24 Burst results for "Michael Krasny"

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:29 min | 4 months ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is for my Michael Krasny. We're talking about reopening schools for in person Learning brand. Stevens is with us who pretended to Berkeley Unified School District. Susan Solomon, also with US president of the United Educators of San Francisco, and Making bunch of gloopy, whose apparent of a couple of Oakland elementary school Children and part of the parent group Open Schools California, which advocates for advocates use me for the safe re opening of schools and Listener named Scott sends this email asking, Why is it that many states have had schools We opened for months, even during large community outbreaks like our current one in California and stayed open without experiencing outbreaks were seeing infections rise at the school among students or staff and Meghan Bunch of loopy, I imagine That's a question your group is asking. Certainly, I mean, I touched on this, but, you know, I think if you look across the country, the district's that are open and those that are not it comes down more to a political climate than it does to covet rates. You know, they're certainly districts across the country which you know currently of higher rates, You know that we do here in the Bay area, which thankfully Are decreasing by the day, which is I think good news. We should all applaud. But you know this can this can be done safely, You know? Certainly. I think Susan Solomon spoke to the need, you know, beyond vaccines for other mitigation efforts. I mean, You know, we keep hearing this if you know specifically here in Oakland, I actually check this morning. You know, our district has a dashboard, which shows where they are, in terms of all the pee pee and other requirements. With over half of things are 100%. There are at least eight more They're above 90. I mean, most of the most of the needs regarding safety are completed on Do you know it just it feels to us like the goalpost keep shifting, And I think that's why it's been so frustrating for parents. And likely probably for leaders and some of these district's who are putting forth you know, massive efforts and expense to meet, you know, mitigation needs, which public health officials say are required, which, of course we support. But then, you know, at what point is sort of enough enough like we 100% support teachers being vaccinated now as quickly as they can be, But if that's not enough, like, what's next? You know, I think we need to be guided by public health, You know, Gee noble. Who heads the UCSF covert response. You know, panda not bad last week with 30 physicians here, saying the school should reopen February 1st that it could be done safely. I think those are the types of individuals we need to be listening to here. All right, Well, I want to hear from another individual who sees things very differently than you do. And that's John Jones was a parent of a kindergartener in the Oakland public school system and John Jones. Welcome to the program. Good to have you with us. Thank you. Welcome. Good morning, Happy New Year to everybody. Well, happy New year to you, too. Why? I want to find out why you are reluctant to heavier kindergartner back in school and why you want the schools to pretty much stay safe in any way possible and not re open. Yes, And just for a few key reasons. The first stars with we live in the soap within my six year old Chan School in East Oakland, which has been hit just proportionally hard by the virus. And upon human news that there is research indicates that there's a new strain in the state of California. I just think right now is not the time to reopen schools and long story short. We have a few more months left of school, so it's just important to do everything correctly, do it the right way. And most importantly, make sure that everyone is safe. And yet at the same time, there are schools that are open. And they seem to be doing OK in terms of lower transmission rates, particularly when they're put up against the transmission rates in the community and all those kinds of things and Some of these states might had. In fact, more red states are have been open for quite a while, and the transmission rates have not necessarily gone up that much. Yes, that's actually true, In fact, to that point of also read of various reports that showed not just in America but across the planet places that did reopen schools, And then there were higher transmission race, which required them to close it down. So at this point at this stage at where we all are at, I just think it's just so important to stay the course. And John do your friends and family feels the same way you do is their debate in the community over there in East Oakland. With my family members? No, I have many relatives who have kids in school and I primary concern is the safety of not just our Children, but are spending family members as well. Well, I appreciate your being with us, and I thank you for joining us. And again. That's John Jones, whose parent of a kindergartener in the Oakland public School system and again we do want to hear from you. In fact, a lot of people are lining up here. You can join us not only by phone toll free at 866733. 6786. You can also get in touch with us on Twitter and Facebook. Where at KQED form or email US forum at KQED dot or let me read an email from Jennifer, who writes, We know that the social and emotional piece of learning is essential for proper childhood and adolescent development. Why can't some activities like sports and clubs be resumed and socially distanced ways, for example? Pools and tennis courts and Berkeley remain open like it. The Berkeley swim Club in the Claremont Hotel. Why can't tennis and swim teams be resumed? Let me go to you on that question If I may bring Stevens Sure I'd be happy to talk about that. We currently have permission. Tonto Age in those kinds of activities..

John Jones Oakland public school Susan Solomon Berkeley Unified School Distri US Oakland elementary school Chil California Stevens Open Schools California Oakland Michael Krasny Meghan Bunch East Oakland tennis Chan School San Francisco Berkeley swim Club
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 10 months ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"His native California to El Salvador, where his parents were born. That's forum. The rebroadcast of Michael Krasny tonight at 10 o'clock. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish, and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. Across the country. Colleges are seeing alarming spikes in Corona virus cases that includes campuses in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Ames, Iowa, and Chico, California. And this week we're seeing how colleges are reacting. Some have ask students to shelter in place in their dorms. Others have sent students home just weeks after their arrival. NPR's listen Ad warning is on a road trip to see how colleges and their students are adapting to the pandemic. She joins us now from the quad at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. Hi, Elissa. As I understand it earlier this week at the very Illinois campus, you're on. The chancellor announced a two week locked down because of rising cases. What's the current situation? There s O. We initially came here to see the renowned mass testing program on campus. So students and staff are tested twice a week here. They're running between 10,000 and 15,000 test today at time, That's 2% of all testing in the U. S. But this week, we're seeing evidence that testing alone. It's not enough cases here are higher than they expected. And that's not an uncommon story all over the country. Could you get the bigger national picture? So about more than 20% of four year colleges started the semester in person. Many are big public universities. We're talking about tens of thousands of students. And these three openings are ceding the spread of the virus. Iowa has emerged as a big hot spot that's driven by students at Iowa State in the University of Iowa. You know, this surge has put campus is in a bind, because if they send students home that's potentially spreading the virus further. But having students on campus is problematic to do schools know what's behind these high case numbers? I'm thinking example over some party crackdown that have been happening. Well at the University of Illinois at school, says some students were finding out their positive and they're not doing anything different. They're not isolating and in some cases, they're.

Iowa University of Illinois California NPR Urbana Champaign Michael Krasny Audie Cornish University of Iowa El Salvador Illinois Sasha Pfeiffer Ames chancellor Tuscaloosa Chico Alabama Elissa
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to form Michael Krasny area officials updated the region stay home orders yesterday to allow for outdoor activities including golf tennis and summer camps these new guidelines also give the green light to restart construction projects which could help thousands of people go back to work as a bay area takes this incremental approach various news outlets reported that California governor Gavin Newsom plans to order the closure of all state beaches and parks starting Friday will break down the details of these revisions and discuss what it means for re opening the bay area joining us is Dr Erica pan she's health officer with Alameda county and that's a very good to have you back with us inform welcome thanks to me I think I'd like to begin with you by just having you explain to us well first of all the reason behind this decision I mean what the criteria were behind the decision and what it means in terms of this incremental approach of opening up but also how safe is it how can we be sure that sure okay questions thanks so much for asking and I think one of the main indicators we looked at for this decision was looking at the total number of new cases per day that we're seeing both in each of our jurisdictions and in the region and also looking at the number of hospitalized patients every day and whether that trend was flat or decreasing and we sell and across the region of the six and seven jurisdictions in six counties that we did see that trend so that was one of the indicators we looked at to make this decision and I also wanna highland point out that our regional order has been stricter for examples and the state health orders so we were we are listings and things that sort of more aligned further with with what is allowed in the city order an inmate at a by some other indicators that we want to continue to monitor an addition to those to be considering future phases of of listening restrictions and some of those indicators are things like not only that the trend of hospice patients but just the overall capacity in our hospitals what proportion of our house with the other being taken up by Kevin nineteen and making sure we're not seeing concerning trends about that as far as being able to search for more and whether there's an adequate supply of personal protective equipment for our workers and then the other things we really want to do during this the most immediate phase is really continue to ramp up testing so we can identify case or what we call case finding and make sure we identify those cases and isolate them safely identify their contact make sure they're quarantined safely and then so those are kind of all things go hand in hand with comfort measures for those that we want to be looking at and and sharing with the public and having the public be able to follow along with us the problem with this and again she's health officer with Alameda county this concerns the six counties here in the bay area as well as Berkeley it's gonna last through I guess well the last in effect until the fourth of may looks but I want to break this down a little bit before I do I want to give up the phone number because I know that many of you have questions about this and most of the talk about governu Simms trying to see if people don't go to the beaches of the parks as much as they're doing not only in southern California but up here in the north as well and you may want to join the program if you do let me give you the toll.

Michael Krasny
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi Michael Krasny coming up next on foreign vox co founder and editor at large Ezra Klein will join us to talk about plans to re open the economy on president trump's response to the pandemic we'll also talk with Klein about his new book why we are polarized which examines political divisions in the U. S. through the lens of tribalism he argues that identity is a central driver of political polarization and explains the hyper partisanship is threatening national cohesion that's coming up next after this news live from NPR news in Washington I'm she Stevens Attorney General William Barr is urging federal prosecutors to take legal action against any covert nineteen restrictions that might infringe upon constitutional rights or civil liberties details from NPR's Ryan Lucas in a two page memo to all U. S. attorneys bar notes that many state and local governments impose stay at home orders and other restrictions to fight the pandemic those measures have been necessary to slow the spread of the corona virus but he says they've also imposed a burden on Americans so bars instructing U. S. attorneys to quote be on the lookout for state and local directors that could violate the constitution or civil liberties he says if a directive crosses a line from an appropriate exercise of authority to stop the virus to an overbearing infringement of constitutional protections the justice department may be obliged to take the matter to federal court Ryan Lucas NPR news Washington Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun says it may take several years before the aerospace industry recovers from a downturn calls by the covert nineteen pandemic and here's David Schaper reports on how Calhoun's dire warning Monday during a virtual shareholders meeting Calhoun told Boeing shareholders the air travel industry is decimated with passenger demand down more than ninety five percent airlines in the U. S. of parked nearly half of their planes winds globally are on pace to lose more than three hundred billion dollars this year Calhoun says it'll take two to three years for traveler returned to two thousand nineteen levels in another few years beyond that for the industry's long term growth trend to return when it does he says the market will be smaller and airlines needs will be different most of Boeing's plants have now re opened but production cuts are likely job cuts could be coming to which Calhoun could outline of Wednesday when Boeing releases first quarter earnings David Schaper NPR news anchors are complaining that they can't get their applications filed with the small business administration system that processes and approves loans SBA says it'll limit the number of applications that lenders can file at one time because the agency system is overwhelmed by the current volume of requests for federal aid New York has canceled its twenty twenty democratic presidential primary which had been scheduled for next month as NPR's Windsor Johnston reports to your kids become the first state to take such action due to the cold at nineteen pandemic state election officials say at this point the vote is essentially a beauty contest that New York can not afford to hold governor Andrew Cuomo had previously ordered that all residents be provided with absentee ballots so they could vote without physically going to the polls critics say the decision should be overturned by the Democratic National Committee calling it a blow to American democracy New York state's primary was set to be held on June twenty third NPR's Windsor Johnston reporting you're listening to NPR news from KQED news I mean it came governor Gavin Newsom says he's not pleased with how many people turned out at Newport beach this weekend in violation of social distancing orders KQED politics editor Scott Shafer has more photos from Orange County could have been taken last summer there's thousands of people crowded on to the beach with umbrellas coolers and beach towels in spite of warnings about the coronavirus Newsome said he fully understands that people are restless especially given the heat but he warned it could set back plans to re open the state you didn't see those images in LA beaches in San Diego beaches in northern California around cemetery county because we had strong guidelines that were not only adopted but were abided by Orange County officials say they want people to maintain social distancing but they don't plan to close any county run beaches at this time I'm Scott Shafer KQ renews Berkeley city officials are expected to release more than a million dollars in grants to small businesses and organizations that have been significantly impacted by the pandemic according to mayor Jesse how to gain the city received around one thousand applications for three hundred fifty available grants funds range from one thousand to five thousand dollars at eighteen says despite a looming budget deficit it's necessary to support local businesses that are critical to the city's tax base it was important for us in local government to step in and to provide support while these businesses and nonprofits are waiting for support from the state and federal government these are grants not loans unlike some of the assistance is being provided the mayor says the second round of grants will be announced in the coming days I mean it can take you with the news support for NPR comes from the eighty been ida Cooper foundation commemorating Fred Cooper by supporting public radio programming that highlights issues including diversity racism equality antisemitism and sexism and the listeners of KQED six minutes now past eleven o'clock temperatures in the fifties for the most part around the bay right now and tomorrow's going to be a warm one getting into ten to fifteen degrees.

Michael Krasny co founder Ezra Klein editor
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is form Michael Krasny we're talking with legislators about how they're adapting to the corona virus pandemic and we want to hear from you how is faith and spirituality playing a role in your life at this time I've been asking a question about whether faith has been in some cases strengthen but what happens when faith is challenged in fact many people feel faith excuse me down as a part of faith but you can try to let us know what you're going through or how you've adapted faith practices to shelter in place orders or any questions you have for faith leaders we certainly welcome your involvement you can also get in touch with us on Twitter and Facebook recommended for more email any questions or comments you might have to form a KQED dot org is a listener named Gerald who writes god is where he has always been and always is in our hearts and minds god does not run a rescue service he runs an empowerment service he has empowered us to be more loving merciful forgiving and compassionate I know I can hear many my atheist agnostic listeners thinking this is sounding a little bit like endorsements for god and all that sort of thing we're talking about the spiritual in our lives and that embraces a great deal of territory it also means for many of you nature and if you don't have the spiritual connection with nature even if you don't have god in your life what do you find really enhances your sense of spirituality we have mark Weiser with us pastor for the Catholic community a pleasant instruments rabbi for the congregation Emmanuel in San Francisco and he mom rami and sure who's a fire excuse me founding director of the time the foundation and the moment sure before we went to that break you were kind of finishing up and I hate to interrupt you but we had to go to the break what worries Michael and yes I was everybody's got a has a different experience with this on the spiritual level for some it's it's the logical answer we're responding to that the theological questions that are coming up is it you know what is this a punishment from god what did we do to deserve that so we're working on no this is president all face for some it said psychological and emotional whether pre existing issues or that spurred by this and so a lot of the most mental health professionals they're doing therapy online they're doing classes then for some it's it's the the health care workers most of healthcare workers who are make up a large percentage of healthcare workers in many areas there at the front line my sister in law is a nurse and they have concerns they're testing for code nineteen they're not giving a masks they have concerns that the theological concerns of is it okay for me to do that you know the health care workers are in some places the N. ninety five masks they don't have a proper fit with a beard and for those Muslims and people of other faiths as well who who keep beards religiously now the question is also coming up do I shave the beard and I've given my advice on that that we have to we have to maintain safety and if that's the way to do it and that's for the front my providers that's what they might have to do there's burial concerns in the UK when they began speaking about cremation the orthodox Jewish community in the Muslim community came together and they fought for their rights to say we want to maintain our ability to to perform our burials they joined hands they said we're going to do it properly and safely and now the families might not have been able to attend the funerals but they were able to get their lives last right so we're also seeing a lot of faith based community coming together people working together and looking at their common the their common beliefs and and seeing how they can work together for this and it's so another soul silver lining is that yes people are coming together they're looking at their humanity we realize this is not I affecting just one community this is affecting humanity is affecting people of all colors races second socio economical status and so forth and then for for myself and my main line of work in dealing with and working with the incarcerated and formerly incarcerated a lot of people in free society are now getting a little bit of a feeling of what it means to be deprived of freedom of isolation and so forth and when we when we're also hearing from our clients and students in prison that because the because of the the the isolation is making it even harder to do a lot of things there's not a lot of healthcare that's already being provided in the prisons and so now we're getting stories from our students that are experiencing I have been diagnosed with Cologne and they have their questions and it makes it even harder to service them and their needs but hopefully we're we're all going to get through this but it's really important that we pull together as humanity regardless of a person's religious or spiritual beliefs and and see those commonalities that we haven't worked together to whether it's a terrible level whether it's it and helping people emotionally whether checking on family whether it's reconnecting with family members reaching out and connecting with people that maybe we haven't maintained as the the the the connections that we need to because those connections are really crucial for us to get through this a lot of emphasis on the humanity of all this from all of you it's it's good to hear and about just how you can sustain and somehow into or through all of this Michael McBride is also with us I twisted his arm a little in Assam the stately passer the way Christian center and want to bring in for an I'm a bring your calls in a moment or two but I want to bring in for you Nancy Schroeder who's even a budding ad Abbas at the green gulch farm San Francisco Zen center I think I have you with us so I have this for are you there okay I thought we had her with us we'll go to her shortly but listen anytime go to some of your calls and let's go first to Justin in Dublin good morning good morning this story is from a faith based perspective as far as death being part of life I feel that we are over sensitized to death in some ways but then we are completely desensitized to it in other ways if you look at how we reacted to the pandemic we are willing to throw ourselves into a global recession out of fear of death but then in other ways were totally desensitized from it in two thousand eighteen up to eighty thousand people die from the flu hundreds of thousands from HIV forty thousand a year from car accidents it just goes on and on so how can you be oversight over sensitized to death in some ways in and understand the cars in other ways you know listen up here thank you all right let me begin with you on that mark western response yeah it's a it's a very instant pricing asked because we've seen those numbers from the very beginning and Amick I think what the the differences here is that this sort of almost came out of the blue people unexpected and the fact that there's there's not a cure for it or are we to predict where it's going has just people very fearful of the lack of knowledge of it when it comes to these other things that car accidents and and normal flu that has sort of become part of our regular existence as as a society have nothing that's good or bad is just what it is and what you said about the fact that this is an issue that helped make you moving so quickly I think has got people very very fearful for their lives for their health and and for one another I'm gonna be in thank you for that past the the passer wise you're only going to some of our other guests on this but I want to read a few comments first because I read a comment that was very Eastick centered and here's David this is as a non theist I want your guests to know that I and many of my fellow nanti is deeply appreciate the work they're doing to bring people together but here Sean who says could it be that it is not our faith in a higher being that is being tested but our faith and antiquated religious systems have based their teachings on unscientific scriptures when I can honestly get into the whole argument about god or no god or anything but let me go to you if I may rabbi Mintz and question the death that was brought up here what do you tell your congregants well first of all I wanna say for anybody who is a theist or non D. S. and we love we love you we love people I think people of faith love all people and and I would I would also say that I love what you said Michael about nature that there's so much to shelter in place and this great here we have an especially about that is that we are inside and we are disconnected from humanity when in fact I think one of the healthiest thing to do is to go outside and in Judaism we call the Torah eight hi Andy at the tree of life go outside and sit under a tree and feel what earth and nature is giving us right now which is the normal and natural cycles that are happening the incredible full moon that happened last night was something that was quite awesome on the desk side how can we not be incredibly sensitized and desensitized at the same time specially western culture where we tend to push that away all the time and engineers we definitely have a deep connection to the practices of the rituals around death but we talk about choosing life at all times at all times in our distance but I do understand whether you're religious person or not a person of faith or not how scary this is because we have the ability to push it out the way up to a point and so I I see now many many people coming to a recognition that they may die or someone who was close to them they loved me die and date we not only need physical or financial resources to help us through this but everybody needs some kind of spiritual resource to get us through a time when there's so much uncertainty about our own mortality and mortality of hundreds of thousands perhaps millions of people city Mrs rabbi was congregation Emmanuel in San Francisco let me bring Sammy aboard semi you're on the air with us on for good morning Michael first of all I wanna say I'm so glad you're back and I had an old number one I wanna say I get very frustrated when people say that why did god do this to us Sir where is god why doesn't he helped us at this time god is he is always there and what he's given us is is he's always behind there behind us he didn't create this he didn't all of these things these are just human things that happen in this world and you know that I just think that number one and another thing is that I can walk into any house of worship anywhere in the world and I can feel comfortable because I have a very deep faith in god I think god is the same in any faith whatsoever and I think if we all believe together help each other love of nature which is god's world and this is just this is a time it'll pass we will go through it but let's all work together let's love each other that's B. especially kind to each other.

Michael Krasny
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:42 min | 1 year ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is for Michael Krasny we're talking with the legislators about how they're adapting to the corona virus pandemic and we want to hear from you how is faith and spirituality play a role in your life at this time I've been asking a question about whether faith has been in some cases strengthen but what happens when faith is challenged in fact many people feel faith excuse me down as a part of faith but you can tell us to let us know what you're going through or how you've adapted faith practices to shelter in place orders or any questions you have for faith leaders we certainly welcome your involvement you can also get in touch with us on Twitter and Facebook recommended for more email any questions or comments you might have to form a KQED dot org is a listener named Gerald who writes god is where he has always been and always is in our hearts and minds god does not run a rescue service he runs an empowerment service he has empowered us to be more loving merciful forgiving and compassionate I know I can hear many my atheist agnostic listeners thinking this is sounding a little bit like endorsements for god and all that sort of thing we're talking about the spiritual in our lives and that embraces a great deal of territory it also means for many of your nature and if you don't have the spiritual connection with nature even if you don't have god in your life what do you find really enhances your sense of spirituality we have mark Weiser with us pastor for the Catholic community of Pleasanton city men's rabbi for the congregation Emmanuel in San Francisco and he mom rami and sure who's a fire excuse me funny director of the time the foundation and the moments were before we went to that break you were kind of finishing up and I hate to interrupt you but we had to go to the break no worries Michael and yes I was everybody's got a has a different experience with this on the spiritual level for some it's it's the logical answer were responding to that the theological questions that are coming up is it you know what is this a punishment from god what did we do to deserve that so we're working on no this is president all face for some it's that psychological and emotional whether pre existing issues or that spurred by this and so a lot of them some mental health professionals they're doing therapy online they're doing classes then for some it's it's that the health care workers most of healthcare workers who are make up a large percentage of healthcare workers in many areas there at the front line my sister in law is a nurse and they have concerns they're testing for code nineteen they're not giving a masks they have concerns that the theological concerns of is it's okay for me to do that you know the health care workers are in some places the N. ninety five masks they don't have a proper fit with a beard and for those Muslims and people of other faiths as well who who keep beards religiously now the question is also coming up do I shave the beard and I've given my advice on that that we have to we have to maintain safety and if that's the way to do it and that's for the front my providers that's what they might have to do there's burial concerns in the UK when they began speaking about cremation the orthodox Jewish community in the Muslim community came together and they fought for their rights to say we want to maintain our ability to to perform our burials they joined hands they said we're going to do it properly and safely and now the families might not have been able to attend the funerals but they were able to get their light last right so we're also seeing a lot of faith based community coming together people working together and looking at their common the their common beliefs and and seeing how they can work together for this and it's so another soul silver lining is that yes people are coming together they're looking at their humanity we realize this is not affecting just one community this is affecting humanity is affecting people of all colors races second socio economical status and so forth and then for for myself and my main line of work in dealing with and working with the incarcerated and formerly incarcerated a lot of people in free society are now getting a little bit of a feeling of what it means to be deprived of of freedom of isolation and so forth and when we when we're also hearing from our clients and students in present that to because the because of the the the isolation is making it even harder to do a lot of things there's not a lot of health care that's already being provided in the prisons and so now we're getting stories from our students that are experiencing I have been diagnosed with Cologne and they have their questions and it makes it even harder to service to them and their needs but hopefully we're we're all going to get through this but it's really important that we pull together as humanity regardless of a person's religious or spiritual beliefs and and see those commonalities that we haven't worked together to whether it's a terrible level whether it's it at helping people emotionally whether checking on family whether it's reconnecting with family members reaching out and connecting with people that maybe we haven't maintained is that the that the connections that we need to because those connections are really crucial for us to get through this a lot of emphasis on the humanity of all this from all of you it's it's good to hear and about just how you can sustain and somehow into or through all of this Michael McBride is also with us I twisted his arm a little in Assam the stately passer the way Christian center and want to bring in for an army bringing your calls in a moment or two but I want to bring in for you Nancy Schroeder who's the biting ad Abbas at the green gulch farm San Francisco Zen center I think I have you with us so I have this folder are you there okay I thought we had with us I will go to her shortly but let's make them go to some of your calls and let's go first to Justin in Dublin good morning good morning this story is from a faith based perspective as far as death being part of life I feel that we are over sensitized to death in some ways but then we are completely desensitized to it in other ways if you look at how we reacted to the pandemic we are willing to throw ourselves into a global recession out of fear of death but then in other ways with totally desensitized from it in two thousand eighteen up to eighty thousand people die from the flu hundreds of thousands from HIV forty thousand a year from car accidents it just goes on and on so how can you be oversight over sensitized to death in some ways and then under sensitized in other ways you know listen up here thank you all right let me begin with you on that mark western response yeah it's a it's a very in sync Westinghouse because we've seen those numbers from the very beginning and act I think what the the differences here is that this sort of almost came out of the blue people unexpected and the fact that there's there's not a cure for it or are we to predict where it's going has just people very fearful of the lack of knowledge of it when it comes to these other things that car accidents and and normal flu that has sort of become part of our regular existence as as a society have nothing that's good or bad is just what it is and what you said about the fact that this is to help make your moving so quickly I think has got people very very fearful for their lives for their health and and for one another I'm gonna be in thank you for that past the the pastor was your only go to some of our other guests on this but I want to read a few comments first because I read a comment that was very theistic centered and here's David uses as a non theist I want your guests and that I and many of my fellow non theists deeply appreciate the work they're doing to bring people together but here Sean who says could it be that it is not our faith in a higher being that is being tested but our faith and antiquated religious systems of baser teachings on unscientific scriptures we're not going to necessarily get into that whole argument about god or no god or anything but let me go to you if I may rabbi Mintz and the whole question of death that was brought up here what do you tell your congregants well first of all I wanna say for anybody who is a theater a month yes and we love we love you we love people and the people of faith love all people and and I would I would also say that I love what you said Michael about nature that so much of shelter in place and that's great here we have an especially about that is that we are inside and we are disconnected from humanity when in fact I think one of the healthiest thing to do is to go outside and in Judaism we call the Torah eight nine hit the tree of life go outside and sit under a tree and feel what earth and nature is giving us right now which is the normal and natural cycles that are happening the incredible full moon that happened last night was something that was quite awesome on the downside how can we not be incredibly sensitized and desensitized at the same time specially western culture where we tend to push that away all the time and engineers we definitely have a deep connection to the practices of the rituals around death but we talk about choosing life at at all times at all times in our distance I'm but I do understand whether you're religious person or not a person of faith or not I'm how scary this is because we have the ability to push death the way up to a point and so I I see now many many people coming to a recognition that they may die or someone who is close to them they loved me die and date we not only need physical or financial resources to help us through this but everybody needs some kind of spiritual resource to get us through a time when there's so much uncertainty about our own mortality and mortality of hundreds of thousands perhaps millions of people sentiments is rabbi was congregation Emmanuel in San Francisco let me bring Sammy aboard semi you're on the air with us on for good morning Michael first of all I wanna say I'm so glad you're back and I had an old number one I wanna say I get very frustrated when people say that why did god do this to us Sir where is god why doesn't he helped us at this time god is he is always there and what he's given us is is he's always behind there behind us he didn't create this he didn't all of these things these are just human things that happen in this world and in order I just think that number one and another thing is that I can walk into any house of worship anywhere in the world and I can feel comfortable because I have a very deep faith in god I think god is the same in any faith whatsoever and I think if we all believe together help each other love of nature which is god's world and this is just if this is a time it'll pass we will go through it but let's all work together let's love each other that's B. especially kind to each other since we're in the semi thank you for that call we know that god is a hero I'm sorry that sounds a little bit later I can say that here's Jeannie rights although I'm a Christian I grew up Catholic I haven't been moved by mass three decades I feel religion is very personal for that reason I don't care for organized religion and all that comes with it and now with some services being online I feel more compelled to attend virtually I especially like having the ability to turn on my schedule and when I'm available so let me bring in Schrader into this discussion and Schrader is as I said earlier the inviting Abbas at green gulch farm and San Francisco Zen center and welcome to the program have a shorter thank.

Michael Krasny
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To form Michael Krasny even before the novel coronavirus reach the U. S. and began to spread many low income Americans face challenges like lack of a livable wage or lack of access to affordable health care and now low income people are expected to be the hardest hit by the effects of the corona virus epidemic how are those who lack health insurance stable housing a regular we're going to weather the crisis joining me to discuss this is so rude Jayaraman director of the food labor research center UC Berkeley also president of one fair wage and welcome to the program thank you thanks for having me glad to have you and appreciate your being here I was reading a quote of yours where you said instructing vulnerability of service workers is going to spread the crisis and actually the crisis increases vulnerability and I think that's exactly right but there's so many people who simply don't have the choice of staying home but have to go to work sick let's begin there that's right you know we've got two million food service workers in California it's actually a we have one seventh of the entire country's food service workers are here in the state of California fourteen million nationally to million in the state of California so much of our economy and time and even culture is spent eating out and that's both when we go to a restaurant or even if people are staying home in ordering food and you gotta remember it's still being made at a restaurant and so we have to worry about these workers that are going to be making our food throughout this crisis no matter what happens even if we're staying home they can't afford to stay home the vast majority of them can't afford to stay home I think people have to understand that paid sick leave is critical and also then top of paid sick leave we need to make sure that workers have wages that allow them to stay home even if they have a paid sick days with both in our experience it has to be both paid sick leave and sufficient livable wages so that they're not thinking you know I really need to go to work to get those steps instead they feel like the way that they're getting that that allows them to stay home really is enough to keep them at home so that is the vulnerability that I think could really exacerbate the crisis the fact that most workers don't feel the luxury that you know Facebook and Google workers field to work from home they they don't have that luxury they have to go to work that is a crisis for us because we know that seventy percent of food borne illness can be traced back to sick restaurant workers according to the CDC and that more than half of all norovirus cases can be traced back to sick food service workers according to the CDC you know that is a crisis that is caused by a structural inequality that these workers face and then that crisis that exacerbated by more people getting sick more people staying home it's going to make these workers vulnerable because they're going to lose it they're going to lose hours it's really uncertain for a lot of these workers what their future is going to be with regard to their job this terribly uncertain it is that is that it's terribly important and and weighs on all of us I mean the concern about food handling and just so concerned about these people who are below the threshold and don't have a health insurance and in many cases let's talk about paid sick leave the labor department says only sixty percent of service industry workers actually have access to time off when they're sick and here in California we had a pioneer program here in San Francisco specifically back in two thousand seven two thousand fifteen there was a sick leave program passed statewide but that only covers three days a year can you give us a picture that's right I mean imagine a food service worker having corona virus and you have your allowed three days off per year and even those three days are at a really low wage that typically you supplement with kept when you actually are going to work so you are getting the bare minimum and it's only for three days if you have corona virus I can bet you it's not going to be a three day sickness sickness and so if you're a low wage worker that have to pay rent and pay the bills and feed your kids you know three days off at a minimum wage is just not going to cut it and you're going to see workers going to work when they're sick whether they know they're sick or they don't know they're sick I mean our industry we have a culture of going to work when sick and it's definitely gotten better by paid sick leave paid sick leave has been an enormous step forward but the amount of paid sick leave is not enough to address this crisis and certainly the wages in our industry are nowhere and enough that we we need on top of paid sick leave today we actually in partnership with about thirty one doctors and public health officials from all over the country released a white paper and a letter to governor Cuomo in New York and really address to the country saying we are facing a crisis in our public health doctors and officials we are facing a crisis and this is not the time to be excluding these workers from a full livable minimum wage queued to be saying we can't afford to pay them this is the time to figure out how to allow these workers to stay home when they're sick because they are kind of a critical like kind of a package for us in terms of the spread of the virus we all know that the food service industry is responsible for the spread of flu during the food flu season imagine what could happen with this very deadly virus again sorry J. R. Rahman is director of the food labor research center at UC Berkeley also president of one fair wage and Anthony Wright is executive director of health access California can you write good to have you back with us inform welcome great to be on I guess the place I'd like to begin with you is we think about people who are in poverty you don't know necessarily where their next paycheck is coming from or have to live off tips and gratuities if you will and if you think about just the struggle that these people are going through people on an hourly wage people don't know about sick leave or health insurance how to get a weather this crisis I think this coronavirus crisis has exposed a lot of the issues and gaps in our healthcare system today both for the uninsured and the insured for it is you know for the uninsured in the first place to go if you have the symptoms of kind of ice is to call your doctor and to and but if people don't have a doctor what do they do and that's to and even with the significant reductions of the uninsured under the affordable Care Act we went from seven million down to three million that's still three million uninsured Californians who don't have coverage and in many cases don't have a usual source of care there's also issues and financial barriers for people who are insured or at least under insured in terms of what may be available I think there's been good actions by the the state and federal levels to try to make sure that there's no cost sharing for screening and and testing and although there are gaps there because of the different jurisdictional issues between state and federal regulation but but that doesn't necessarily cover treatment so we have this patchwork system and I want to be clear for people who have these are the symptoms for people who are at risk they should they should seek the care and there are options but is a patchwork and there are gaps and holes in those options and so we can go through them I in this program but you know it's it's it's troubling in our if we're trying to actually get a handle on this public health crisis our whole health care system is stronger when everybody is included and when we have large gaps in the system that actually makes our public health response particularly vulnerable and.

Michael Krasny
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:51 min | 1 year ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot org slash donate welcome to form a Michael Krasny dear white America I've left earth in search of darker planets a solar system that revolves to near a black hole I've left in search of a new guy I do not trust the guy you have given us my grandmother's house yeah is only outdone by the fear she nurses each time the blood fats summer swallows another child who's saying in the choir take your god back though his songs are beautiful his miracles are inconsistent that's the voice of po Dennis Smith who has really created a sensation with his work he is a poet who identifies well not only is in many ways they are police use me as a non identifies with that by identity of of not using should we say the regular pronouns but being referred to as they another being a binary pull it but actually a poet who is black and a poet who is HIV and identifies as being queer and I was really looking forward to talking and I'm hoping that we will be able to he stirred up a great deal with that they're what America pieces you can imagine which went viral in which has been heard over and over again and he has a new book out called home me which I was anxious to talk with them about the problem is we're trying to connect with NPR and we're having some problems so we invited and this is just a sign of how gracious he is you know road the sun to to join us once again and talk with us some more about what we were talking about the last segment actually maybe good place to begin her jail if I could was he was what about Ariana prevailed put this whole segment together and kudos on that score and she study was run to chi and UC Berkeley who had a lot to say about multi ethnic identity and I'm wondering about your thoughts about multi ethnic identity people continue to say well the Filipino experiences so different from the African American experience how can you compare them and yet they come under that bracket of ethnic identity just sucks you know I I don't align myself with with those folks who are saying you know the Filipino American identity is different than African American identity or other marginalized communities I see it maybe because I grew up in Stockton and I you know I had relatives already been here since the thirties and but I also was an immigrant and so I kind of straddle straddled two worlds of a an immigrant and then also family we've been here since the thirties and so but but because of history of knowing history like stories about Leri it Leon we are absolutely aligned and have many similar issues many similar things that have happened into our complete with our communities with other that are very similar to other marginalized communities so when we talk about multi ethnic identity at you know I see Filipinos as as part Filipino Americans as part of that conversation what do you feel that do we have done this to me Arianna not yet okay what do you see is particularly similar is where is the common ground as you see definitely when we're talking about when we're talking about racism for instance in an journey for justice the life of where it lay on the children's book that we were talking about earlier about layer it Leon Filipinos were absolutely discriminate upon and we're physically beaten murdered I'm home out here in California and you know there was signs for it we have real signs in the children's book or in the book that says I get rid of all Filipinos are will burn this town down it in fact in Stockton California where I'm from and where I grew up and currently reside the community the Filipino community center was bombed and so when people talk a little bit about that story historically what happened what led to it or was he so it was bought there was an anti Filipino sentiment people were thinking especially during the Great Depression that you had these migrant workers and they're taking a job they're taking our jobs basically the same thing that we're talking about now they're taking our jobs but there might you know there was Filipinos are migrant farmworkers on and you know they were busboys they were they were doing a lot of manual labor manual labor services exactly service work in so these things were happening in our communities and so when people say that we are not part or with Filipino Americans say that or they say that we're not aligned with it or we don't see ourselves as multi ethnic or people of color are marginalized community because our parents can there's doctors or nurses it might be because they don't they haven't read their own history here in the United States and sometimes it's a radical feeding to align with yourself with your at your history here in the United States because Filipinos have been colonized for so long they will identify with you know the declaration of independence or they will recite and learned so much American history but when you tell them they are actually part of American history and actually where there are you know at the in the Delano grape strike and have been making history especially such a pivotal social justice movement as the Delano grape strike they won't identify it as their history even though it's American history because of that colonial mentality that news is the same in fact let's talk about that because they were colonized people the Filipino allies by the United States of America certainly that plays into a lot of that sense of being outsiders and being maybe even victims even in their own country Spain colonized the Philippines for over four hundred years and had really you know the language the dancing the culture everything had infiltrated and the United States in the colony of the United States and so there is a there's always kind of a the ideal wear dark is bad white is good also the United States is above all in even Spanish if you claim Spanish or Chinese or another identity other than Filipino then it means that you're elevated in some way and if you have lighter skin that see that's even better your chances of success are even better even you know if you want to work at a fast food restaurant in the Philippines you have to be of a certain heighten a certain skin color and so all of these things when you get Filipinos who come here and they emigrate you don't want to be known as the farm worker they want to assimilate as soon as possible as soon as they can and not identify with social justice movements young so concerned about assimilating though it wasn't really now like you're talking about now he kept his identity and kept intact as a Filipino and is a Filipino American he did but you know he came here when he was fifteen and so he was polite in my eyes you know I think of my fourteen year old daughter and I think if she had com we're in the Philippines and she had come here she would grow up you know so so much differently like that's a young boy and he grew up predominantly here in the United States so definitely his identity and the way he spoke everything was influenced by what he was learning on the field and the man he was surrounded surrounded by and you know what he was seeing in his daily life and justice that he was seeing is a live so he did he did come out very very tough and doctor don about one when she was alive in Andres the by and when we were creating this book we would laugh and say we wanted to make a second book called monals after dark and we would laugh because that you know the monologues monologues is at its it respectful term for an older familiar member of your community in a look on all that I like the look on on the Philippines and we would laugh because the mom owns and this time the Filipinos who were laborers who would had come in an already been in the United States for you know decades by the time we get to nineteen sixty five we're taught you know if you mess with them they would find you at night and they would write the situation and they were taught you know by their own experiences that they have to be ready for anything in fact we were laughing because there's something called and and look I know knife that a man Kerry is in his pocket to always be ready and to this day Andres the buy in our I sure illustrator he started laughing when we start talking about this piece because he said you guys are not going to believe this because I have a look on a knife in my pocket well so good to have you again and thank you so much for filling in this time while we try to connect with our guest in a Smith good to have had you and I appreciate very much for being with us thank you for having me and now a transition to our guest in a Smith there is a black where non binary public the national first captured the public's attention back in twenty fourteen with a viral video performance of that poem you heard earlier dear white America the nurse who I'll note for our listeners uses gender neutral pronouns has since gone on to receive a number of awards for their work including the forward price as well as fellowships with the poetry foundation cave cannon and national endowment for the arts just to name a few and now they are the author of a new book of poetry homey it was me to talk about is Dennis Smith good to have you Hey good to be here sorry I'm late yes are you lay too I had lots to talk about with you and now I have to truncate that and market shorter but boy there is a lot we actually both have Richard UW Madison and Hey please I'm sorry I looked at the that that that has to do with maybe different parts of our lives or other places I hated to your live in fact I was just reading about you getting reading your work in connection with the TS Eliot four quartets award and seeking what T. S. Eliot who I studied a lot and has was such a state and an Anglican kind of poet and what a contrast I mean your poetry is so full of vulnerability and vitality and life to it and I talk about the rhythms here I'm talking about just your willingness to well put it all out there and also sing and celebrate with joy but also let us know what your suffering what you're going through let me just give you the plot is that I feel you deserve for the work that you've put out there and I know this work is different because home is a work that's not necessarily what we heard earlier were maybe thinking about white people or the white gays or they're not in your mind there your heart as much in this poem is mainly your people your truck yeah it's a much more intimate collection then down collars that was I've been saying that it's it's different because even though I have always been speaking to these larger audiences of these larger lex walks of life considering the we or the you in the palm now it's I I feel like I can name who this book is for you I can call them architects and I can miss them a compressor that obviously different such changes that the tenor of the work I think I've always been trying to call somebody ability especially since is always some element of compassion in my work but yeah the you is a lot more personal right is named it is a book of of of names of people or people that I I I know in touch of love it you know there's a lot of conventional furnaces sodas and yeah at the center of this in fact is queer identity in search of strange word for somebody who came up the way I did because you know when I was a kid the word queer carried all that stigma with it and all that nastiness and and shame that you write about it but now we have queer studies we have you know the word being put into a whole different frame and all different non pejorative kind of association and talk about that a little bit because when when you talk about queerness you're talking about being naked in terms of who you are and what you are but also you know you feel a lot of the sense of being intruded upon as as someone who's black and someone who's has HIV yeah I think the intruded upon his maybe more of a dog because that they I.

Michael Krasny
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Michael Krasny a contentious bill and me to allow more housing production here transit and and single family neighborhoods failed yesterday in the California Senate SP fifty spurred intense opposition from critics who said it wouldn't encourage enough subsidized housing and would take away cities control over local planning decisions on the other hand housing advocates call this bee fifty California single best hope to boost housing production in a state that experts estimate is short by three and a half million homes the bill's author say centers got winner of San Francisco is not giving up just yet but the chances his colleagues reverse course today are slim we tell you who's joining us for this segment Erin ball the series here with us in studio affordable housing reporter for KQED welcome Erin thank you for having me good to have you also good to have William Dylan who joins us from Sacramento reporter with the Los Angeles Times and locally and Dylan good morning good morning to you Erin let me begin with you if I may this is the third year in a row it's fallen short three votes short and basically the opposition boils down it seems once again to the concern over local control and not enough affordable housing yeah I mean this is going to be controversial from the start these are people who have since it was introduced been opposed to this bill they've been very vocal about their opposition the affordable housing folks have been a little bit less vocal but getting more vocal certainly as the the bill was moving to the floor I think they were trying to work in good faith with senator winners office and try to reach a compromise on the bill but as it was nearing a vote they you know be centered sending letters saying vote no on this and there is so I am doing a kind of geographical split here is no yeah it was interesting to watch some of the boats coming down yesterday and the opposition from the you know most of the entire delegation from the Los Angeles area there were nine LA area centers a senator's rather either voting no or abstaining on the bill and obviously when you have when the bill for three votes short not having support from the largest region the state is going to be a problem well you down there in southern California you had a position from Bob hurts for for example from van Nuys who said that yeah it's it's too much avoiding the power of local government and also single family homeowners but you also had a good deal of effort on the part of station or Holly Mitchell yes I think the opposition to this which I'm as Erin noted is kind of coming from two different sources a lot from suburban single family homeowners worried about changes to the character of their community also from a and G. dash of gentrification and anti displacement groups worried about develop potentially fueling more developers she feeling those issues I think that encompassed a lot of the opposition from Los Angeles you had senders can talking about that you mentioned Bob Hertzberg talking about the concern about local governments are losing some control and Holly Mitchell talking about the concern about did have occasion displacement so all of the opposition is gonna wrapped into what folks from LA were talking about yesterday and we should mention here in northern California there were votes of no by Steve Glazer veranda cherry hill cemetery and bill died of napa but this is up for reconsideration today are and it seems unlikely it seems almost just like a courtesy but there's a lot going on behind the scenes that's right right now the folks who are you know supportive of this bill are making calls they're trying to get constituents to make calls are trying to get friends moms to make calls are trying to get everyone that they know to put pressure on their representatives to either flip their vote or or to get those six senators who abstained or one center was absent to to to make a call to to vote yes or you know even vote is put this to bed really well leave Dylan governors from did not endorse SP fifty but he has made pledges to increase our own building by about five fold and certainly has a lot of interest in this in some saying he was working in favor of it at this point what kind of club can the governor have to reverse things if any and what you gonna do yeah it's interesting you know he's kind of walked in interesting line particularly this year with this bill as he noted he has to pay a late promised to really expand home building in the state of the mail on the campaign while he's kind of walk that back a little bit I think central to his plan to help resolve that cal California's housing problems is to try to do things that would spare a big increase in production and this bill has been seen for better or worse as though the main measure to try to do that yeah this year he's talked about wanting to work aggressively with leadership in the Senate and members that move this bill forward but still kind of kept his distance not actually embracing the entire thing and so you know yesterday when there was a break between after the first vote and when that kind of the vote finally ended he did call at least one of his one democratic senator into his office bill dot it at representative from napa gonna talk about what was going on and you know document the meeting ended up voting no and so it's the one kind of unclear to us exactly how much of a shoulder Newsome is putting into trying to get this bill across the finish line and if it does end up feeling that I think the onus is on him to put something forward that that that his idea if you will to to try to meet the scale of the campaign promises that he's well let's hear what your listeners have to say I'd like to have you weigh in I know there was a lot of concern about this bill on both sides and now is an opportunity for you to react to the fact that it went down but as I said there is an attempt at least to get another vote through though it seems pretty slim at this point let me hear from you though if you have some thought you'd like to express here this is an opportunity for you to do so in give us a call we invite you to call.

Michael Krasny California Senate
How to avoid epic Thanksgiving failures

Forum

02:28 min | 1 year ago

How to avoid epic Thanksgiving failures

"Hey welcome back to Forman Scott Shafer here today for Michael Krasny and for the rest of the hour we're delving into the thanksgiving holiday and a lot of people will tell you that thanksgiving is their favorite holiday the food it's not divided by religious traditions but of course it can also be very stressful specially if you're hosting the event and so for the rest the are we're going to delve into how to avoid epic failures when it comes to the meal you're cooking in the entertaining all that entails what to do if you forget the key ingredient for example or if there are family or guests who are want to talk about politics or something else is going to be a little dicey joining me to talk about that maybe dish out some advice Cassidy Olson kitchen and cooking editor for reviewed dot com welcome thanks for joining us Hey thanks for driving me also Margie Ryerson is a family and marriage therapist based in Wildwood creek and Margie good to have you as well I'm sure we'll have some questions about dealing with unruly family members as to what it is about I guess it's just it's always been an issue I guess but it seems like it's more acute now in this particular area that we're in but I want to begin with the food and the meal and and Cassie also what what in in terms of your experience what like what are some of the most common food related problems our kitchen problems that come up at thanksgiving yes I think things giving can be such a stressful time because of course the food is so central and everyone's so excited to you know actually died and then there's a million moving parts often you're eating at like two PM you're eating much earlier in the day then usually would be so I think the biggest issue that most people have is just the timing aspect and of course you know today with thanksgivings two days out now is a great time to get be getting ready for thanksgiving for not already ready so I think really people are you know not defrosting Turkey's long enough which I've had the same issue in the past they're not you know planning out dishes in advance about trying to she's in advance they're not cooking in advance so you know they got up at the crack of dawn and are scrambling all day you don't get to spend as much time with the family yeah that's inevitable but I think preparation is really key and then you know of course I'm sure people of trying to deep fry Turkey is our snatched her keys are do weird things with her case yeah I always an issue as well and probably not a great time to try out recipes you've never tried yeah probably not a great time to just start launching new things in your family I think in general if you have any time at this point it's kind of crunch time but cooking in advance is a great idea but yeah I think the right time to do the tried and true is I think that's why it's a you know holiday tradition tradition

Forman Scott Shafer Michael Krasny Two Days
BBC World Service, BBC and Nicolas Maduro discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

00:18 sec | 3 years ago

BBC World Service, BBC and Nicolas Maduro discussed on BBC World Service

"Writes candidly about transitioning to a transgender woman she joins forum to discuss her. Memoir her work in politics and losing her husband to cancer four days after, their, wedding it's the, rebroadcast of forum with Michael Krasny it's in thirty. Minutes after the BBC World Service live from London on

Bbc World Service BBC Nicolas Maduro United States Sarah Mcbride Lesley Kirwin Michael Krasny Advisor Mugler Lesley Cohen Europe Venezuela Stuart Mcintosh Venezuela Facebook Andrew Brunson London NFL President Trump Philip Wilson
Dozens shot across Chicago in spate of overnight violence

Morning Edition

09:27 min | 3 years ago

Dozens shot across Chicago in spate of overnight violence

"Which Norman Lear produced and wrote Charlotte Rae in a documentary about the facts of life a spinoff of different. Strokes railroaded giant befall. And a rice sense of humor to both shows which helped revive the flagging fortunes of NBC at the time Charlotte raise last screen appearance. Was in the movie Ricky and the flash When she, was nearly ninety shortly before she was. Diagnosed with bone cancer net Libby NPR. News police in Chicago say at least forty people were shot there over the weekend at least four people died the Chicago Tribune, reports the largest single shooting came early Sunday, morning when gunmen fired on a group of people standing in a neighborhood Chicago police chief Fred Waller link most. Of the shootings to. Gang violence I'm korva Coleman NPR news in Washington Support. For NPR comes from tirerack offering a tire decision guide to help customers find tires that fit their car and, driving conditions with, a network of more than seven thousand independent installers tirerack. Dot com helping. Drivers find deliver install You're hearing morning edition. On k. q. e. d. public radio little later this morning on science will hear about the first pharmaceutical drug derived from marijuana which may soon be coming to drugstores near you it's a medication to reduce, seizures in. Epilepsy patients, a Berkeley teenager was the first patient to try the drug, after his. Mom went to extraordinary efforts and risked. Arrest to get it, for, him here, more on science during morning edition this morning at six twenty two. And again eight twenty two here on kqed public radio. After morning edition it's forum this is. Michael Krasny today on forum in our second hour Airbnb strategic advisor chip Conley joins us to discuss his new book wisdom at warp it's all about how to stay relevant in the workplace as you age join us for forum, it's nine to. Eleven here on public radio Hot and dry weather is forecast in the, Sacramento valley with smoke from wildfires affecting air quality. Today's forecast high in Sacramento is, ninety six degrees with very light to westerly. Breezes this afternoon in the bay area sunny warm day is forecast well hot and dry in the inland valleys of the bay area morning clouds along, the coast should burn off by noon today's highs. Will range from the mid and upper sixties at. The coast to the seventies and eighties around the bay eight upper eighties and low nineties bay area inland seven and a half minutes now past four o'clock morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene in, Culver City. California and, Noel king in Washington DC good morning what exactly was the, nature of. A meeting between Donald Trump junior and. A Russian operative at, Trump, Tower in, two thousand sixteen the White House I said that meeting was about. Adoption policy but the president has described it in other. Ways and then yesterday he tweeted quote. This was a meeting to get information on An opponent he said in that same tweet that it was legal but he also. Said, that he knew nothing about it the president's, also been tweeting about his former, campaign, chairman Paul Manafort Manafort is back. In federal. Court this week he's on trial for Bank and tax fraud, his trial comes out of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference Chuck Rosenberg. Is on the line with me now he's, a former federal federal prosecutor he worked in the. Eastern district of Virginia where manafort's, trial is taking place Mr. Rosenberg good morning Good morning well all right so. This isn't the first time that the, president has acknowledged that this meeting. Was affected Lee an attempt to get dirt. On Hillary Clinton President Trump of course. Was not at that meeting why do you think that President Trump is bringing. This back, up now See'ums mightily concerned about it and perhaps with good reason if, you look at the indictment that the Muller team lodged against the Russian military officials. From the GRU we know that in, March and April of two thousand sixteen so prior to the meeting and Trump Tower the g. are you already started to hack into the emails of, the Clinton campaign the Democratic National Committee and the, democratic congressional campaign, committee fast forward to that meeting I. Think, the operative question Noel is what did the US persons Trump, junior Manafort and others attending that. Meeting know, about what the Russians had already done and did? They joined. That, conspiracy even. After it began with the president has said said on Twitter that this meeting was quote totally, legal also though made an attempt or made. An effort, to to, say I didn't know anything. About it I mean could this particular meeting cause legal trouble for president Trump Quite. Possibly it certainly seems like it could cause legal trouble for the Americans who attended the meeting at the very least meeting with a. Hostile foreign power with the Russians should trigger counter intelligence concerns among any sort of savvy political. Person first thing you do is pick up the phone and call the. FBI they don't seem to have done that could cause legal trouble for the president quite possibly as. Well particularly if having heard about the meeting getting the readout from his son about what happened at the, meeting he tries to cover up the intent of the. Meaning he tells false stories about what the meeting was, four and as we know dictates a statement on Air. Force One, concealing the purpose of the. Meeting that's an obstruction of, Justice quite, possibly and it could land the president and others around him and quite a bit of. Trouble let's talk about one person who formerly was around the president who is potentially in quite a bit of trouble palm Manafort since we last talked to you the trial started the government is laid out some pretty powerful evidence for. The jury do you think prosecutors are in a strong position heading into week two or how. Would you characterize your position no I think that's exactly right I think. It's a strong physician and here's why these cases paper intensive document cases tax fraud and Bank fraud. Tender run according to script there's somewhat formulaic the government introduces income they introduce expenditures they put on accountants, to show that the accountants didn't know that Mr. Manafort. For instance had foreign Bank accounts or that he was, concealing income and then unwittingly these accountants help them prepare. Tax returns, that he files with the. IRS which understated income and, omit the, fact that he has control over these foreign Bank accounts all of that is formulaic and. All of that is precisely what's happening in a courtroom in the eastern district of Virginia manafort's case are testifying to These things yeah That's exactly right and so what I expect you'll see in the coming week is a little bit more. Of the same there'll be some summary witnesses from the FBI who will total up the amount of money in the Bank accounts and ultimately will tie those accounts to Mr. Manafort directly will show that he committed income from his. Income tax returns then I expect we'll hear. From, Mr., gates well. Yeah that is that is that is the big, question? This week right manafort's Paul, manafort's longtime deputy Rick gates expected to. Take the stand how does he fit into the? Prosecution, strategy here well criminals tend to. Run with criminals so Mr. gates. Isn't admitted criminal Mr. Manafort is. An accused criminal it shouldn't surprise the jury very much that these two guys plotted together conspired did much of the same thing tax fraud and Bank fraud to fat in. Their own waltz I think the government will put Mr. gates, on the stand they'll they'll have him. Admit To all his wrongdoing that's fairly typical to and then they'll take him step by step through. The indictment having him explain each of the. Things, that, he and. Mr. Manafort did together to cheat the IRS and, to? Fraud banks and just briefly, how do you see Mr. manafort's defense. Lawyers countering the government's case what's your strategy here? Well, they're gonna try and do two. Things one they'll try and say. That Mr. Manafort lack the intent. To defraud the IRS or the bank's perhaps if his income tax returns understated income they'll say it was an accident because he was a very busy man and second I. Think they'll try to pin as much of this on Mr., gates as they possibly can The real one at fault took Rosenberg, was a federal prosecutor in the eastern district of Virginia thanks so much Israel passed a law last month that continues to cause controversy the, nation state law defines Israel? As the, nation state of the Jewish, people critics say this? Law, discriminates against religious minorities like Muslims and. Christians. Who make up about a fifth of the Israeli population as NPR's Daniel estrin reports from Tel Aviv this law is sparking protests, from religious, group that's one of Israel's staunchest supporters the Druze religious minority in Israel. Held an, unprecedented protests this weekend thousands gathered in Tel Aviv's main square chanting the Hebrew word for quality She The you are religious group and shoot of, Islam their ethnic. Arabs but unlike most other Arab, citizens they've committed to serving in the Israeli, army they.

Paul Manafort Manafort President Trump Fraud NPR Virginia Chuck Rosenberg Mr. Gates Donald Trump FBI IRS Trump Tower Coleman Npr Noel King Bank NBC Chicago
Michael Krasny talks to Lillian Faderman about Harvey Milk

Forum

03:06 min | 3 years ago

Michael Krasny talks to Lillian Faderman about Harvey Milk

"Welcome to forum i'm michael krasny lillian inflator men's new biography of harvey milk looks beyond his iconic status as san francisco's first openly gay supervisor and delves into the musings and misadventures brought him to california harvey milk has lives and death explores milk's career in theatre his stint in the navy has days working on wall street and lillian fadiman is also the author of the gay revolution a history about the struggle for gay and lesbian rights in fetterman welcome back to forum thank you michael thank you for having me glad to have you it's been probably about twenty years twenty years i think is delighted to because you're in i mean harvey is an i no doubt about you sort of an icon to in many ways international and much recognized acclaimed scholar of lgbt history and literature and someone the chronicle of higher education said as a mother of lesbian as also musing about how kind of strange it would be for harvey milk where your life today to try to keep up with all the changes in terms of gender identity and sexual identity in the fluidity and the kind of morphing and mutating that we've been through but let's talk about harvey milk today's excuse me tomorrow is a day to celebrate harvey milk set aside for that purpose and i was thinking about asking you first about his radicalization because he really had nothing to do with stonewall flyer inviting them to a homosexual as the word was then a homosexual lecture and he told harvey about it and harvey was shocked harvey said you shouldn't do that you'll upset those people so much your advertising that their homosexual so harvey was very different in the early nineteen sixties than the man he became in the seventy s very different is putting a model was i was a goldwater supporter i me like the libertarian more than maybe he liked the republicanism buddy was also kind of a i think was wandering jew he was going all over the place looking for an identity but working in so many different ways that you wouldn't expect he was a teacher but he's also in the navy and he was doing production work around broadway with things like jesus christ superstar we learn from your book and hello dolly at hair and and the reality an investment banker i mean these are the sorts of things you don't identify with harvey milk yes and that's why i call it the lives and death of harvey milk was so many different people but i think that in each of those various harvey's he learned something and he used all of that as a politician i i think he finally found himself in the last five years of his life but he took a long time searching for who the real harvey was and it was only in san francisco that the real harvey emerged but even in san francisco you think harvey milk with that camera store has which was a hang out and castro street and suddenly a number of years later one of the hundred most significant men in america according to our people in america human beings in america according to time magazine it's it's a it's an extraordinary story in a quantum jump and let's talk about the beginnings of that i

San Francisco Eugen Biffin Tom Horrigan Woodbury New York Randy Shields Harvey Harvey Boston University Tom O Horgan Randy Schultz Harvey Milk Milk Eight Years Nine Years
Michigan State to pay $500 million to Nassar sex abuse victims

BBC World Service

01:45 min | 3 years ago

Michigan State to pay $500 million to Nassar sex abuse victims

"The california report team and john sepulveda's will be along at five fifty one six fifty one and eight fifty one for you right here this is michael state good morning it's six after four forum begins with michael krasny at nine and at nine forum we'll discuss san francisco's proposition e which you no doubt have heard about it would ban the sale of flavored tobacco products including flavored vaping liquids supporters of proposition ise this will keep tobacco out of the hands of teens but opponents say the measure would hurt small businesses you'll hear from both sides of the issues in the nine o'clock hour at ten former israeli prime minister ehud barak joins forum to discuss his new memoir he'll give his perspective on the recent violence in gaza and other issues as well former israeli prime minister abe who barack in the ten o'clock hour of forum this morning bay weather today mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy highs is cool as the sixties near the coast and around the bay up to the mid seventy s inland here's more morning edition the time again seven after four this is morning edition from npr news i'm david greene in culver city california and i'm rachel martin in washington dc three hundred and thirty two women it's hard to wrap your head around that number think about a huge auditorium think about that auditorium filled to capacity three hundred and thirty two that's the number of women who alleged that they were sexually abused by larry nassar he's the former sports doctor at the michigan's at michigan state university who also worked for usa gymnastics yesterday the university of michigan agreed to pay five hundred million dollars to settle these hundreds of claims yesterday's proposed settlement is one of the largest ever for sexual abuse victims we're joined now by the.

Larry Nassar University Of Michigan Washington Culver City NPR Barack Prime Minister Michael State Michigan State University Michigan John Sepulveda Rachel Martin California David Greene Gaza Ehud Barak San Francisco Michael Krasny Five Hundred Million Dollars
China announces it's imposing new tariffs on 128 US products

02:27 min | 3 years ago

China announces it's imposing new tariffs on 128 US products

"California's now fighting the feds over its interest in protecting immigrants in the country illegally the twenty four years ago the tone was very different no one recognized that there was people power in the immigrant community and their allies we didn't know we were that powerful i'm brian watt how pushing back against proposition one eightyseven galvanized a bay area community tomorrow on morning edition this is michael krasny today on forum in our nine o'clock hour we'll have our weekly politics roundup then in the second hour local author nikki meredith will join us her new book is called the manson women and me monsters morality and murder for nine to eleven here on kqed public radio and coming up this morning and science self driving cars are entering a new age in starting this week the dmv is allowing companies to get permits for testing cars without a backup driver in them while this new technology has many tech lovers excited some people are worried about what this could mean for road safety science reporters take a closer look comes up this morning in morning edition at six twenty two in eight twenty two here on kqed public radio good morning expect sunshine later today with highs sixty s along the coast in peninsula seventies further inland currently fifty four degrees in san francisco it's morning edition from npr news i'm steve inskeep and i made martin good morning president trump is targeting china on trade and now china is fighting back starting today the chinese government will be imposing three billion dollars worth of new tariffs on a list of us products this is retaliation for the trump administration's tariffs on imported steel and aluminum here's rob schmitz joins us now live from shanghai hero mourning rachel what exactly are we talking about here what us products are going to take a hit this is a long and wide ranging list we have one hundred and twenty eight products from apples and berries pork products recycled aluminum ethanol and the tariffs that'll be slapped on these american products when they enter china will range from fifteen to twenty five percent in a statement china's ministry of commerce said quote we hope that the united states will rescind its measures that violate world trade organization rules as quickly as possible and those measures.

Chinese Government Ministry Of Commerce Shanghai President Trump NPR Kqed Murder United States Rachel Rob Schmitz California China Donald Trump Martin Steve Inskeep San Francisco DMV Nikki Meredith Michael Krasny Brian Watt
US payrolls surge in February but wage growth elusive

02:14 min | 3 years ago

US payrolls surge in February but wage growth elusive

"I'm side is and i'm a long haul this week on kqed's the duelists will feature a theatrical alternative to march madness and a fochi from vermont that alongside an artist thoughtfully taking on human trafficking though shows and more on the dualist our guy very best in arts and the bay area this friday in every friday morning at 620 to an eightwicket kqed's morning and this is michael krasny here's what's coming up later today on form with meena kim uc berkeley professor and former secretary of labor robert rice will join us in a studio to talk about his new book the common good we shouldn't be swayed by the myth having nutro free market we must make the market work for us join us for forum nine to eleven right here on kqed public radio mostly cloudy today with temperatures in the '60s and a ten percent chance of showers tonight live from npr news in washington i'm louise schiavone after more than a year of hot rhetoric at name calling between their two nations north korea's kim jong own and president trump are preparing to meet in person the development caught people by surprise around the world and at home former us ambassador to the un bill richardson said frankly when i heard the news i was speech was flabbergasted it keeps streamling risky for president trump but i commend him he spoke to abc news richardson has traveled to north korea several times the us stipulates this is a meeting not a negotiation the labor department releases the government's latest monthly employment reports at this hour and pr zyuganov gucci has more analysts expect the job market to show continued strength they project about two hundred thousand new jobs which could lower the unemployment rate further but last month's report also showed a big spike in wage growth assign that employers are facing higher workforce costs that stoked fears that costs would increase across the board pushing inflation higher and prompting the federal reserve to raise interest rates sooner that spurred a global stock selloff however most analysts are not projecting wages to show similar wage growth for february.

Kim Jong ABC United States NPR Kqed North Korea Bill Richardson President Trump Vermont Louise Schiavone Washington Robert Rice Secretary Professor Michael Krasny Ten Percent
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Get ready for stay white coverage ahead we have the california report coming up on this monday holiday here's joe mcconnell lighter traffic today relate traffic but a big problem the developing probably the all the mom pass it actually happened at three but over the last couple of minutes they've declared a sigler with some lanes what this is east 580 after grant line is you transition to 5 the ramp to 2 of 5 is now closed down while they tried to clear a big rig that went over the embankment again of a three o'clock this morning and that they until recently haven't had the lanes blocked transystems modified schedules today holiday schedules that means san jose crash 280 south the 10th st joe mcconnell for kqed traffic with joe brought to you by unbound dot org on this monday stay tuned for forum its later this morning at nine o'clock on monday morning won't have the forum monday news roundup the latest news out of washington tim including an update on fridays indictment of thirteen russian nationals and three russian organisations for alleged interference in the 2016 you a selection that's with michael krasny on forum at nine and looking ahead to the ten o'clock hour social justice pioneer carl anthony a discussion on the intersections of race and urbanism environmental and social justice activists karl anthony draws on decades of experience as an architect in his new book the earth the city and the hidden narrative of race the book part memoir and part to to uh to tory old grapples with questions of urban democratisation and sustainability the discussion today on forum two hours we hope you'll listen and participate nine to eleven today on kqed public radio courage.

joe mcconnell michael krasny california kqed washington carl anthony karl anthony two hours
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The then luna man welcome to forum on michael krasny earlier this week the san francisco department of public health voted to approve safe injections sites in san francisco the facilities expected to open in july will offer intravenous drug users of sanitary place with hygiene supplies where they can inject drugs as well as dispose of needles epidemiologist alex krill is a member of the safe injection services task force and he joins us in the studio to discuss the science behind this initiative walk amongst grow thank you for having me glad to have you and we should say that uh this was a unanimous vote by the supervisors and they will release recommendations specific recommendations within a few months it doesn't appear to be a whole lot of opposition or at least organized opposition but we've had three years of legal neil exchange and there are underground sites so that have been operating for about three years and this is going on in vancouver and so forth you have hundred cities now i believe throughout the world what does the research tell us in terms of what this does you know we had an extensive amount of research from canada from australia and from europe about these sites basically what they show is that they really help the people who come there in terms of reducing the likelihood for hiv for hepatitis c 4 dying if they have an overdose others softtissue infections that they might have while also helping their community in the sense that it removes needles from the streets it helps to reduce the amount of public injection that's that's that's happening in streets and parks as well and so it it really helps the people who go there as well as the community and we're talking about the sites would have already been named right bayview in mission south the market in the underline well from the task force the recommendations was there were there were recommendations for four different neighborhoods that potentially would have some of these services and that did include i believe that tenderloin south the market mission and bayview what i heard from the health department just this week was i think they would start with perhaps two sites and maybe move onto more after that but.

michael krasny san francisco alex krill vancouver canada hiv san francisco department of pu australia europe three years
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That are expected to range from the low to mid 60s love northeasterly winds from ten to thirty miles per hour there is that wind advisory in effect from eight this morning till six this evening for those i winds also a a club coastal flood warning for king tides until three o'clock tomorrow look of the forum on michael krasny and two thousand one haroon logo was a student debt nyu and the founder of the university's islamic center but after a crisis of faith he had plans to lead his leadership role instead the nine eleven attacks thrust him into the spotlight as a spokesperson for american muslims now mobile is out with a memoir titled how to be a muslim american story and he joins us this hour in studio the talk about his struggles with bipolar disorder and the burden of being a professional muslim llc thank you for having me you were were called upon to be in i suppose sir this is the way you have turned it a professional moslem it was it was not necessarily a calling that you felt you were seeking hit the time was the last thing in the world i wanted to do i was the i was a kid in new york that when the subway train approached and a return people on the car i wouldn't get on because i was afraid of large numbers of people and then i ended up in a position like you said where seemed like everyone in the world wanted someone to explain everything about islam and being a twenty one year old kid probably not the easiest thing in the world to do not only the explain though that in many cases it was like people wanted you somato apologize or really say how sorry were something along those lines for the really actions of people were of other part of the world yes and i think that that still happen to a significant degree my uh second book reading i was asked my opinion on hamas and other terrorist organisations which i found a little bit jarring because the book as you said is actually nothing to do with politics or national security but uh for some folks if they see muslim they assume that we must all be the same and so this a hybrid as identity.

michael krasny founder bipolar disorder new york hamas haroon twenty one year
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The end of the work week a week trough is expected to pass north of the bay area on saturday but the best rain chances are going to be closer to the oregon border so we're expecting dry weather through the upcoming weekend as well we'll have high temperatures today ranging from the low to mid 60s it six minutes past nine luck of the forum on michael krasny in bremmer foreign affairs columnist for time magazine and president of eurasia group of political risk consultancy judges in the studio for this forum our he made news earlier this year when he revealed details of president trump's second meeting with russian president vladimir putin at a g twenty dinner we'll get his take on the investigation and a russian interference in us elections and the latest geopolitical news including the trump administration's approach to dealing with north korea which launched another ballistic missile yesterday and today boasted that newest missiles could reach across the united states welcome command rhetoric good to have you back good to be back with the first time i had you in the flesh after all these years but delighted that you're here with us not as concerned about north korea's many americans are why i'm not as concerned that there's going to be direct military confrontation i was in vietnam for the apec summit where trump was attending and his discussions both publicly about north korea in asia as well as his private conversations with a chinese president xi jinping were much more solicitous on diplomacy on negotiations on sanctions and he wasn't focused at all on the americans using military more fired fury no i mean i think we should give trump credit for the fact that when things don't work out for him he stops talking a vitamin he literally discussed mexico paying for the wall every single day when he ran for the presidency and you don't him saying that anymore because he can't get it done and i think when it becomes apparent that push north korea does he cannon there isn't a military option his ability to stop talking about that is far greater than that of any other president we've seen recently although he did say will take care of it when he was asked about dismissal causes missile now can hit the continental united states it has.

michael krasny time magazine president eurasia group trump vladimir putin north korea vietnam asia mexico united states oregon apec jinping six minutes
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Malcolm to forum a michael krasny as a fellow at stanford hoover institution victor davis hanson understands what it means to live as part of what he calls the california coastal elite but he spends a majority of his time at a family farm in the central valley in its this perspective that informs his opinion the california politicians fail to understand and serve the needs of the state's low income and middleclass residence victor davis hanson will explain in this hour and we're going to talk about a lot of things but why he thinks politicians who focus on trendy progressive causes are leading the state into decline from the crumbling infrastructure of oroville dam to hampering the state's agricultural sector and as you mentioned victor davis hanson and is in a classics of military history the senior fellow at the hoover institution at stanford and also a nationally syndicated columnist for the tribune media services and we welcome you back to the form program let have you thank you for having me again against the place to begin his with your notion of what i suppose we can call to california's there is carmel atherton brentwood coastal elitist you call them and then there's everybody else and you see this as a real divide a divide between maybe those who understand hydraulic fluid as you put it in some fairly wellheeled economics who have no idea what that is all about house of hurting estate though i think that the state is largely governed in i mean that in the most loose terms values actual governance state legislature the governor are senators of the majority of our representatives would also are educational institutions caltech stanford berkeley you see away uh.

Malcolm michael krasny oroville dam senior fellow hoover institution stanford california carmel atherton brentwood stanford hoover victor davis hanson
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Low 60s to the low 90s it's now six minutes past nine welcome to swap top the third in a series of conversations kqed foreign is having with other npr stations across the country today were cohosting a joint broadcast between kqed in san francisco and wcp end and cleveland a michael krasny the host of forum in i mean he eddings the host of morning edition here at ninety point three deputy cpn swopped talk is a chance to hear how different communities across the country are grappling with the issues that matter to them this hour the strained relationship between police and minority communities oakland's police came under the supervision of a federal court order back in two thousand three after police abuse by a group of rogue officers dubbed the riders and the city is still trying to meet reforms over fourteen years later an and in cleveland the one hundred thirty seven shots police chase and fatal shootings of two unarmed african americans and two thousand twelve sparked a federal probe by the us department of justice and cleveland's decision to make reforms and have them approved by a federal judge and agreement known as a consent decree you will be hearing that word allott tonight president trump thinks such federal oversight is counterproductive his attorney general jeff sessions has said consent decrees reduce police morale and actually lead to more crime so is federal oversight the solution to local police problems or is if the problem and what can are two cities learn from each other that's gonna be our discussion this hour and you can follow this conversation on twitter with the hashtag swap talk we also want to hear from you so tweet us and will open the phone lines later this hour we're going to talk to different people from oakland and cleveland who are involved in these issues but i to give us a quick sense of the types of federal oversight operating in each city we're joined by jim i'm shannon he's one of the lawyers from that two thousand three police abuse case that michael mentioned where they negotiated for federal oversight of the.

kqed jim i attorney president department of justice us cleveland michael krasny npr san francisco twitter jeff sessions trump african americans court order oakland cleveland fourteen years six minutes
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Though welcome to forum a michael krasny scientists no eleven more today about mental illness than they did a generation ago but uc berkeley psychology professor stephen inshore says that social attitudes toward mental health issues have not kept up with the advances in research intro joins us in studio this hour to discuss the urgent new to de stigmatize mental illness or that more people can access the help that they need russia going to hear about his memoir another kind of madness which explores his experience growing up with a mentally ill father who zone this was kept secret for eighteen years and i welcome seen android of program welcome back to the program with a of smell thanks so much great to be here always i guess the place to begin early i wanna talk about your book i because it's really quite poignant and of personal i know you put your whole soul into it the begins in 1930 6 actually was something you didn't find out about until 1971 when your father close the door and told you about it there's you're dead of sun of quakers hearing voices in his head and getting up on top of roof and feeling he can fight fascism make his contribution to the war effort and to a essentially by the wings that he has to fly a now this is a very dramatic story obviously but a story that you had not even a scintilla of understanding of how you didn't know what you daewoo's experiencing or what he had experience in this had been a patterns whole life when my sister and i were quite young bakken oil hi on the lead dr lead psychiatrist told my father clearly if your children ever learn of your mental illness or your hospitalizations they'll be permanently destroyed you and your wife or forbidden from ever mentioning it and my dad was always adherent of medical advice and so until my first bring break from college i lived in silence about the most important issues there in your family in the face and it was in some ways an idyllic childhood my father was philosopher my mom putting wishart ohio state to highest eight football games what could have been a better life except for the sign silent terror looking underneath day experience dad would disappear for three or six or.

stephen inshore russia michael krasny professor android daewoo ohio eighteen years
"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"michael krasny" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to forum on michael krasny adultery more human sacrifice column tobin's new novel house named his fresh take on an ancient greek myth king agamemnon is about to set sail for troy but there's no winter phyllis fleet sales so he chooses to offer sacrifice of the gods his own daughter the guardian recently called toby in a giant among storytellers in his other books include the testament of mary in brooklyn which was made into an oscarnominated film he joins us in studio for the segment to talk about his writing in the enduring relevance of greek tragedy and so good to have you back with us and form good morning to you i guess the place to begin here is in the sasid this myth a so full of of violence and uh revenge and all the rest of it the minutes 'extraordinary myth but by understand it you didn't go to saw the laser euripides erv ask lewis or any them you had a play that you read from quite a mistress point of view the civilians yet as late play by eureka days and he's though he's trying to make a man's too clad a mess stra for having given all the best lines to her daughter electric in earlier interational earlier vashem versions of this and a hat and read us whereas pires i knew the rs dire written by a slips and i knew the various electra's button when europe is at the end of his life writes this it is really explains a great deal that this mother was lured to the camp before her husband went to the war by him great told her look we have found a wonderful husband the warrior kill as for our beautiful daughter if agenda you get a seamstress is working and bring our son arrest states to witness the wedding and come all three of you and we will have asked you a great celebration before the war and she's food immune she thinks this is true when she arrives it's pigs it's a picture happiness yard to domestic moment it's the father being you united with these my wife with his loving daughter with his son whose if playing soared fighting with and she she remembers it because it vivid in her memory because it's the last time this will occur and he hasn't the courage to tell her that instead of a wedding is going.

tobin troy brooklyn lewis pires electra europe michael krasny toby