14 Burst results for "Michael Keating"

"michael keating" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"michael keating" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for this. Npr podcast and the following message come from betterment of full service 401k provider help attract and retain talent by helping your employees save for retirement and more no business is too small to get started learn more at betterment dot com slash. 401k live from npr news. I'm jack speer. Florida is reporting the highest numbers of children hospitalized with kobe. Nineteen of any state daniel prior of member station w. m. f. e. reports orlando's largest hospital system it its highest number of pediatric hospitalizations. Since the start of the pandemic nearly two hundred children are currently hospitalized with cove in nineteen in florida chief medical officer. Dr michael keating with adven- hal central florida says the delta verion surge is not sparing kids right now. We have about a dozen children in the hospital. Which is our all time high and i. I wish there were not and there was a time when there was none when we were doing the right things last year. Keating says the right things include face masks for all k twelve students but just a few school districts in the state have defied republican governor ron santa's ban on mask mandates and are requiring students where facial coverings for npr news. I'm danielle prior in. Orlando mutombo banner. Now reported to have taken control of afghanistan's third largest city the strategically important provincial capital of herat the latest advance further squeezing the country's embattled government just weeks before the end of the us mission there. The seizure of herat marks the biggest prize yet for the taliban long with another seizure. The cuts off a crucial highway linking the capital kabul with the country southern province. They're also reports kandhar has fallen weeklong. Blitz insurgents have now taken over. Twelve of afghanistan's thirty four provincial capitals communities across the pacific northwest are.

"michael keating" Discussed on ABC Radio MELBOURNE

ABC Radio MELBOURNE

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"michael keating" Discussed on ABC Radio MELBOURNE

"Against Scottish independence. But there's a caveat, and I wouldn't like to go back into beautiful. That is what's being proposed by Scotland's first minister, Nicola Sturgeon. If she wins a majority for the Scottish National Party in the elections held overnight, she'll demand a new independence referendum from Boris Johnson. Lost food was held in 2014 and 55% voted No, but that was before Brexit. Hi there. My name's say the Mass and on the local SNP Kansas 29 year old SNP candidates, Sarah Massine has been pounding the pavement in Edinburgh, knocking on doors and asking for support. Polls show people here are evenly split on the issue of independence. She says They should have the right to vote again because the majority of Scots didn't vote for Brexit. She's getting a good response from young voters, in particular young people's opportunities and to work travel and study abroad and I'm going have been taken away from them. Some of the voters I am spoke to an end and right. We're worried about the economic impact of leaving the UK Estado for Mitch. And why is that? Think care. This ghost economies, the bet. Fragile to go independent Scottish independence. Is it a yes or no for you? Well, the last time it was a yes. This time, I'm really not sure. Boris Johnson's already said he won't grant another referendum that Michael Keating, a professor of politics at Aberdeen University, says the U. K government can't hold out forever. Legally. They can't ignore it. They can ignore it and just hope that issue goes away..

Michael Keating Sarah Massine Boris Johnson 2014 Edinburgh Scottish National Party SNP 29 year 55% Nicola Sturgeon Brexit Kansas U. K government Aberdeen University UK Mitch Scotland Scottish first minister Scots
"michael keating" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WGN Radio

"WGN so John Belushi may have started the blues brothers with Dan Aykroyd on Saturday Night Live in nineteen seventy eight the big movie in nineteen eighty but Belushi's brother actor and comedian Jim Belushi has stepped into their shoes touring in concert all these years even opening up for the rolling stones at Soldier Field right here in Chicago Jim is started countless movies and spent eight seasons as a star of ABC's according to Jim you know spearheads Belushi's farm which features cannabis brand the blues brothers and here is Jim Belushi how are you Jim all I am excellence glad you're joining us now would hearken back a little bit you know you you and your brother John as well sister Mary younger brother Billy all grew up here you have always kept Chicago close your heart over the years I mean you you you're back here all the time you're here supporting your teams I it I think that's fantastic yeah I will Chicago minimum routed their arch people are kind warm and I'm treated very well there are actually people very well I got great cigar shop you know the back wheel shop old town absolutely all walking the streets I love the I don't know it just it just makes me feel good to be here in Chicago or I don't know but I I learned my craft there right and I got everything I needed from second city either so I don't know I'm just really grounded there kind of well what brushes my spirit and what time did you realize okay I'm gonna break in the comedy I want to do this when I was sixteen I want to start a job at second city and I've never seen magic before I mean that was magic and at that point I want this I want to be here I want I never should have been just chasing the magic and when I got the second city was metro experience magical communication with the audience and the other actors and that feeling is what makes you present in short good teaching up for all these years I find where will I go now such a great training ground for that and it's in the notes such as him and what a let's do it let you do is that as a as a as a comic a comedian as an actor that stage being as simple as it is and the set as simple as it is it lets you really shine it lets you really really you know not use you're not using a million props you're not using any at all yeah you have to fill the space you do but it's kind of odd because then when I went to television right from second city I had couches the walk around we okay gentle reader call sure is there okay there are well I said to you before we got started that you know there were first to memorable roles for me watching you and laughing my **** off and one was working stiffs with Michael Keaton back in the late seventies then yeah that was hysterical that was a great show that was pretty Marshall directed the pilot and it was one of the best pilots I mean she's the physical comedy the relationship comedy and the joke well perfect there are no yeah we shot like nine associates yeah yeah I have it on VHS somewhere Michael Keating zero zero quite brilliant twenty Marshall directed it was of paramount that was at the heyday of their sitcom Walden I was very grateful to be part of it yeah Paul Reubens in that too yeah yeah yeah all of the users only report yeah yeah he was at from Groundlings at the time that the improv company outlaw change here sure and about last night which was filmed so much in Chicago and that's what connected me to you so much as I knew your Chicago guy it was filmed in Chicago and I still can't tell you to this day how many my buddies and I will say yep pull this like it plays jingle bells all right but I would encourage you to go with the right terrorists and road but I feel a little more than I did the play at the Apollo theater and then don Simpson came out to see it because you wanted me to do while I was working stiffs yeah and he said we should make that the screenplay and I said that the producers Jason but sure okay and then they got the need to clue and tin cans respirator and they gave the Simpson in the log book and then the office my brother John is that right yeah she a John called me to set the bar which is offering a special version of Chicago the movie I sort of do it it was only talked about the doors and don't do it you can't listen I can't lose the cheeseburger if you look shorter like I can't do you know Kissinger I give to anybody you you've eaten up everything this war was mining it on stage my role leave it alone and these are well you don't understand Hollywood Jimmy you know there there he Kiki muscles of damning are hot and they're offered to me and then I said I don't care package you for why don't do it then they're going to give it the billing Murray would you rather have somebody in your family do it sure actually you don't yeah they got mad at me and hung up yeah early past yeah the bill Lawry pass I think John sets up the billing I don't want to throw out for six years about Chrysler picked them up and that movie changed my career is that how long that's that sat on the shelf was this was six years before going to turn a lot once we couldn't attach a big star to a a little wobble Walpole got hot with J. normals fire and he was phenomenal for tri service say it's a goal picture V. says Yasser he said the US on the network you know Chicagoan directed at that role was made for you know yeah I I would be grateful really really it made me made me very happy ma'am yeah I bet I bet it'd and it's great to see all the Chicago landmarks around there too you did Saturday Night Live very early in your career to another legendary Cassidy Murphy Joe Piscopo Julie Louis Dreyfus Tim Katherine ski your body as well you began on the show you know for years if your brother John left the show one year before he left us did you did you ever feel gosh I got a lot to live up to our I'm my own guy and I'm gonna make my own mark well I mean listen I was up there my brother you know I mean you because my brother but I was a fair just like everybody else look for him instead of light was the hottest show on TV you and everybody that I mean most of people on that show from second city so the natural extension for second city actor one Saturday Night Live so everybody would want to do it and of course will be offered to me I was like of course I'll do it and everyone's told me not to do it and I was wrong this is I'm an actor of a comic actor business which is a great opportunity I'm doing that well your brother yeah yeah yeah my brother my brother but I'm still doing that well you get a lot of Flack yeah yeah yeah I'll deal with it I never got any Flack people were very warm and nice to me well I wasn't delivered on that show I was only there for two years and I felt like I was.

WGN John Belushi Dan Aykroyd Saturday Night Live Jim Belushi
"michael keating" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

08:28 min | 2 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Ordered delivery from your local restaurant recently and if so how did it go your lightning talk about how she had to go to a certain zone in a certain area and then it was a hand off drop off we had it brought right to the house by the way lightning when you did it did you wipe anything down did you take any extra precautions handling the food or anything I didn't touch the food my husband was the one who who grabbed the he's the one who paid with his card and grab the food and all that so I don't touch anything so but when you got home all the packaging at all yeah I did yeah I didn't do anything out of the ordinary some people have been wiping this stuff down no there's now like tips online how to handle it god food for what it's worth we haven't done the delivery yet like when the people just come to your house and shop your I haven't done that yet we won't we picked up everything so far so it in the midst of the shutdown I haven't actually done the delivery thing it one other thing I'd love to get into by the way because this is become a quick thing much like a rotavirus this is come on real fast but you know there's all this zoom stuff going on right now yes learnings room meetings all that sort of stuff have used if you're about to zoom blooming that's happening I heard about it because I saw your tweet that's the first I've heard of it well I'd like if anyone has had this happen to them I'd love to hear from you six one seven two six six sixty eight sixty eight because I'm wondering how widespread this is hi this doesn't happen to me we don't do a lot of zoom stuff our schools aren't doing it yet but we've done it a couple of times they've had like once a week type of things and so we did one last night and we haven't had problems but the idea is that you're on this I have whatever ten twenty thirty people sort of invite only meeting and then learning or whatever it is and as you're doing it somebody like it's like the joker from the original Batman with Jack Nicholson and Michael Keating Michael Keaton where somebody interrupts you and all of a sudden you you're getting you could either get like porn you could get some sort of silly stupid little video or something like that it it's you know how this works some idiot in his basement thinks this is really funny and has figured out a way to hack into your little zoom conference and they've said you some sort of stupid thing okay said it hadn't happened to me yet thank god that's me knocking on wood lightning but it's not enough people that people are tweeting about it I'd love to hear your story on it number one number two I I mean I think we all know the answer to this but how much patience do you have for these guys I mean man I know we're talking about letting people out of prison right now but to me if you catch somebody doing this I want to put in a prison that specifically had a corona virus problem I'm not kidding yeah I am so pissed about this that's terrible yeah this is what people are doing with their time I know Hey let's crashes schools soon session and send something inappropriate I know it's terrible it's disgusting it's gross you know I mean come on grow up people in this is only gonna get worse because what happens in situations like this lighting where some people act really good some people act really stupidly and other people don't know what to do but it's that second category it said idle hands are the devil's workshop right that old cliche well people sit around with nothing to do when they get bad ideas in their head and they say I wouldn't I could even figure out a way and then when they figure out a way these are we gonna do this we're gonna do this and the next thing you know now people are getting their job always out of question the only way that people can be productive you have some sort of social distance conference call and people are getting them people are doing the social distance learning thing and people are hacking into that and they're putting in stupid did appropriate things it just drives me crazy and I'm telling you I got no patience for it whatsoever none and it makes me utterly upset another no when it comes to the delivery of wine and beer I can read some of the text for you here that are coming in it says VB if they have it Maine beer company that I order for I. F. I'm doing that for lunch I'm definitely ordering so if they have me if they're offering Maine beer company with whatever our yester on there definitely ordering that another one says Kowloon has a my tie in other mixes for sale that's interesting I did not know I didn't know that he you get to my tie lightning my husband's a mai tai fan in a zombie fan of the I can't do those hard drinks I can't do it I'm like a blue Hawaii and I'm a fruity that's where I go and even that can be strong I'm not in my faith and I don't know you're doing day but I don't do that thank you I'm it's it's I'm a little odd when it comes to drinks I like something that's a little fruity and sweetie but also like it when it's harsh at the same time so it's a really weird mix slick my ties scorpion bowls I absolutely love but also like drinking it just neat so it's it's it has to be a particularly on those two spectrum you know I'm saying and I know if the view is doing he was is not speaking to see where I was going with this yeah and I had the I had to pick it up by now I was doing I go further I I was like you know what I'm catching on to this and I know he's going to do just wanna make sure light at all one more quick one here this person actually is hit us up on our Facebook message so this is a little bit different than the tax side they're saying restaurants now have managers working so their salary people and they don't they believe they don't need any more tips that's their opinion on that the salary people don't need tips I don't I don't follow actually they're they're saying that they're essential personnel and they're basically putting their managers up to these tasks for salary personnel not your waiters not your bartenders you usually get tips so they believe that the managers that are working and giving you your delivery and pick up and take out they believe they don't need any more tips our retelling me all right so you're not tipping on a delivery now I mean what sense that I don't know that's all they said they just said managers are I don't they're talking about pick up they must be talking about back up I'll take another one lighting I'd love to hear six one seven two six six sixty eight sixty eight if you are one of these people that is delivering food how have the tips band have they been ridiculously generous or what are people saying to you as you've done this I'd love to hear some experiences from this I just naturally assume that people or or giving a much larger depths how many people are like that person out there that's a no no don't get fooled these are the guys making the minimum wage or less than minimum wage these are salaried people and they don't need the tips are you are you like that if you're in the delivery game I'd love to hear what your reaction is how people I've been how the transactions are going how it's different than it was even say two weeks ago number one and number two how the tips are are the tips better or worse thank you Kelly financial pulled out right now lighting our tips until our non food delivery right now better or worse than they were a month ago I don't even consider the prospect that they might be worse until that person sent in that that message at so that's good that's an interesting topic six one seven two six six sixty eight sixty will take your calls when we come back it's V. V. you're in the middle one is Tuesday right here on W. RKO here's your deal on money question of the day Donna from Indiana asks I had to take early retirement three years ago due to health issues I have a high interest mortgage on my home and about eighty thousand dollars I'm wondering if I should use my savings about two hundred thousand and pay off the mortgage Donna absolutely not you can not blow through your liquidity and risk your financial foundation without knowing your current interest rate and depending on how low of a rate you can get it may be worth exploring a refinance but only if it makes sense you absolutely cannot drain.

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the left that will not be there anymore they'll have a freshly dug in a new a new a person with a different outlook on exactly the great suggestion as well because we will move forward but will disappear to the only way that the concerned party can continue Mr fonts triples doubles to be more inclusive to be that one nation policy I'm so pleased at the very very first speech the prime minister gate outside number ten was that she taught take you right back to it would normally when prime this is waiting and win big they just say right we've done it let's crackle but he asked me to fight I think the expectations that we won and I talked to has to change let me bring up my very very pleased to hear that brief thought Michael Keating if you would from Brussels well three quick thoughts number one I think device that see right I mean it's great to move on I've just come back from the Middle East and Africa and you know it's not just to Europe and the U. K. the needs of a clarity I think everybody would like clarity in terms of building your relationship secondly I hope that you know one of the consequences of having such a comfortable majority means that I'm much more pragmatic approach is not going to be possible to sorting out the relationship because a lot of this is being charged with ideology and unhelpful things I mean Brits are famous for that pragmatism and we need a sensible withdrawal agreement that is not just driven by United deadlines and so on and the third thing is as the barren mind the Europeans on approach to this I mean is Scottish independence isn't just in the gift of the UK and the Scots I mean the Europeans can have views on this and there are countries such as Spain which are going to be quite uncomfortable with the notion of parts of the United Kingdom seeking a pen so this is this is a done deal even if you know some kind of understanding can be reached within the United Kingdom to buy so what I'm gonna say thank you move on to other matters but we appreciate your time to buy so would whose just been reelected as the Conservative Party member of parliament the sea to born with east in southern England it said the twenty three and a half minutes past the hour now almost a hundred years off to one of the worst cases of racial violence in American history an investigation to find the victims bodies has been re opened an estimated three hundred people were killed in the nineteen twenty one Tulsa massacre in the black neighborhood of Greenwood was burned to the ground investigators have used ground penetrating radar to search the area three suspected mass graves and the preliminary findings are due to be released on Monday as Jane o'brien now reports from tells in the early nineteen hundreds the Greenwood district of Tulsa was a thriving black community with restaurants and shops and even a photography studio a self contained and prosperous it was known as black Wall Street came to an end on June the first nineteen twenty one of twenty young black man was accused of assaulting a white girl and white riotous stormed the neighborhood.

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:43 min | 2 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I really respect the negotiators and the hard work they doing it's very complex very hard work but it should be sorted out by now that's not the main child as the main challenges putting a global price on carbon putting an end date on the combustion and putting a moratorium on all investments on cold saving all the force I mean those are the big decisions but now are needed because we need to cut emissions by half over the next decade I mean that's what the IPCC the United Nations intergovernmental panel on climate change shows very clearly so you know it's like it's like the negotiators are not even close to the main topic of the challenge were facing yesterday's deadline was not met so they talk again today does that give you any cause for optimism well in a way yes because it does show that they are committed I mean that the world has turned a corner they realize that that awareness and opinion you know everything from fighters for future but also business leaders around the world civil society scions you know in general political leaders of those gathered in Madrid understand that if they failed the world will really judge them very very negatively so it show that they're doing a hard job to try and succeed the challenges that they must succeed because what they're doing is just a partial is at the heart of of the challenge but I I think in you know so it's a double view on this I really respect the negotiations it's really important that they come to closure I think they will come to some form of closure but they must also admit that now is the time to go to the finance minister to the prime minister's to the energy ministers and say look here we have to widen this agenda so that we can get some action your hunt rocks from director the Potsdam institute for climate impact research in Germany talking about those talks in Madrid and talking Rosie about the politics of it and the difficulty of arriving at any could have meaningful deal on this and the politics also Hong seven believe the heart when you think that the the politicians who really need to make the decisions on this have to go home and sell it to that and that troops to disagree yeah it well disagree up to a point it's about finding that balance isn't it in days yes I don't but I think there is some disagreement unfortunately I although there is a rising sense of shad concern about the climb emergency there are still pockets of electric all comet tonight is and how to how to manage that and the trees difficult Michael Keating I mean you had rocks from was slightly more encouraged by the fact that they're still talking but he didn't seem very upbeat beyond that I mean I I think what he's pointing to is a lack of political will in some countries to go forward with this and is not I mean I think rose is right there a climate denies but they're also powerful forces that don't really want to see this agenda unfold as quickly as it needs to because it threatens the core interests I think another issue which complicates things is even if there is political will in certain countries the whole issue of equity and you know who has to take what show that I'm not as a highly charged issue because of course in the global south people feel that this is a problem that's largely been created by richer countries and therefore they have to take a very high disproportionate chef and there's a lot of kind of ugly incompetence politics and then I think the third thing he points to who is in the absence of a kind of a rule book on you know who's going to blow the whistle on what happens if you don't obey the rules at a time when multilateralism is in retreat if and I think that's a very very tough problem to crack it said thirty minutes past the hour the British prime minister Boris Johnson has hailed he's conservative parties resounding election victory as extraordinary underaged people across the UK to heal the divisions over brexit one issue though that may cause problems for the conservative administration is the campaign for Scottish independence in Scotland which voted to remain in the European Union and the twenty sixteen brexit referendum the Scottish National Party the S. and P. one forty eight out of the fifty nine seats in the Westminster parliament Scotland had a failed independence referendum five years ago but the leader of the S. and P. Nicholas sturgeon says her party showing in this election strengthens the case for another one Westminster highs ignored people in Scotland for more than three years it is time for Boris Johnson to start listening I exit regretfully the he has a mandate for breaks it in England but he has no mandate whatsoever to take Scotland eight of the European Union Mr Johnson has said he will resist calls for another independence referendum in Scotland on the line is to buy sell would he's been reelected as a Conservative Party MP for the seat of born with east in southern England was also a defense ministers been foreign minister as well welcome to the program to buy so would good morning good morning how do you see this Scotland issue playing out we'll see just to take stock of what happened this is such a huge event this is like nineteen seventy nine when Margaret Thatcher K. made a real opportunity for the prime minister to bring the nation together but you're right to highlight the challenge in Scotland if I miss comparison with long with London that many of the London seats also remain faithful to coal bin socialism why was that it was because the prejudice you actually paid bigger than perhaps tribal instincts and in Scotland I don't agree that the people were voting for independence from the United Kingdom they want wanting a separate Scotland it was simply because the brexit this position was so and now that that will move forward I think that will dissipate so we will not rise to the coals for a second referendum in school and I don't believe the people want to depart from the U. K. as I said I think this is simply the policy that they chose to take because of the the support for remain that does a lot of hope in that also you you don't know that's true do you well we've had a referendum already and even the S. and P. themselves said right that's the issue put to bed for a generation but we've seen in seats right across the country that if you wanted to support a remain that would stand you do have to choose probably the double Democrats old SMP because the position by on labor was just so big US and in Scotland that's the way I have what about why they picked up and done well and we have to recognize that ultimately I think it very dangerous to go down to go down this road it's S. MPs clearly on a mission is that rests on that track but the mandate that we have for the from the nation I thank you it's very very close to what is now a requirement is to make the case to say those who are concerned about leaving the European Union and I would be one of them having that should remain is to say that the deal on the table we'll continue to allow to announce to have a close working relationship with me from a business perspective or otherwise political security to make sure that we remain close at but will so on the on the referendum if we can do that we can provide the insurances to those people in Scotland that she remaining part of the union is also good thank what of recent history on this and I was talking about this in the studio member to go when you look back to recent times there clearly was a lot of pressure on the government of the day before the first Scottish referendum of for a long time people said no no we can't do that we can do that in the end they said okay you can have one at the same thing happened over the E. U. referendum what's what's to say that at some point in the next five years we would hear the government saying no no no all right then well it's interesting the person who is responsible for both decisions about was the camera supports and we don't do referenda well in this country the question that you was was pretty basic you know if you can help let's say was very clear the ons was a bit more complicated note the question wasn't clear you know it's not in what color your studio is but if you make a the I'll have the votes to change the color of your studio into a different color you you might get more than fifty percent saying yes what color you want to change it to is it in a different matter and it could be more arguments and that's exactly what's happened with the you won't leave meant where it's supposed to coach people had so many different views on and the government the dates recently I have to pick that up the pieces of the you know the debates and say well it looks like we want more control over Knowles will control of our borders I'm a control of our money but people didn't really I don't I don't sing catch the people understood the nuances between single market customs union implications on the backstop all that was pretty fresh there's no point out where one of my doing I was engine pulls from doing the whole referendum that basically I'm gonna what not to do that but anyway I don't know I don't know I I I hold myself back to so regular in Britain in every pub in every family and indeed and into the two rooms in parliament ultimately we have now a a deal with the prime minister I think surprised many went to Brussels after he became prime minister I was able to secure a new a new proposal a new deal I'm we now do you have a chance to get back in time but I believe with that certain determination will move into the transition period often circus generate and we can make this happen and we need this to happen because what was also trade with the result the huge result that we saw was a desire to move on that the frustration the impasse the gridlock that Britain has been and stocking has not been good for our reputation is not be good for British business is not being good to track investments in this country so it's very very clear they doubt has been let's move forward I'm divorced okay let me bring some thoughts in the studio that I'll have to go to grace to you intently Rosie Campbell filled yes I'm really interested in this in a cool for the nation to heal itself and I'm we've been talking about the geographical divide that divides electoral support but also throughout the program we've been talking about the fact that amongst younger people amongst women and also months ethnic minorities the conservatives didn't win so I'm wondering what you what you'll government's going to do to it to bring those people together into hill the hill the nation had the fight you a such an important point if we want to be that policy that just gets you know short shiny a majority then we have to continue doing what we're doing in the past what we see in this time is many northern states particular post industrial areas labor support since normally learning themselves that support to us and we have to turn that into a permanent living in interesting word in this context you you'll you'll slightly anxious are you that they're not gonna stick around for a long it's it's not just my ex is the prime minister talked about that yesterday he said we recognize the trust you to bestowed on us we now have you done so soon you'll support you turn your back on Corbin socialism and we want to prove to you that actually we want to turn it into something more permanent we actually want to under for the future itself unless we do if we don't do that but not policy is an app speaking to go into a position because the two issues there absolute dominance in this election one was a form of socialism pushed by Jeremy Corbyn which is just out of sync with nobody out he could really relates to it it was just too far.

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The BBC world service with me Judy marker coming up a little later why mass killing of black residents in the US city of Tulsa almost a hundred years ago we'll be back in the news next week following the massacre of both blacks and whites swept this under the rod they had to focus on surviving they said that to talk about it meant that they had to re live it and it was simply too painful to re live there were mothers whose sons they never heard from again wives who lost their husbands children who lost their fathers simply never heard from them again more on those past events in Tulsa in this half hour with me throughout the program Rosie Campbell professor of politics at London universities king's college and Michael Keating executive director of the European institute of peace in Brussels and a former special representative of the U. N. secretary general in Somalia more from them in a moment after we brought you up to date on events in Madrid negotiations at the U. N. climate talks that tossed with reducing the risk of catastrophic global warming have been unable to wrap up the meeting by yesterday's original deadline discussions that resume this morning to produce a draft agreement still low no significant well no significant breakthrough and still much to be resolved these include the rules guiding the international trade in carbon credits finance to support the country's most vulnerable to climate change and with a big countries will give a strong signal of intent to curb emissions I spoke earlier to professor you had rocks from director of the Potsdam institute for climate impact research in Germany he was at the talks until a few days ago and you would have heard him on this program from Madrid when those talks began I Austin how much progress he felt had been made it's a very worrying situation there is reason to be you know deeply concerned that they're not making progress and the dilemma is that even if they were making progress is only to close the deal that was signed five years ago we're not making programs on the climate emergency that we're facing that we really.

Germany U. N. European institute of peace London Rosie Campbell US BBC Madrid Tulsa Potsdam institute Somalia representative Brussels executive director Michael Keating professor
"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:37 min | 2 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Political agreements peace agreements that have a real chance of surviving so we work with parties to conflicts we try and understand the perspective of people who are affected by conflict and ensure that perspective is included in discussions about conflict resolution because if you fail to do that political agreements once survive but very importantly we work with the European in St piece we work with European political act is decision makers both in Brussels but also in European states not just the usual European states on them are also working with the growing number of players who are involved in conflict resolution I mean some of them are professionals such as you and bodies he you invoice and non governmental organizations but also women's groups youth groups business people this is the kind of growing area unfortunately because there are more complex and more violent seven and it needs you know and it needs standards I was about to suggest that said it may not mean I don't oversimplify this but is it possible almost to draw up a blueprint to get people you know they're all best practices that people could pursue here based on evidence of recent success stories well you know every situation is different but yes there are things that tend to contribute to the success of six me in a peace processes and political agreements and things that largely condemned them to failure and you know one of the big stories recently has been Afghanistan hi I'm nineteen years of international involvement doesn't seem to have delivered peace and as many lessons that have not been applied that have but it happens all over the world and you know we have working in about a dozen places around the world and it's remarkable how you know you're in a the wheel gets reinvented every time and one of the things we try to do is say look every situation is different everyone has to draw upon their own history their own culture to understand what's going on bought you know make sure you know who the political economy make sure you understand the dynamics of the contributing to conflict and who the most credible lack to saw the need to be involved in reducing violence and in you know building lasting peace so there are approaches that apply everywhere even though the specifics there was a different tailored to each situation you might want to pursue that theme a little more in a moment because you mention Afghanistan we're gonna look at that now with particular reference to the US military commitment that a trillion dollars it's cost thousands of US lives have been lost and that's not counting of course the vastly greater number of casualties among the people of Afghanistan themselves on Monday The Washington Post newspaper released a a huge in previously confidential trove of documents it'd obtain showing that throughout these long years of war senior figures within the US government and the military have been saying of vociferously the US strategy in Afghanistan was deeply floor but the public messages fail to tally with that private assessment the more than two thousand pages of testimony point to concerns over the whole range of U. S. aims from nation building to ending opium cultivation and training the Afghan millet tree we were devoid of a fundamental understanding of Afghanistan we didn't know what we were doing it's one of the more striking but also typical quotes from Douglas luta three star army general who was the White House liaison on I've got is done during both the bush and Obama administrations he explained his criticisms to the BBC what I meant by we didn't have a fundamental understanding is that we did not understand the complexities of Afghanistan sufficiently to craft a strategy and what do I mean by the fundamentals I mean the demographics the economy the politics the history the culture the regional context in Afghanistan lives in a very tough neighborhood so my experience working on Afghanistan is that we seldom got to the level of deep understanding sufficient to fuel an effective strategy well Adam would she is a researcher on US military strategy at the Quincy institute for responsible state Croft in Washington and a former US army veteran who served two tours in Afghanistan he told me about his initial reaction on seeing the release of the so called Afghanistan papers the first thought that came to my mind was the parallels between the Afghan papers that the washing post released and the papers that we got called the Pentagon papers that were released during Vietnam now there's some differences between those but overall the senses similar that they reveal that even though we are in a losing war politicians leaders military leaders knew that that war was unwinnable but they sort of continued it either just sort of say face or to kick the can down the road so to say but just to save face when so many lives potentially are at stake him and that's extraordinary thing to decide is certainly is I think one of the reasons that the Afghan war for the United States has been able to continue as long as it has is because certain costs have been sort of concealed from the American public sort of different from what you see in Vietnam where you have a large anti war movement some of those are financing for the war using debt rather than sort of taxes or bonds there was no drafts certain things like that the even take some of the casualties off the list because in Afghanistan we use a lot more contractors than we did actually uniformed service members so if you just count service members you have about twenty four hundred killed in combat but if you add contractors into that that brings that number over five thousand and so certain things like that have sort of concealed the cost to the American public plus the number of civilians of course who have died as well that's right yeah which is often not something that's counting does this boil down to the difference between winning the war on winning the peace afterwards yeah I think that's a very important distinction to make I think the US military is very good at winning wars but it is very poor as as you say winning the peace and I think that's because militaries are not really designed to do that I don't think they're they're designed to build dates I don't think they're designed to build nations democracies and I think research has shown over and over again that they're just not really good at doing those things the utility of military force in Afghanistan essentially met its maximum about two thousand and two at that point it started to try to build states in a try to build a security force there and those things that the military just isn't really equipped to do so what how does that inform your thinking does that say to you you need a separate body of people to perform that second roll or does it say to you that America should get involved in fuel wars in the first place certainly those are the two options right either you needs to build up the civilian side of US foreign policy which is the department state you know donations in development aid or use sort of scale back yours sort of adventurism and choose to enter fewer wars and I think the answer is sort of both I think state department could use certainly a larger budget and could institute programs that would alleviate the need to intervene in this conference in the first place but I think it only comes down to I think an understanding that both American leaders in the American public needs to know that we need to sort of dial back what our expectations are what we can achieve in the world using military force but if you look at Afghanistan specifically taking some of those documents back to two thousand and one clearly straight after nine eleven the American public was willing some sort of reaction the Taliban held sway in Afghanistan wasn't that a classic example of a situation where the Americans felt they had to act yeah I I think they certainly did and I think that intervening in that conflict for those initial goals I think was something that both the American people wanted and that the military could achieve now those initial goals were to to overthrow the Taliban and to go after al Qaeda elements and other terrorist elements in Afghanistan like I said they accomplish that fairly early around mid two thousand two that was that mission was essentially complete now what they didn't think about leading into that war and what they often don't think about leading into most wars is what victory is gonna look like you're having some theory of success of what is going to be a win here and how can we sort of you know finish this conflict and that wasn't thought about and that's why these sort of see no plan for what's going to come after which led to corruption which led retribution and that sort of environment was ripe for Taliban to sort of take advantage of those grievances they use on Afghanistan and so not having a plan for what comes after is is ultimately what leads to needing to have these long complex and what does that say about what should happen in Afghanistan now from your point of view yeah so that's the most difficult part if we go back in time you know it's easy to say this is what we should have done this is how it should have been better but we're at a point now eighteen years in where the Taliban are stronger than they ever were the organization is extremely well organized and disciplined and so I think the cost that it would take in order to achieve the vision of success that they have which is this really well constructed western liberal democracy is essentially prohibitive that they're unwilling to pay the price to get to that sort of success and so they think they think they need to sort of dial down what they think success is going to be and most importantly the military the US military in Afghanistan I think the utility of it there is pretty minimal Adam when she in Washington I wonder how much Michael Keating that tallies with what he was thinking about how to go about peace work well yes it really does resonate I mean in a way what Adam said in dog food before him is first would you gotten out of the country secondly you've got to have a political strategy which is thinking towards the end game in either of those were ready to place thirdly is if you can spend a lot of money spend it wisely and get the balance between you know what you're gonna spend on state build in development versus security get that balance rights and that's very very difficult and that wasn't achieved another thing is to try and build the legitimacy of national authorities and one of the things that's come through these papers is that the net effect in many ways of the U. S. and broader international engagement laws to generate corruption and actually undermine the legitimacy of the very people that we were supposed to be supporting and then getting the narrative right is important and that you know what you're seeing is people trying to main political support back home for an engagement by essentially fibbing about what's going on and there's an irony here that you know unless you have your own boys abroad it's very difficult to maintain that level of political support and yet the most useful thing is often not having troops on the ground but being engaged in many other ways but selling not politic he is quite tough and the more obviously separate body of people to do the administration work once the military work is to a large extent done yeah I mean I'm not very comfortable with this crisp distinction between security anonymous because you're going to keep the place secure or what you do the administration when I mean there's another dimension that you know building security forces is also a state building effort and the trouble is we often focus on the kind of the hardware in the ability of individuals nas on how an army or a police force can actually be a state institution if you think of Britain people think of the Bobbi all the.

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You have this much money you have to look to argue about and is a lot of vested interests a lot of people with very high expectations what that money can do for them and the government's intervention means I think they just kick the can down the road and the question is how far did they kick it so if we have problems than problems as we're going to be much bigger especially if rates are as low in the future as they are right now this discussion dominating coffee mornings in the Netherlands reflects proves our concerns about the impact of lower interest rates and aging populations of the global pension system but as far as anything else piggy bank sexy around there and make sure he runs the Dutch federation of pension funds has warned contributions maybe height by up to thirty percent on prices start going up it will be harder for pension funds to keep generating the returns of the past well imagine you have a big band right I miss repose and you need to have enough money in if not only for the current generation but also for the future generations and when the race free market rates lower sh that leads to the fact that there is less money now to be paid out to the current generation because more money needs to be hold for the next generation got a so you you you should play it safe so they can know for sure you will get that money nice to be able to in this country it is and it should stay nice to be old in this country and that's why the parliament and the employees and employers organizations are really hard working on that right now the government is working on an over whole bus promising if new extra money bottle serve papers you know these retirements been prissy sweet so far for from men's Nestle one to have I get to do whatever I want and I do have volunteer work and I teach a doctor there is a level of frustration why are you cutting on my pension and the trouble with people that have you have the potential age we cannot go out and make money or earn money but of all the daily things cost more this new supermarket shopping yeah heating yeah so I'm making those punches those red but the seeds of discontent are beings so soon at the other end of the generations spectrum to you with many young people tensions conundrum is intensifying anxiety about what will be in store for their retirement and a whole again reporting and Rosie camel is not just a political dilemma in the Netherlands is it no it's affecting us everywhere well this is a combination of the low interest rates and an aging populations we're living longer and making use of a pension so much longer but going back to what he was saying earlier about young of those whose if older voters are more inclined to vote they're the ones that politicians will tend to favor and that sets the rights and of course politicians and democratic systems also Thomas anyway if you've got electoral cycles of four years or five years depending on the country it's very easy to kick the can down the road and keep on kicking it Michael Keaton you'll have worked in countries where the demographics look far younger because the populations of a young well in many of the countries I've worked there is no social security system for older people of course I can help having a very personal take on this side and the car yet qualifies old but I'm barreling down that track and it seems to me that you know what all this means is that people you know I'm losing confidence that the states will provide in that they need personal strategies I mean what I would like to see is great solidarity between young people and old people in terms of how to manage this problem and perhaps that's can involve different ways of living and Rosie that that gap between old and young in political terms in in in in the way put the population has has perhaps grown apart in recent time certainly in the U. K. that's been quite pronounced insets ages now one of the most significant predictors of electoral support so we waiting for the most reliable figures in the last election can is just happened but you know the polls suggest is not any different from twenty seventeen the fat in under forty five the largest party support was labor in quite the reverse in the in the older age groups so I think a lot of that is to do things like difficult he's getting on the housing ladder thinking you might never get to retire quite quite a quite a different view of what life gonna look like Rosie Campbell Michael Keating with me throughout the program you're listening to weekend from the BBC world service the latest news headlines of a distribution of the BBC.

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:22 min | 2 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The United States the United Kingdom and Canada have issued a vice warning their citizens to exercise caution if traveling to northeastern India following violent protests against a controversial new citizenship bill on Thursday thousands of protesters defied curfew orders and clashed with security forces mainly in the states of us some entrepreneur two people were killed in police fire the demonstrators see a son's identity is threatened by the legislation prisons newly reelected prime minister Boris Johnson says he will resist calls for another independence referendum in Scotland in spite of the pro independence Scottish National Party winning forty eight of Scotland's fifty nine seats in the British parliament is leader Nicholas sturgeon argues that there's not a clear mandate for another poll a Sears Smith reports Nicholas thirteen Meg knowledge is that not absolutely everyone who voted S. and P. is ready to support independence but after winning eighty percent of Scotland seats she believes she must not be allowed to hold another Scottish referendum Nicholas thirteen insists she didn't want to see Boris Johnson returned as prime minister but she knows a Tory government in Westminster while Scotland voted the opposite way is the result is most likely to advance her greatest ambition independence for Scotland tens of thousands of people are expected to gather in the Italian capital Rome later what's expected to be the biggest rally yet but I knew street protests group against the far right the sardines movement began in the city of Bologna BBC news it's six minutes past seven GMT welcome to weekend from the BBC world service with me Judy market coming up this hour why the pension system in the Netherlands often cited as perhaps the world's best is still of course of deep political divisions a lot of money and it's not clear who owns the money if you have this much money you have to look to argue about and is a lot of vested interests a lot of people with very high expectations what that money can do for them the politics of old age and retirement coming up in this half out two guests with me throughout the program Rosie Campbell is here professor of politics at London universities king's college and Michael Keating executive director of the European institute of peace in Brussels and a former special representative of the U. N. secretary general in Somalia more from them in a moment but first to bring you up to date on U. K. and US politics the British prime minister Boris Johnson has hailed the conservatives resounding election victory as extraordinary as urge people across the U. K. to he'll let divisions over brexit speaking in Downing Street Mister Johnson said he would repay the trust of labor supporters who voted conservative for the first time world leaders have been reacting to the conservatives victory president trump hasn't made a secret of his support for Boris Johnson and in welcoming the result he seemed to hope the Tories success would rub off on his own reelection campaign I want to congratulate Boris Johnson on a terrific victory I think that might be a harbinger of what's to come in our country it was last time I'm sure people will be thrilled to hear that but a lot of people will be actually a very big percentage of people because this was a tremendous victory last night and it's very interesting the final votes are being tallied right now but the numbers are tremendous so I want to congratulate you as a friend of mine it's going to be a great thing for the United States also because that means a lot of trade tremendous amount of trade they want to do business with us so badly under the European Union it was very very hard for them to do business with us president trump on Boris Johnson what parallels all that between what's happened in Britain over the last forty eight thousand where things stand with American politics a question for Dr Mathew Wilson associate professor of political science at Southern Methodist University in Dallas Texas what what has to be careful about interpreting too broadly because of course they're contextual differences between the countries but I think one major lesson that is being drawn by Americans is the dangers of veering too far to the left I think that Jeremy Corbett and his repudiation by the British public is a cautionary tale for the Democratic Party about how they get really squander a chance to beat Donald Trump if they're perceived as dangerously leftist I'm out of touch ideologically and so I think that's the number one parallel that's being talked about today in the United States and that's about who the Democrats end up picking isn't it that's right because in the democratic primary there are moderate choices like Joe Biden and then there are a variety of much more leftist choice it's like Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren and one of the battles that's going to be fought next year in the Democratic Party is whether the Democrats want to be their traditional center left selves or whether they want to be much more decidedly leftist one of the Boris Johnson Donald Trump comparisons that are sometimes made well there's a bit of that they're both sort of eccentric quixotic figures in a sense not the sort of person who ten fifteen years ago would have been thought of as by any means a typical president or typical prime minister so they certainly have those features in common I would say one important difference though between trump and Johnson is you know Johnson is a classically trained Oxbridge guy very much an intellectual of the sort that's not really Donald Trump so I mean they're not the same person they're not the same political figure but they have found it some similar themes certainly of nationalism and I think that's going to be the common element when you look at the two is how the electric response to a much more kind of nationalist appeal in the politics and when the two men sit down to talk top of the agenda arguably will be a future trade deal because we now know pretty much for sure that the U. K. will leave the European Union under Boris Johnson and at that point he will be looking to make deals with other countries most obviously the United States how does that look to you just now well today Donald Trump was actually promising saying that one of the first orders of business would be to work on a major trade deal between Britain and the United States don't know we'll see what the details of that look like but I certainly would expect that that will happen but before that can go too far down the road we're gonna have to see what brexit ends up looking like how clean a break there is between Britain and the trade rules and regimes of the European Union only once United States knows how much Britain will continue to be constrained by you you rules will we be able to figure out what a trade deal bilaterally between Britain and the U. S. couple Klein and Donald Trump would like that break to be as clean as possible yes that's right and of course that's going to be something that will play out in intraparty negotiations among the Tories going forward is just how hard and how clean is that brexit doctor Matthew Wilson of Southern Methodist University in Dallas Texas so were were to my guess Rosie Campbell and Michael Keating I'm Rosie your work at king's college includes work with the global institute for women's leadership because your director of that I think what what exactly is that setting out to do I would like this to his leadership was off Chad Michael sees due to get out the former Australian prime minister and off to her time in office she reflected on the experience just she had and she proposes institute to king's college London on all goal is to bring the best quality research together during research but to a much better job of communicating it so we really want to know what works to prevent will women into leadership positions how can we create gender equality what places and actually what really is effective and she brings quite a lot of experience to that particular issue sees that the does let let's just play little except in this will ring bells with a lot of people when she was in the Australian parliament October twenty twelve she outlined the perceived misogyny over then Australian center right opposition leader Tony Abbott it was during a debate in which he was calling for the resignation of the van parliamentary speaker pizza slipper a party colleague of Judea Kellogg's for alleged sexual harassment of a mail stuff he has stayed and worked in a discussion about a women thing the representative institutions of power in Australia the interview was a man called Stavros the leader of the opposition says if it's true stab roles that men have more power generally speaking than women is that a bad thing and then I discussion means use and another person being interviewed says I want my daughter to have as much opportunity is my son to which the leader of the opposition says yeah I completely agree but what is man body physiology or temperament more adapted to exercise authority or to issue commands she made quite an impact around the world with that particular speech dingy I remember it vividly and when I'm walking on the street with Judea women of all ages come up to and say that they remember that speech and what a difference it made to them to hear it being cold out publicly so absolutely and if this particular body what to make specific differences what what would you like to achieve above all else I think we'd like to know him in in in in twenty years with my kids for the growing up I'd like to think that being a woman wouldn't be a barrier to access in leadership positions and also when women occupy those positions they wouldn't be stereotyped to judge differently from men we'll have you back in twenty years time see that's what please stay home Michael Keating I mentioned your work is former special representative of the U. N. secretary general in Somalia a country you still take a great deal of interest in unknown in the last few days people will recall news of an attack on a hotel in in Mogadishu a place popular with politicians army officers diplomats how would you assess the security situation that just now well I think the security for ordinary people Israeli very low in whatever way you measure it economic security personal security and so on I mean the country is facing multiple complex conflicts relating to the insurgency al Shabab in the bombing that you referred to his results of that but they're also conflicts relating to efforts to build the states in the relationship between the central government and the federal states there are conflicts relating of the very local level some of which go back thirty forty fifty years of a natural resources of land for a sense of unresolved grievances historic injustices and of course it's so complicated by the fact that Somalia it is a bit of a theater for bigger powers to play out that rivalries as part of this sort of broader scramble for Africa new scramble for Africa ports and you know access to resources and so on so security is not great enjoyment of human rights is not great having set that Somalia has made real progress over the last five ten years compared to where it was twenty or thirty years ago there are being elections as a government coming to place their security forces and so on and just staying with the election am I right in saying there is a plan for one person one vote elections ideally by the end of next year that's right but you know somebody has been through this and when I was the U. N. envoy that twenty sixteen twenty seven teen we tried to go towards one person one vote elections but unfortunately the country isn't ready for that for a whole variety of reasons including security but also having the institutional capacity to pull this off and there is the stronghold clams still have over politics and one person one vote is very threatening in many ways to the clan grip on power and in terms of everyday life in Mogadishu just now I mean on your not there at this moment but I mean you've got a you've got a sense of it no doubt yes I mean I had a very strange existence because I was living in a bong could compound I mean I did get around a lot but always with a huge posse of security people around me I think for ordinary citizens of the city life has definitely improved you see that people enjoying themselves on the beaches and restaurants people laughed at night having said that shopbop is unfortunately evident pretty well everywhere they're very good at collecting taxes and they're able to pull off these attacks up on a fairly regular basis the Texas born is interesting isn't it that that sense of being organized because you know what you want to spend that money on well it is you know a and it's not just a minute but many insurgencies to depend on you know they need money to continue and they they you know in addition to that ideological identity they are sort of you know economic Matheus I mean they they have to tax economic activity to survive on their fairly efficient at it and one of the measures of somebody's real success is its progress on the debt really front but unfortunately it's competing the government with how should Bob as a tax collector Michael Keating Rosie Campbell with me throughout the program you're listening to the BBC world service I'm a news crucial.

United States United Kingdom Canada India
"michael keating" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"IPC. the biggest stories on the south coast from the dell ups newsroom here's tim weisberg this is w._b._z. news a thirty seven year old new bedford woman became the first offended to be convicted of drug crimes related to the year long wiretap investigation dubbed operation high stakes crystal hinson pleaded guilty last week to an indictment charging her with conspiracy to distribute heroin she was identified as a distributor purchasing heroin from the ortiz drug trafficking operation during the wiretap investigation on two separate occasions in june of two thousand seventeen she ordered heroin from the leader of the organization prosecutors say over the course of a little more than a week purchase eighty five grams of heroin from him they say she has an eleven page criminal record of forty seven year old fall river repeat offender arrested in two thousand seventeen for trafficking fennel ascendance serve two and a half years to four years in state prison and fall river superior court ramos pleaded guilty to an indictment charging him with possession with intent to distribute fennel subsequent offense in february of thousand seventeen officers approached a man after seeing him exit one truck and then approach another have quick interaction get back in his own truck and then drive away please pull them over believing they had witnessed a drug transaction they discovered a total of one thousand one hundred and thirty blue glassy and baggies offensive and approximately two thousand dollars in cash in his truck and alleged fall professional trafficker whether an extensive history of drug distribution related offenses found dangerous by fall river district court judge ordered held without bail up to one hundred and twenty days forty-one-year-old jamie nobles charged with one count of trafficking and fennel and excess thirty six grams nobles was the target of a search warrant executed by far over police earlier this month officer saw her lever apartment and play something in the trunk of our roommate's car before driving away she was pulled over and returned to her home inside her bedroom closet police located three hundred ninety five small baggies containing white powder and a separate bag containing about forty one grams of suspected fennel inside a plastic box labeled with her first name and a lawyer for judge charged with helping defendant avait and immigration enforcement agents says it's unfair to take away her salary while she's fighting to clear her name in court attorney michael keating told massachusetts highest court wednesday it was wrong to suspend judge shelley joseph without pay when she was only been charged in his presumed innocent katie is asking the justices to reinstate joseph's pay and let her work on administrative tasks for the court system while the criminal case plays out prosecutors say joseph helped man from the dominican republic who was living in the u._s._a. legally sneak out the back door of newton district court she's pleaded not guilty to obstruction of justice in w._b._z. sports the red sox off the next two days they had to london they'll play a game series overseas against.

two thousand dollars eighty five grams thirty seven year forty seven year thirty six grams forty one grams forty-one-year twenty days four years two days
"michael keating" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:59 min | 3 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on WGN Radio

"What they believe. But these aren't just spoken by advocacy repeatedly lead by example, in his job as defense attorney representing the very unpopular. But likely innocent client, Tom Robinson, in the end, although everything didn't work out. According to plan etiquettes was rewarded for his morality and showed exactly what a role model should look like. Yeah, that's the first that's the first movie dead that pops into into my head. It's such a great movie. Great book, obviously fantastic. Great. They did a great job. I mean obviously, it's a classic. It's a classic book. But, but they did a great job with the movie. I mean, that's that's you know that's the thing about an Gregory pack is always going to be associated with that role. You know of all the roles that Gregory Peck is played. I think that's the one that he is most, obviously most remembered for. And he's played a lot and Damian's. I was gonna say. Yeah. You know, I got then I got throw in John cavities in Rosemary, baby. Roll god. Yeah, bad. That's bad, dad. Yeah. That's clearly a bad debt. Yeah. We'll get into what we want to mix it up. TV movies bad. Good dads, three one, two nine eight one seven two hundred for talk and text two nine at one seven two hundred. Here's Juliane WGN. Hi, julie. Hi, Robert young. Father, no clear was nobody better, of course, legendary, you know, back in those days, like in the fifties, and the sixties TV dads were so iconic. You know, and they were they had value and they were really good. They were good. He Robert young was one of the best. Oh, and their kids had such respect for them, wonderful. It was different time. Julie? Have a good morning to take care, by the way, I want to thank everybody for all the congratulations that I've been getting for those people who might not know I'm humbled. I one of the Silverdome Illinois broadcaster's award last night for best radio personality, which is insane really insane. And I want to thank all the people who are who have been converted congratulating me on that. And I really appreciate it. So thank you, and yeah. So, yeah, that was a big deal. It was a lot of fun. It happened last night. We WGN won multiple awards including station of the year. So I was just thrilled and I want to thank everybody for all the congratulations, that I've been getting so appreciate that we're getting back to dad's movie TV dad's. Good bad three one two nine eight one seven two hundred years Mark the bread. Manny, mark. Thanks, man. Yeah. My vote would be Sean Connery. And the last crusade is the older doctor Joan. Oh. Yeah. I've only seen. I haven't seen that movie. I got I don't even know how many years is there something don't call me junior. Isn't that one of the lines in the movie? Yeah. He says that many times he does he named India or you name to after the dog. Right. And then in real life, that's where it came from too, because George Lucas, and a dog named Indiana. Correct. And that's where they got it from all right? Mark say, how do you white for me? Okay, buddy. Thank you. I see Marcus Mary to. The woman who was one of the stage managers on among the dead. Really? Yeah. Yeah. She's really great three one two nine eight hundred seven two hundred is the is the phone number. If you would like to join us, now here's a weird one this over here at yard Barker, they pick Bob advantage from my life. Michael Keaton movie that about seven people saw, have you did you ever see my life? No, no, Michael Keating. Michael Keaton is dying of cancer, and he decides that if I'm not mistaken, his wife is pregnant at the time. And so he videotapes a whole bunch of stuff for, for his for his son to watch after he's passed away, like how to shave and all that kind of, you know, all the advice that he would give the kid had he been alive. When Michael Keaton's character is diagnosed with terminal cancer during his wife's pregnancy, he refuses to let the universe takeaways fatherly responsibilities. Instead, Bob made videotape after videotape. So he can not only teach future son to do things like play basketball cook shave and drive, but also son would get to see his father c-, whose father was, it was a good thing, too, because Bob vantage that character is one of a kind. I'm trying to remember who directed that movie. Can you look that one up my life, nineteen Ninety-three, Michael Keaton, and I can't remember his wife was in it? It's it loose. Joel rubin. Bruce, Joel Rubin, Mr. the writer of ghost. Oh, yeah. Yeah. The writer of ghost and the writer of Jacob's ladder. He likes to read movies about people who are dead or dying. Less. We forget deep impact, deep impact another movie about people who are going to die. Bruce, Joel Rubin. I guess it was just first movie as a director because I think it was just a writer before. That was, I think his credits were just as a writer who played the wife in my life. Let's see here the wife. Yeah, the, the female lead, I think Gina date was Jeetan wasn't Davis. It was a pretty big name, Nicole Kidman. Nicole kidman. Okay. So that's my life from nineteen Ninety-three. I have not seen it since then. So I haven't seen in twenty six years. I remember thinking it was that great. Yeah. And I obviously I love Michael Keaton. All right. How about this Brian mills from taken? Yeah. Liam nason. The Liam Neeson's from took tooken. When you really think about it. Brian mills who played by Leeson probably gets into a bit too much trouble to be considered a good dad, but hey, the guy's still knows how to get things done like tracking down his daughter from halfway around the world and dangerously rescuing her. Well, killing about thirty two different people in the process hallmark probably doesn't make a Father's Day card for that one. No. That was one of those movies that surprise the hell out of me. You know, because rigidly taken. Was going to go straight to video. They weren't even given a theatrical release. And, and I remember seeing the trailers Ford and reading about it. I'm like, what the hell is Liam Niessen? What is this, and then it turned out to be phenomenal. The sequels not so much. I own all three that the, the second and the third now second one, the second one kind of passable, the third one is ridiculous. Yes, where they bump off fame ca Johnson. Yeah. But honestly, if you're, it's a great movie to show, your kids because it definitely reinforces the idea like all you gotta listen to dad, because he tells daughter, like, here's what you have to do. Don't do this. Don't do that. Like you two on concert, what even in two thousand nine. Yeah. Two thousand eight what, what teenager is following you to on, on concert through Europe. Oh, I think a lot. I don't know. I think a lot, but a frequent contributor to this show. Well, he's not a teenager, but Colin suitor follows you to around, but was he in two was he a teenager in two thousand? No, he wasn't. That's, that's all. I'm saying is that that's an odd banned for like a seventeen year old to be following around Europe in two thousand eight but nonetheless, it's a great movie. If you wanna scare your kids in this mission. Well, you know, the it was just like it was such a surprise, like I said it was such a surprise. I expected nothing. And it was weird because at that time, lame Niessen wasn't known as an action star, you know, by any stretch of the imagination. He was Michael Collins he was Oscar. Schindler. I mean he had done a couple of action things here and there, but he wasn't known as like a bad ass, you know, taekwondo fighting throat punching maniac. He wouldn't be the first guy that I would cast in a movie like that. But man he's great in it. And it's really, really terrific movie. So, yeah. Liam Neeson's from took. All right, good. Father, great father, Liam Neeson, taken does anything. He possibly can rescue his daughter. So what do you guys think best worst, most memorable TV and movie dads?.

Michael Keaton Liam Neeson writer Liam Niessen Joel rubin Mark Europe julie Bob vantage Nicole Kidman Gregory Peck Tom Robinson WGN Bruce Robert young Damian attorney Liam nason Michael Collins Sean Connery
"michael keating" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"michael keating" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"And if she's already if you're introducing someone new that's fine just commit sheet because right now, she's MJ in name only and then acts like someone completely different which is kind of weird. So that's interesting. You say we're going to talk about the secondary characters in this franchise a little bit. Because a lot of them are just Emam only did you. Yeah. Go ahead. Ned leeds. What's what's what's his name? I well, see. Let's have it here. It's just Ned is he given a last name. And there's no Harry in this either. Yeah. Where so that's another thing I'm bringing up right about now. Let me look it up. So the FOX's name he Jacob battle. But what's his what's his character? Just says that because there was a lot of stuff on the internet that he was Ned Leeds. So I am the it just as Ned Betty snuggle playing Betty Brant just says Betty, but then it does say flash Thompson. Also, let's not forget JB's smooth. Is in this movie some capacity, also Michael Keating, J James maybe by Edens also listed in the cast for this movie. So so it's die as MS Michelle Jones, which gives you the J, but it's not. Where I was going with the Ned thing was if he's Ned Leeds s means he's hop coddling. Yes. And they're going to judge real crazy. Yeah. Before any Osborne's? Also, did you notice adventures towers being renovated lots of speculation who's bought the tower? Is it an Oscar by is it the Baxter building is this how they're going to bring in the fantastic for is it shield. Why is it being renovated? Was it destroyed an endgame? Let's get questions July fifth twenty nineteen these questions will be answered now. I have to really interesting articles the first one on ask you guys if you agree with some of these things, especially you comic book, movie dot com. Ten things marvel still needs to do to make Tom Holmes? Peter parker. The most spectacular Spiderman to date, and these are a lot of the things we've been thinking of. Okay. Let me know if you agree with any of these starting with introduced the daily bugle, I think that's a step into bringing this. Tom Holland Spiderman closer to the the one we love he's. He's got to have some kind of adversely. Somebody hates everybody. Right. Right. The beauty of the early. Spiderman was j Jodie. Jamison demonized him in the public. Wanted to do something. What? He comes up it. He doesn't even get fed that he likes. He is my old buddy flash. He's just like. Yep. Yeah. Up some nice zingers. Penis parker. I mean, those kind of funny. All right. Yeah. Assemble the sinister sakes, I feel like they're eventually going to try to get to that. Maybe in the next movie. That's fine. Is it gonna make it better than the senators just more authentic? I I love this next one latte..

Ned Leeds Ned Spiderman Ned Betty Jamison Emam Peter parker Betty Brant Tom Holmes Jacob Michelle Jones FOX Oscar Osborne Michael Keating Thompson Edens j Jodie J James
Thieves snap up rental scooters in SF

San Francisco Chronicle Business & Technology News - Spoken Edition

04:27 min | 3 years ago

Thieves snap up rental scooters in SF

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. Feves snap up rental scooters. Assaf shared electric scooters are disappearing from city streets in high numbers. As thieves target the portable vehicles in the first two weeks. We lost two hundred vehicles to the theft, which was just shocking said Michael Keating CEO and founder of San Francisco's scoot networks. People were grabbing them all the time. We realized that if we kept losing them at that rate. We wouldn't have any left in response scoot, scaled back its vehicle numbers an expedited its plans to include locks on its two wheelers. San Francisco's skip has also experienced that's but declined to specify how many however, it's vehicles have a wheel lock mechanism. So they cannot be ridden unless they're unlocked with an app scoots to healers can be ridden in manual kick mode without using the app albeit in an unsatisfying experience as they are not designed for that. Their electric Motors require an app unlocked to work both skip and skewed have alarms. Go off. Scooters are moved without being reserved in their apps city sanctioned e scooter rentals started October fifteenth under a pilot program in which scoot and skip each have permission to rent out up to six hundred twenty five scooters scoot started out offering about three hundred scooters but have that to about one hundred fifty a day in recent weeks? Something residents have complained about on social media. We're not trying to hide that Keating said the reason is the fact ramping up more scooters depends on the success of the lock scoot this week will add combination locks and cables to scooters as an interim measure users will get the combination from the app after a scooter is reserved in early December scoot will switch to its long-term solution Bilton electronic locks with thirty two inch cables the smartphone. Apple unlock the device at the end of it ride. The user must lock the scooter to street furniture such as bike rack or pole and snap a photo of it. Skip has been renting its full complement of six hundred twenty five scooters and said it has gotten positive writer feedback. Skip also plans to add built in locks to its fleet. And is now testing them out on about a dozen scooters. In addition to warning thieves, the locks should help keep more of the scooters out of the flow of pedestrian traffic and prevent people from knocking them over. Skip said it's working on new technology to detect win scooters are written on sidewalks, which is prohibited. We want people to learn that when they get to the sidewalk they should pull up the scooter and walk it to the furniture zone said Julie SU skipped chief marketing officer referring to the sidewalk edge. We're scooters are supposed to be parked in March. Three other scooter companies lime bird and spin burst onto the streets in San Francisco. The scooter deluge led to a temporary ban, and then creation of the pilot program. The San Francisco municipal transportation agency, which oversees scooters said the number of complaints is much lower now than in the spring. The agency's three one one line logged three hundred thirty six scooter related complaints from October fifteenth to November fourteenth or eleven point. To a day in the spring. It receives complaints at the rate of forty four point six day, scoot, scooters average, two or three rights day Keating said by contrast, I go chilly were scoot rolled out scooters around the same time sees six to ten rights day per scooter, that's because the vehicles there are concentrated in a central business district while in San Francisco, they're dispersed throughout neighborhoods. He said skipped climbed to say how many rentals at facilitates. But it's pleased with usage sue pan said writers, use them for first mile last mile connections to transit as well as for scenic rides such as along the embarcadero or in Golden Gate park. She said constant theft is clearly not sustainable Keating said he declined to say what scoot pays for its two-wheelers, but industry sources say e scooters are bought wholesale from China for around three hundred dollars scooter thefts and vandalism are issues in many of the hundreds of cities worldwide that have the two-wheelers bird, graveyard, an Instagram account with sixty thousand followers. Chronicles the sometimes brutal ways scooters meet their end such as burning being thrown off buildings are being tossed in the ocean. Caroline said is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer, Email see said at SF chronicle dot com. Twitter at sea said.

San Francisco Michael Keating San Francisco Chronicle Theft Assaf Twitter Apple PAN Golden Gate Park Writer Julie Su Bilton Electronic Instagram Caroline Chief Marketing Officer Staff Writer Vandalism China