17 Burst results for "Michael Halpern"

"michael halpern" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on KCRW

"And Cher. Really gives her a platform to express herself. But in a way that is very sophisticated when you think about Bob macky look beyond the sequence. This is someone who started out as an assistant with the great Hollywood costumer Jean-Louis, John Louis was the customer who created Marlena Dietrich's cabaret act costumes from John Louisa tally a he went to work with Edith had multiple Oscar when our who worked with Alfred Hitchcock his training in those Hollywood costume studio. Workshops was as sophisticated as say Karl Lagerfeld experience working for pier. Bell math in Paris. Okay. He understood how to build a costume like it was a piece of Qatar, and he has done that we share from the beginning that they met. So you say that there's so much sophis-. Dictation to Bob macky that we should understand. But razzle dazzle is clearly front and center and always seeing people today in entertainment in fashion who are embracing razzle dazzle with equal passion. You know, I look at at Bob as the sort of Raja of rhinestones, the Sultan, I would say of swarovski he really took that old Hollywood variety show or Vegas act costume and contemporary it in the seventies. I think similarly what is going on. Now is you you are seeing these very sophisticated designers who are doing the same thing there might be less of it. But it certainly there is a Bob macky infusion spring summer. Eighteen Gucci Alexandra Maekelae who I recently saw at Chateau marmot lounging around his spring summer two thousand eighteen show is indebted. It was inspired by the stage wardrobe that Bob macky created for Elton John's nineteen seventy seven stadium tour. And when you look at the designers today who are really championing Bob macky that is Adam Selman who. In two thousand fourteen created a nude allusion dress for Riano to wear to the FDA awards. If you look at Michael Halpern who has a has a collaboration with top shop at the moment, which you can find at the grove. Let's fast forward to this summer summer twenty nineteen and what is the met costume exhibition celebrating but camp, okay? Rupaul part of the committee rupaul Bob macky costumed rupaul award season is coming up. We're going to be seeing a lot of red carpet fashion over the coming months. We hoping that we'll see anything on the level of pizazz that Mackey created for his movie stars, especially share. You know, I think right now, the red carpet is an entirely different place because of me too. And I really think women the whole black wave. That kind of the black veil that was draped over the red carpet last year, which actually came off at the Oscars. But I think it's kind of allowed actresses to let down their hair and be a little bit more individual. So that's another thing about working with a designer. You know, a lot of these actresses today flipped from one design house to another. Consequently, a lot of them don't have an identity share like say, Elizabeth Taylor who long worked with Helen rose, Audrey Hepburn who long worked with Uber. Givenchy share really followed in that footsteps, and I would love to see a contemporary actress really keep to that. You know? I think also what's happened with the Oscars, and what Bob macky that sense of fun and mischievousness and kind of that kind of forbidden glamour where you were touching on. Say drag or you know this camp, look, which is what they were referencing certainly and punk, you know, going back to shares incredible outfit at the Oscars which was informed by punk and really caused a stir. And I don't think anyone aside from Bjork in that fantastic. Swan costume has ever come close to it. But the fact is today design houses, you know, Armani Valentino Chanel they control the red carpet because they have professional contracts with actresses Gucci where actresses are contractually obliged to wear a designer that they are aligned with. And consequently, they don't want a kind of fun stunt on the red carpet, they want a look that's going to be a strong as an advertisement that you would see in American vogue and does Bob Mackie designed new costumes are we seeing more like sort of just updates of all costume. Well, Bob macky is actually a character in the play. He's portrayed by Michael Barabbas, the actor who's been in a chorus line and kiss me Kate. He Bob macky, actually designed the costumes for himself to betray Bob macky and put him in a rather swanky kind of snakeskin blazer, which is kind of fun. He has said that he actually never kind of wore that. But you know, you always have to elevate it. There are a lot of great recreations of those iconic share costumes, so we're talking about a number of her Oscar guises, those were all costumes there. It wasn't about fashion. You're seeing you know, the gypsy tramps and thieves belly dancer meets native American Indian. But it's not just the same old.

Bob macky Bob Mackie Oscars Alfred Hitchcock Hollywood Karl Lagerfeld Mackey Rupaul Marlena Dietrich Paris Oscar Riano Chateau marmot Michael Halpern John Louisa Bjork Alexandra Maekelae Edith John Louis Elizabeth Taylor
"michael halpern" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Of those places for sure if you want specialty boutiques, and you're looking for something a little bit more personal it could be like a Nick luxury outer wear it could be they have an outlet at the Galleria or you could go to what's the story that I'm thinking of it the Galleria. That's really great with trail, Mark. Oh trae. Yes. Specialty stores that carry only coats and are really specialized in that. Wonderful. Thank you. Well, good luck. Because I think winter is definitely here and you're going to need the coats. Thank you for calling sandy. All right. We have just a quick minute. And you were mentioning velvet in one of the other looks that that I was reading about that. I thought something I didn't know this London designer he's he's fairly new Michael Halpern. And he's been doing a lot of sequins and all that kind of thing in velvet, but he's been showing neon and I love the idea too. I mean, first of all I love velvet. I think it's it's a wonderful. But I think the idea of bright color velvet that I have not seen a lot of. And I think that would be fun. Well, and it's again, just how you pair it, you know, I mean if you're gonna wear an entire neon outfit. That may not be the trick know, let's say in a beautiful black holiday suit or a navy or Brown, and you did a little pop of neon to it that could be really great. Okay. Let's go party. The holidays, and I love winter fashion. I really do. Oh, yeah. No. It's lots of fun stuff. All right. Well, we have got to take a break. And when we come back, of course, it is that time, you know, tech report coming up. So stay tuned shopgirls. We'll be back right after this. Previously on Jason and Alexis. All. That. More like, I'm just a brand new baby when they're seven years old and now kids at seven or like his going to take a selfie of me neck. Now, pretending to be computer developers. Tweet. Thanks. I tweet. I writings social media influencers. That's what I do. Forget about kid sister. Take pictures of food for fifty dollars. Bringing you everything entertainment Jason and Alexis in the morning with producer dawn on mytalk one zero seven one. The holidays are just around the corner. Hey, it's Alexis for southern lights Ryan's here. Ryan, how.

Alexis Michael Halpern Jason Mark Ryan navy producer Brown fifty dollars seven years
"michael halpern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:04 min | 2 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin in Indonesia rescue efforts are underway after a massive earthquake ensue NAMI hit the island of Sulawesi on Friday. Hundreds of people have been reported dead and many more are missing after waves almost twenty feet high destroyed buildings and swept away cars. Rescue workers fear. The death toll could rise since some areas remain inaccessible Suryana is the Indonesian country manager for Catholic released services. She's been aiding in those rescue efforts. And she's with us now from Jakarta serianni, thank you so much for speaking with us. Thank you. Can you just give us a sense of what it is like they're just tell us? What you see what you know? So far, we see the damage and the impact of the disaster is quite defense Stacy, but the. From the central government. And also their local government has deployed nearly thirty police personnel and humanitarian agency to the target area. Or no. The challenge now transportation to that area because it. And some road leading to the CD's also damage there's still many people declared missing and the search and rescue. Priority right now. Have there been any aftershocks reported? Yes. The earthquake aftershocks have been reported for more than one hundred aftershocks so far. But the national agency for disaster management. Did not issue any warning because the life of an and the scale of the after show. And the question is fine. So you were telling us that a lot of resources from in-country are being deployed there. Do you have any sense of what the priority is right now? What what do you need? Baiocchi now for the government and for humanitarian workers. And one hour. On the ground. We can see Monday identified needs there. But in my experience, you will need all the relief items like hop shelter and also food you'd be needed by the community at this point. Do you have any sense of how the international community is responding to this? So far, I understand that the this disaster has attracted international community since the government has yet to be clear. Whether this is nationality after that will be open for international part. We are still in the stage of needs assessment is the government needs our help international. Have they were asked and we'd be ready to feel that is. Yes, sir. Yanni at Catholic Relief Services. Thank you so much for speaking. With us engines so much the US Environmental Protection Agency is moving to dissolve its office of the science adviser. That is the direct. Scientific advisor to acting EPA administrator Andrew Wheeler the EPA describes the move as an effort to streamline the agency, but critics call it another move by the Trump administration to diminish the role of science in decision-making. Dan, Boyce has the story this past summer. Andrew Wheeler took over at the after the resignation of embattled administrators, Scott Pruitt and Wheeler. He's familiar with the EPA. He started his career with the agency in the early nineties. I do understand firsthand the stress that goes along with a change in management or a change in a reorganization. That's Wheeler addressing EPA employees back in July after his first stint at the CIA he worked as an adviser to Senator Jim Inhofe, one of the biggest climate change skeptics on Capitol Hill. Then Wheeler worked as a lobbyist where one of his major clients was a coal company. Still he told the assembled EPA staff. He brings a passion for helping the environment. We must be able to speak with one voice in. Clearly explained to the American people the relevant environmental and health risks that they face, but to Michael Halpern, the plan to remove the post of top science adviser is a step away from that pledge. He's with the union of concerned scientists area, this is a colossally bad idea. Now, the EPA did not respond to requests for an interview. In a statement the agency describes it more as a bureaucratic reorganization. Combining this office of science advisor with the office of science policy. But helper and says what that does is it moves. The agency's top science advocates several rungs down the chain of command and the EPA administrator should have immediate access to those advisers science advice is important both for long term policy decisions and for reacting during a crisis a crisis like hurricane Florence recently causing the release of toxic coal ash in North Carolina. We interacted with the science advisory position all the time. That's STAN Myburgh acting deputy EPA administrator during the final years of the Obama administration. He believes in the importance of the science adviser, but says in some ways, this reorganization appears to be an understandable response for an EPA working with reduced staff under President Trump, and in this particular case, I think it has gotten more attention because some of the concerns about the administration's use of science, those the Trump administration broadly, and the EPA have been notably dismissive of scientific advice under administrator Pruitt, the EPA restricted the types of scientific studies. It recognizes impro- it also appointed several scientists who worked for industries the EPA regulates Myburgh worries about the signal. This latest reorganisation sends because there are a lot of pressures acting on an EPA administrator when it comes to crafting policy lawsuits demands and deadlines in the statutes pressures from state from industry from non-governmental organizations. Myburgh says it's important science remains one of those pressures to Dan voice, NPR news. If there is such a thing as a white, nationalist prodigy, Derek black might have been it. He was born to son of Don black the founder of the racist. Website storm front the gods center. Former KKK grand wizard, David Duke, he was deeply immersed to his home schooling and his parents activities into the philosophies of white supremacy. But the young Derek added his own touches using tools, like a daily radio show and rhetoric that void it harsh racial slurs in favor of junk science and white grievance. All of that in an effort to win the hearts and minds of white Americans. That is until he enrolled at new college of Florida in two thousand ten when the worldview he had built up over lifetime began to unravel and with the prodding of a surprisingly diverse group of friends, he began the painful process toward unlearn, his beliefs. Washington Post reporter Eli low has written a book about that journey. It's called rising out of hatred. The awakening of a former white nationalist, he's with us now from the NPR bureau in New York. Eli welcome thanks for joining us. Thanks for having and Derek black is also with us from New York. Derek? Thank you. So much for joining us as well. Thanks for having. So I think a lot of people will find your story fascinating. But to you, it was all normal growing up. Right. I mean, there was nothing you found strange about it. Yeah. It was very normal in the fact that it was what brought the family together. And we were very close family and loved each other deeply and did a lot of stuff together. And the fact that we were all bound together by doing a political sort of thing felt extremely normal and did not feel at all unusual or incorrect. So were you taught to be afraid of people who are different than you. Or was it more that we're just better than these people, and they need to leave. I'm not totally sure it was either that's complicated. Really? Because in the house. Everybody would talk about the fact that we don't want anyone to have a worse life. We don't want to dominate. Anyone is just that. Everybody would be so much happier. If they all have their own governments in their own nations and their own spaces. And there's a real strong sense that white people and probably East Asian people are just the most creative in the smartest. But you know, that's just an unfortunate fact of history, and that's just an unfortunate fact that people don't wanna. Deal with and that didn't feel like hate to me that felt like we were being misconstrued and misunderstood. When people would say, it was hate because it didn't sound like it. So let's fast forward though, and compress a lot here and say when did the cracks in that world view start? Yeah. I think going to that college is also a sign of how confident we all were in that my family was in my conviction. My ability to think independently and to be curious, and I did not go. They're expecting to have my world view challenged because I was quite confident that it was factually, correct. And that the arguments against it were ones that I had already heard and I had already figured out we're wrong. And there was there wasn't any one point at the college where I realized oh, this is wrong. It was a long slow engagement both with the people who this belief system says shouldn't be in the country trying to wrestle with the fact that I'm friends with you. I don't quite see. How I can reconcile saying in the long run you don't belong here and then bit by bit having the evidence for all the stuff that sound scientific and sounds factual realizing that those things one by one weren't correct. And we were abusing statistics that worked in concert over two and a half years. So let's bring you into this conversation initially when you reached out to Derrick and you wanted to talk to him about historic. He said, no, I want to disappear. I don't want to be part of this. I don't well. How did you persuade him to or how did it happen that he then decided that he didn't wanna talk? Yeah. Yeah. I mean when I first learned about Derrick he was sort of in hiding from his past. I mean, he changed his name at that point. He moved to a different part in the country, and he'd been very intentional about people not finding him. I think for Derek the thing that mostly did the persuading was our national rhetoric in our national politics. I mean, when I I reached out to Derrick, and he said he was not interested over the course of the next year all of these talking points from his past and many of the talking points that he had worked spread over the radio every day or during speeches all of these seeds that he'd planted. They were growing all around him. And he heard some of these very scary racist ideas surfaced in the presidential campaign in two thousand sixteen and in the rise of the far-right in Europe. And in in the ways that the black lives matter movement was talked about, and I think Derek on his own came to the conclusion that these were huge powerful forces the needed to be confronted and reconciled with and that his silence in some ways was continuing to make him complicit. So what's the takeaway? Derek? And of course, when asked your take on that too. We absolutely do not have to accept society in the assumptions the racist assumptions that people have. But they're also not gonna go away. I think the disconcerting realization that I've had over these years. I spent quite a few years trying to never talk about this again and thinking that the country was just gonna fix itself, and then realizing that that's not going to happen. It happens because we do stuff, and I've been coming to the realization that it is harder to advocate for anti-racism than it is for why nationalisms when you're saying that our society is fundamentally unjust, it is based on white supremacy. You're asking people to change to do something and to sort of shoulder that burden and that is a hard thing to ask people, and it's a lot harder than telling them that things are fine. And they don't need to do anything about it. What's your takeaway from Derek story? I think in addition to being to this book being the store. Derek's transformation? It's also the story of of the people who he encountered who shared real persistent, courage to confront these very dangerous ideas deck with you. Go. Can I ask you? What's your life now to the degree that you feel comfortable saying in my day to day life? I am a graduate student of history trying to pursue that and figure out how it integrates into my life. And before I met Eli. I wanted to never speak in front of anyone ever again and idell pretty deeply into history thinking that that could keep me away from talking about now talking about our lives and since meeting Eli and these years of working with him to try to tell the story. I think I've come to realize that it's never that easy. And I have a responsibility to speak out about things that I have a weird platform to do. And sometimes that's not always pleasant. But I think is important and I'm still trying. To figure out exactly how to do it. And your parents, we have a relationship, and that's due in no small part to them. It was not always clear that we would be able to talk and a lot of love on their part went into realizing that it's more important that we be able to speak as a family, then that that be cough just because of beliefs, but there's a there's a Gulf there. And a lot of those conversations are about how I am making the country worse by advocating anti-racism and that I'm going to do America. If I keep advocating this stuff. What do you do for thanksgiving? I think I think like a lot of college students, you left home. And then you come back, and you're hanging out listen to the family conversations, and your have a new mindset, and you say, oh, I never really heard it that way before I for I left home that was Derrick Blair. He's the subject of a new book by journalist SAS low called rising out of hatred. The awakening of a former white nationalist. They were both with us from New York, Derek lack so thanks so much for talking to us. Thanks, a your, thanks..

Derek black US Environmental Protection Ag Andrew Wheeler Eli low Derrick Blair administrator STAN Myburgh NPR New York Michelle Martin Indonesia Scott Pruitt earthquake Dan voice Jakarta serianni Stacy Suryana country manager Yanni cough
"michael halpern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One Russian rubles some other The. Numbers money is going into the US. Government bonds and sometimes does during nervous times the yield. On the government's ten year note now at two point nine percent the Dax index in Germany is down one point eight percent here the s. and p. future is down four tenths percent so is the Dow future the Turkish currency is at sixty two. Point I'm sorry the it's at six point two to the US dollar it's down twenty, six percent now over the last ten, days the. Turkish leader is vocally against higher. Interest rates even if the economics demand them the Turkish liras also under pressure amid tensions with the US after Turkey arrested a. USO pastor on, espionage allegations a common and controversial insecticide has been banned by US federal court the chemicals been linked to developmental disabilities in children and there has been a protracted battle to stop its use on crops marketplace's jed Kim reports the health impacts of. Corpora, files have been characterized for years and the EPA had been, moving to. Ban it Until Scott Pruitt became administrator and. Then at the end, of March, twenty seventeen decided not to ban this chemical Marissa, or Dona is with Earthjustice which sued to remove the chemical some hope. The ruling is a sign that more reversals are coming Michael Halpern is. With the union of concerned scientists the lot of the decisions that. Were made under Scott Pruitt. Should be revisited because many of, them did sideline science and the public health at. Risk Dow DuPont is the largest producer of clerk paraphrase it's us. On a lot of crops including soybeans apples, and oranges will Roger is a spokesman for the American Farm Bureau federation he says farmers like it. Because it's cheap and effective is it the end, of the world probably not but it might well end up putting some. Farmers out, of business. If they can't use it as now the EPA has sixty days to ban the pesticide I'm Jacob for marketplace Marketplace morning report is supported. By the kendeda.

US Scott Pruitt EPA Dow Dow DuPont USO Earthjustice Michael Halpern Dax jed Kim Roger American Farm Bureau federatio Germany Marissa administrator Turkey Dona producer
"michael halpern" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Is the Turkish situation spreading. I'm David Brancaccio in New York. The Turkish currency is down. Again this morning. It's lost about twenty percent of its value against the dollar over the last ten days. Some of this is the Turkish president who is not a determined to believer in central Bank independence. He likes to pressure Turkish officials to keep interest rates down even if the economics indicate otherwise. And there's news today that the European Central Bank has begun to monitor the exposure of some foreign banks to the crisis in Turkey. Let's get a briefing from Brian Lawson, senior consultant on banking, economics, and country risk at IHS market in London. Good morning, good morning. So what is happening in Turkey is not staying in Turkey. European officials are increasingly watching this very much. So in that the a number of European banks that have some quite sizable exposures to Turkish economy. If we look at the likes of BBVA. A and unique credit. Each of them have significant show holdings in major, took Hispanics and inevitably with the weakness in the Turkish currency, the value of those investments on our declining. But to be clear, are you seeing signs of a contagion effect in which instability in Turkey has spread to other countries? Other emerging markets took a problem, but it's a local problem of the stage. There is no fundamental run on emerging market assets, nor has there been any view that is really going to cause widespread economic contagion. What it does do is have a disproportionate effect on those parties most exposed to the country and not as why the individual share prices of baby VA. UniCredit Bank this morning have shown weakness. Bryan Lawson who watches this at HSS market. Thank you very much for the briefing. Thank you. The Turkish currency is also. Under pressure with tensions rising with the US after Turkey arrested a US pastor accused by the Turks of espionage. The lira is down to five point nine two to the dollar. Now, some other numbers money is going into US government bonds as it sometimes does during nervous times the yield on the government's ten year. Note two point, nine percent now stocks. The SNP future is down four tenths percent. A common and controversial. Pesticide has been banned by US federal court. The chemicals been linked to developmental disabilities in children, and there's been a protracted battle to stop its use on crops. Marketplace's jed, Kim reports. The health impacts of corpora fees have been characterized for years, and the EPA had been moving to ban it until Scott Pruitt became administrator. And then at the end of March, twenty seventeen decided not to ban this chemical Meriva or Dona is with Earthjustice, which sued to remove the chemical. Some hope the ruling is a sign that more reversals are coming. Michael Halpern is with the union of concerned science. It's a lot of the decisions that were made under Scott Pruitt should be revisited because many of them did sideline science and put the public health at risk. Dow DuPont is the largest producer of clerk purifies. It's used on a lot of crops, including soybeans, apples and oranges will. Roger is a spokesman for the American Farm Bureau federation. He says farmers like it because it's cheap and effective. Is it the end of the world? Probably not, but it might well end up winning some farmers out of business if it can't use it as now, the EPA has sixty days to ban the pesticide. I'm Vicky for marketplace..

Turkey US David Brancaccio Scott Pruitt EPA UniCredit Bank European Central Bank BBVA Brian Lawson Bryan Lawson Roger American Farm Bureau federatio New York president Earthjustice senior consultant Michael Halpern Dow DuPont
"michael halpern" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"On the world famous k rock sure sweet when i was six point seven k rock is k r o q and you're listening to the kevin and bean show how about a new round of kevin beans animal stories maybe story story story wras story story stories stories or your blues all story four out there too the animal and i think he did a pretty good job i hope you don't have any more awful sounding animals today it's interesting you should ask that question because there is sowed saudi will never get out of her head not but i i want to start with one of the most terrifying things i have ever heard of we go to the news in corpus christi texas cliff and her husband were doing weekend yard work when she spotted a four foot rattlesnake set cliff says her husband quickly took a shovel in severed the head of the reptile okay so you see a big old rattlesnake use a shovel by the way i've done many times when i lived in california we have a lot of rattlesnakes where i lived in santa clarita and that's what you do is you chop their heads off mission accomplished right you don't name them and releasing back into the wild what can go wrong once you've taken the head off a rattlesnake you're asking moments later he'd been down to dispose of the snake and that's when the snakehead bit him no yeah that's the thing no it's not the thing is it a big caveat is thing he chopped the snake's head off the snake's head how long can it survive answer to that but his surprise he thought easy peasy right let's in that case because there's no body released all its venom into him at that point we had a lot of venom now explain that to me i don't understand it how come there's more venom coming out of just the severed independent snakehead than there would be if the snake we're still don't know but it sounds like i don't know but it sounds like maybe they store it someplace else in the body yeah i don't i don't know either i don't know how it all goes into the head this is a weird story it's a very weird story that was a very bad deal for this guy sutcliffe called nine one one and began driving her husband towards the hospital immediately he began having seizures lost his vision and experienced internal bleeding the first twenty four hours were the worst doctors told her her husband might not make it or the way he's laying there if he's conscious he's laying there in the hospital bed going i i have to do to win this battle with a rattlesnake i'm about to oh my leg here in the hospital you really did get the last laugh snake even after giving him huge amounts of antivenom a normal person that gets better it's going to get from anywhere from two to four doses of antivenom how many doses of antivenom dispose this guy got after getting bit by a rattlesnake head we say two to four say ten at least let's go twenty he had to have twenty six doses cliffs husband is now in stable condition but his kidney function is still poor trauma surgeon michael halpern says although dying from snake bite is rare it happens how many snake bites you think there are the united states every year snake bites that result in death or just no okay either one bad both he gives both statistics surprised wow.

kevin twenty four hours four foot seven k
"michael halpern" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Traffic reports more often than seventy newsradio temps are going to be up to about a ninety or so downtown los angeles a later on today looks like eighty s long should be mostly cloudy today across europe so the humidity is really considerably higher than we've seen the last two or three days we'll have your five day forecast coming up in less than ten minutes we're just talking about the outages looking at the dwp map again in korea towns really been hit hard to five hundred still out there and they're saying that they might have those referred by seven o'clock tomorrow night yeah tomorrow night again we're going to be on that hopefully get a little more information from the dwp this morning on what caused the outages what people can do if they had problems as a result and when they will get their power back on six thirty seven at knx president set to unveil his choice tonight for a supreme court nominee and it's gonna be the president's seconds nominee to the high court in less than a year and a half political analyst larry sabato says it's unusual those presidents get maybe one or two picks out of their presidency whether it's a term or to some don't get any the most recent being jimmy carter presidents have to be lucky and trump apparently is lucky once again donald trump doesn't like the media until it works for him and that's exactly what he's made it do tonight cbs nbc and abc have all made adjustments to their evening lineup so they can dedicate coverage to the live events political analyst michael halpern tells connects mr trump is utilizing the primetime slot to get the biggest audience he can in the morning it wouldn't have any significance here in the united states in fact mr trump will lock up valuable tv time before and after his announcement the whole family hour halpern says mr trump has mastered the art of media and that trump really understands how to move an idea so he's using the primetime watching hours to do it other jordan can extend seventy newsradio we will carry the president's announcement live that starts at six o'clock sock a little more about the president leaves tomorrow for a nato summit in brussels there's concern is focused on the alliance members paying their share will dominate the gathering tweeted this morning saying that by some accounts the us is paying ninety percent for nato an official with the german marshall fund warns the topics some of them could be shut out a set of deliverables not nuts bishops sometimes more so up to them and so that but there are big doubts now about whether us president will sign up to the president's also gonna visit england and scotland before meeting with russia's president in helsinki video trump administration failing now to meet the court deadline to reunite all of the kids the very young ones who were separated from their immigrant parents at the border on friday the administration asked a federal judge for more time but the judge stuck to the deadline another hearing is planned for today the american civil liberties union says there are one hundred and two children under the age of five who must be reunited with their family by tomorrow but it expects less than half of the cases will be resolved the justice roberts said this morning it's been working tirelessly their words toward the goal of reuniting all of those young children with their parents while still ensuring their safety but again part of the problem is they don't know which belongs to which parent supporters of the saints gas tax increase have raised three times more than backers of proposition six now that is the initiative to repeal the tax increase that's one that's going to be on the november ballot supporters of the increase who've donated to the campaign include a lot of construction companies labor groups and things like that by one prediction the total race by november by both sides could reach seventy five million dollars coming up we're gonna.

los angeles seventy five million dollars ninety percent ten minutes three days five day
"michael halpern" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Vision inexperienced internal bleeding the first twenty four hours were the worst doctors told her her husband might not make it for the way he's laying there if he's conscious he's laying there in the hospital bed going i saw i have to to win this battle with a rattlesnake i'm about to in the hospital you really did get the last lap snake even after giving him huge amounts of antivenom a normal person that gets better it's going to get from anywhere from two to four doses of anti venom how many doses of antivenom disposed this guy got after getting bit by a rattlesnake head two to four i would say ten at least let's go twenty he had to have twenty six doses cliffs husband is now in stable condition but his kidney function is still poor trauma surgeon michael halpern says although dying from snake bite is rare it happens how many sneak by the united states every year snake bites that result in death or just wow i don't know there's about six to eight thousand snake bites per year in the country and ten or toll people die so there's a very low chance of you dying from a snake bite and by the way this guy did survive he did recover from the snake by but six to eight thousand a year i was surprised by that many oh i'm sure he'll never stop saying i should have ended up in the hospital like that here's a dog story of this edition of animal stories a mother in stockton california says her eight month old pit bull is a hero pup for saving her and her baby's lives last week when a fire broke out in another unit of the four plex i love stories like this were pit bulls are revealed to be.

united states california michael halpern stockton twenty four hours eight month
"michael halpern" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Venom now explain that to me i don't understand it how come there's more venom coming out of just the severed independent snakehead than there would be if the snake we're still don't know but it sounds like i don't know but it sounds like maybe they store it someplace else in the body the head i don't know how it all goes into the head this is a weird story it's a very weird story that was a very bad deal for this guy set cliff called nine one one and began driving her husband towards the hospital immediately he began having seizures vision and experienced internal bleeding the first twenty four hours for the worst doctors told her her husband might not make it by the way he's laying there if he's conscious he's laying there in the hospital bed going i i have to do to win this battle with a rattlesnake i'm about to oh my here in the hospital you really did get the last laugh snake even after giving his huge amounts of antivenom a normal person that gets better it's going to get from anywhere from two to four doses of anti venom how many doses of antivenom dispose this guy got after getting bit by a rattlesnake head we say two to four say ten at least let's go twenty he had to have twenty six doses oh cliffs husband is now in stable condition but his kidney function is still poor trauma surgeon michael halpern says although dying from snake bite is rare it happens how many snake bites you think there are the united states every year snake bites that result in death or just wow i don't know there's about six to eight thousand snake bites per year in the country and ten or toll people die so there's a very low chance of you dying from a snake bite and by the way this guy did survive he did recover from this snake bite but six to eight thousand a year i was surprised by that many.

cliff united states michael halpern twenty four hours
"michael halpern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There is news from the washington post over the weekend policy analyst at the centers for disease control were given a list of seven forbidden words they should avoid when putting together their budget proposals the words are vulnerable evidencebased science face entitlement fetus transgender and diversity will the list earn shock and ridiculed from scientists and members of the public cdc chief doctor brenda fitzgerald tweeted over the weekend though that there were no banned words instead some officials are suggesting that the change in language is the technique to make it easier for republicans to approve the budget michael halpern is the deputy director of the center for science and democracy at the union of concerned scientists the cdc is there to prevent disease outbreaks and support disaster preparedness centre promote public health it has the strong reputation for independence and for leaders that defend that independence when you see them coming out with the list of banned words mid idea that were somehow it a point where words like diversity or sciencebased would be controversial just remarkable well what's going on here in your view michael halpern as it is it commented de emphasize her ban certain words like this we've seen debates like this in the past two people might remember things like the mexico city language which bars entities that receive us foreign aid from discussing abortion is this like that just regular all politics it's pretty common for politicians to play to their audience and for anyone to send a message in a way that they think it's going to be received well but when you ban certain words lake science based or evidencebased or transgendered versity you're getting towards a point where scientists won't be able to do their work at all where it a situation where if you don't do the research if you don't collect the data uncertain population you don't have anything to talk about or to get in the way of policies that you don't wanna put forward so earlier this year we saw on lgbt americans the census department was reversing course and stopping a proposal to collect more information about sexual orientation even though there were a lot of federal agencies that were pleading with them to do so if you don't ask for the information you don't have to address the.

policy analyst michael halpern deputy director cdc public health washington brenda fitzgerald mexico
"michael halpern" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You do expect some up a tick in their hiring however if you had to provide this is what i used to do what i worked on capitol hill we we designed tax incentives to increase employment this would probably be the last way we would do it a because of its complexity be because it picks winners and losers and see because it's not particularly uh targeted to increasing employment for example if you wanted to increase employment you would provide a perhaps a tax credit for hiring to a directly and that is not part of the serb bill at all well bob corker has written to orrin hatch demanding an explanation for this pass through change that's going benefit bob corker for this to pass the smell test for you martin sullivan what should at answer be what do you want here well and speaking out as an expert in with as a private citizen yeah i would like to know how this gotten to the bill and i would like to know how a lot of things gone into the bill it's all been done behind closed doors there's no transparency and i think it's outrageous win a senator who votes on the bill doesn't even know what's in the bill this whole episode just brings out the lack of transparency in the whole process in it's a very unfair i think to the american people martin solomon thanks for being with us thanks for having me martin sullivan is chief economist and contributing editor for tax analysts here is news from the washington post over the weekend policy analyst at the centers for disease control were given a list of seven forbidden words they should avoid when putting together their budget proposals the words are vulnerable evidencebased science face entitlement fetus transgender and diversity with the list earned shock and ridicule from scientists and members of the public cdc chief doctor brenda fitzgerald tweeted over the weekend though that there were no banned words instead some officials are suggesting that the change in language is the technique to make it easier for republicans to approve the budget michael halpern is the deputy director of the center for science and democracy at the union of concerned scientists the cdc is there to prevent disease outbreaks and support disaster preparedness centre promote public health it has this strong reputation for independence and for.

capitol hill tax credit bob corker senator martin sullivan chief economist policy analyst michael halpern deputy director cdc public health orrin hatch martin solomon contributing editor washington brenda fitzgerald
"michael halpern" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on The Takeaway

"So more importantly at the game means that were also less prepared to continue success in reducing teen pregnancy and addressing these kinds of issues so whether or not people choose the right words uh we're seeing a pattern of political interference in science that impacts public health and safety so where do you think this goes michael halpern if it's the case that certain members of congress should just don't wanna hear words like transgender or evidencebased and they're making decisions what's the ultimate outcome of an attitude like that well science requires openness and honesty not censorship in fear and if scientists are looking over their shoulder worried they might say the wrong word or ask the wrong question they're not going to be pursuing the tough questions that we need to ask they're going to be less likely to pursue the most promising lines of inquiry and we're gonna squander a lot of opportunities to improve public health and safety and protect the environment michael halpern with the union of concerned scientists thanks michael thank you paul law or roll paul is anything on a frankly because as we said is no there's milk emerging whatsoever fbi special counsel robert muller has obtained thousands of emails and documents from president trump's transition team after the twenty six election and before he took office on january 20th of course it's all part of the investigation into russian interference a possible collusion in the campaign white house lawyers meanwhile are challenging the legality of muller collecting evidence in this way and the president has called the investigation a witchhunt but conservative media outlets are doing something different here a steady drumbeat a places like fox news consistently and relentlessly attacking muller and his investigation so the investigation into donald trump's campaign has been crooked from the job it did fix was in coalition go to jail this is worse than even i am now but we don't even know how much money moeller has requested to spend on this which the investigation was weaponized to destroy us.

public health michael halpern congress robert muller president media outlets donald trump moeller paul fbi special counsel white house fox milk
"michael halpern" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on The Takeaway

"What should at answer be what are you want hair well speaking out as an expert at but as a private citizen yeah i would like to know how this gotten to the bill and i would like to know have a lot of things gone into the bill it's all been done behind closed doors there's no transparency and i think it's outrageous win a senator who votes on the bill doesn't even know what's in the bill this whole episode just brings out the lack of transparency in the whole process and it's a very unfair i think to the american people martin solid and thanks for being with us thanks robin me martin sullivan is chief economist and contributing editor for tax analysts there is news from the washington post over the weekend policy analysts at the centers for disease control were given a list of seven forbidden words they should avoid when putting together their budget proposals the words are vulnerable evidencebased sciencebased entitlement fetus transgender and diversity with a list earned shock in ridicule from scientists and members of the public cdc chief doctor brenda fitzgerald tweeted over the weekend though that there were no banned words instead some officials are suggesting that the change in language is the technique to make it easier for republicans to approve the budget michael halpern is the deputy director of the center for science and democracy at the union of concerned scientists the cdc is there to prevent disease outbreaks and support disaster preparedness centre promote public health that has this strong reputation for independence and for leaders that defend that independence when you see them coming up.

senator martin sullivan chief economist michael halpern deputy director cdc public health contributing editor washington brenda fitzgerald
"michael halpern" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Keyword there from the sustainability desk more places scott tung explains is fracking a wrist to drinking water how much air pollution is okay those are the kinds of questions the epa science advisory board takes on in the brand new head of that board is michael honeycutt at texas state regulator who rolled back rules i'm 45 chemicals the head of a separate epa board on air pollution has done work for fossil fuel and chemical groups it all worries michael halpern at the union of concerned scientists it's really up to the highest advisory board in any type of administration to set the record straight scott pruitt is taking what should be a sounding board and turning it into an echo chamber this administration has already overruled that science advisers once by keeping a controversy i shall pesticide on the market and putting friendly scientists on imports has long been a goal of regulated companies as johns hopkins epidemiologist tom burke he served on past epa science sports those folks who been impacted by epa science have unfortunately always sought ways to push back on a scientific process epa had scott pruitt frames conflict of interest differently at the agency yesterday he said academic scientists who get government money they are the suspect once when we have members of those committees that have received tens of millions of dollars in grants at the same time that there are advising this aid agency own rule making that is not good and that's not right a spokesman says the epa need scientists who quote understand the regulated community i'm scott tong for marketplace.

advisory board scott pruitt tom burke epa scott tong scott tung michael honeycutt texas michael halpern
"michael halpern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are higher than other states the ad calls at a local lawmakers supported the new gas attack it was funded by a california farmer's association and they're not the only ones mad about the tax site it affects nearly everyone in carcrazy california and the poor will feel that extra twelve cents a gallon more than the rich the gear unwarranted john paul is a fiscal conservative and president of the howard jarvis taxpayers association he admits california's highways are in bad shape but coupon says her existing guest tax is his vision to take care of those needs he believes lawmakers are to blame for wasteful spending rick getty's who teaches infrastructure policy a cornell says california might be the only state where new gas tax can survive politically most other places it's really politically um there were title he says other states are trying different ways to raise money for infrastructure in oregon drivers are charged per mile of road they use virginia has raised its sales tax and your mark that money for road fixes some states are adding new toll lanes so the political folks who need realized they need more funding have to think about those alternatives one thing all fifty states have in common getty says they're not waiting around for any federal help in new york on line pilot for marketplace at the epa this week there were some new science advisors announced extensively the top independent experts in their respective fields independent being the keyword there from the sustainability desk marketplace's scott tung explains is fracturing a wrist to drinking water how much air pollution is okay those are the kinds of questions the epa science advisory board takes on in the brand new head of that board is michael honeycutt at texas state regulator who rolled back rules on 45 chemicals the head of a separate epa board on air pollution has done work for fossil fuel in chemical groups it all worries michael halpern at the union of concerned scientists it really up to the fight advisory board in any type of administration to set the record straight scott pruitt is taking what should be a founding board and turning it into an echo chamber this administration has already overruled that science advisors once by key being a controversial pesticide on the.

epa michael halpern texas michael honeycutt oregon howard jarvis california scott pruitt advisory board scott tung carcrazy california new york getty sales tax virginia gas tax cornell rick getty president john paul
"michael halpern" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"In new york i'm ryan kyla for marketplace at the epa this week there were some new science advisors announced a sensibly the top independent experts in their respective fields independent being the keyword there from the sustainability desk marketplace's scott tung explains is fracking a wrist to drinking water how much air pollution is okay those are the kinds of questions the epa science advisory board takes on in the brand new head of that board is michael honeycutt at texas state regulator who rolled back rules and 45 chemicals the head of a separate epa board on air pollution has done work for fossil fuel in chemical groups it all worries michael halpern at the union of concerned scientists it's really up to the highest advisory board in any type of administration to set the record straight scott pruitt is taking what should be a founding board and turning it into an echo chamber this administration has already overruled that science advisors once by keeping a controversial pesticide on the market in putting friendly scientists on the boards has long been a goal of regulated companies says johns hopkins epidemiologist tom burke he served on past epa science sports those folks who who've been impacted by epa science have unfortunately always sought ways to push back on a scientific process epa had scott pruitt frames conflict of interest differently at the agency yesterday he said academic scientists who get government money they are the suspect once when we have members of those committees that have received tens of millions of dollars in grants if the same time that there are advising this agency on rule making that is not good and that's not right as spokesman says the epa need scientists who quote understand the regulated community.

ryan kyla epa scott tung advisory board scott pruitt tom burke new york michael honeycutt texas michael halpern
"michael halpern" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"michael halpern" Discussed on KCRW

"Gas prices are higher than other states the ad calls at a local lawmakers supported the new gas attack it was funded by a california farmer's association and they're not the only ones mad about the tax hike it affects nearly everyone in carcrazy california and the poor will feel that extra twelve cents a gallon more than the rich the gear crack unwarranted john paul is a fiscal conservative and president of the howard jarvis taxpayers association he admits california's highways are in bad shape but could paul says her existing gas tax is the vision to take care of those needs he believes lawmakers who to blame for wasteful spending rick getty's who teaches infrastructure policy it cornell says california might be the only state where new gas tax can survive politically most other places it's really politically dortha he says other states are trying different ways to raise money for infrastructure in oregon drivers are charged per mile of road they use virginia has raised its sales tax and earmarked that money for road fixes some states are adding new toll lanes so the political folks who need realized they need more funding have to think about those alternatives one thing all fifty states have in common getty says the now waiting round for any federal help in new york on line kyla for marketplace at the epa this week there were some new science advisors announced extensively the top independent experts in their respective fields independent being the keyword there from the sustainability desk mark places scott tung explains is fracturing a risk to drinking water how much air pollution is okay those are the kinds of questions the epa science advisory board takes on in the brand new head of that board is michael honeycutt at texas state regulator who rolled back rules on fortyfive chemicals they had of a separate epa board on air pollution has as done work for fossil fuel and chemical groups it all worries michael halpern at the union of concerned scientists it really up to the highest advisory board in any type of administration to set the record straight scott pruitt is taking what could be a founding board and turning it into an echo chamber this administration has already overruled that sign science advisors once by keeping a controversial pesticide on the.

scott tung michael halpern fortyfive texas michael honeycutt oregon cornell howard jarvis california scott pruitt advisory board Gas prices epa new york getty sales tax virginia rick getty gas tax president john paul carcrazy california