21 Burst results for "Michael Hill"

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 3 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Org. Dot org that is pledging is really easy. And we want to give you an opportunity on our last day of our fall fundrise fundraiser. I keep saying fundrise, then because I'm rising. And we want to remind you that listener support fuels all the reporting you hear from WNYC and NPR. It's morning edition on WNYC. It is the last day of our fall fund razor independent public media on WNYC, helps to keep democracy strong so we're asking you to give right now you can pledge at 888-376-9692 or online at WNYC dot org. I'm Michael hill and with us this morning is Jacqueline and WNYC's program director with an important message about now is a great time a really great time to pledge. It sure is. It is the last day of our fall fundraiser in this morning. We have a dollar for dollar matching period happening right now. Every single pledge to 8 8 8 three 7 6 WNYC or made online at WNYC dot org will be matched dollar for dollar thanks to FJC, the donors at FJC recognize the difference that individuals can make to vital organizations like WNYC and they are providing the matching funds for this dollar for dollar matching period. 8 8 8 three 7 6 WNYC 888-376-9692, we also accept your pledges online where we're happy to say they will be doubled dollar for dollar there too. And if you're listening to us if you're streaming the WNYC app, well, what a surprise there's a donate button there as well. So if you've been listening and waiting for a good moment to make your donation, we hope that right now is the moment to do that. It is the last day of our fall fundraiser, your pledge helps assure that we will end on a strong footing, especially as we've got this dollar for dollar match going on. That's 888-376-9692 that's 8 8 8 three 7 6 WNYC or you can pledge online at WNYC, dot org. We run on the honor system here nearly half of the funding for everything you get from WNYC comes from voluntary contributions from our listeners. That means what

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Breaches before they happen. CrowdStrike, protection that powers you. Its Layla faulted from NPR's morning edition. The demonization of fact based journalism is one of democracies biggest threats. This aversion to truth has taken hold as the number of local newsrooms has dwindled leaving reams of disinformation to fill the void. In public radio, we have a responsibility to counteract disinformation. This station is an oasis amid all the noise and fiction, having a reporter at the school board meeting at city hall, that is our resistance to the undermining of a free press. We resist by being there by providing platforms for people to see themselves reflected and to see difference. We resist by building bridges, and by holding people to account. We do it thanks to you. You give us the tools we need to fight attacks on truth by donating to this station. Here's how. By calling 888-376-9692 that's 8 8 8 three 7 6 WNYC or pledge online at WNYC dot org. Your support supports the programming that we provide on WNYC, such as morning edition, you're listening to right now. I'm your host, Michael hill, and with us today is Nancy Solomon from the WNYC, newsroom. It's our fall fundraiser to raise money that keeps this station. It's programming and NPR and the

Layla NPR city hall Nancy Solomon Michael hill WNYC
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 4 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC in New York at 6 O four, a good Tuesday morning on Michael hill 46 with rain out there today, and today 40 52 for a high and rain. Yes, just 52. It's cool. The Long Island railroad says commuters can expect faster transit times thanks to the completion of a new ten mile third track, the new track along the railroad's main line runs from floral park to hicksville, governor Kathy hochul, touted the project completion yesterday in Nassau county. What does this mean for long islanders? Well, it's great. They all start with the letter F if your delays, faster commutes, and more frequent trips. I think that just about gives us an a for all those, not enough, that's an a. Officials say the third track will increase LIRR service by 40%. The two and a half $1 billion project began construction. Excuse me, in late 2018 Food delivery workers across New York City often struggle to find places to charge their bikes and take shelter during bad weather. Now a $1 million federal grant is aimed at changing all of that. Mere Adams and senator Chuck Schumer have given details about the funding for new charging and rest hubs for delivery workers across the city, Gustavo nachi, a delivery worker in cofounder of lost delivery Easter unidos, says the hubs will help fill an essential need for workers. We're going to have the basic service for all delivery workers like a baked tuna and battery charging. So it's going to be something

Long Island railroad Kathy hochul Michael hill WNYC floral park hicksville Nassau county LIRR Mere Adams New York senator Chuck Schumer Gustavo nachi New York City
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:42 min | 4 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Working to close inequality gaps for women and improve the economic well-being of families I dot org. It's morning edition on WNYC and Michael hill. When Eric Adams was campaigning for mayor, he said, ambitious goals for building new bus and protected bike lanes. But 9 months into office, both goals appear already out of reach. WNYC Steven Nelson reports his transit agency is also struggling to keep up with routine demands. As a candidate, Eric Adams said he was going to be the first mayor to use a bike to get to work. You are going to see me on my bike all the time right in two and from city hall in the real way. He made big promises about street improvements too. He'd put in 300 miles of protected bike lanes and a 150 miles of bus lanes in four years. In April, mayor Adams was already boasting about how busy his transportation agency has been. We get stuff done in this administration. That's why we continuously use the term historical, but 9 months into office, Adams is nowhere close to meeting his campaign goals. The administration expects to complete 30 miles of protected bike lanes this year, and for bus lanes so far, the Adams administration has installed just two miles. Unfortunately, mayor Adams isn't getting things done for bus riders. That's tabitha decker, deputy executive director at transit center. Bustling are one of the most effective tools that the city has to speed up our buses, which are the slowest in the country. The slow pace of work comes as some advocates worry about a brain drain at the Department of Transportation, one indication of trouble is the way routine documents and statistics aren't being updated. The vision zero crash map hasn't been refreshed since the end of July, the map has data that advocates and analysts use to determine dangerous intersections in the city, and bicycle counters that show how many cyclists are on the streets, haven't been updated since April, since Adams took office, routine reports on street safety that used to come out reliably during the de Blasio years, haven't been released yet. John or cut with the group bike New York worked at the DOT during the Bloomberg administration. And since the agency is struggling to retain talent now. That's repelling people who are the driven interested talented cohort that the city needs really badly. A spokesperson for the DOT didn't address this. He did say the agency plans to spend $900 million on street improvements, and that a lot of road work is typically done in the last few months of the year. Steven nesen, WNYC news

Eric Adams mayor Adams Steven Nelson Michael hill WNYC Adams administration tabitha decker transit center city hall Adams de Blasio Department of Transportation Bloomberg administration John
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:30 min | 7 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on WNYC and Michael hill. Last week, the NYPD said it'll work with law enforcement across the state to conduct a sustained crackdown on the spike and drivers using fake license plates and drivers who cover their plates to evade tolls. WNYC's transportation reporter Steven Nelson has witnessed firsthand how law enforces are trying to apply the brakes to fake license plates. On my way to an unrelated press conference at the bottom tip of Manhattan by the entrance to the FDR drive, a white van zoom's past. Its rear license plate is covered by a blue surgical mask, a common tactic used to avoid paying tolls. Suddenly, a state trooper flashes its lights and pulls the van over. I've been following the issue of television for years. The MTA says it costs the agency $50 million a year, and then this week mayor Eric Adams joined Kim royster, the NYPD's chief of transportation to announce the creation of a joint agency group to crack down on the problem, and that anyone who obscures their plates, even police officers will get a ticket. This is our warning to all. This ends today. Anyone who commits these reckless acts will be held fully accountable for their behavior. That's what we owe New Yorkers here today. So, it was puzzling when the trooper returned to his car shortly after speaking with the driver of the van. That's when the driver pops out. He's wearing a heavy dark vest with the words police in bold white letters. He pulls the mask covering the plates off, I snap a picture of the front window before the van drives off. The two officers inside, wave to me, as they get back on the highway. When I ask the trooper what happened, he shrugs and says the officers said they were undercover, so he let them go. There didn't appear to be anything under cover, though, about two officers in uniform with an expired NYPD placard on the dashboard. The registration of the vehicle was also expired. A spokesperson for the state police wrote later in an email that troopers can use their discretion and in this case the trooper decided not to issue a ticket once the mask was removed. Speaking this week, mayor Adams noted that drivers that obscure their plates or use fake ones are often involved in other illegal behaviors. This is connected to our crime problem. This is connected to our vision zero problem. This is connected to the disorderly of our city. This is part of one of the rivers we are damaging. Running the van's plates in a city database showed this vehicle has broken many traffic laws over the past three years. It's racked up 163 speeding red light and bustling violations. Under a recently signed law, the driver should have taken a driver's safety course or risk having the van impounded, but a closer look at the registration reveals, it's a rental. It's still unclear why the NYPD was using the van, why they covered the plates, or why the vehicle has so many violations. A spokesperson for the police writes the incident is under review. Steven nesen, WNYC news. It's Monica edition from NPR news. I'm Steve inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin. Over the past few decades, much of indigenous activism has focused on water preservation. A new exhibit at New York City's Metropolitan Museum of Art examines the meaning of water for native nations. Here's NPR's Jennifer Venezuela. First I

NYPD Steven Nelson Eric Adams Kim royster Michael hill WNYC MTA mayor Adams Manhattan state police Steven nesen WNYC news NPR news Steve inskeep Rachel Martin Monica Metropolitan Museum of Art New York City
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 8 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There are some sentences you should never have to say This is one of them Yesterday's shooting was the deadliest in an elementary school since sandy hook a decade ago President Biden spoke last night As a nation we have to ask when in God's name are we going to stand up to the gun lobby I'm Michael hill it's morning edition from NPR and WNYC An 18 year old armed with several weapons killed 19 children in two adults a parent who lost her child in a mass shooting a decade ago talks about the despair and rage of watching it happen over and over again It's Wednesday May 25th two years ago today Minneapolis police murdered George Floyd The news is next Live from NPR news on corva Coleman authorities in Texas say in 18 year old man shot and killed 21 people yesterday at an elementary school in the town of Vivaldi most were children They believe he acted alone The gunman was shot and killed by law enforcement President Biden learned the news on Air Force One as he returned from a trip to Asia Biden is furious Why are we willing to live with this carnage Why don't we keep letting this happen We're in God's name is our backbone To have the courage to deal with it and stand up to the lobbies It's a time to turn this pain into action For every parent for every citizen in this country we have to make it clear to every elected fish in this country It's time to act the superintendent of the school district and ubaldi says classes are canceled for the rest of the school year Today is the second anniversary of the murder of George Floyd large crowds are expected in Minneapolis tonight where they will hold a candlelight vigil from Minnesota public radio Matt sepik reports Floyd's street corner memorial continues to draw visitors from across the country Dorothy priest or of boiling spring South Carolina stopped recently to reflect on the racial justice movement that Floyd's murder ignited and to pay her respects His heart.

President Biden George Floyd NPR news corva Coleman Michael hill WNYC NPR Minneapolis Vivaldi ubaldi Biden Air Force Texas Asia Matt sepik Floyd Minnesota South Carolina
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:58 min | 9 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on WNYC I'm Michael hill and its poetry month And you've been sharing your pollens with us Yvette hilliger of Harlem centers this poem she calls it root cover up My real hair is coming back And it's grayer than ever This morning my husband asked the kids who's that woman with the kinky gray hair fixing our breakfast Oh I just can not go another month without an appointment No massage no facial note threading no many petty no bikini wax no relaxer no dying my hair It's been almost 6 whole months now Jesus Mary and Joseph what is the world coming to I miss my pretty hands and feet And my soft shiny manageable hair rich with vibrant color I'll just have to do it myself I'm doing everything myself now The laundry the cooking the cleaning Even schooling my own children It's outrageous Plan B searching root cover up You got this You washed the dog Oh my There's so many to choose from Root cover up spray root cover up rinse Touch ups dick Touch up applicator to in one applicator touch up marker fill in powder airbrush tent you have got to be kidding me How am I supposed to know which one of the Ho damn this pandemic and it's social distancing mandate When will my world get back to normal Boys Boys I told you class doesn't start for another ten minutes Whatever it is go ask your father Thank you so much to all of you who've sent in your poems this month We say thank you thank you Your forecast now very quickly this morning 53 with clouds going up to a high today of the mid 60s afternoon shower or two At 6 45 It's.

Yvette hilliger Jesus Mary Michael hill WNYC Harlem Joseph
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 10 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is morning edition on WNYC I'm Michael hill We close out our radio rookie series with reported volatility When she was two years old her dad went to prison growing up she visited him regularly but then stopped Now more than a decade later she shares her journey to reconnect with him So today's the day that I'm gonna go visit my dad I just woke up and I feel extremely nervous anxious It's bringing up a lot of emotions of when I was a child And I used to go visit my dad in prison and all the stuff that we had to do just going there I started recording these voice diaries last summer I hadn't seen my dad since I was 12 years old As a child I remember going to visit my dad and my dad picking me up and throwing me in the air And that was like my favorite part of the visit Because I just felt so free And now that I'm older I'm realizing the effects of having a dad that's in prison and how it does cause a lot of trauma And the root of all of my problems was the fact that I didn't have a dad growing up And I think that's like why I struggle so much with my identity and understanding who I am in this world because a half of me I don't even know anything about I'm just ready to understand who my dad is so that I.

Michael hill WNYC
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 10 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition on WNYC and Michael hill April is poetry month and we're asking you to send us your poems on the theme of normalcy whatever that means to you in this moment listen to Nancy lubarsky centers this poem called after the vaccine Rose of daffodils line both sides of my front walk They are movie fans at the Oscars They lean slightly toward the door waiting pointing The breeze covers the path with Magnolia leaves a pink carpet instead of a red one The sun calls to me announces my arrival I open the front door step out Cherry blossom petals fall like confetti A woodpecker taps out a faint drum roll and here I am grateful to everyone for making this possible We want to hear your poem send us your poetry on the theme of normalcy You can submit them through Twitter at WNYC or email is the address WNYC poetry a Gmail dot com And we may just read or have you read as you've been hearing your poem right here on doubly when my say Marketplace mortar report is next and later a morning edition we continue our radio rookie series today with an examination of the role of the police in communities and what alternatives might just look like When people hear police abolition initially it sounds like well if we just eliminate police then what am I going to do That story more still ahead coming up Next hour WNYC is supported by the Met now on view fictions of Emancipation carpo recast a single sculpture sparks an in depth look at portrayals of black enslavement and the relationship between art and abolition Learn more at met museum dot org 46.

Nancy lubarsky Michael hill Oscars WNYC Twitter
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 11 months ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To WNYC dot org or call 8 8 8 three 7 6 WNYC that's 888-376-9692 Good morning from all of us here at double units I'm Michael hill And with us today is Jacqueline Kara WNYC's program director And thank you if you've already made a contribution to support us during this fundraiser We appreciate your support more than you know We don't take $1 of it for granted So if you are a member of WNYC thank you so much especially if you are a sustaining member we really appreciate those ongoing pledges of support And why do we need those ongoing pledges of support Well the news comes out every day so we need to continue to fund what you're relying on WNYC for We know there's a lot going on in the world This is a very tense time And we are certainly conscientious of the fact that we're doing a fundraiser at this moment but I assure you you are not missing any breaking news If anything happens we will pause our drive and get that news on the air to you and we're being very careful about what we are putting on the air to make sure that you stay up to date whether it's listening to the newscasts or here and listening to morning edition But our message is and it always will be no matter what the news cycle we need to be funded to be able to keep doing this And that's why we turn to you during these on air fundraisers a few times a year to remind you of the important vital role you play in keeping us going And that is with your voluntary contribution at whatever level works for you We're calling it $5 Friday as a way of emphasizing that it doesn't take a lot to support us and $5 a month might be a very affordable way of use for you to start a membership with WNYC So think about that for a moment Think about how often you tune into this radio station and what you rely on us for and then please do turn around and take action and make a pledge 8 8 8 three 7 6 9 6 9 two 8 8 8 three 7 6 WNYC or make that pledge online at WNYC dot org That's.

WNYC Jacqueline Kara Michael hill
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming up on morning edition jobs that became more dangerous during the pandemic were often performed by immigrants These experiences have led some to push for better working conditions will have more on that later this hour Chile this morning a sunny and 65 today right now we are looking once again for your support This is morning edition on WNYC I'm host Michael hill with us is our program director Jacqueline senkata It's our fall pledge drive and once again we are raising the money that keeps double NYC coming to you We've been through a whole lot together with the past couple years after started this pandemic we did tell you we would be here for you throughout the pandemic and the pandemic is still underway and we're still here We will continue to be here but we can only keep this work up with your help Listener support is carrying WNYC like never before and going forward will depend even more on your support you are listeners We're asking you to set up a small ongoing monthly contribution we simply call it here sustaining membership Give now at WNYC dot org look for that red donate button and wear it out if you can or call 8 8 8 three 7 6 9 6 9 two and Jacqueline if folks pledge this morning we have something nice for them and it's I would say it's seasonal as well Seasonal I like that I think you're absolutely right Michael It is a seasonal thank you gift on top of any other thank you gift you might choose today We are also offering the WNYC knit hat as a bonus So pick a giving level pick another thank you gift Maybe it'll be the WNYC hoodie that's available for the scene dollars a month And the reason I've put those two together it's not coincidental One is they're both black with red logos So I think it'll be a beautiful combination You've got your hoodie and you've got your WNYC knit cap So let me just lay that out again You make a donation at whatever level is comfortable for you or also suggesting maybe that $15 a month level for a WNYC hoodie if that's what you'd like to get as a thank you gift And on top of that we're going to throw in the WNYC knit hat as a bonus also black knit with the red WNYC logo So you can see photographs of both of those thank you gifts consider becoming a donate a.

Jacqueline senkata Michael hill WNYC Chile NYC Jacqueline Michael
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Com Later on morning edition on WNYC global supply chain disruptions are ongoing way anytime soon and that means certain products are going to be hard to find this holiday season That story is coming up in about 15 minutes Mostly sunny today with a high near 80 but cooler and windy this weekend that is on Sunday It starts to feel a bit more like fall outdoors and it definitely feels like fall inside here WNYC as we finish up this first week of our fall fundraiser Good morning once again I'm Michael hill and with me today is senior political reporter Bridget Bergen bridge good morning again Good morning Michael It's the fall pledge drive and we're raising the money that keeps this great institution going thanks to your support Throughout the pandemic listeners support is carried WNYC like never before and will continue to rely increasingly on your contributions because you value WNYC and we appreciate that So we're asking you to set up an ongoing monthly contribution we call it sustaining membership and we need to get to 1500 sustainers by noon today to unlock $50,000 from one of your listeners one of your co listeners as we say one of our listeners will mesh Nagar kart day Give now a WNYC dot org or called 8 8 8 three 7 6 9 6 9 two that's 8 8 8 three 7 6 9 6 9 two and Bridget 1500 sustaining members by noon I know we can get there because we have great support and great listeners Absolutely And you know I think it's useful Michael to take that 1500 goal and let's break it down You know let's chip away at it as a team listeners Let's get 40 new sustaining members by 7 a.m. When we started this morning that was our goal and we've already started to chip away at it We only need 36 more sustaining members by 7 a.m. that's a totally doable thing We're in this together And that's part of why you listen to WNYC This is a community It's a.

WNYC Bridget Bergen Michael hill Michael Bridget
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"N Y C I'm Michael Hill 50 years ago this past August, a black man named George Jackson died under heavy gunfire at San Quentin, California prison and activist and author before his death Jackson and Aspire to lead an armed revolution against America's white ruling class. News of his death was the final straw in overcrowded and inhumane prisons across the country, including here in New York, where 50 years ago today, the Attica Correctional Facility upstate became the scene of an uprising that quickly morphed into an organized rebellion, complete with hostages and a list of demands. On this 50th anniversary Doubling in my sees race and justice unit is revisiting the Attica uprising in the context of the current prison reform and abolition debate. We begin with the witnesses, three men who are incarcerated at Attica 50 years ago, when all hell broke loose. My name is I'll kill and should go on. But at the time it was inadequate was long has killed more. I look at hung up on names, but I'm just letting you know My name was Tyrone Larkin's 73 years old from Brooklyn, New York My name is Alhaji Cherita. I grew up in Harlem area. I was inadequate. 1971 uprising in Attica happened behind frustrations that happened. Within penal system of New York State correction facility adequate was wonder Most Brutal. Prisons in New York State, as manufactured was called the last Stop, You know, inhumane situation, So once a month I was given a roll of toilet paper to use Okay. Basic essentials. A roll of toilet paper that toilet paper. Run out, Get find someplace else to get it. Um, you took a shower. Once a week, So the game was a soap that was made out of a lie and with, um cheer your skin up. It's in one of the most rural parts of New York state. Uh um, while I'm in county And the majority of the people that ever incarcerated them was black Latino and they came from urban centres. So there's naturally a clash. Diametric clashed. Look at 1971. Hell, No, we won't go referring to, uh, Vietnam. Uh, let's say it loud. I'm black and I'm proud most African Americans was recognizing their identity. As being black, as opposed to being Negro. Let me go back to August, 9th. George Jackson was killed that triggered off from moved out with all the prisoners Black white. You know Hispanics From there, everybody was on edge. Any little thing. From that point on, I would have exploded and that's what happened. We just brought the master the fire that was Tyrone Larkin's Haji Sharif and kill Shaquan, speaking with W. N. Y C race, and justice reporter Joseph Gedeon Now to help further set the stage and understanding the Attica uprising of 1971 R Series producer Emily Lang spoke with Professor Heather Ann Thompson about her book, Blood in the Water, the Attica prison uprising of 1971 and its legacy. We just heard from three men who were among the 2200 incarcerated people, mainly black and Puerto Rican at attic on September 9th 1971. Alluded to some of what led to the uprising. But can you describe some of the political chapters that informed this moment? Well, there were so many. I mean, this entire event takes place at a time when the entire nation is in Flux. The entire nation is aware that there is deep, deep racial injustice at every corner of the nation. So the men in Attica are standing up for racial justice and for basic human rights in the same way that anyone is and whether you're in the yard at Attica or anywhere else. You are determined that finally in American history, the promise of equality and justice for a hall is going to mean something. There had been institutions like the New York prison system that had been saying Yes. You know, we will take seriously parole rules we will take seriously. The fact that we need to feed people decently within our prisons. We need to honor yard time or that you have basic care and none of these things were happening. People were being fed on 63 cents a day. The abuse was rampant, and that is the context that is the political context. Peaceful negotiations continued for nearly four days in your book, You suggest the conversations and documents passed between these various political actors show the government's true intentions. To end these negotiations with blood shed the blood of prisoners and state employees describe some of that evidence. One of the real tragedies of Attica is that at the time, we don't really realize how much extraordinary Sympathy. So much of the American public really had for basic human rights behind bars. One of the things that Attica did was it really lifted the veil. They were able to show what life was really like, Uh, an ordinary Americans were appalled. When they realized, you know they were appalled at the conditions that they saw. And and so what happens, right? How can these people then become the same people that will vote for the punitive policies that become mass incarceration can become so hostile to people who were behind bars Well, The state of New York is in large part responsible for that, and those hours those minutes those days at the very end of the Attica uprising or what we have to look at, and what happens essentially, is that we are told That the state of New York has no choice but to go into Attica with armed troopers and to retake this prison by force. We know this many decades later, now that we've actually gotten in there and been able to finally see some of those documents. We now see that, in fact, negotiations were proceeding. Everybody wanted them to proceed. The observers there were telling the Rockefeller administration do not go in there with force because it will be a bloodbath. We now know that in fact, the Rockefeller administration was told if you go in there, you will end up killing Your own state employees because it is so volatile and they go in any way And not only do they go in anyway, we know that they deliberately did not give The men any warning. We know that what ensued was not just a massacre, but an orgy of violence. And guess what? They didn't tell the American people. That's what happened. They stood out in front of that prison and told the American people that the prisoners had killed the hostages that the prisoners were responsible. For the horrific violence that became the end of the Attica uprising. And so in effect, they soured a generation of American voters on the idea.

Emily Lang Joseph Gedeon George Jackson New York Tyrone Larkin Harlem August, 9th Michael Hill September 9th 1971 Alhaji Cherita Rockefeller Vietnam Flux Heather Ann Thompson Jackson Brooklyn, New York three men San Quentin, California 50 years ago 50th anniversary
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"N Y C I'm Michael Hill 50 years ago this past August, a black man named George Jackson died under heavy gunfire at San Quentin, California prison and activist and author Before his death, Jackson Aspire to lead an armed revolution against America's white ruling class. News of his death was the final straw in overcrowded and inhumane prisons across the country, including here in New York, where 50 years ago today, the Attica Correctional Facility upstate became the scene of an uprising that quickly morphed into an organized rebellion, complete with hostages and a list of demands. On this 50th anniversary doubling in my sees race and justice unit is revisiting the Attica uprising in the context of the current prison reform and abolition debate. We begin with the witnesses, Three men who are incarcerated at Attica 50 years ago, when all hell broke loose. My name is are killing shaquan, But at the time it was inadequate as long as killing your look at hung up on names, but I'm just letting you know My name is Tyrone Larkin's 73 years old from Brooklyn, New York My name is Alhaji Sharia. I grew up in Harlem area. I was inadequate 1971 uprising Annika happened behind frustrations that happen. Within penal system of New York State correction facility. Attica was one the most Brutal. Presence in New York state. As matter of fact, it was called the last Stop, You know, inhumane situation so once a month Was given a roll of toilet paper to use. Okay. Basic essentials. A roll of toilet paper that toilet paper run out. Uh, you have to find someplace else to get it. Um, you took a shower. Once a week, So the game was a soap that was made out of a lie and would, um, cheer your skin up this in one of the most rural parts of New York state? Uh um, while I'm in county And the majority of the people that this incarcerated them was black Latino, and they came from urban centres. So there's naturally a clash. Diametric clashed. Look at 1971. Um hell, no, we won't go referring to, uh, Vietnam. Uh, let's say it loud. I'm black and I'm proud. Most African Americans was recognizing the identity as being black as opposed to being Negro. Let me go back to August 9th. George Jackson was killed that triggered off from moved out with all the prisoners black white. You know, Hispanics from the everybody was on edge. Any little thing from that point on Would have exploded and that's what happened. We just brought the master the fire that was Tyrone Larkin's Haji Sharif and Akil Shawan, speaking with W. N. Y C Race and Justice reporter Joseph Jedi in now to help further set the stage and understanding the Attica uprising of 1971 R Series producer Emily Lang spoke with Professor Heather Ann Thompson. About her book, Blood in the water, the Attica prison uprising of 1971 and its legacy. We just heard from three men who were among the 2200 incarcerated people, mainly black and Puerto Rican at Attica on September 9th 1971. Alluded to some of what led to the uprising. But can you describe some of the political chapters that informed this moment? Well, there were so many. I mean, this entire event takes place at a time when the entire nation is in Flux. The entire nation is aware that There is deep, deep racial injustice at every corner of the nation. So the men in Attica are standing up for Racial justice and for basic human rights in the same way that anyone is and whether you're in the yard at Attica or anywhere else. You are determined that finally in American history. The promise of equality and justice for a hall is going to mean something There had been institutions like the New York prison system that had been saying Yes. You know, we will take seriously parole rules we will take seriously. The fact that we need to feed people decently within our prisons. We need to honor yard time or that you have basic care and none of these things were happening. People were being fed on 63 cents a day. The abuse was rampant, and that is the context that is the political context. Peaceful negotiations continued for nearly four days in your book, You suggest the conversations and documents passed between these various political actors show the government's true intentions. To end these negotiations with blood shed the blood of prisoners and state employees describe some of that evidence. One of the real tragedies of Attica is that at the time, we don't really realize how much extraordinary Sympathy. So much of the American public really had for basic human rights behind bars. One of the things that Attica did was it really lifted the veil, they were able to show what life was really like an ordinary Americans were appalled. When they realized, you know they were appalled at the conditions that they saw. And and so what happens, right? How can these people then become the same people that will vote for the punitive policies that become mass incarceration can become so hostile to people who were behind bars Well, The state of New York is in large part responsible for that, and those hours those minutes those days at the very end of the Attica uprising or what we have to look at. And what happens essentially is that we are told that the state of New York has no choice but to go into Attica with armed troopers and to retake this prison by force. We know this many decades later, now that we've actually gotten in there and been able to finally see some of those documents. We now see that, In fact, negotiations were proceeding. Everybody wanted them to proceed. The observers there were telling the Rockefeller administration do not go in there with force because it will be a bloodbath. We now know that in fact, the Rockefeller administration was told if you go in there, you will end up killing Your own state employees because it is so volatile and they go in any way And not only do they go in anyway, we know that they deliberately did not give The men any warning. We know that what ensued was not just a massacre, but an orgy of violence. And guess what? They didn't tell the American people. That's what happened. They stood out in front of that prison and told the American people that the prisoners had killed the hostages that the prisoners were responsible. For the horrific violence that became the end of the Attica uprising. And so in effect, they soured a generation of American voters on the idea that prisoners were human beings. That was Pulitzer Prize winning historian Heather Ann Thompson, speaking with W. N Y sees Emily Lang tomorrow we'll hear about the manifesto of the 27 demands the prisoners made of Governor Nelson Rockefeller and whether they were ever met as a result of the Attica rebellion..

George Jackson Emily Lang Joseph Jedi New York Tyrone Larkin Harlem Akil Shawan September 9th 1971 Michael Hill Haji Sharif Alhaji Sharia August 9th Jackson tomorrow Rockefeller Annika Flux Vietnam Three men 1971
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Y. C and Michael Hill today on the Brian Layers show. Our former high ranking State Department official who was based in Afghanistan for years shares her take on the logistics of the evacuation and how the U. S can speed up the process for Americans and our Afghan allies there. Plus, it's asked the mayor with Mayor Bill de Blasio right now. Here's Jon Schaffer with today's gig alert. They started as a street band in Mexico City. But son ramp Pera has attracted attention as far south as Chile. And why not? They have a distinctive sound, starting with the three brothers, who all play marimbas and including elements of punk, Scott pop and the ubiquitous Latin dance rhythm called Colombia. This song is called Cumbia Alga Ribera, and it comes from San Ramon Perez album. But Tuco and album named after the band's father, who was also a marimba player. You stay. That's cumbia alga Ribera by sunroom para the family band plays tonight at Gold Sounds in Brooklyn and then tomorrow at the annual bar Wbez in the Woods Festival in western Massachusetts. For details, go to new sounds dot org. Do not stand in front of my Oh, that will get us moving on a Friday August 20th. Despite the weather out there doesn't make a difference that get you going on Friday. Get you ready for the weekend? 76 clear today a slight chance of afternoon and evening rain Mostly cloudy with a high in the mid eighties and tonight more rain chances. Flight one's own 73 calm wind out there and then over the weekend. More rain chances for Saturday in for Sunday and during the day and at night temperatures in the mid to lower eighties it's w N. Y. C at 5 46. This is morning edition from NPR News. I mean, Martinez and I'm Steve Inskeep. When we try to follow the shifting path of the pandemic, it's easy to get lost in the numbers. Not all of us are statisticians. Amanda Arun Chick of NPR's Planet. Money Podcast brings us a fallacy to watch out for At the end of July. I went to Iceland for the same reason that lots of people have been traveling there. They've had very low covid rates and very high vaccination rates. So Iceland said to potential tourists come to Iceland, where you can pay big bucks to ride little horses. But as we are packing to go on a trip, there was this covid spike there and this was very concerning because most of the people getting infected were fully vaccinated. You might have heard similar worries about Israel or the U K or about that outbreak in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Katrina Wallace, an epidemiologist at University of Illinois, Chicago, ran the Iceland numbers for me. She found that over one month this summer 67% of Covid infections there were in people who are fully vaccinated. Which sounds really bad. So when you first look at that, at first blush, you say, Oh, that means most people that are vaccinated. Will end up getting covid so we shouldn't use the vaccine right. But that's 67% does not mean that the vaccine isn't working. It's a misreading of what's actually happening. It is just people committing the base rate fallacy. They're not considering the whole context of the data. The base rate fallacy. That means a very critical piece of information is missing the base rate. The base rate is basically how common some characteristic is in a group. So in this case, the base rate that we care about is what percentage of the country's population has already been vaccinated. And the answer is 71%. 71% of the total population of Iceland has been vaccinated, so that's a lot of people for context In the US, we only have about 50.2% of our population fully vaccinated At this time in Iceland, almost everyone who could get a vaccine got a vaccine. So it's not surprising, then that when Covid cases do happen in Iceland, most of them happen in vaccinated people, a thought experiment. Imagine a world where everybody has the vaccine where 100% of people are vaccinated in that world. If there's any covid left every single case, 100% of cases would be in vaccinated people. So the more useful question to ask is how big was the risk of catching covid if you were vaccinated, and how big was the risk if you were unvaccinated Wallace says. In the past six months, six of every 1000 vaccinated people in Iceland caught Covid. But for the unvaccinated, the rate of infection was triple that 18 of every 1000. So clearly, it was better to be vaccinated. And it's not just COVID. Wallace says. This base rate fallacy is useful to keep in mind whenever you hear people throwing numbers around to make a point. What I would advise is just any time you see, like X percent of this or, you know, five out of 10 that I would just say. What's the broader context here? What are we talking about? Because once you consider the base rate, you get a very different story. Amanda Ransik. NPR news.

Amanda Ransik Michael Hill Steve Inskeep Mexico City Jon Schaffer Katrina Wallace Martinez Afghanistan 71% Iceland Friday August 20th 100% 67% Friday Wallace Chile six tomorrow Amanda Arun Chick Sunday
"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"michael hill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Y C. M. Michael Hill last June, people all over the country were protesting the murder of George Floyd. Advocates in New York City took aim at the NYPD budget, arguing that the city should defund the police and instead use the money for Education, mental health services, housing and food support. But now, a year later, we know the actual cuts to last year's police budget did not add up to the $1 billion local lawmakers had promised. And for the most recent fiscal year, which started yesterday, the NYPD budget actually went up by $200 million. Dr. Christina Greer is a political science professor at Fordham University. And she joins us now by Skype. Dr Greer Welcome back to W N. Y. C. Thanks so much for having me you're most welcome. Last year, people were camping out outside City hall over NYPD funding. But this year, there wasn't much pushback over the increase in the N Y p D's budget. What's changed? Well, I do think some spikes in crime, both petty and and more than petty, have sort of tempered some of the fervor of people wanting to defund the police. I think that's the primary reason but also, you know, Much of the conversation has changed. Sadly, the phrase defund the police has gotten a lot of attention. But what a lot of new Yorkers are asking for is a reallocation of resources. But as we re emerged into the city and people feel a little less safe, whether it's on the subway or in various neighborhoods, I think some of that passion of taking police off of the streets has diminished in particular groups among New Yorkers. Last hour. We interviewed the former NYPD Police Police Commissioner Bill Bratton, who talked about Yes, we should take more money to address some of the social issues in our society. But he says he likes what President Biden is talking about, which is adding more money to police departments. He calls it Refund that is R E hyphen Fund, the police giving it even more money. Your thoughts on that. I mean, so many police departments across the country have obscene budgets where we know if we invested on the front end. We wouldn't have to put so much money on the back end. So if we really did invest in education and supporter, housing and homelessness services, we wouldn't actually need more policing. I think you know so many police departments across the country are invested in buying more toys for various officers. I don't think we need tanks in various cities. I don't think that we need some of the artillery that somebody Least departments across the city or across the country have so there's a fundamental disagreement about what that money should be used for. And I think a lot of taxpayers also frustrated that so much of these budgets goes to paying out families because of police misconduct. I don't think that they mined. The families are getting money. I think it's just the millions upon millions of dollars that we spend every year. Uh, two Compensate families for bad behavior when we could do a much better job at more substantive training, making sure that that money and those resources go into communities so you don't need so many police in the first place. Now the front runner on the Democratic side in the race for mayor appears to be. Eric Adams, a former police captain says he will reform but not defund the N Y P D talk a little bit about his approach. Why would any community that has been over police, one of former police officer for mayor Well, if you look at the map, it's quite interesting. You know. Eric Adams did not do very well and sort of the high voting population of, say, Lower Manhattan, Lower meaning beneath 125th Street or gentrified Brooklyn. But all the other areas of New York Eric Adams had quite a presence, and it's a both and approach. There's so many New Yorkers who want Safe streets. I mean, most most people in cities want that. But they also don't want police officers to come cracking skulls of their loved ones or they themselves. So if many homeowners black, white other agree that There should be police on the streets. They are frustrated with the rise in crime, both minor and major. They also believe that police officers should not run through their communities with reckless abandon and make them less safe. So you can't be afraid of the cops and the robbers. You have to make sure that the policing that is in place is actually there to support the community and not make a community feel threatened, and I think that's something that Eric Adams has tapped into. He's always had this insider outsider status. As both a police officer but someone who's been highly critical of the NYPD over much of his career, and I think there's a level of trust when you look at folks in the outer boroughs, black communities, white communities, immigrant communities where he can say I know that there are good police officers. I know some of the structure of the NYPD. I also know their capacity to do harm. And so having that inside track will make me the best candidate to address some of these calcified issues that have been in the city for quite some time, Doctor. Greed. Thank you. Very much. We'll have to leave it there. Dr. Christina Greer, Fordham University. Thank you. Mm time for StoryCorps. Today. Two women, friends and colleagues remember.

Eric Adams George Floyd NYPD $1 billion New York Last year Today Lower Manhattan New York City Christina Greer last June $200 million last year Skype a year later this year yesterday StoryCorps Brooklyn Two women
"michael hill" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"michael hill" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Michael Hill is a senior vice president of on field operations for MLB, and you can go read that statement about Gripping agents, and if they've known about it or whatnot, and Greg responded with, I played 17 years for seven teams, and not one team taught me how to apply gripping agents to anything And you know what? I believe Greg's window out of two and so to say that everybody did it. Is a farce. Just like to say everybody took steroids is a farce. You can look at like a true true gem of a baseball player. Brandon is going to love this Ken Griffey Jr like that kid had the talent, beautiful, swinging base. Most beautiful swing and his neck and head or body never exploded. Like we saw any of those other people that we talked about the smash brothers Rafael Palmero, and you know what? Griffey Jr probably could have extended his career if he would have 100%, but I believe him when he says no, I've never used any performance enhancing drugs. So just to say it's part of baseball, and this is just how it's always been to me is it's that's a You can't use that as an excuse or an argument, because it isn't there are those who have the talent that didn't have to at all. Did Sandy Kovacs for the Dodgers back in the day? Didn't I don't know that You don't know your value have no idea. I mean, well, maybe as you do. Maybe they didn't do. They didn't do that. He might have been popping those one of the The green is the greenies. I'm just saying, I mean, if we're gonna if we're going to shut all these people that injected, you've got to shun the same people that are cheating the altars like court. It's like if someone quirks their bad, like they're ashamed, but they're not really cheating is cheating guys. So if you're going to be one way on the line, you can't be like Oh, it's not really a big deal on it, right. Final thoughts on the NBA Unite Atlantic Philly gets in the way in about 27 minutes series tied 22. Any thoughts on that. Just give me the Hawks because I'm tired of Billy Should we need in the Phillies Phillies should win at home. Hawks Hawks have to win tonight and they're gonna win the series and then the late show tonight. The Clippers at Utah nine o'clock. Clippers star. Why Leonard will miss Game five. What are they saying? You know, it's a sprain. I I haven't read the entire article. I just saw the statement. That was a recent news flash that it's a sprained knee in hitches the rest of this series better than a terrorist. They were worried. It might have been a tear of the A C l but playoff P needs to score 50. Oh, God. Direct, little little Durant will call him if he does that. I don't don't you ever You don't want to go a little the rent? No, This has been fun. Don't you ever, Durant Also Kevin Durant, 49 last night 17 rounds 10 icis like Michael Jordan last night legendary willing his team to victory over the Milwaukee Bucks the next lead. The Bucks three games to two. And don't look now, but he's got to do it again. Against the Bucks in Game number six, you know, probably do it in game number seven to hopefully, Harden will be a little bit healthier. Maybe Harden hopefully hard makes a bucket. Well, no, that's what I mean. I mean to. It was obvious that he was not 100%. He was there for moral support. Do you think you put him on the court? And yes. So you have to. Yes, Garden? Yes, I agree with that. Mike. Thanks. Been fun, as always love you. Mike Murphy loves everybody. Dan hats go to their website..

Michael Jordan Rafael Palmero Mike Murphy Michael Hill Sandy Kovacs Mike Kevin Durant Greg Ken Griffey Jr 100% 17 years Brandon Dan Griffey Jr Durant Milwaukee Bucks Hawks Leonard Utah 17 rounds
Breakthrough for women: Miami Marlins hire Kim Ng as GM

AP News Radio

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Breakthrough for women: Miami Marlins hire Kim Ng as GM

"Kim man has become the majors highest ranking woman in baseball operations hired by the Marlins as their general manager the club said eng is believed to be the first female GM in the fourth major north American professional sports leagues she's won three World Series rings while spending twenty one years in the front offices of the white Sox Yankees and Dodgers and becomes the fifth person to hold the Marlins top position in baseball ops she succeeds Michael hill who was not retained after this past season I'm Dave very

Kim Man Marlins Baseball ENG White Sox Dodgers Yankees Michael Hill Dave
Miami Marlins, Jeter Part With Exec Michael Hill After 19 Seasons

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:50 min | 2 years ago

Miami Marlins, Jeter Part With Exec Michael Hill After 19 Seasons

"So I don't know what the hell the marlins did over the weekend because they seem to have their first good since what two, thousand three and we were all wondering what Michael Hill was doing still with that job early on in that regime, and now they finally have a good season and they don't bring him back now he's not technically fired his contract expired. They're not renewing it for people who don't know. Michael. Is the GM for the Miami Marlins and what are you guys billy what do we make of this? Like what is doing here where we finally have a good season and then we get rid of Michael. Hill I mean I think before the season no one would have been surprised if Michael, Hill, wasn't there at the end of the season his contract was expiring. You wasn't part of this regime. person they inherited kept. So they you know made them an offer they couldn't come to an agreement and that's it. Now, they'll bring in their own person and that'll be that they did actually make an offer that well. Let me give you some clarification on this because David. Samson. Actually talked to Mike Ryan during during the segment that they do that is always informative and he if you were listening to that actually. What happened is exactly what he said was going to happen which is the Marlins were going to make him You know I'm using this term figurative figuratively, but also literally a token offer because he's one of two black executives in the league with that kind of power it's one of the reasons that he was still there even as they gutted the entire franchise because it wouldn't have looked good and quietly during twenty twenty after a playoff season. They needed to look like he turned down the job. So David Sampson said it was an embarrassing. He predicted an embarrassingly low offer that Michael Hill couldn't accept and that would he would have to walk away from and so what they said in the press release is mutual parting of ways.

Michael Hill Miami Marlins David Sampson Mike Ryan GM Billy
Miami Marlins to Allow Players to Report to Summer Training

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Miami Marlins to Allow Players to Report to Summer Training

"Months after coming to a screeching halt. Baseball is back with teams reporting to what's being called summer camp or spring training 2.0, ahead of workouts on Friday, Miami Marlins president of baseball operations, Michael Hill says with every team time for first on opening day 23rd 24th. He likes They're versatile, Deep 60 player roster over the course of 60 games. We're going to take advantage of that, and you know, pitching will be a big part of it. Stand healthy or be a big part of it, and hopefully we'll be able to take advantage of all of those areas. While the majority the Marlins and raise players will warm up at Marlins Park and Tropicana Field, others had to Jupiter in Port Charlotte. Still, fans not allowed.

Marlins Marlins Park Michael Hill Baseball Tropicana Field Port Charlotte President Trump
Robert F. Kennedy's granddaughter dies at family compound in Massachusetts

America's Morning News

00:31 sec | 3 years ago

Robert F. Kennedy's granddaughter dies at family compound in Massachusetts

"And Robert F. Kennedy's granddaughter search the Kennedy hill has passed away at the age of just twenty two the Kennedy family releasing a statement last night following reports of a death at the family's compound in Hyannis port Massachusetts the spokesperson for the family releasing that statement further details not released hell was the daughter of Robert and apple Kennedy's get child Courtney and Paul Michael hill was one of four falsely convicted in the nineteen seventy four Irish Republican Army bombings of it too

Robert F. Kennedy Kennedy Hill Courtney Paul Michael Hill Kennedy Hyannis Port Massachusetts Apple Kennedy Irish Republican Army