going to be the person who fixes it but someone like a. Warren would be the likely candidate. So we've just reelected will elected because he was elected before the man that trump cools Britain trump. How do you think Boris Johnson feels about being called Britain's trump? I think I don't think he likes it. I don't think he's actually reading your book different character. He's definitely not the guy who is coming out of the fifth risk. He's not stupid he's not stupid. He's not agreement but also he's surrounded by people who his chief advisor Dominic Cummings He. Ha trump does not have someone in that role has been thinking for twenty plus years about how to reform the administrative state. The BLOB is he sees it but not by just neglecting or ignoring right. I mean it's that other thing which I didn't think exists in any of your categories which is the kind of Super Smart Guy. He really wants to experiment with this thing. Bringing outsiders get used ideas of failure. It's but it's a completely different mindset. I didn't I didn't see anywhere in your account. Those kind of people who do sometimes attach themselves to not trump politicians but Boris Johnson. Stop additions but Johnson. There is a project here to potentially reinvent administrative state but it is a conscious thought through it may well not work but these are totally different totally different things. It's funny I. I think that the analogy between trump and Johnson is misleading. There are forces that are obviously propelling similar forces that are propelling both of them hostility to immigration being a very good example but they themselves seemed like very different characters and their motives seem a little different to me when. I was having an argument with a friend last night. Not Discussion of British friend. Who's more screwed us or you. Would you rather play our hand? Or you're just say on this podcast. We also include the French. We have I think you should leave them out of it but we will leave him. I would have a small president but rather have your political leader. But I'd far rather have are broader portfolio of problems and assets and liabilities. You have bigger deeper problems. I think than we do but we have. We have a genuinely insane person running the government. I think he's actually a crazy person. If he was in any other context he might be institutionalized but he's it came out of New York real estate which tolerates a lot in Manhattan is a lot to answer for the. I don't think there's any other society in the states that would have tolerated. Donald Trump Newark masked a lot of stuff. And we've got him in the White House and that's just not what you have if you have a different thing. One Shad feature of these two successful politicians the movement that supports them. Is that when you look at the demographics? They tend to attract votes from people. He didn't go to college or university. There's a big education in politics and sometimes this is played out as kind of insurance versus knowledge. But as you say I mean I always think. That's very misleading way to do it. The people who elected these politicians don't know what they're doing because as you say no one knows the store. You didn't know it. I didn't know it. It's not like the people on the other side of the people who vote for Kuban Elizabeth. Warren know what these government departments do. It's it's not a divide in the electric between ignorance and knowledge about the need for government. This is true and toews dangerous line because he sometimes here you heard it around brexit in this country.

president DONALD TRUMP Boris Johnson Warren Kuban Elizabeth United States Congress federal government Donald Trump Newark Bush London review of books West Wing executive Katrina Oval Office Tokyo prime minister White House Britain toews
"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Have a particular business interest. And I'm going to go in and figure figure out how to turn this enterprise towards it but I'm not sure that's the majority of it isn't the similar sorts of things with people who've gone and say ranchers managed to get into the Department of Agriculture. Right after the election and shut down the publication of animal abuse cases. Things like that have gone. On fossil fuel companies have managed to get their you know their fingers in various climate change operations and shut them down. So one strain of trumpism is just like. Let's let's pillage the place but there's a second in the second is Rick Perry who is until now secretary of energy now. Rick Perry I think is probably a pleasant nice guy who while he was presidential candidate call for the elimination of the Department of Energy when he remembered that was remember that was he called. He said he wanted to remove eliminate three departments of government and he couldn't remember the names on stage in a presidential debate then afterwards said Oh yeah it was the Department of Energy. I'm back then that did disqualify you from being president. Because he's campaign grated. We'll have to Oth- now with what's so funny about. It is what people thought was embarrassing was that he couldn't remember. The name of the Department of Energy which should have been embarrassing is that he wanted to eliminate the Department of Energy Department energy manages the nuclear arsenal among other things. And it's not even that's not even the most interesting thing does it's got responsibility for not huge but incredibly important sort of seed venture capital investment in technologies that are moonshot technologies. That private enterprise won't invest in that has generated on the solar power industry comes out of the department Tesla would not exist without loans from the department energy so it's been really important the American economy it also manages all the national labs Lawrence livermore Berkeley Lab. I mean science enterprise but nobody said to Rick Perry when you know. How do you justify eliminating this thing? And then of course when trump nominates him and why does trump nominated him because trump doubt doing it all by himself as a reality? Tv show anything's energy oil. Texas cowboy. He looks like he should be Secretary of energy. The previous secretary of energy was an mit physicist. Which is a really good qualification. Because you're dealing with. It's a big physics enterprise now you don't have to be a physicist to run the department energy but help at least to have the conversation at Rick Perry. He doesn't have a brain that's capable of engaging with the basic mission of of the place. Now he's not hostile to the mission when he gets the job he actually says. I'm so sorry I said we were going to eliminate this now. I know what it does that it's clearly really important in the runs around becomes a cheerleader for the Department of Energy. But he can't actually manage it. He's in he's incapable of it. And so that's a second version is just people who managed to stay in trump's good graces who were willing to demonstrate sufficient loyalty to trump who were completely and utterly unqualified for the jobs. They've been given but they wanNA garnish their resume. So that's there's some of that and quite a bit of that actually especially in lower level positions and I'd say the third streak are people who are actively hostile to government ideological libertarians. Who are often hooked up to industries that want to see regulation eliminated that kind of thing but Mick Mulvaney for example put in charge of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Which is everybody agreed on? The back end of the financial crisis was was a good thing to create. We needed a needed. A referee between the bottom half of the American Economic Order and Wall Street which was pillaging them the now in the subprime mortgage loans space in payday lending in student loans. These things need to be policed because the people who are using the financial products are easy to abuse. And they're being abused Mick. Mulvaney win has gone in in the most extraordinary way and they have not really been very many stories about this but he's gone in and they can't eliminate the department that is not into their power but they can like take everybody from the student loan place in move the mode of the payday loan place. They don't know what they're doing or tell them. None of this stuff is going to be released. Do your work. None of. It's going to go anywhere. They just stuck a wrench in it. And I mean there are in financial interests that are happy. They stuck a wrench in it. But I think they stuck renting it in Parkas Mick. Mulvaney thinks that like government regulation shouldn't exist. This kind of idiot libertarian thing. So it's lots of different things going on at once trumpism. But would you say you know? It seems to me when I was listening to you that they all seem more extreme forms of what's happened before so the first one that you have plenty of businesses who see government as an opportunity to get contracts from the second one you get political appointments people who are basically being rewarded for that loyalty to a a president and the third one kind of thing that the Reagan administration to some extent. So do you see. This is a continuum in which and trump just took it to a whole other level architecture. That's right it's just more extreme. I'm leavened by actual expertise. That's the other thing. Is that anybody who knows anything? Need not apply. There are a couple of exceptions like people who ended up in jobs and it's surprising how well suited they are for the job but we're nobody was paying attention head of the SEC. I think is very good by accident. Some people have ended up in the right job but there were a whole raft with people who were Republicans who were well suited to run some of these places who knew things who were dismissed largely because they knew something because in knowing something. You're it's harder to resist the impulse to challenge trump to explain to him. Have you you know it's very interesting. The way trump responds when someone tries to tell him something new and he did this very publicly. I was sorta hit twitter for a moment and then it didn't get the attention. I thought it deserved win. Maybe three or four months ago to American female astronauts did a space walk and was historic about. It was two women had never walked in space together before but women had walked in space. Not just American women Russian was the first one to do it and obviously lots of people walking space but they had a call with trump while they were doing it so there was this great moment where trump all to be gracious but trump says he gets on. He says you're the first women to walk in space while the Women Astronauts. There's a great tradition of female astronauts. They know that what they wasn't true. They said very politely. We would be remiss if we didn't say that no some a woman has walk in space before us and this is all on camera. Trump gives them the finger. As as the minute they start telling in this in the in the ply he does he does this. You know in a way. A teenage boy does with his mom and rubs his middle finger up against his temple. He's giving them the finger. I think that is kind of like this. Is One aspect of his character is a terrifying aspects that he regards people telling him things he doesn't know as an insult because he knows everything. No nothing you know everything. His belief about himself and I think it's a very believable. I know everything. So if you're trying to tell me something new then you're challenging my sense of myself and I think that's who he is so that's a problem when you take over something as complicated as the government because nobody. Nobody not even like this really. Funny One of th- I didn't know anything about the government when I went into start writing this book to find out that lifetime civil servants who work inside the Department of Agriculture are so aware of how little they know about their own department that have created a drinking game and the drinking game is someone says something that the government does and you have to guess as an employee of the department agriculture whether the Department of Agriculture does it. And if you guess wrong you drink and there's so many things that department agriculture does that. This drinking game can go on forever. So it's a complicated enterprise in the pose of the I mean the most useful attitude of anybody who's been elected president in its presence is humility. You need to explain this to me. And he's took the opposite approach. He fired everybody who could have explained it to him and said I'm doing it all by myself. So then the what are the consequences. It's a new novel even Reagan. Do this kind of thing. It's a novel approach to governing. When.

trump Department of Energy Rick Perry Mick Mulvaney Department of Agriculture Department of Energy Departmen president secretary physicist Oth Texas Women Astronauts American Economic Order twitter Reagan
"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

"A certain direction that will benefit your company. You you've come from assets you own so a good example of this. Maybe the purest case study the National Weather Service. It's how Americans get their weather but Americans don't know that's how they get their weather. The National Weather Service gathers all the data required for the weather models and actually generates its own very good predictions but we also have this private enterprise companies that sell market weather forecast the weather channel accuweather and these places depend on the National Weather Service for their data in order to make their weather predictions. Americans just see the private companies mainly because the National Weather Service is not allowed to market itself even though it's hovering there in the background and so every now and then you'll have some nut congressman say. Why do we need the National Weather Service? We can get our weather from accuweather but they don't realizing that accuweather is getting its weather from the government that these people are supposed to be managing so trump into the job. Running the National Weather Service allows the fellow who is the CEO and owner of this family. Business accuweather who has been for decades trying to stymie whatever relationship? The National Weather Service has with the American people and make it difficult for the American people to get the National Weather Service forecast so they have to pay for accuweather. And if you go into the National Weather Service they would tell you. This is the single worst person to put in charge of us because he's hostile to our the service we provide the American people. The Guy Actually tried to get a bill passed would forbid the National Weather Service for communicating with the American people. Now think about what that means. It means you're GONNA privatize weather. Forecasting or at least the delivery of the weather forecast the national weather service would still provided data tacky weather. It means that if you're living in Oklahoma and you're worried about tornadoes got help you. If you can't pay for the for the very best forecast it creates this dystopia. We're rich people can get out of the way of bad weather and poor people get killed by it so this man is a really good example of one version of the trump administration. One part of it which is like I have a particular business interest. And I'm going to go in and figure figure out how to turn this enterprise towards it but I'm not sure that's the majority of it isn't the similar sorts.

National Weather Service accuweather Oklahoma congressman CEO
Solvable Presents: Help in a Crisis

Solvable

07:38 min | 1 year ago

Solvable Presents: Help in a Crisis

"Hi It's Michael Lewis here. I'm nearly finished with the next season of against the rules. It's like last season in some ways. I'm talking with people about inequality in American society and what it's doing to our idea of fairness but this time only telling the story through the Lens of coaching and coaches the edge that coaches can give people and who doesn't get that edge in our society as we all know things are not normal right now. That's why we're bringing you this extra bonus episode. I guess I should. I say I'm still alive and so far disease-free but I've been doing a lot of interviews lately with people who dedicated their careers to helping other people. This is an especially good time to be talking to people like this. So you're GONNA get to hear a couple of their conversations right now. Here's a guy whose work is also really relevant right now. His name is Jimmy Chen and he left behind a fancy career in Silicon Valley to build an APP which is called fresh E. bt it helps people on food stamps. Well let's actually formerly known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program there about forty million Americans who accesses program. They get funds once a month on a car that looks more like a gift card than an ATM card. And most of the state programs don't have an easy way to let people know how much is left on their car. They don't even know their balances. So it's it's hard to budget and make smart decisions. That's a problem at anytime but it's a huge problem right now with so much food insecurity in our economy and Jimmy's got a solution. Jimmy thanks for joining me so Are there peculiar anxieties? That you sort of saying in response to this virus in the population that you serve. Well we've seen a lot of people concerned about not being able to purchase more toilet paper and I think that's the thing that You know people are often cracking jokes about in the general population. Why are you stocking up on toilet paper right now but when we talk to our users about that specific situation they actually have a very real need there for a lot of our users. They can't afford to purchase things like toilet paper in bulk and so they are purchasing toilet paper every time they go grocery shopping or on a very frequent cadence and so if the grocery store is sold out of toilet paper. That's a real problem because they don't have a backup supply that they can use and so a lot of people are really worried about that. So it's interesting because no one has explained to me why the that shelf and no other shelf in the grocery store. Except maybe the disinfectant shelf is empty. Yeah I mean. I don't know which way the flywheel started on this particular one but I know that for low income folks who maybe haven't had the resources to go out and stock up on Toilet Paper. It is a different level of scary. Okay so let me back up a minute. Let's just start a little bit about you and what you do like what your company is short. So I'm the founder and CEO of propel were technology company that aims to help people who are low income. The United States to navigate safety net programs like the food stamp program to improve their overall financial health. We build a free smartphone. App called the fresh UBT APP. That helps somebody who gets food stamp benefits or snap benefits on an e bt card to see how much they have left in benefits but also to connect to a variety of different social services to save money and to find different ways that they can earn more cash. Are you already seeing an uptick in users in response to what's going on in the economy right now we are seeing about thirty percent more usage each day than we normally do and to be clear those are for people who are already using fresh bts so we have also seen a lot of stats about how enrollment in the food? Stamp Program has gone up dramatically over the past week but the weight of the Food Stamp Program has actually structured. Those enrollments don't become actual cases usually for about a month and so we would see that a month later as people enroll in the program. So you're always seeing. What are you imagine is going to happen over the next few months? Well I think there are a couple of different populations that are worth thinking about here. The first are the people that are already getting food stamps. Now so you know there are forty million Americans priors took ovid and all of this crazy pandemic stuff there. A forty million Americans that were already struggling to make ends meet in a normal economy These are the folks that are already using the food stamp program. The majority of them are working and have children Just trying to pay the bills so those are the people who use fresh. Et now and they're facing a very specific set of challenges as this is kind of the financial shock that is really putting the behind. There's a separate set of Americans that we can also talk about the the people that are probably one or two tiers of income higher than that Maybe have a little bit of savings cushion but not a ton and as a result of the economic shock. Here they're the ones who are newly applying for the program so I think those two groups are GonNa have different types of outcomes but face the same challenges but how big is that kind of food stamp adjacent population. Well there's that popular stat. That forty percent of Americans can't afford four hundred dollars shock right now. These are all of the Americans that are living paycheck to paycheck. And it's not necessarily the case that those folks are all very low income you could be making seventy or eighty or ninety thousand dollars a year and still be in that population of not being able to afford a four hundred dollar shock as we've spoken to our user base about what the past week has been like We have heard from people that eighty eight percent of people who get food stamp benefits. And we're working have had their hours cut or lost their jobs entirely and of those eighty eight percent the average amount in job earnings. That has been lost is five hundred dollars. So we're talking about this. Four hundred dollars shock. That was going to send people over the cliff. That shock has happened right so it makes what you do even more important. Yeah that's right I think broader than propel the reason I started propel. Was this notion that we have a safety net here in the United States. That people who go through financial hardship have a variety of resources provided by the public sector and the private sector and those resources are aimed to help people in financial need to get back on their feet and more broadly. I think you know this whole Kobe. One thousand nine mass is a real test of our safety. Net in the United States of NACHOS programs like food stamps or programs like Medicaid and unemployment. And so on that also have to pick up the slack and are seeing tons of more traffic these days as people are looking to these safety net programs to help them to get through this really unusual time. Alan good you start the company. I started the company about five and a half years ago. How did this happen? Well I grew up in a loving and supportive family that also experienced a financial shock and had trouble putting food on the table. I think most American families we were sort of on the edge financially and then when my dad lost his job when I was about ten we had a few years of just really tough Financial Times. I was fortunate to go to college on a full scholarship on financial need and then spent a few years working in different software companies in Silicon Valley after I graduated from college and one of the things that just really struck me after spending years working in Silicon Valley and these companies. Just how people solve the problems that they understand. And that's by enlarge the reason why so many products that come out of Silicon Valley are solving the problems of twenty to thirty year. Old Men. Yes who live in cities and have gone to College? Are there's a demographic biased to the software that we create due to the problems that tech entrepreneurs

Silicon Valley United States Jimmy Chen Michael Lewis Founder And Ceo Supplemental Nutrition Assista Ovid Old Men Alan
"michael lewis" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on The Book Review

"That he that he so disables the federal government that we all wake up and realize it's importance and there's there starts to be some energy between behind genuine reform place. I mean the pay scale for example. There's a there's a there's a pay scale that's in place. It was put in place in the pay structure in the forties. And it was premised on the idea that everybody in the in the government's a clerical worker in so the pay and the government has not kept up at all with the private sector getting a scientist to move from a corporation into the government even when we really need him to do. It is difficult. The flexibility to hire and fire is a real problem. The average higher takes a hundred and six days the age of the federal government. They're five times more people over the age of sixty than under the age of thirty in the government that's like the reverse of the private sector. I mean certainly Wall Street Goldman Sachs. Probably the opposite. It's the tech. The technology in the government ninety billion dollars spent on technological infrastructure like the computers that run the tax system. Seventy billion of that is spent just keeping up ancient system systems from like the sixties. So there needs to be someone who needs it needs to be a radical but investment in the government right. That's what needs to happen in order to get young smart graduates with computer science degrees to one. Actually go in there. The backlash to trump might be that there might be a new narrative about all this I could. That's the silver lining all right. I WanNa talk a little bit about the mechanics of this book because you approach this in a different way from your previous books which is to say you did part of this on audio before you did it in front and I'm curious if that changed the process at all sort of talking out your book before putting it down on paper in its final form a little bit. I've found so I have read my books before audiobooks. Not In the last few in the liar's poker that kind of thing and I found when I read the book I was. I pulled out a pencil. Even though the book was the book already and I started and I realized some sentences could be better so improved the pros to have to speak in. It also encouraged me to let a couple of characters breathe who I might not have let breathe quite as much. It gave me a license to just tell the story a bit more and I think I think that audio does do that. I think that you you're slightly different in the way you tell a story when you're on a stage talking to an audience than when you're in alone in a room with a pencil. You're you're more attuned to the emotional effects of the stuff on the page. I think so. I think it had subtle effects Nut massive effects. You torture us a little bit on the on the journalism end here by your books. Come and we have no idea what they're going to be about and they land at the last minute or but that's okay but what's next. I don't know I I didn't finish this till two months ago and I do think that every time I published a book I need to take a few months and ask myself. Should I really right another? Because I think people writers who have a market for their books they just start to generate them to generate them. And I don't want to do that. I WanNa feel like each one has its own real mission so I will wait a few months before I even decide and think about it that I'm still a writer. I have one last question on. You dedicated this book in memory of Tom Wolfe Fighter why he met the world to me pulling radical chic off my father's shelf when I was maybe twelve or thirteen and reading even though I had no idea who the black panthers were Leonard Bernstein. I was rolling around on the floor of our house in New Orleans laughing and I remember distinctly having this thought. Someone wrote this book and that had not occurred to me at any book. I've ever read read the hardy boys or legends of the NFL. I'd never died. There was an author. They were just books. Books were books and all of a sudden I had a sense of a writer is voice was so strong and then a writer was giving pleasure and I trace my interest in being a writer to that moment and he was he couldn't have been sweeter to me in the beginning of my career and I became very fond of him and I thought well I wanted to dedicate the next one to him anyway but he always said you know one of the subjects that he avoided politics in Washington. That was boring. He thought that American Democracy. He said at one point in one of his letters that it's like this train is rolling down the tracks and people will scream at it from the right and people will scream at it from the left. Just GonNa keep rolling down the tracks and says you know Richard Nixon steps down as we have a revolution or give me a break. I think. Now that's no longer true to say you prove them a little bit wrong here in this all right. Michael always a pleasure to have you here. Thank you so much thank you. The book is called the fifth risk by Michael Lewis. It's reviewed this week in the perfect. Hi I'm Tara. Parker pope creator of well the healthy living section from the New York Times. If you're looking for simple ways to build healthy habits join me each day for the well minute our new flash briefing skill on Alexa to get started searched from my well minute in your Alexa APP and tap enable then ask Alexa to play your flash briefing to hear your daily challenge if you need detailed instructions go to ny times dot com slash voice. Be well and I'll see you soon to start this journey. Our second guest on this episode is the fantastic time French other of the Dublin. Murder Squad series here. She is talking about her latest novel. A Book I thoroughly enjoyed.

writer Alexa Michael Lewis Goldman Sachs scientist New York Times New Orleans Richard Nixon Tom Wolfe trump Murder Leonard Bernstein Parker pope Dublin panthers NFL Washington
From the Archive: Michael Lewis and Tana French

The Book Review

11:16 min | 1 year ago

From the Archive: Michael Lewis and Tana French

"Michael thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. So you've covered very exciting topics before. Wall Street is exciting. Sports is exciting. The Department of Agriculture is not generally considered exciting. How did you decide to to turn to this? So it wouldn't have been exciting before trump. I think trump electrified all the material. So what happened. Several things at once happened. I just finished a book about Danny. Common name is diversity to Israeli psychologist who Study the way people Miss Miss Value. Risk price risk and one of their insights. Was that if you take a catastrophic risks. I mean it's like a one in a million chance of happening and and make it a one in ten thousand still very remote increase the likelihood one hundred times people don't feel it and I had this sense. When trump was elected in the way he was approaching governing that he was he was doing that across a big portfolio of risks that. I thought that the one way to think of the federal government is a manager of giant portfolio of risks many of them catastrophic and that people weren't feeling it exactly. I was doing on this in about how to write about it when he made Rick Perry the Secretary of Energy of Course Rick. Perry had said that he thought the Department of you should be eliminated when he was on stage in a debate but he couldn't remember even the name of the place and once he collided with it he realised. Oh maybe it shouldn't be eliminated because the departmental has nuclear weapons in inside of it and I thought well maybe this is the this is the way maybe actually kind of want follow it follow ric currency what it means for. Rick Perry to be running this place and then somewhere in all this. I learned that the Obama Administration partly because they're required to by law partly because Obama was a responsible person had essentially Had BEEN AT WORK. For a year to create these briefings for the whoever was gonNA roll into the federal government and run it and there was a there have been thousand thousand people across across the government who had spent the better part of a year creating these briefing books thinking about how to present the government to someone who didn't know anything about it and these briefings were supposed to happen the day after the election. I mean they're gonNa roll and that's what happened. When Obama rolled in to replace Bush and the trump people hadn't shown up at all so then I had a hook but now I do too in the hook was I'm GonNa go get the briefings. Briefings and trump people never bothered to get and kind of learn about this portfolio of risk and try to get a sense of what we should be worried about why that was the start and then you ended up covering not just the Department of Energy but also the Department of Commerce and the Department of Agriculture. You know I had a selection problem that reminded me a bit of the selection problem. I had with the big short and the big short there was a pool of kind of fifteen Wall Street guys who had seen the crisis coming or thought they'd seen it coming and made a fortune betting on the collapse of either Wall Street or the housing market and I wandered around a long time on a casting. Search figure out which ones were the best to tell the story through. Who are the other contenders? There were a lot of them. I mean they were. They were hundreds of them but they were fifteen of them and and all were willing to let me write about him. It was just who could kind of teach the reader the most important things what was the best way to dramatize this. And in this case I had actually fifteen cabinet level positions fifteen departments to choose from and I had a narrow down. I couldn't do the federal government. I wasn't gonNA keep the reader for more than a couple of hundred pages. I knew right away it was going to be three or four and I thought I had some criteria I thought one. It's gotta be something that I suspect. Most readers have no idea what it does and I just. I would just market test this. I'd be at a dinner party and say they might tell me what the Department of Commerce does and nobody had any idea that half the budget went to weather collecting weather data. You know or in the department energy most people didn't like Rick. Perry as opposed to the Treasury Department of the State Department of people have some vague idea. What does it? I wanted to be out of the public eye because I thought among other things I think. The risks are greater when public not watching the trump administration and finally. I thought they started to be very important so the Department of Education. I mean it's nothing's not important in the federal government but some of it's more important than than others so i. I spent time in most of the departments. I mean are talked to people from most departments and eliminated things along the way and then figured these are the three I wanted to do. Having said that I mourn not having written about the State Department and more not having read about the Department of the Interior. I think you could drop a writer into any one of these places and he would come away with a really. There's a wonderful stories to tell I mean. The Department of Education Is One. That's been written about a lot because of that. The high profile of the appointee to a lesser extent repairing sort of when he came in there was a flurry of attention and then kind of died away. So what is Rick Perry doing at the Department of Energy and what the Department of Energy supposed to be doing? It's a really good question what he is doing what. I dipped out of this story. I mean the last time I interviewed someone at the department injuries. Maybe six months ago and what I'm told. Is he set himself up as a kind of cheerleader ceremonial head of with the. Who isn't all that interested in the place? So you seem tweet a lot about it but we never got the briefings presumably. I know more about it than he does. Because I sat down with people had them walk me through the whole department. Maybe by now. He's accumulated some information. But what does it do? It's a vast science project what it is and part of the science project is tending to testing assembling nuclear weapons. That that's a big part of the budget. Another big part of the budget is cleaning up nuclear. Waste their sites in this country. And you wouldn't believe it. It's sort of like green type. Post-apocalyptic PLACES PAN for Washington. The Department of Defense three billion dollars a year trying to clean up the remains of the plutonium factories that that generated the atom bombs for World War. Two you ask the people in the department energy to give you an honest estimate how long it's GonNa take to to clean the place up hundred years one hundred billion dollars. I mean that's not trivial. And and what is at stake is there is a giant plume underground of of nuclear waste. That's slowly drifting towards the Columbia River which is not that far away said up on the Columbia River because they need the water to cool the it was there for a reason but if it leaches into the Columbia River. It's a catastrophe the for the Pacific northwest and it's managed in a very short term way. Things happen there. That are very alarming but does that predate trump or is it always been managed in a short term way although trump was the trigger for my story and trump is by far the most negligent manager of the federal government. We've had my lifetime Fisher probably forever. I never thought of his story. Just about trump. I thought of it. A story about the narrative we have created has poisoned or at Lea- screwed up the relationship between the society and government. That that this whole notion that the government is filled with lazy stupid. Bureaucrats who were kind of dead weight on society is a really dumb story. It's not true story. Department energy actually illustrates this. There is within the Department of Energy and his science project a seventy billion dollar loan portfolio and a few hundred million dollar venture capital fund. That is responsible for the entire. Solar power industry is responsible for Tesla. The first that were given to Tesla it is. It's it's the only place where dollars will be allocated to long term innovation. Industry doesn't do this if you she track back. Where the the innovations that led to the current American economy came from almost always it started with a government some government investment the Internet. The iphone wouldn't wouldn't exist without govern investment. When I think about the government I think of it as this. This exquisitely important exquisitely complicated machine that. We've let rust for decades telling ourselves a story that we need to basically just kick it every now and then it keep it from being too lazy and this guys come along and got sledgehammer. Trump has come along and he's getting this is getting you. He's going to do really mortal damage to it all right. So here's a short term thinking way of looking at this if you have things like nuclear cleanup. That are one hundred year. One hundred billion dollar projects is this potentially four year maybe eight year term of neglect. Kind of benign neglect. Because it's just GonNa it's all moving so slowly anyway or is he actively doing something in these departments. That is making it far worse. We have to worry. I think we have to worry a lot in. That's not me saying there's there are people who were kind of professional watchers of the federal government who are independent reps of the situation and then they're terrified for a few reasons. One is just the people who were in the federal government in the first year. The trump administration twenty percent of the top six thousand managers in the government civil service senior executive types left Biz. A hollowing out of the talent. And there's real talent there. These are not trivial. People people who were there in a lot of people federal government could be being paid a lot more money in the private sector and they've been drawn to some mission whether it's school nutrition or tending the nuclear arsenal or the weather service. They're there because they love the mission in because they know how important job is and we've mistreated those people for a long time. But now the level of mistreatment got very high and the dispersion of those people is a problem but then there are lots of things that are not so long term. I mean the trump budgets zeroed out both the loan program and the investments in the Department Energy Department of Agriculture Department. Agriculture has a three billion dollar research. Budget typically always overseen by a scientist and agricultural scientist. And if you talk to the woman who previously occupied the place Kathy Woteki a re a one a distinguished agricultural scientists who've been in government. Thirty years really knows what she's doing. She's all of his budget right. Now is one way or another being directed to research tied to climate. Change that we're to feed ourselves we're GONNA have to think differently. Be where how and where we grey sheep and cows and grow wheat and the climate change and have a big effect on the food supply trump appointed to this job right wing talk show radio host from Iowa who happened to support who knew who has no science background whatsoever named Sam Clovis now he has recently been removed from consideration. And there's nobody on his anybody in the job right now but the neglect of investment right now in the government will have consequences down the road. The bright spot is make it so bad and this is the point of the book. It make it so bad that people may wake up and we'll have a different narrative about our government.

Federal Government Donald Trump Rick Perry Department Of Energy Department Energy Department O Department Of Agriculture Department Of Education Department Of Commerce State Department State Department Of People Department Of Defense Columbia River Barack Obama Treasury Department Danny Michael Obama Administration Department Of The Interior
Princess Diana's Niece Kitty Spencer Converting to Judaism for Soon-To-Be Husband Michael Lewis

Unorthodox

03:08 min | 1 year ago

Princess Diana's Niece Kitty Spencer Converting to Judaism for Soon-To-Be Husband Michael Lewis

"Lady Kitty Spencer. Princess Diana's niece who apparently according to various British reports is going to convert to Judaism She's marrying a Jewish fashion tycoon. More than twice her age. According to The Times of London Lady Kitty Spencer. A twenty nine year old model. GotTa give to Michael Lewis. Sixty one year old chair of the Foscarini group in December. Not The author. Michael Lewis not who leaving Tabitha Soren former MTV news for percents. Don't even say that pooh-pooh Kim Hoorah for very specific subset of royal watchers. Who are Jewish like. This is like catnip. This is the perfect thing. It's sort of like how Meghan Markle's I wish there was a whole thing of like is Meghan markle Jewish that was like a few days of of speculation on the Jewish Internet. Yeah I mean. I don't really care about this. I'll be perfectly honest. I just think that it's I liked marvel at the fact that like this is the stuff of headlines. We don't really run this kind of blog at tablet anymore but like there is a world in which this generates headlines for like at least three days. I'm well on the record over the years I've written about his royal watching especially for an American proud citizen of a country that fought a war to get rid of royals and to not have to bow and shit before them. Royal watching an American is sad to begin with Amen. If you'RE GONNA watch if you're going to be obsessed with them out of some sort of weird deep Anglo Philip Pathology. We want them to be sort of like dysfunctional church of England like like drunk in dysfunctional wasps. Like I don't want I want there to be no Jews in the royal family. I want them to be this like fabulous train wreck of what happens. Through centuries of high church Y Anglo Inbreeding you see kids. That's why we fought a war right the idea that we want them to kind of that. We Ju- sort of want to sneak in through marriage through conversion on no way this like we will be off running. Hollywood and the media and electing Bernie Sanders President or having jared Kushner baked peas or whatever we do in America. Were Jews. Get to do it up. We that. That's our bag. The royal bag is being like stiff. Upper lipped GIN tonic addled extramarital affair having Weirdos and I want nothing to do with that exact these I think might be your most controversial take yet or the one that's GonNa get you into the most trouble and I look forward to it but I don't think I wholeheartedly. I hate you. Fine Century MELTSA Leila Mark. But I don't think people wash because they like want to be I mean there's a fascination we watch and we watch from a distance from an ocean away Understanding that this is not our culture but just finding a fascination in the pomp and the pageantry and. I don't think there's anything wrong with that. I think you're inferring. A lot of weird things onto people who just like to watch a pretty wedding fine but then it's not a Jewish wedding that that's not the wedding we want to watch. We've seen enough Jewish weddings. We've been to Leonard's of great neck I disagree they do a great Bat Mitzvah. The thing about the royal family over the years is that like it's basically become a reality show right like all day thing about William and Kate's wedding. We can watch it. There's no reason why we can't see ourselves in that world because they're they become so much a part of our world so I think it's I'm all for it. I love my Jewish relatives too much. I love the Big Jewish family too much to wish any of us into that family but all the sparkling thing into the most useless family on the face of this plan south. No

Meghan Markle Michael Lewis Kitty Spencer Princess Diana Anglo Philip Pathology Tabitha Soren MTV England Jared Kushner Bernie Sanders Leila Mark JU The Times Hollywood Leonard William President Trump America Kate
"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

06:41 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

"It's too dangerous because he sometimes here you heard it around Brexit in this country that have the ignorant people had voted for the thing. They didn't understand no one understood. That's true but it's much more dangerous when the president in the face of ignorance behaves. Let your does that seems to be well put. There is a dangerous narrative at work here. which is the electorate is divided Eddie between ignorance and knowledge? And I don't think that's the I agree. I just want to pick you up on something you said earlier in that respect as well as you said we all needed you needed to civic education. I send if you like that in this country I feel like we've been put through a civic education over the last three and a half years because of what happened after the referendum. I don't think in this country understood our own constitution listen. I don't think we understood what was happening to. Countries politics understood many of the social economic problems in this country in that sense. I think that what's happened is being a wakeup call to his was all of facing ignorance so I think this is the silver lining of trump is that I think that versions of that has happened to a lot of Americans the awareness that I need to start paying a different kind of attention to this process so I think that's true and I think that you know this political moment is a byproduct of of a very long period of not exactly peace and prosperity there. Obviously you know America's been at war in its own way forever and not everybody what he is experiencing prosperity. But there's been an absence for a longtime of an existential threat of the sort that like the Cold War provided World War Two or the depression or the pandemics that happened in the early twentieth century. So there's this less less of a need people feel less. They can afford Ford to ignore. This thing is a nineteen centers off. I think into this the luxury of stepping back from things that should we needed to be much more engaged with out of taking it back a little further eighties but yes. I think that's right. It's a luxury to be able to afford. Donald Trump in the White House and I think a lot a lot of people who will pay the biggest price for him being there people who voted for him and they'll realize at some point that this was it was one of the really striking things about the trump support was that consistently across the country. The more rural the person the more likely they where to vote for trump the fewer people in their town the more likely they were for trump. And it's also true. The fewer people who are in your town the more utterly dependent that you are on the United States government for the firehouse that schools the hospital and that people didn't make that connection that they're handing over essentially initially the instrument for their salvation to someone who doesn't care about it is breathtaking. It's it's beyond like not voting for your economic interest. It's like you're voting waiting for someone who potentially could just crater your entire existence. isn't an also then a breathtaking of what came before that it got to this point. Yes it is is that I think that's absolutely true when I was going to ask you about the connections between this and all the other things you write about from sport to behavioral economics exit everything else. I will not do one on finance. We'll street at a question about ignorance. So the people who ran those banks that nearly took us all down did not know what was going on inside inside those banks. Clearly the chief executives did not understand what they were selling and the consequences were nearly work catastrophic for some of them and Nettie catastrophic for all of us here. We are ten plus years on so they had the ultimate Waco. We haven't had that yet in politics and God knows what it would look like if we did. I mean it doesn't bad thinking go away but other people who run those banks. I mean if we took that as the modal did they learn the lesson. Do they now know what they're are doing when they saw the consequences of their ignorance or they back in the place where we started this conversation. which is ignorance is actually strategically useful? So if you want to be in this business so knows a big question. I guess my crew that the the society has forced them to behave differently than they behaved leading into the crisis so for example they all are better capitalized than they were. All the American banks much much better capitalized than they were. Before they got a cushion that they didn't have. I think it's also true to say that the CEO's are all if I had to bet warier carrier of their employees more aware of their ignorance. People might be doing things inside the bank so that they know that if if they didn't know before it's hard to believe they didn't know before they must know that these institutions are too complicated to manage j. p.. Morgan is smart as Jamie diamond is and his as well. Run as it is compared to all the other ones. He can't know everything that's going on inside JP more. It's just too complicated. These things are many times the size and many times the complexity of the Solomon Brothers that I once worked in and there was no way the head of Solomon Brothers knew what everybody was doing it I could. I could prove it to you because I was doing stuff that that was kind of crazy that he didn't know about and I was a million so I think what they counted on going crisis was everybody had the same incentives everybody had the same interests inside the bank and everybody was kind of smart and selfish so it would result in US making money. They didn't realize that they had people who could make lots of money doing things that would in the end torpedo the bank. So I I bet they have reacted to that. I don't I don't know for a fact that I I bet that they've reacted in any case. We all know the same crisis never happens twice. Whatever happens next? It's look like the financial crisis and it looks like something else and if I had to predict what's going to happen in the financial sector is it's it's not going to start in the financial sector will start with the government. I mean Donald Trump does something that calls into question say the trustworthiness of the US government to repay its debts. That's kind of thing that could trigger the next financial crisis and the other things command like Donald Trump would never end up running a bank because he they wouldn't let him anywhere near it. It'd be when you back when he's real estate developer that he was dishonest and he is an idiot by the time he was done with the New York. Vecsey wouldn't lent him so they have very low opinion of him but he's president but he's president we will tweet the League's not just a Michael's the most recent book the fifth risk but will the other ones too. They are all worth reading studying this weekend. We're going to be putting out. The first in our new series of episodes about the history of America can teach us about American politics now. We're starting with impeachment impeachment of Andrew Johnson and the impeachment of Donald Trump. My Name is David Cement and weeping token policies.

Donald Trump US president America Brexit Andrew Johnson Ford Solomon Brothers Nettie New York David Cement Waco CEO League White House
"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Certain direction that will benefit benefit your company you come from asset you own so a good example of this. Maybe the purest case study the National Weather Service Service. It's how Americans get their weather but Americans don't know that's how they get their weather The National Weather Service gathers all the data required for the weather models and actually generates its own very good predictions but we also have this private whether enterprise companies that sell market weather forecast the weather channel accuweather and these places depend on the National Weather Service for their data in order to make their weather predictions. Americans Americans just see the private companies mainly because the National Weather Service is not allowed to market itself. Even though it's hovering there in the background and so every every now and then you'll have some numb nut congressman. Say why do we need the National Weather Service. We can get our weather from accuweather but but they don't realize that accuweather is getting its weather from the government that these the people supposed to be managing so trump into the job. Running the National Weather Service allows the fellow who is the CEO CEO and owner of this family business accuweather who has been for decades trying to stymie whatever relationship. The National Weather Service has with the American people and make it difficult for the American people to get the National Weather Service forecast so they have to pay for accuweather and you go into the national. The Weather Service they would tell you. This is the single worst person to put in charge of us because he's hostile to our the service we provide the American people day. The Guy Actually tried to get a bill passed would forbid the National Weather Service for communicating with the American people. Now think about what that means. It means you're gonNA privatize ties weather. Forecasting or at least the delivery of the weather forecast the National Weather Service which still provides data to accuweather. It means that if you're living living in Oklahoma and you're worried about tornadoes got help you. If you can't pay for for the very best forecast it creates dystopia. We're rich people can get out of the way bad weather and poor people get killed by it so this man is a really good example. One version of the trump administration one part of it which is like I have a particular. Take Your Business interest. And I'M GONNA go and figure figure out how to turn this enterprise towards it but I'm not sure that's the majority of the. It isn't the similar sorts.

National Weather Service Servi accuweather CEO CEO congressman Oklahoma
Gut bacteria prefer to chow down on certain dietary fibers

Generation Bold

07:45 min | 1 year ago

Gut bacteria prefer to chow down on certain dietary fibers

"Now speaking of the field of aging we have a leading scientists in research in the field of aging are with us right now a doctor Michael Lewis garden and I just want to give you his website before we do anything it's Michael well the normal way am I CH a E. L. L. U. S. T. G. A. R. T. E. N. dot com and we will also have that on our website of course and he is a scientist a Tufts University and the human nutrition research center on aging so his research when it comes to an interest in is specifically about aging and that he sees a problem the problem is our guts he's written a book about it I'll tell you all about that in a minute but I want to go to the doctor right now. why are you concentrating on microbes in the god of microbial health and what does that have to do actually with the science of better H. R. two so to jump into that I should say that about five years ago I didn't care about microbes bacteria viruses on that I didn't care about any of it he didn't walk in on my radar at all I started off studying blood predictors of muscle mass and function in older adults and when I was doing that I published several papers that identified bacterial metabolites in the blood that were either positively or negatively associated with muscle mass and function in older adults so that led me into the idea of well maybe the cop microphonics playing some role on stark Pina and based on that I was able to get some studies funded and as you saw at the conference I publish that recently published some of that data on the role of got microbiome on muscle strength but there are a bit in emerging field right now the will of the gut microbiome on the government's lack of muscle mass and functions where three papers and mine support paper so far this year have identified microbes for real for the gut microbiome on muscle mass and functions so it's an emerging a rapidly emerging feel dope now in terms of nutrition that potentially can optimize that the most obvious place to start would be with dietary fiber in the reason for that is because our humans don't have the enzymes to digest dietary fiber dietary fiber passes into your large intestine and then bacteria in your large intestine convert those those fibers into short chain fatty acids so basically very short little fat but you don't you don't normally get from diet with the exception of something they like water which may have small amounts of the short chain fatty acid butyric but very low amount compared to what you could convert from five or so then once these bacteria make short chain fatty acids does ready I go from the inside of the intestine into the intestinal cells which can aren't test motels the mitochondria particular use those short chain fatty acids to make energy that energy is used to improve got barrier function which is important for keeping stuff that was in the inside of the intestine from going into the blood and that's important because during aging that that. got here actually decreases so if you have a low fiber diet your body will be able to have optimal intestinal barrier function more stuff that inside the intestines will leak into the blood potentially activating information information of all kinds of nasty things sore muscles are green all the issues in our blood so again port place to start in terms of optimizing our health and longevity is optimized dietary fiber intake that's the core theme of the book and I should also I didn't start off with that idea and that approach the idea and the that is default through the literature I basically changed my diet after going down this road do you have a super high fiber diet rabbit close to a hundred grand five a day triple the RDA so that I can optimal got very function and you know improve systemic functions. so you thought your listening now and you know that there's a tremendous amount of information both technical and practical and I won just give you the website again that that is the doctor or scientist website Michael lust Garten L. U. S. T. G. A. R. T. E. N. dot com and it again this is not coming from the world of selling supplements this is coming from the world of science research both in the laboratory and personally so now let's get practical for a second I every morning I take my flax seeds and I put them in my yogurt alright I take my chia seeds and I put it in my smoothie but I don't think I have anything compared to the amount that you're putting into your body and is there anything country indicating them and these are the ways that you're suggesting people get the dietary fiber. so flak he can be a great way to get increase your fiber but the foundation of my diet is a few festivals not in terms of fiber content per calorie nothing beats the fiber density vegetables and a happy post on this on my blog by compared the fiber and not just five or ten nutrient density of vegetables compared to all green calorie for K. per calorie per calorie nothing beats vegetables opt for fiber and nutrient density so when I eat vegetables I'm not eating a few for the broccoli and meeting a pound or more actually sorry. Graham a more actually yesterday I had eleven hundred grams broccoli morning in addition to other stocks so a meeting if you divide the best schools to get this fiber goal but I should mention I'm not vegan I'm not a vegetarian I do eat the meat ID with some dairy I can be to make but at the end of the day for me it's more than just a simple dietary ideology way say go high fiber for me back to work and I know that because like I said I track my diet in a truck my circulating biomarkers it'll lower fiber diet was able to optimize my biological age then I I promote that too but for me what works best for me is a very high fiber diet in terms of optimizing got help and biologically. so let me just tell everybody that. when tell and Mikael when Dr Michael it's gotten speaks people listen so are also remember these scientists and part of his experiment is himself which is what makes him so unique in the scientific world and I will tell you that his overall and I'm reading his book and you should always book microbial burden a major cause of aging and age related disease easy to get on Amazon I put on my kindle it was a pleasure to read on the plane all the other day and I learned a lot but the fact is that his over arching words are no that I self sees very much like the oracle at Delphi no they sell and he knows himself because he keeps testing and so this doesn't mean you go out and and you do this but I tell you what I did do doctor I went out and I would have had to carry. you said so that was the only way yeah. we're gonna come back in a couple of seconds and I'm I do want to talk about that how we can as a practical matter could some of what you have learned and you learn things that are very impressive and work for most people to different degrees out into our diets properly and that were also does look a little bit about the idea of nutrition as we get older because they're even changing that concept when it comes to surgery used to tell you not to eat that's changing we'll be back in just to get you

Amazon Graham Dr Michael Mikael Delphi Eleven Hundred Grams Five Years
Andrew Luck's retirement shocks football fans

Hugh Hewitt

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Andrew Luck's retirement shocks football fans

"And we were shocked by the stunning retirement the age twenty nine Andrew luck the Indianapolis Colts quarterback one estimate I read it a half billion dollars in four gone earnings your reaction might going to made it your top ten but your personal reaction to this young man saying I've got enough I'm not going to risk my health my personal reaction is that this present a massive issue to the NFL how dangerous indeed bill attending the sport can be hold it takes on top talents agenda and I were talking about this last night you reminded me of one of the great Green Bay Packers Brett Farr battled addiction to pain killers the talk about taking fifteen by the bike it in at one time taking a month's worth of pain killers in two days and so I think that the lock during the war you said that the joy had gone out of football the you're stuck in a cycle of the injury rehab injury we have the New York times on football a comma convulsant writing players of locks generation now make a loop whose calculation between help Christmas money and that's going to put them in conflict with team owners who always want more football not what and if you did a little more digging tomorrow you'll see that Andrew luck got crushed his first two seasons with the colts because they had a terrible offensive line to go back to Michael Lewis is great but the blind side and I'm watching Baker Mayfield were on the cover of the brands on the covers SI Odell Beckham junior Jarvis Landry and behind the Baker may feel and Nick Chubb we're gonna have a great year we had a very good offensive line after job attorney I was at left guard and I'm beginning to think that reading that Andrew luck story the brown should start trading draft choices to get in a line to protect their asset which is Baker may feel he's the whole club these everything and the reason Andrew luck is quitting with half the career of Roethlisberger and and one two fifths of the career of Tom Brady is because you don't have an old line it be it Michael Lewis is frightening still right this is a brown story is proof that all politics is local the the the ill the triumph of hope over experience has led me to have season I have my four on the fifteen people want them and I'm so excited about Mike Allen always a pleasure good Monday

Attorney Jarvis Landry Green Bay Packers Indianapolis Colts Andrew Mike Allen Tom Brady Roethlisberger NFL Nick Chubb Baker Baker Mayfield Michael Lewis Colts New York Times Football Brett Farr Billion Dollars One Two Fifths
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Well. One of the most important things we do for our health. Every day is brushing, our teeth, and yet most of us, don't do it properly. Quip is a better electric toothbrush created by Dennis and designers quip was designed to make brushing your teeth more simple, affordable, and even enjoyable people when they brush their teeth brushed too hard. And some of those electric toothbrushes they're just a little too abrasive. Quip is gentle enough on your sensitive gums, and leaves it tingling leaves you feeling like I could brush my teeth forever. You're probably thinking this toothbrush. There's gotta be a catch probably some clunky charger that I need to plug it keep it going know doesn't require clunky charger it runs for three months on a single charge. Quip is one of the first electric toothbrushes accepted by the American dental association. You know, I. But it's also backed by twenty thousand dental fashions clip starts just twenty five dollars. And if you go to get dot com slash rules right now you get your first refill pack for free with a quip electric toothbrush. That's your first refill pack four free at GT Hugh, you, IP dot com slash rules. We're back with more of me, and Malcolm, while in conversation at the ninety second street, y his new company pushed industries is the production house behind against the rules, and I couldn't help tease him a little bit about something. The crew, there told me. It's funny that the producers when they came to be in the first place they said, please, please don't be like, Malcolm, and, and try to tape your own stuff the first season almost of Malcolm's podcast almost killed this nonsense. You know what they are at another out there. They're purists right there. They come from NPR, which is like the cathedral on the of sound gothic cathedral where and they sit and they study their scripture. And then they go into the cloisters and they take about silence. Then they listen to pure audio evenings like that's not the real world. I'm living in. I'm not I'm not in the monastery. I'm so I don't listen to them. They don't listen to you. Wait. So we've questions we have questions we actually quite a lot of time. I had some other. Oh, I wanna to talk to you about. Falling in love. It's we talked a little bit. I want you to talk more about this because you are in your fiction, and you're not fixing your books you fall in love with characters, and then you were saying that in the pike is doing a different kind of storytelling. What you're having many voices. Does that impair your are we going to get the classic Michael Lewis character who we fall in love along with you? And if we're not does that sort of a you a little bit sad about not having people to fall in love. You have people who fall in love with is just they're up there. They're in a single episode. I just don't live with them for the whole series. I fell in love with Alex Cogan Alex Cogan is he was the, the academic responsible for the work that supposedly allowed Cambridge, and Linda to get Donald Trump elected. And in fact, it's all bullshit. The his work was useless. The real story there is that it's amazing. The Cambridge Analytica persuaded anybody. They knew anything that was useful hustle. It's a hustle. It's a hustle, right? Yes. And a lot of you wanted to believe that, that's why Donald Trump was elected because they needed a reason why don't we what episode is this is this is actually part of episode three. So what's the what's the larger store largest stories of the Klein of, of these culture? Wrestling is, so it's language rafts. It's buds Mun. It's referees in the newsroom. So how this story ever got to the front page of the New York Times is, is part of it, but he's built up as the main character of the thing and in a very similar way to a character that. You would fall in love with in a magazine piece. So this is totally. In some ways, it's, it's it's easier to sell the characters because you can hear them. You can see why you should follow them up with them. You've can Feinberg don't you showing up, how many people here you can't really see. I wonder how many of you here, know Ken Feinberg is. Ken Feinberg should be a household name can find Berg was. An ordinary lawyer when he was brought in, in the early eighties to try to resolve the dispute between Vietnam veterans and the chemical companies that made Agent Orange in Vietnam, veterans without a whole lot of evidence. I have had brought suit saying that, that this, this chemical that was sprayed across the jungles of yet, nam was responsible for all these health problems. They're having and the case had lingered in the courts for seven or eight years and judges had despaired resolving it. And a judge asked this young lower can find Berg to see if you negotiate outside of the court. A solution resolution to the between the companies and in six weeks, he had the thing done news on the front page of every newspaper in the country and his career, then just went he all of a sudden he became America's referee. So he's, he's brought into Judah these disputes and. The question was, like two questions. Like, what are we going to do, when he dies because he seems to be brought Emmys like these, like the Forrest Gump of a of American tragedy and second? It's like what, what, what is it about like, and I don't want to give away the story, but he there were. He had a theory of himself and his wife had a different theory of him. And the wife was right. But, but, but you but his theory of his wife's theory, you can hear kind of proven, just in the sound of his voice voice is fan. It's unbelievable. So, so. It's so good that I think it's all the voice. So it's so it's so could be the it's, it's the righteousness in the voice. It's the. It's a Boston accent, like you cannot believe, and so the episode opens with the passage. In the bible. Solomon resolving this Butte between the two women each of whom is claiming the baby is hers, and he's solemn about to cut the baby into and fibers voices. So we're gonna have an actor read that we the five voice was. So we just had Feinberg read the bible. And it was it felt like God was reading the bible. So you the. So this for this form, it's just nice to have a different way to tell a story and a different way to get to an audience. I don't I don't regard this as a substitute for writing books, but it's different. And it's interesting when you write it no matter how come recessional you're writing style is it is not conversational that how people talk is so different from how any writer writes that you have to learn how to write your own dialogue that. And so kind of interesting anyway, thanks for doing this, Michael. Thank you. Pleasure being with you. Again.

Ken Feinberg Donald Trump Malcolm Michael Lewis American dental association Vietnam Dennis Alex Cogan Berg Wrestling New York Times NPR Cambridge Analytica Hugh writer Solomon Boston Forrest Gump America nam
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

09:19 min | 1 year ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"There's a dark side to the American dream, and it's not pretty from seat thirteen originals the team behind the number one podcast. Root of evil is a new series called gangster, capitalism, takes an unflinching look, white collar corruption season, one examines, the brazen college mission scandal, also known as operation varsity blues, exposing Hollywood, celebrities, CEO's, and college mission scam artists in schemes involving bribery, money laundering fraud, award, winning documentarian, Andrew Jenks is covering the scandal as it unfolds with each episode. He takes his deeper inside the investigation and into the inner workings of these tricks on the rich trying to cheat the academic system. He tries to answer the questions. How did this all happen, and where do we go from episode? One of gangster capitalism is available now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Hi there. It's Michael Lewis here. You probably know that against the rules is the first podcast that I've ever done, and it probably shows, so I appreciate all of you for sticking with it the first season's over. But we want to give you something a little extra as a token of appreciation. The writer, Malcolm Gladwin I had a conversation back in April of two thousand nineteen when against the rules had just launched. We met in front of a live audience at the ninety second street, y which is this great center of culture in Jewish life on the upper east side of Manhattan. We had a big crowd, and the whole thing was a lot of fun to do. And we talked about how I got interested in not just podcasting but the quandary of referees in American life. We want to give you a little peek behind the curtain of producing the show and also a glimpse of the next season of Malcolm's podcast, revisionist history. Thank you. Malcolm for doing this. Thank you, my policies to the audience. I'm the reason this is light is on subway. Yep. That feeling no further explanations needed. Michael, thank every time you do some new project you. Trump me out to interview you and this is like my fourth time doings, but I've done it as much for us. You've done for me and I'm going to have to do it in September. Apparently you might have to do. You might have to do that September. Last time we were on the stage. I feel I'm mortally offended you and I got all kinds of angry not angry, but kind of several friends of mine who might actually be here tonight, semi me, you know, saying, chiding me from my I didn't let it. I pursued particular lines of uncomfortable inquiry with too much vigor. So I'm gonna very not. I'm going to be nice to see me. Nasty, Malcolm, put aside and just going to get nice, Malcolm. That's talk about just for the record. I don't remember any of that. That is I really don't remember any of that is your arms, a pleasure to speak with. That is a great time genius. I do think have an ability to sell the most. Unbelievable shit. And that you did it. You did it with me the last time, and I don't wanna see just I was fended in any way. But Jesus vice Malcolm. What do you think you're doing? No, no, you're, you're this just proving to the world. What a what a fantastic wasp, you are. And by the way, you're probably the only wasp is room. Your ability to kind of like Nazi and dismissed explain away conflict is quite extraordinary. Let's get spent much of my life is the only wasp in the room back your on your tombstone toy. He lost every room. I wrote this piece for the new Republic called toy and it was about being the toy about being the one go I in every Jewish institution. It made everybody feel comfortable. Nobody cared what I thought about Israel. I could I could work on Passover. They played that role. All right. So you wanna talk about. Well, this wonderful podcast if yours. And I wanted to start with obvious questions that you're going to get it every time you do any kind of media, they're gonna ask you this question. So I thought I'd start with. This transition from writer to podcast her. How was it what you persuaded me? This was a lot easier than it was. You really did which was a lot. It was a total lie. So the short answer is it was a lot harder than I imagined it to be a lot more fun than I imagined it to be. And it was different. And it was the I came with conclusion that some stories are better told in this medium than in a book for him for me, anyway, you have this great gift of I've said this many times, you have this great gift of taking ideas and giving them the quality of actions that you don't actually even need a character. All you need is your ideas to play with on the page and the people become almost incidental and a couple gone. I I'm not sure I meant it. No. But, but it's it it's you create the feeling of narrative even without conventional ingredients of an era. I can't do that. When I write, what is essentially SAS material it reads like an essay if I don't have a main character if I don't have come drama that I'm playing out and this, this idea was naturally kind of. It was a series of seventy pieces around a theme. And as a book, I don't think it would have cohered. But so one of the cool things, I found was the voice pulls your voice is able to pull an audience through a story, even if there's not exactly a story, even if it's even it's not as materials, not as unified as you would like it to be. It was on the page. I found it's, it's just it's interesting them in the all said, you can hear the characters voices, you know, when you put something in quotation marks, no matter what you do around making that getting that sound off the pay. You can't completely reproduce it. And we have characters who just come to life, their voices just this bring you up to do any work at all. As that was interesting to me. You saying, but are back over you to dwell a little bit on that idea that there are certain ideas, certain stories, you, you can only tell this way podcast, what did you maybe should I just I explain with podcast is because it's just got him out yesterday. The first episode. So it's called against the rules, and it's about referees in American life. And it it's general argument is that the human referee is on the run or under assault, wherever you wherever you turn except in the cases where the rest been bought by one side. And then he might be very comfortably in Scotland in a rig system. But the, the there wasn't from me, there wasn't one story, I wanted to tell their whole bunch of stories. I wanted to tell and they would felt in, in a book, like either, like a separate story or a digression along digression. I think. And I, I wanted to play with the argument and I wanted to play with the subject matter. But I, I didn't have one person or I didn't normally what I have is either either. I've, I've, I've main character who can teach the audience and I you know, I had seven or eight characters here, and that would have been been hard to structure as a conventional narrative. So it was interesting to be able to do this. The other big difference is book, writing is really an individual sport. I mean it is just it's just you. And the this is definitely I don't know how you found it. But for me was completely a team sport. It was, and it was fabulous. I mean, the editor that people who Nick retell who made the music. The producers are all intimately involved to extent that in a couple of cases, the producer went and did a couple of the interviews. And that was having to having both make work with other people was healthy for me, but also having to because I often have to do it. But having to satisfy them in the course of that was interesting normally, I'm dissatisfying me. And they were hard to satisfy, they hard to please. And that was it was interesting to have that friction in my life. Did you feel like pleasing them entailed compromises, though, entailed learning with the hell I was doing? I mean, really they were right. And I was wrong. Well, those kinds of things we wrong about.

Malcolm Gladwin Michael Lewis writer apple Hollywood Andrew Jenks Manhattan bribery Israel producer fraud CEO Jesus editor assault Nick Scotland
Aleksandr Kogan: The link between Cambridge Analytica and Facebook

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

06:39 min | 2 years ago

Aleksandr Kogan: The link between Cambridge Analytica and Facebook

"I wanna start this episode by telling you just the very beginning of a story. I recently heard about a guy named Alex Cogan born in nineteen eighty six into a Jewish family in the Soviet Union. After the collapse in nineteen ninety one. The government loses control and Jews or even less safe than before Alex's dad's starts getting death threats. So he up and moves his entire family four generations of Cogan 's to New York City. In nineteen Ninety-four, Alex enters first grade in Brooklyn public school, he's conspicuous way taller than the other kids. He speaks no English. He's also got a talent for math and science. Once his teachers can understand him. They think he has the makings of gifted physicist. Life's not hard for him. But as he grows up he begins to see that. It isn't always easy for everybody else. Six months after they arrived in the United States. His great grandmother had jumped from their apartment window to her death. His parents the loves of each other's lives. Split up Alex cries every night until they get back together. He enters high school in one of his close friends attempt suicide another becomes clinically depressed. Alex begins to read psychology. He's a math and science kid, but he's getting more and more curious about human nature. And the first time I met him. And I really remember very distinctly because he almost always wore these giant basketball shorts. No matter what the weather is terribly dressed like a lot of Berkeley undergrads, and you know, basketball shoes that's decker Kellner the psychologist at the university of California. Berkeley who runs something called the greater good science center, where they study human emotion. We heard from him in episode one. Alex Cogan was a shambolic six foot four inch freshman back in two thousand and five when he knocked on daggers office door instead he'd like for decker to teach him. Emotions fascinated him. It come to cal- to study physics. But he'd been thinking about love about the distinction between loving and being loved. He wanted to study it the way it study a quark and now came in. He said, you know, I have seven kinds of love that I'm gonna put people into like. Wow, that's interesting. And there are twelve variations of I forgot what the other factor was that are set of conditions that he wanted create and there were eighty four different conditions in his study. So he's gonna study seven different kinds of love. And he's going gonna stay all these different variables that would would maybe predict right? The force of the love power of the low. Exactly. So he's about to make love more complicated than it's ever been. So sounds like right. He was going to confound our understanding of love decker talks Alex out of that idea. But this kid is so smart and original and full of energy. So decker takes him in. And it isn't long before Alex's finding things to do that. No one else is doing for instance, the thing that he does after they discover a gene it's associated with human kindness, and Alex did this cool paper where he showed if you present videotapes of people who have that, gene. Or this variant of gene that makes them kind. And I am an observer. And I see one of those people for twenty seconds on video. I trust them. Right. I'm like this guy. I go to battle with this guy ride. I trust this guy by the time Alex graduates from cal- he's established himself as the most promising student in the entire psychology department, and the most unusual just this big sweet natured guy with a serious talent for math and statistics and desire to study huge questions like what is love when he left and he so unconventional, Michael. He coulda gone to any graduate program in the country, and he chooses the university of Hong. On what? Because he met this woman or got engaged fell in love. Yeah. Fell in love but decker and Alex stay in touch. They collaborate on a few papers. They're both interested in big questions about human nature at the same time. Social media has started to create a new way to study those questions. In late two thousand twelve Facebook invites decker to visit and asks him to create a bunch of new emojis ones that better convey actual emotions when Dacca sees would Facebook knows about its users. He's blown away. This could be the greatest data source it will ever exist. And it would help us answer questions from the scientific perspective. Like, how does disease spread in some neighborhoods, but not others what predicts heart attacks where does hate crime, whereas it likely to happen, right? That was all tractable the data. The had meanwhile, Alex had moved to England to teach a Cambridge University. He was still researching the same stuff the positive emotions, and he too was saying possibilities in the new social media data, and I was at Facebook doing my consulting work. And I saw there. What are you doing here? And he's everywhere, you know, like, I'm working on this other project, and he told me about it. Alex Cogan told decker that he wanted to use Facebook to study things like love and happiness, for example. You might be able to take a fairly small sample of data say the likes of ten thousand Facebook users to make discoveries about those emotions in entire countries. The math was complicated enough the decker himself didn't fully understand it. He then forgot all about it until one day a year or so later when Alex Cogan called him up. He calls me after Trump's elected. And he says, I think I've done something that was part of this election as like, okay? Well, let's stock. What is it? And he said I created this mechanism that was purchased and used in the Trump campaign. Here's word of the actually it had some effect or that he'd be perceived heads affect I don't think he made that distinction. I just think he thought out now Alex Cogan sense that he might have a problem. He just had no idea how big it was going to be.

Alex Cogan Decker Kellner Facebook Soviet Union New York City Basketball United States Physicist Brooklyn Public School Berkeley Donald Trump CAL University Of California University Of Hong Cambridge University Michael Dacca England Twenty Seconds
Who should take the hit when identity theft occurs?

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

07:05 min | 2 years ago

Who should take the hit when identity theft occurs?

"I live in Berkeley, California. It's a peaceful place for an American city in twenty years. I've never so much notice the police station never occurred to me that I even needed to know where it was. Yes. Zoe. But now here I am inside the place surrounded by cinder block walls, in pictures of legendary police officers in across the table from me, there's a living legend officer Joe do. So I'm going to tell you what happened to me. Okay. And why I'm here so beginning last year, we started to get calls at eight in the morning from CitiGroup big back. And I was getting the kids out the door for breakfast in the phone ring. And this happened ten times twenty times three times fifty times. I mean, it was just like harassment, and they said, I the money, and it was absolutely bizarre. Because I didn't never any any business with CitiGroup. I mean, no credit cards. No, nothing. But he said we had like fifteen thousand dollars of outstanding loans. I just wanna say that again. So you hear it city group said I owed them fifteen thousand dollars. And so Finally, I said look quit calling us just driving crazy in the mornings, and whatever they stop. Calling. Okay. The next thing. That happens is I got a note from American Express saying my credit score has collapsed because I have Wellstone a debt to city group. So American Express call me and says we're gonna put a limit on your account because you're like, oh, scores declined. And I call them and said, well, how's this happen at a, you know, this a credit aggregate name experien- has sent a report saying you've got some bad debts. I didn't even know what experience was or what it did as it turns out there a bunch of companies that make their money by gathering up, whatever anyone Bank or credit card company has to say about you. And then spreading the word to the others. So that if one Bank thinks you owe them money all the others. See you as a problem? Experience one of those companies and odd become one of those problems someone claiming to be me opening a credit card account with CitiBank in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. And he gave as his address street in Miami. But it's a street that doesn't even exist credit. Limit was fifteen thousand somehow he managed to borrow sixteen thousand four hundred and six dollars and repaint. None of it fifteen thousand four hundred and six dollars when I called experience to say how come you have this on my credit report? They said, well, we can't do anything about it to city group said you of this money. So I called city and city roof said they didn't know who I was and at no record of my social security number. We was just a mass. I was I was in stuck in on hold for hours. And they gave me no joy. I mean, no joy at all. Finally, experien- tells me that I need to file an identity theft comp-. Plate with the FTC the Federal Trade Commission, which I did. And they said I had to go come to the police station and file report for them to take seriously my claim that my entity had been stolen. So to summarize myself, just they're a big New York Bank hands fifteen sixteen grand to someone pretending to be me. Michael Lewis, then some credit agency broadcasts, a total. I about my behavior. And now I need to drive down to my local police station and bother a local cop. So that's why I'm here. I wanna file a police report for identity theft. And I wanna ask you a couple of questions about before. I do it. The first is how often do you all have people filing identity reports with the police very frequently. Also, it's not this is not where it's not completing common owner. But that isn't the question. I most wanted an answer to I'd been doing another question for so long. It's almost hard to put it into words. I mean, just as a lot. Horseman officer. Does it not strike you as strange that? I've never had any do with either one of these parties, and they wrote me into this. And and it's my problem. All of a sudden, it seems to me that CitiGroup should be filing some sort of complaint with the police, not me, and I shouldn't have to deal with this at all. It's very odd that its frame this way, the whole notion of identity theft noticed I'm still me for the first time officer la- do is looking a little dubiously. Like, I'm crossing some wine. Like, I'm gonna start asking him for his opinions about animal rights or about the local native American burial ground, somehow wound up under the parking lot of a fish restaurant cups. Don't control the rules of the game. They just enforce them. The very idea that I should have to spend a minute having to deal with this seems just a little odd. I mean, if you take it out of the financial sector, and you say I managed to persuade Zoe that I'm Audrey in. I get her lemme ten grand. Arteries, my producer on this episode Zoe is my associate producer. They're here at the station with me recording just standing there in their headphones. Expressionless dead. I'd. Is always not gonna have any ability to disrupt my life or get me. I mean, it's an odd thing that the financial system has now put this sort of strain on police resources. It seems to me. So let me put it as a question. If people are coming in filings reports taking your time and all the rest is never struck. You that seem to little crazy to have the police in the middle of this to answer it. It's interesting in the fact that it's a different type of victimization, right? I don't think of myself as a victim. But if you want me to be one, I want you to be. But it turns out I have to be the victim. At least if I want him to file his report, if I'm not a victim that I'm to blame for whatever fake Michael Lewis has been doing at his fake address. Here's the funny thing I feel victimized not by whoever that guy dude wasn't Miami. But by city Rupe like they present themselves as someone who has been victimized by essentially, my of inability to prevent anybody from stealing my identity. But really if they'd never done the dopey thing in the first place, we wouldn't even be here. And that's the thing that that kinda gets under my skin is that the financial sector has figured out a way to shift the burden of this problem onto people who have nothing to do with the problem. Let me get you a casing, right? I've never had a case number. Can you put me on the boarding generate numbers for thirty five to nineteen? Numbers me talk. Just like another language. Six zero one six. Thank you. Like, I. So I'm gonna give you a business karma the case number and also many give you a victim of identity theft family. I already said this, but I'm the real Michael Lewis, and this is against the rules a show about the decline of the human referee in American life, and what that's doing to our idea of

City Group ZOE Michael Lewis Officer Experien Miami Berkeley American Express California Federal Trade Commission Joe Do Harassment Citibank Sioux Falls South Dakota Producer Wellstone New York
"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"It started with feeling some nagging worry about this world. We find ourselves in. Deep Curtis through the clipboard. Steve Kerr has got teed up. Steve Kerr has got a jacket. A world where everyone hates the referee. Those who could kickable playful bone does account referee. Heels like someone keeps poking you in the back of the shoulder. And then saying foul foul foul. I would never say the things that I do to referees to a person in normally. I'm Michael Lewis, author of the blindside moneyball the pig short the fifth risk. This is my first podcast. It's called against the rules. This season taking you to all the poorly refereed corners of life. Look where we're sitting right now, Michael we're in a crappy parking lot across the street from one of the most important capital market building on the globe on the globe. I just have some simple basic questions through my trash people. Do it questions about what's happened to our idea? Fairness when you first float this idea. How's it greeted? Okay. So when I first float this come on. This is the early two thousands. And I'm talking about new government agency. Oh, just what everybody's looking for right? Here's what I think we still need our referees someone to make the call someone to protect us when lice unfair. But these days, it's not easy. Why would anybody want to be ref seriously? I wonder that too man. And they're not allowed to say anything. They're not allowed to explain themselves not allowed to defend themselves. So I'm going to defend them. It starts April. Second against the rules is the new show from Pushkin industries. You can subscribe now for free wherever you get your podcasts. So do you have anything you'd like to say to the referees of the world before we turn this recording off don't pick sides, unless it's my son?

Steve Kerr Michael Lewis Pushkin industries Curtis
Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

02:28 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"It started with feeling some nagging worry about this world. We find ourselves in. Deep Curtis through the clipboard. Steve Kerr has got teed up. Steve Kerr has got a jacket. A world where everyone hates the referee. Those who could kickable playful bone does account referee. Heels like someone keeps poking you in the back of the shoulder. And then saying foul foul foul. I would never say the things that I do to referees to a person in normally. I'm Michael Lewis, author of the blindside moneyball the pig short the fifth risk. This is my first podcast. It's called against the rules. This season taking you to all the poorly refereed corners of life. Look where we're sitting right now, Michael we're in a crappy parking lot across the street from one of the most important capital market building on the globe on the globe. I just have some simple basic questions through my trash people. Do it questions about what's happened to our idea? Fairness when you first float this idea. How's it greeted? Okay. So when I first float this come on. This is the early two thousands. And I'm talking about new government agency. Oh, just what everybody's looking for right? Here's what I think we still need our referees someone to make the call someone to protect us when lice unfair. But these days, it's not easy. Why would anybody want to be ref seriously? I wonder that too man. And they're not allowed to say anything. They're not allowed to explain themselves not allowed to defend themselves. So I'm going to defend them. It starts April. Second against the rules is the new show from Pushkin industries. You can subscribe now for free wherever you get your podcasts. So do you have anything you'd like to say to the referees of the world before we turn this recording off don't pick sides, unless it's my son?

Steve Kerr Michael Lewis Pushkin Industries Curtis
Blue Origin Launches Its Space Tourist Rocket For A 10th Time

Gary and Shannon

03:25 min | 2 years ago

Blue Origin Launches Its Space Tourist Rocket For A 10th Time

"Real revelations in that book, and you spoke with Michael Lewis. I did about his book and about these revelations even some revelations that he had that weren't included all people you're going to have your mind blown if you're wondering what's going on in the Trump White House in the transition team. And within the Trump administration's how decisions were. Were made. It's really revealing. And we'll get into a lot of those details when we come back, Jane wells and Mark Thompson for Gary and Shannon, KFI AM six forty. Here's Monica Rix and drama teacher at Costa Mesa high school has been arrested in a child sex case police say Brandon niece was busted on suspicion of committing several lewd acts on a thirteen year old boy starting in twenty eleven these has been involved in community musical theater and taught dance at a camp in Newport Beach. He also taught dance at the boys and Girls Club in Tustin and fountain valley cops say because of nieces access to children. They there may be more kids out there who had inappropriate contact with him. A jury has awarded three hundred sixty thousand dollars in damages in an excessive force lawsuit against an Orange County sheriff's deputy Connor Zion. Had slashed at his mom roommate and a responding deputy before another deputy showed up and Saddam to death in two thousand thirteen lawyer for the family, Dan Stormer says the death was found to be lawful. But the jury decided the emotional distress as the man was dying was not fracturing his skull stomping on his head three times. And they put. A value to it lawyers for the defense say it's hard to second guess an incident that only took twenty three seconds. The deputy is now a sergeant and received a medal for his actions at the US court house in Santa Anna, Corbin Carson KFI news. Brought to you by reborn cabinets. A political opposition leader in Venezuela has declared himself. Interim president swellings have been protesting since the dictator. Nikolai doodle was sworn in two weeks after possibly unfair election. Vice president Pence posted a video message yesterday, nNcholas Maduro is a dictator with no legitimate claim to power. He's never won the presidency in a free and fair election. And he's maintained his grip of power by imprisoning. Anyone who dares to oppose him pen says the US supports the opposition leaders moved to assume power and challenge by the widow says he is breaking off relations with the US a nurse in Phoenix has been arrested because his DNA matched that of an an of a baby that was born to an incapacitated patient police chief Jerry Williams says the nurse was responsible for the women's care at the time of the alleged sexual assaults. Road this arrest to the veteran, we owed this the rest of the newest member of our community that innocent baby medical staff say they were surprised when the twenty nine year old woman gave birth last month because she's been in a vegetative state for twenty six years Johnson and Johnson has agreed to pay one hundred twenty million dollars to settle deceptive. Marketing claims general of forty six states accused Johnson and Johnson of misleading. Metal on metal hip implant patients to think the implants would last at least five years people. Also have claimed the metal implants can cause internal issues like groin pain, bone, erosion, and tissue death. The company faces more than ten thousand lawsuits in connection with those claims KFI traffic there is some police activity now happening in bellflower on the Ninety-one. What's the liquid boulevard? Looks like the right lane has been coned off. Things are really busy coming up at six. Oh, five thanks to Becca who called Ralph's saving you time traffic line. Triple eight five hundred five thousand three eastbound side slows down just before you get to the seven ten still this

Nncholas Maduro Johnson United States Trump White House Trump Administration Michael Lewis KFI Orange County Costa Mesa High School Interim President Monica Rix Jane Wells Nikolai Doodle Tustin Newport Beach Saddam Dan Stormer Connor Zion Fountain Valley Brandon Niece
"michael lewis" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"michael lewis" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Well michael lewis thanks so much for speaking with us thanks for having me michael lewis articles about how the trump administration is changing the federal government on the ground level are published in vanity fair his book the undoing project is out in paperback he spoke with fresh here's dave davies who is also whyy senior reporter asked we take a short break look schwartz will review a new recording at pianist nelson free plane brahms this is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from swell investing an impact investing platform that aims to deliver prophet as well as purpose swell identifies high growth potential companies that are working to solve today's biggest challenges light clean water disease eradication and renewable energy now people can invest in portfolios of stocks that a line with their values vis is impact investing it's also good business invest in progress at swell investing dot com the brazilian pianist nathan frei ry is one of classical music critic loyd schwartz favorite pianists his latest recording as an album of piano music by brahms why doesn't always love brown's but he loves this recording here's his review do you love brahms that's the title of the famous 1950 nine novel by france was a gun and it's a titled it's always had a special resonance for me because among the unquestionably great composers brahms's one i've always had some question about his mixture of will steer classical formalism and thick textured romanticism often leads to heavyhanded overstatement.

dave davies reporter nelson renewable energy loyd schwartz brahms france michael lewis nathan frei brown