34 Burst results for "Michael Dell"

Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

The $100 MBA Show

06:10 min | 5 months ago

Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

"I could begin today's episode by naming all the famous entrepreneurs. We all know that don't have a college degree. Whether. It's Mark Zuckerberg or Walt Disney or Michael. Dell or Steve Jobs or Steve Wozniak or Bill Gates or Ray KROC or I can keep going right. But. That doesn't prove that have a college. Degree is a waste of money, or the conjugate doesn't help you become an entrepreneur. I let's recognize the fact that everybody on that list I just named and more ones I didn't list are exceptional entrepreneurs, exceptional people whether they're very bright and talented, whether they have a lot of tenacity like Ray Kroc, or just are willing to work harder than everybody else I'm not interested in edge, cases or extraordinary people that are extraordinarily things. I am interested in addressing this question with the fact that what about everybody else everybody who may not be a genius or The special gifts of some of the people we've talked about. Can they make it as an entrepreneur without a college degree? Well, let's talk about what caused. Agree gives you so that we can boil it down to. Do you need those things to be successful there more college degree? We'll give you an education. They will teach you somethings who go to class and you'll learn now whether that. is of date or not is a different matter, but you will learn. You will gain those skills number two. It's going to put you in an environment where you're going to meet. Other people go to college whether it's online or offline, you are going to be networking with other people other likeminded people other people. WanNa be successful just like you, and often you know in the same field whether it's computer, science, or business, or whatever it is so one you're gonNA give formation number two. You're going to get exposed to people, and you'll be able to build a network and the third thing that call will give you is a piece of paper. They'll give you a certificate. They'll give you a diploma. Something that tells other people employers particularly that hate. This person knows stuff or knows this area of expertise whatever your degrees in, so it's almost like a permission, slip or sort of like a coupon like hey, this paper proves of this person. Know something in this area with a stern on a different matter, but that's how society views a degree, so those are the three things college will give you now. Can you achieve these three things outside of college with Al GonNa College Information Skills. Skills Yup, you can learn the outside college whether that is indifferent programs online learning courses online books, universities will have a monopoly on the information, right? You can get this information elsewhere network while there's a little bit different because you know you're not in a space like an actual campus, but hey, you still can go to conferences. You still can meet people online. You could be a a person that really values relationships in kind of. Of Fall some advice. We talked about in this in this podcast. How To make sure you build your network constantly? So this is doable. Assad College, and the third thing is the piece of paper now a totally different think society has agreed that this piece of paper will allow you to get you know opportunities whether it's jobs or an interview or whatever it is. This is the difference the piece of paper. So do you need a? A piece of paper. That's the question here, so college is beneficial. If you do need a piece of paper that permission slip, but if you plan to be an entrepreneur, if your soul is GonNa, be a business bill I want to be an entrepreneur. All my life I don't want to really pursue a career that requires me to have a degree. If that's you tried and true, then really GonNa College may not make the most financial. Financial Sense not going to say it's going to hurt you, but it's a lot of time often in your prime years and a lot of money being spent on something, you may not really need because you can achieve the things you want to achieve as an entrepreneur without it now if you are not sure if you like fifty fifty. Hey, I think I to be an entrepreneur, but maybe I want to work for a little while. While maybe I want to start a business and then after that I wanna go ahead and you know work somewhere at a corporation, a degree will help you get that job. This justice, the reality of the situation there are exceptions to the rules of course in different careers one of them is programming development engineering technology. Many engineers don't have college degrees, but they're so highly skilled, and so saw after that they can get a job. Job Easily and our certification programs outside of the university structure that you can take in that field that can qualify you to get jobs. A lot of people say hey, getting your degree is sort of like a backup plan. You can always get a job if things don't work out, but that really doesn't help you answer that question of. Do you need a college degree to Be Successful Entrepreneur? I don't think you need it I. I do believe you'll. The half caused. Degrees can be successful I. do believe that people that don't can be successful as well as a matter of how you WanNa spend your resources. Your time and your money I can't tell you for certain that thing that I learned in university. I don't use at all in my day to day life as an entrepreneur. I'm sure there are some things that I've picked up that I've used. But if I'm going to be completely honest. I don't think there's enough of that. I would say would require me to have gone to college to be. Successful, so you also have to define what success means. What does success mean to you as an entrepreneur? Is Success being able to pursue a hobby that you love and make a profit is success being able to replace current income in your current job with your business success, a a million dollar business is that a ten million dollar business? Is it a billion dollar business which a lot of? Of People think that's the only meaning of success. No, you need to define what success is for you as an entrepreneur and for most people I think it should be able to make a healthy living that allows you to be financially free doing something that you really feel passionate about that. You

Ray Kroc Assad College Steve Jobs Mark Zuckerberg Dell Bill Gates Steve Wozniak Walt Disney AL Michael
Philadelphia's Wawa Welcome America Fourth of July celebration moves entirely online

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 6 months ago

Philadelphia's Wawa Welcome America Fourth of July celebration moves entirely online

"Philadelphia's annual fourth of July extravaganza is movie entirely online this year the details from cable I W. city hall bureau chief Pablo welcome America CEO Michael dell beans as the celebration is being reimagined to include some aspects of the traditionally vents such as a concert but it will have no impersonate elements at all we may not be able to gather in Philadelphia's great public spaces this year we are excited to give all Philadelphians something to celebrate debates is a concert line up in other events including whether there will be fireworks will be announced at an unveiling scheduled for June tenth the economic impact on the city will be much less than normal but then so will expenses mayor Kenney says he's happy the event wasn't simply canceled we want to have some ability for people to be energized to stay inside to watch proceedings and keep people safer and keep them indoors large gatherings such as welcome America will be the last element of pre covered life to return once the pandemic is controlled officials reported continued progress on that front but with two hundred twenty four new cases of the virus and fifteen additional deaths they say it's too early to predict a date for re opening

Philadelphia Pablo America I W. City Hall Bureau Chief CEO Michael Dell Mayor Kenney
No fireworks? Philadelphia’s July 4th Welcome America festival will take place indoors

KYW 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 6 months ago

No fireworks? Philadelphia’s July 4th Welcome America festival will take place indoors

"Annual fourth of July celebration is moving entirely online this year officials announcing the new format today at the city's daily coronavirus briefing he would leave city hall bureau chief Pat Loeb has details welcome America CEO Michael dell beans as the celebration is being reimagined to include some aspects of the traditionally vents such as a concert but it will have no impersonate laments at all we may not be able to gather in Philadelphia's great public spaces this year we are excited to give all Philadelphians something to celebrate debates is a concert line up in other events including whether there will be fireworks will be announced at an unveiling scheduled for June tenth the economic impact on the city will be much less than normal but then so will expenses mayor Kenney says he's happy the event wasn't simply canceled we want to have some ability for people to be energized to stay inside to watch proceedings and keep people safer and keep them indoors large gatherings such as welcome America will be the last element of pre covered life to return once the pandemic is controlled officials reported continued progress on that front but with two hundred twenty four new cases of the virus and fifteen additional deaths they say it's too early to predict a date for re opening

Pat Loeb Philadelphia America Bureau Chief CEO Michael Dell Mayor Kenney
Becoming a Small Business Owner by Accident

The Small Business Radio Show

09:26 min | 7 months ago

Becoming a Small Business Owner by Accident

"You know I never wanted to be a small business owner when I first started out in the early early eighties. I want to be President of IBM but for me. I then got tired of my boss. There who promoted incompetent people over myself so I struck on my own. My next guest is also an accent. Entrepreneur Markets Babcock. Start out as a personal trainer at a big box gym when he was twenty which eventually led to strike on his own. Her Name Mobile Mobile Studio and eventually formed a partnership with fellow personal trainer but at time he was twenty four. Marcus welcome to the show. Great to be here today. It's good I fine for most small business owners. If we knew actually what we're in for we probably never would have struck out on our own because it's just way too crazy absolutely it's kind of the debris mindset in the beginning like. I could be my own boss and comes second. So so why is that? Isn't that because we read all the things about these great incredible success stories? And we think we'RE GOING TO BE THE NEXT. Michael Dell Bill Gates. Yeah exactly I think in some peoples cases like myself. It's it's forced onto them so I actually ended up getting laid off at the big box gym and Had become a small business owner but then just the dream of. Hey now my future is really in my control. And I'm very confident myself and I'm GonNa make the same big of course that's the dream like. Okay now I work for myself. I can work anytime I want to with anybody that I want to. It's going to be fantastic. I control over my own life but it doesn't quite turn out that way does it. Yeah no not not quite You find yourself working more hours Less less pay more expenses. And you're not like really doing the fun stuff anymore. You're not doing the stuff that you were doing beforehand. Which my case was actually doing the training with with the people who is more about the marketing bringing New People on organizing all of that. And I think that's the most difficult part of having your own business because most of us get started to solve a problem. Help a customer but we don't realize there's all this other stuff right around running a business as you said marketing keeping track of. Who's paid who hasn't paid setting appointments all the things that kind of get in the way of actually doing the work yeah. It was very humbling. I was like Oh yeah I can. I can definitely track money on my own I can. I can organize my calendar on my own. I can keep track of all my clients Piece of paper or my head and then it actually start scaling and I'm going. Whoa spending twelve hours a day trying to manage the business. And then you know it felt like another twelve hours doing the actual training and that's a that's a real big issue. You said when you scale tell us about your journey and how it all worked out so when I was in the big box gym I had like a or nine clients which was a good load for me I was also doing a full time college at the time too and then a little thing called college right. Exactly just mixed in there Anyone I struck out on my own I actually took a year off college and decided to Kinda grow. That business I I was like I'M GONNA go out mobile. I'm going to eventually grow to the point where I'm going to hire on people that was my idea scaling and what I never realized is hiring. Somebody on is pretty expensive and be. It's not as clean of a scale as some people may think it's not like you just grow until you hire somebody. Then they grow and they and you hire somebody else it's It's more about juggling everything. And so won't how'd you try to start to juggle things? What was your first attempt at doing that? Yeah so the Good Ole Excel spreadsheet I started getting people's names in all of a sudden. I'm like hey I can't remember who this person is or win this Appointment was And I should remind them so. I opened up Microsoft and started making an excel spreadsheet of. Everybody's names. How much they paid me Win Their next appointments were do. How many Sessions they had left and when I should remind them. This is interesting Marcus because that is really where everyone starch. Obviously people you start on paper right but now more of the same modern or computer savvy. People they opened up next cell spreadsheet and excels good for a lot of things but fairly soon it does have its limitations. Doesn't it yeah? I mean I got really good at excel macro 's and conditioning conditional formatting and stuff but it it has limitations. It can't be organized as effectively. There's not really a whole lot of automation unless you really start getting in there and start coding off visual basic Visual basic my my. There's another thing I want to do. I run my business. Let's learn visual basic. Yeah Yeah just add on another thing while I'm going to college and learning and actually running a business Yeah and then you spend time developing some sort of high like hybrid app out of an Excel spreadsheet. Yeah it's interesting. You say. The HYBRID APP. I find out that people. Then go from the Excel spreadsheet. They go towards an APP for this APP for that right. So the gopher an act for collecting their money then they'll go for an APP for Scheduling. And they'll go for an APP for something else and that's okay for a while but pretty soon you have all these different APPS and none of them talk to each other and it becomes. Its own kind of mass. Doesn't it yeah exactly? It's almost hoarding or collecting the best of the best. I'm an APP quarter. Yeah exactly you go hey this scheduling tools awesome when you get this and then go. This payment tool is going to do everything for me. I'm going to get this and that. Oh my gosh. That's marketing tools. Amazing I'm going to get this and then pretty soon you're spending more time. It's not as much time moving information from your scheduling tools to manually put it into a crm system or your payment tool or a marketing tool. And you're kind of back to square one but you're paying more money because think about what you really want to do. I mean your case when you're providing a service to various people is you want to see a customer holistically right. You want to know how often they come see you. How how much they paid you. Next time they're coming. You WANNA be able to market to them based on all that information and you can't keep porting information from one thing the other in fact sometimes it's hard to get data in and out. Yeah exactly sometimes. It doesn't think over right away. I mean in my case with the personal training. I wanted to have basically the folder that I would keep on paper of virtual right so I could open up. Somebody's cards see. What my notes. Where last time. I talked to them what they paid if they actually. Oh Me 'cause I don't WANNA give them free sections on accident and then I want a very personalized email. I can send out to them without spending the time to actually write one out for every single person. So what all in one solution mark did you turn to to actually solve this problem? That is so common for small business owners. I mean back in the day because this was quite a few years ago now I turn to mind body and that was heavy. I think I was looking for something. A little bit is used by a lot of like Yoga. Gyms and I know that our karate school but it's it's really a big application it is. Yeah very big application and. I think it's great for bigger. Gyms wasn't for me so I try that out moved onto something else And then eventually ended up partnering with a bunch of trainers and Yeah started just kind of using best of breed apps like we said collecting a minority in them and kind of going back. If I can tell myself advice now it'd be looking more something like the APP so we have now like defeat us so tell us about Vida and what it does for for small businesses. So that's going to be really that into and business management part where a lead can comment through the funnel and scheduling or the contacts tool. That's on like website on your social media on landing page and they're gonNA fill out information that you're going to capture and so the crm automatically so the system automatically tell you have a new appointment remind you and the client and then their information gets put into that CRM system that contact management tool. There you keep any sort of private notes on You can share and receive documents through there. You can charge. You can take payments and manages the whole life cycle of the Klein on that end and then it kicks their information out to the marketing tool. Well so you can trigger out automated messages out to these people and The manual announcements. And it's pretty personalized without really doing much work. It's interesting because I think a lot of people. A lot of small business owners see finding the customer right providing the service of the customer and then trying to stay in touch with that customer service again they see as really separate functions in their organization but the successful small business owners they will attract it as you said always from identification that prospect through customer to repeat customer that's so critical because we all know markets. It's so much easier to get another sale from a current customer and then find a new one. Yeah and it's a lot less expensive to market towards an existing customer than a new one right if you're leading. All of those current clients fall through the cracks. You're literally throwing away money

Business Owner Marcus Entrepreneur Markets Babcock IBM President Trump Michael Dell Microsoft Vida Bill Gates Klein
Doctor in Garden Grove, CA provides a 10-minute coronavirus test

Tim Conway Jr.

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

Doctor in Garden Grove, CA provides a 10-minute coronavirus test

"A doctor in garden Grove has been offering a ten minute rapid tests to detect the virus the test popular in South Korea looks for anybody's built up in the body to fight off the virus make a little **** on the finger at the tip of anything and we put a drop of blood in the cartridge Dr Michael dell says he's offered the results free for people who still have to work police officer holster worker Amazon delivery gas stations or supermarkets now says he's already out of task but thousands more expected any day the FDA says it's allowing the test provided patients are told it's not FDA approved and that a negative result does not necessarily mean a person is covert

South Korea Dr Michael Dell FDA Garden Grove Officer Amazon
"michael dell" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:13 min | 10 months ago

"michael dell" Discussed on How I Built This

"And please do stick around because in just a moment. We're going to hear from you about the things your building but first a quick message from one of our two thousand nineteen lead sponsors of how I built this Hiscox. WHO understands every small business is unique and Taylor's policies to your businesses very specific needs? Get a quote or purchase. A policy at H. I. S. C. O. X. DOT COM HIS COX business insurance experts experts planet. Money is the man who popularized recycling by making a deal with the Mafia. It's the bedroom. Beats maker making hits for Drake Nicki Menaj and the woman trying to get her money back from Ben Nimmo planet money from NPR. Hey thanks for sticking around because it's time now for how you built that and today we're updating the story. The first ran about a year and a half ago about two sisters in Lynn Massachusetts who had perfected the family recipe. I make this stuffing's that's Casey White. And I make the Dow and that's her sister Vanessa and the dough and the stuffing therefore Perogie. The Polish dumplings filled with cheese and potatoes. Sometimes sausage their grandfather used to sell them at the Family Deli in western Massachusetts in middle school goal. I would go there on Saturdays and help pinch Rogis and we always had them in our freezer. kind of like our kraft macaroni and cheese were. We just had him for his. And Knesset Casey went off to college. Their mom would bring them coolers full of Pirogies from the Deli and by the time they graduated they were still eating them and their friends were to ensure they could get parolees trader Joe's or wherever but who wanted those there wasn't really anyone making pirogies like families to make make and we finally said it was one of those ideas where you're like. Someone's definitely going to do this. And then we we realized after a while that no one was real. We don't maybe we should delay day. Maybe they should make Perot Giesen seldom okay. So at this point he was two thousand. Fifteen and Vanessa. Casey's grandfather was no longer alive but had written all of his recipes out by hand so they went to the Deli and the Gaza. We brought them back to my house and caked my table role in flower and so began the Perogie making for ten hours. Every Sunday Vanessa would do the dough and should be not too thick not to who shoo weeds and Casey would do. The fillings started with three flavors potato and cheese the pineapple and cheese and sweet potato caramelized. Onion wait ah I do not believe. They grow pineapples and Poland. It is very strange. Yes definitely not something. You would find back in the old country. But it actually was one of their grandfather's. There's recipes anyway. Every weekend Casey Vanessa would make the pirogies freeze them and then sell them at the farmers market in Melrose Massachusetts though I fire virus market with about fifty boxes and sold out in an hour in realized that there was a market and one reason they were selling so fast I think dumplings are the ultimate comfort food. Or It's bananas or it's Asian Dumplings Ed Food Twenty. All that year Vanessa Casey would make and sell pirogies Roque's on the weekend and then office jobs during the week but there is a point where we had to go to the next step because we were just making only you can only make so much in that that that long ten hour day we couldn't grow it unless we kind of took the leap of faith so we quit our jobs and after taking that leap the sisters move there Perogie operation from Vanessa's house to a commercial kitchen in Gloucester Massachusetts. They hired a few people to help them. Make more pirogies. But Vanessa Sir. She is still doing the dough stretching it out running it through the Joe Cheater and then cutting those circles thousands of circles day for the rest of our staff to fill Elon. Hinch Vanessa and Casey call their company. Judge you PIROGIES. Judge is the Polish word for grandfather and since we last talked to them. They've shifted their business from retail failed to wholesale which means they're focusing on large distributors like stadiums grocery stores in fact they're about to launch in their first grocery stores next month with fingers crossed on a possible contract with a stadium coming up and by the way that pineapple and cheese stuffing they no longer make it Apparently people don't like pineapple with cheese like we went to Poland a few years back and neither of us are pineapple on any menu. If you WANNA learn more about judge you parolees had to our podcast page how this NPR dot org and of course if you WanNa tell us your story go to build that NPR dot org and thanks so much for listen to the show. This week you can subscribe it apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast and while you're there please do give us review. You can also write to us at H. I. B. T.. NPR Dr Dot Org. And if you want to tweet it's at how I built this or at Cairo's our show is produced this week by run up Fata with music composed by RAM team Arab. Louis thanks also to candidate. Lim Julia Carney Neva. Grant Jeff Rodgers. Our intern is Sequoia Carrillo. I'm Guy Roz and you can listening.

Casey Vanessa Vanessa Casey Pirogies NPR Casey White Vanessa Sir Poland Dr Dot Org Hiscox Family Deli Lim Julia Carney Neva Lynn Massachusetts Taylor Massachusetts Drake Nicki Menaj H. I. S. C. O. Ben Nimmo Gaza pirogies Roque
"michael dell" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

10:03 min | 10 months ago

"michael dell" Discussed on How I Built This

"So you guys decide to go public. I guess in Nineteen Eighty Eight Do An IPO and raise tons of money. And why did you why. Why did you decide to do that by the way because at that point you I guess owned the entire company? Well we need the capital. We were growing at like eighty percent it per year and the company was only four years old and we were expanding into all sorts of new countries. We were expanding into new product article lines you know and we also wanted to be more of a pure with our customers and being a public company somewhat enable bliss to do that because customers could look and see that we were you know a real legitimate company. Yeah you know that that was helpful to time. Well here's what I think is harder harder for people to wrap their head around. which is you were expanding by an order of magnitude every year you? There was huge amount of revenue coming in but but yet that wasn't enough cash and capital for you guys to expand sure all the revenues not profit we. We weren't a software company and so we did need need some capital to finance the growth of the business and hire more people open new offices open new factories build. It systems you know. We absolutely needed some capital and by getting that money. Were you able to say okay now. We're going to beat. IBM WE'RE GOING TO BE BIGGER THAN IBM. Well We definitely want to to be the biggest and I would say it changed a little bit in that timeframe to you know competing with Compaq and one of the things I think I learned along the way was that if you obsess on the competitors editors you could be making a really bad mistake And I think you know that was definitely true in the case of those two in the sense that we had a better business model and if we were trying to just look at them we would miss opportunities by not listening to our customers. And how did we get from a company that started in a dorm room to having a half a billion dollars in sales well. We did it because we listened and we learn so I I guess by the year two thousand and two thousand two thousand one dell computers. PC's becomes a number one brand by by sales by market share more than compact more than IBM. Yes what did you do. You remember finding that out. Yeah you know we sort of have this Celebrate for a second Sometimes a little longer but you know we were focused Kristan. How do we keep growing? How do we expand into servers and storage services and software and how do we solve the next unsolved problems and two thousand one? We've been thinking a lot about China and India and the emerging markets markets and So there wasn't a lot of dwelling on any particular success so I mean the company you You know the story of Dell is pretty remarkable because it seems like from the moment you started selling. PC's of your dorm room until two thousand one. It's a success. After success after success there was no moment of failure. There was no there was no real struggle. Is that true is that is that right. No that's now right at all there were plenty of struggles and certainly if you go back and look at the history there you'll find all kinds of missteps along the way and did ends and mistakes you know. What was the dumbest mistake you you may? Because it doesn't I mean Michael I'm beyond it doesn't sound like you made any mistakes shakes it. Sounds like you were pre naturally gifted as a high school kid to understand business and then you understood computers and then you just started the successful company so what what was a mistake. You made okay. So nineteen eighty nine we created something called Dell UNIX which was which was a software? Yeah Yeah you know this. This was sort of prior. To the whole Lennox way yeah and UNIX was a well used operating system in mid range computer systems you know turns out we were really early at that and that was that was a really bad idea. It was a kind of a horrible misadventure bid cost the company money did it affect stock price. Sure yeah all that around the same time. We also had a a wildly ambitious engineering program that had our team had cooked up and it was too big of technical leap and the project failed. It was a project called Olympic. We had problems with our inventory control early on you know. We had all kinds kinds of mistakes. Fortunately no then we're fatal and one of the things I learned a long long time ago. You know when you find a problem fix it as fast as you find it uh-huh and look when you're pioneering in a new area where the new business model there's no playbook there's no You you have to just learn by doing and you have to into it an experiment your way through the problem. I'm curious about two thousand four because you you you stepped down as CEO of Dell. The company is just. It's a obviously a fortune. Five hundred company had been already for more than a decade huge revenues. Did you think okay. I've made it. I'm thirty nine time to move on and start a different phase in my life. Not Really. I didn't really think about stepping down. I had this partner in the company. Kevin Rollins who was the president of the company. He and I were running the company together and and I decided okay you be. CEO for awhile. I'll be chairman. I'll still be very involved and after about two ears you know. The industry started changing pre rapidly and the board came to me and said you know. Hey we think you should go back to being young. Yeah yeah and I mean what what happened. During that time because by all accounts that I've read there was a decline in two thousand four. Del Starts to lose market share and then a couple years later. HP becomes a number one PC seller. And then you come back in two thousand seven so what was going on in those three years. I think the market was changing. I think there were new. Things starting to emerge the cloud. What people we'll call it cloud today starting to show up? I think we weren't being aggressive enough in changing the business given the he's shifts. That were happening. Yeah you know it's a change or die business it's quicker dead business and the board asked me to come back into the CEO role and I was happy to do it but I've read that that around that time. The the quality in the service of Dell was was in decline with the company was is getting a lot of heat. And I'm sure you saw that criticism. So how did you. How did you deal with that? Look I think I think you can in any inigo dote you know extrapolate but there were definitely some areas where we could have been investing more in innovation. And we you you know. Change the focus of the company starting around two thousand seven to understand what we needed to do to be you. You know an important and relevant company in the future and so look I felt then and feel now deep sense of responsibility and commitment into the company. And I'll I'll care about the company after I'm dead. What what does that mean? All Care for the company after I'm dead the means that you know this is a lifelong pursuit for me. In terms of you know helping the company reach its full potential and certainly my dream is at the company persists well beyond my lifetime which You know still pretty young guy so I think that's a many years away. I wonder Michael. How much of your success has to do with you? Know your hard work and your brains and you know intuition and how much of it is luck good question I don't really know I'm sure there's some element of of luck there I I I've probably been lucky. A Lot. you know I feel like I. I was really lucky to be born in the United States. That's probably the biggest stroke of luck right there because I think in the United States when you're twenty years old and you show up and you want to sell something to somebody you know they look at you too funny so i. I think that that was my biggest stroke of luck was just being born here in this country and having the opportunity in the freedoms that that's at forty minutes that's Michael Dell and if you still think of a Dell computer as the nerdy John Hodgman character in those pc versus Mac commercials dough. Computers have actually been used by the good guys in the Jason Bourne movies movies and Spiderman Captain America even mission impossible in fact a few years ago in two thousand Sixteen Dell was the number one brand featured in movies more than Sony more than Mercedes Benz or Adidas and yes more than Apple.

Dell Michael Dell CEO IBM United States Compaq Kevin Rollins Kristan HP John Hodgman Adidas Lennox Mac chairman Sony partner Jason Bourne
"michael dell" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:40 min | 10 months ago

"michael dell" Discussed on How I Built This

"Factory operation and so this was a little bit scary because it's sort of looked like a massive dorm room. You know it was. It wasn't the most put together. Place this is. This is not an actual tool dorm room right like you you had by this rented out office space. Yeah Yeah We. We're growing quickly. And so we you know we tried to clean this space up and and put on some semi respectable business attire. Yeah so the guy's going through and we're showing him. Here's how format the hard drives. And here's how we you know. Insure the quality controls. And we're sure we can meet your demand for this order for one hundred fifty units and he says what are those and I said. Well those are the computers that we have to format hard drives and by this time we'd actually been assembling our our own. Computers Format hard drives became too expensive to buy am from other people and he said well. Why don't you sell those us and I was like? Oh that's a great idea. I should've thought we were so busy. Making these hard disk drive kits that we. Dan Really thought to make our own computers when we come back in just a moment how that idea launched Michael Down a path that would make del one of the biggest computer companies in the world. Stay with us on Guy Rosner listening to how I built this from. NPR Hey everyone just just a quick thanks to two of our sponsors who help make this podcast possible I to squarespace the website builder dedicated to providing customers with easy to use professionally designed designed templates. Join the millions of graphic designers architects lawyers and other professionals using squarespace to promote their business visit squarespace dot com slash. NPR for Free Fourteen Day trial. And when you're ready to launch us the offer code. NPR to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain. Thanks also to First Republic Bank whose first and only business is client service. They work with you to create customized financial solutions. That support your the unique needs and goals reach out today and you'll be connected with a dedicated banker who will always be your first point of contact with the bank because they understand your total financial picture. They can recommend the services and products. That are right for you or your business to learn more visit first republic dot COM Maddie Safai. Here host of shortwave daily science podcasts from NPR. Listen for new discoveries everyday mysteries and the science behind the headlines All in about ten minutes every weekday. It's a great addition to your daily listening whether you're a science nerd or you know just a little science curious. Subscribed grabbed two shortwave from NPR. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR. I'm Guy Roz so normally at this point in the show we start to talk about the slow and steady growth of business and the early struggles goals and all the hard work that went into getting enough ground but in the mid nineteen hundred s pretty soon after Michael hired his first engineers to start making taking the first dell computers from scratch. They were selling so many computers so fast that they started to compete with the biggest name in computing thing. IBM IBM at the time. Had A six megahertz to eighty six computer that they sold for three thousand nine hundred ninety five dollars. Yeah so we introduced a twelve megahertz to eighty six base computer and we sold it for one thousand nine hundred ninety five dollars so our computer was twice as fast and was half price. How how are you able to do that? What we still made a decent margin Selling them and I think one is. We had some clever engineers and we had this great supply chain that we created traded. And so when we would sell let's say two hundred computers in a day You know we would give that signal back to our suppliers who would every day or every few hours deliver parts to our factory. Yeah and then we would you. You know ship those computers out to the customer so we add a unbelievably efficient supply chain. We created out of necessity because we had no capital that also meant that we had the freshest parts at the best cost and as the cost of materials were coming down. We benefited from that. And we could get get the latest technology to the customer faster than anybody else and you didn't. You were direct to consumer company. You didn't retail shops. We're not selling Dell computers. Peter's right you have to call Dell or fact style and order computer at the time that's right except Most of our business wasn't to consumer to business. It was two businesses. But that's what you said is actually a common misperception. A lot of people thought only consumers by from Dell. That's actually not what was happening. We were. You're selling to all sorts of companies and governments and small and medium-sized businesses. And that was most of our business even from the beginning and at that point like the late eighties. What did you have in mind for the future like? What was your ambitions for the company? Well we we had some pretty big aspirations. The first one was we said we want to expand globally. It was pretty clear to us that. If you were only successful the United States that would be good enough. The second was that we had to go after selling to you big companies. Because if you didn't sell to the really big companies and the biggest governments in the world well you weren't going to be irrelevant company out. And then the third one was we said. We had to differentiate on the basis of service and we created this thing called On site service and today would be a very common thing but back then you know if your computer broke you had to put it in the trunk of your car. Hard to get back to the computer store and then they would take it and then they ship it off somewhere you'd wait weeks and weeks and supposedly get it back so we came up with this program where he calls on the phone says before the Internet. And if you had a problem we'd help you resolve on the phone and if we weren't able to resolve phone we'd send a technician with parts to your location to fix your computer on site and we did that all across the United States and we thought the minute we announced his our sales will double because it was like so much better than what we were doing before for and they didn't double instantly but after about three months a double so well I wanna I wanna put this into perspective because you know we we think about about like really young entrepreneurs.

NPR Dell Michael United States First Republic Bank Guy Rosner Guy Roz Maddie Safai technician IBM Dan Peter
"michael dell" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:30 min | 10 months ago

"michael dell" Discussed on How I Built This

"You know as soon as I got out of school I would rush over there and and they had all of the computer companies of note in the world in the Astrodome and they were showing off their computer crimen. And that's amazing coincidence because as you went to that convention which happened to take place in Houston that year happened to be in Houston that year and it just happened to occur like a couple of months after. I got my driver's license. Yeah so yeah I mean. There's there's definitely some luck involved here right and that convention not only were you there. But Rod Kenyon anion went there to who went on to start Compaq Compaq and Dell came out of that convention. Yeah well and I remember in my chemistry class In highschool the guy sitting next to me was telling me that his dad had just left Texas instruments. Sir Go start this new computer company and you know he was one of the early guys at that Compaq some amazing so you see you you. Obviously you graduate high school And then you go to university till to UT Austin right yes. Does a pre MED major. And you know some some of this was the programming from my parents because my father is a doctor of my older brothers doctor and I always. I thought I'd be a doctor and and when I started going to school my parents weren't around all the time. Hi Right because I'm I'm in Austin near Houston. You're pretty far away so you got a lot of free time on your hands so I start exploring this whole computer thing further and one of things that I noticed about the computer business was that it was very inefficient. It took a really long a long time for the technology. Get from the people that made it to the people that were buying it and it was actually rather expensive and slow slow to occur and to me that was sort of frustrating. So you are a your student at. Ut You're supposed to be doing pre med training right and you start to think the PC market like there's an opportunity here is that what what you start to think. So I was in this mode of of buying computers and soup ing them up with more capability and then reselling them and and it was just sort of a fun thing to do at way to make some money. I loved the computers actually working out. Great what would you do. You would go. And and find like second hand computers and take them apart and rebuild them and then sell them to people. No I was buying new computers. I would upgrade them with more memory and actually the main business became putting hard drives in those machines so back then the original IBM personal computers had no hard disk drives. So what I would do is I would buy. A couple of these. Describes and by a controller card writes some software and make some cables and make a hard disk drive system that you would put inside an IBM computer and then instead of two one hundred sixty K.. Or three hundred and twenty K.. Floppy disk drives. It would have a ten megabyte hard drive right which which at the time was something. Amazing sounds ridiculous. Today ten megabytes then was that was like unbelievable. How long would it take? Take you to upgrade one computer for example. Oh it didn't take that long pending on what you were doing. Maybe thirty minutes forty five minutes. That's something like that so you can see. You can do a bunch of computers every day. Oh sure yeah no problem in between classes. But you really weren't studying you weren't. There's no way you were doing your schoolwork I was. I was definitely slacken off on the schoolwork during that time. Yes but who would you. I mean how did you find customer so it was no craigslist. There was no the eighteen or nineteen years old. I guess I mean. How did you even know who to sell these two? I advertised in the local newspaper newspaper. I bid on state contracts and I. It's kind of funny the The State Office that was responsible for buying computer requirement and everything else was about three or four blocks from my dorm room so I could just like walk over there and they they would give you all the dockets for all the things. The state wanted to buy. How did you even know how to do that? You know I don't really remember how I figured that out but I somehow figured it out and you know but let my. My biggest customers were universities in the area. Doctors lawyers architects things. He's like that students weren't really buying computers at the time and most of the students that I knew they weren't really interested in computers at the time. That sounds. It's crazy right now but this back in nine hundred ninety three and nineteen eighty four. There weren't very many people that had personal computers time. Okay I am hoping that I don't like a broken record but I'm just I'm just thinking Mike Golic here you are. You're an eighteen year old kid. I mean you probably probably looked like a a baby in you. Were going around hockey computer. So like why would these architects or businessmen are lawyers have taken can you seriously well. I guess they figured I'd do. I was talking about I. Nobody ever said. Well I'm not going to buy from you because as you don't look the part or something so I think the early adopters of computers were sufficiently technical and Geeky that I was able able to relate to them in a way that resonated and so I didn't have any problem. And how much money were you making the time I was doing about about fifty to eighty thousand dollars a month Lau in business when I was in my dorm room that I mean that's just an insane amount of money. Honey I mean. Did you tell your parents that you were that you were making this much money No no I didn't Now so you know they they eventually going back to late. Eighty three they became very upset with me. And said you have to stop this and and focus on your studies. You gotta get your priorities straight. You know what are you doing with your life and all that stuff and you know I agreed to do that. You know it was like going cold Turkey or something it just. It lasted about ten days and I actually realize is that this was more than a hobby or a nice way to make some extra cash on the side while I was going to school but actually something very passionate about so during sorry no ten days I I sort of mapped out. You know the the beginnings of how it was going to finish up my freshman year but then the launch this as a real official business and I eventually made a deal with my parents that if it worked out I would continue can you and if it didn't I'd go back to school. I mean it's I can just imagine how exciting it was you're eighteen and you're selling your starting a company basically basically without even realizing it I guess what was it that was more exciting. Was All this money that was coming in or was it just that you were just selling a bunch of computers. Well it was probably a little bit of everything I mean. The opportunity for what became Dell Computer Corporation was more and more apparent. And while you couldn't see out three or four years you know you could see far enough out that you keep going. I guess the first couple of years or the at least for the first two years you were just buying off the shelf computers and making them better. That's right you know what Whoa we started. Upgrading other people's computers. And then we started making these hard disk drive upgrade kits that became the main gene business of the company selling hard disk drive subsystems and memory kits to upgrade the computer. You say Michael When you say we who who are the we the and you started this by yourself in your dorm room and then who did you bring on to help you. Well always say we that makes it sound like there's more of us But we started just me but I I hired about one person a week every week you know for the first year or so and then it became became more and more and I remember one time we had this customer. Who wanted to come visit us? It was Martin Marietta which is now part of some much beer company and the guy wanted to buy like one hundred and fifty of these kits which was for us at pretty enormous order and he wanted to come to Austin and see.

Dell Computer Corporation Houston Austin Compaq IBM Rod Kenyon Ut craigslist Mike Golic Martin Marietta Turkey hockey Michael Lau official The State Office
Dell Computers: Michael Dell

How I Built This

09:28 min | 10 months ago

Dell Computers: Michael Dell

"Long before for anyone heard of the tech underpins like Mark Zuckerberg. Evan Spiegel ORC. Trina Lake back before it was fashionable to drop out of college to pursue your startup even before people used the term startup back in the ancient days of the one thousand nine hundred eighty s the dorm room miracle story. You've heard of was Michael Dell's now today. The company is enormous beyond enormous worth billions of dollars Dell has sold more than six hundred fifty million computers since Michael founded in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. And what's amazing about. This isn't the money it's not even the idea. What's amazing easing about all this? Well Michael Dell. Because he's not a backslapping sales guy. He doesn't come across as particularly charismatic. He's actually on the quiet side. Maybe even a little shy Michael grew up in Houston in the nineteen seventies was just as digital technology was taking off in that city with companies like Texas instruments and then later Compaq. His Dad was a doctor. His mom was financial consultant and the expectation was that Michael. Michael would become a doctor like his dad. But even from a young age Michael Dell felt pulled in a different direction he was into numbers. I mean I remember when I was small child. My Dad had this adding machine victor adding machines before the electronic calculator and I was was just fascinated that you could add up numbers with this machine and really big numbers and and it would make this like mesmerizing sound every time it did it and I just kind of love that and then I remember when I was about Seven or eight years old. I bought a calculator. I it was the first semiconductor based calculators and I was fascinated that this small machine could do complicated math problems so yeah I got I got very interested in this stuff it also turned out that about equidistant between my junior high school and our and our house there was a radio shack store and so when I was riding my bike home I could stop by the radio shack next door and see the you know early forms of the of the personal computer and hang out there until the kick me out of the store and were you you know like kind of entrepreneurial as a kid yeah I kind of liked business And I had all kinds of businesses is selling baseball cards Had A stamp auction. I got a job at a gold coin and jewelry store and I was to negotiate with people that were selling things and by those things the lowest possible price because the owner gave me Nia percentage of the cut and whether you also worked for the local paper for for some time. Yeah so I got this job. Working for the Houston is in Post newspaper. It doesn't exist anymore now. They think they combined with the Houston Chronicle. And my job along with hundreds of other mostly mostly you know. Teenagers was to call random people on the phone and try to sell them a subscription to the Houston Post newspaper and I observed three things the first thing I observed. Is that if you sounded like the people you were talking to. They were much more more likely to buy the newspaper from you like you. You put on a text like a heavy Texas accent. Yeah I'm not GonNa do it for you here but I think you can. You can use your imagination nation. Okay so second thing I heard was that people that were getting married. Were much more likely to buy the newspaper and then the third thing I observed is that people that were moving into a new house or residents were also far more likely to buy the newspaper. Well how did you Who was getting married and was moving in? Well you talk to them. You strike up a conversation you just call people and say and ask them about themselves. I guess this is like at that a time or perfectly happy to tell strangers personal details right. Yeah so I. I observed this and what I figured out is that in Texas. This is when you as many states when you want to get a marriage license you have to go to the county courthouse. It turns out this public information right and among the information that you give to the county court is the address you want the licensed sent to so so with this information. I devised a direct mail program where I sent letters to all of the people that had applied for marriage licenses in Sixteen County area surrounding Harris County. Which is where Houston Texas is is and I hired a bunch of my high school pals to go out to all these county courthouses and type the names in two small apple two computers and I sent a massive direct mail campaign to all those people that were applying to get marriage licenses and there were also at that time in Houston? There was a building boom. There were these very large apartment and condominium complexes that were going up and so I would go to these buildings under construction and sort of figure out who was in charge and say A. Hey I'm from the Houston Post newspaper and you know we've got this great offer where your new residence get the paper free for two weeks and all of these do is fill out the form. You're a high school student when you're doing this. Yes how much money did you walk away with. But I think it was about seventeen years old. I made a little over eighteen thousand dollars that year. This is like freakishly precocious of a of a high school senior. Like that's it's just weird that you would even no to think of doing those things I mean. Don't don't you think I didn't really think about it like that. I just it just seemed like a good idea so I was pursuing. You was working. I pull you things that didn't work but but that worked so I I kept doing eighteen thousand dollars. What did you do with that money? I mean that that must have been more money than you've ever seen in your life. I bought a BMW. So I wanted I wanted to. BMW Am. W what did the other students think of you. What did you have this reputation as like a business whiz kid in high school or or like? What did they anything about you? You know. I don't really know and I and I didn't really care So I I was sort of keeping myself and I had a few friends is but I I wasn't the most social of kids but you must have been somewhat social because you were going out and selling stuff to strangers rangers. Sure social enough to make the sale. Yeah so you are on the one hand doing this entrepreneurial stuff and then I guess you were also just really into computers. Yeah the original computer that I you know got my hands on at home was the same one everybody else had. which was the apple to apple to? Yeah Yeah and one of the beautiful things about the apple two was that all of the circuits were discrete circuits that you could understand so you could go in and start to play with those and modify them and reprogram the BIOS and upgrade the system and take it apart put it back together so something happened here around Nineteen Eighty one IBM introduced the IBM PC. And that was sort of a very important moment. Because if you dial back the clock to the late seventies early eighties in this company. IBM had a leadership of the part of the economy referred for to US Information Technology. Unlike any other company at any other time in history they were by far the dominant company so in Ibm mm-hmm introduced the IBM PC. This to me seemed to be a very important moment so I try to understand everything was going on about that and so when you took apart this. IBM PC that was selling for about three thousand dollars. As far as I could tell it was about six hundred dollars. It's worth parts. Wait you bought one and you took it apart just to check the insides out sure. Yeah Yeah what else would you do. So you gotta you gotTa take it apart. How how can you understand it if you don't take it apart philly? Most people buy computers to like you know at that time. He has to do basic you know accounting owning and word processing. You bought it to take part. Well I wanted to understand did and you know to understand it. You have to take it

Michael Dell Houston Texas Houston Post IBM Dell Mark Zuckerberg Houston Chronicle Trina Lake Evan Spiegel BMW Apple Financial Consultant Baseball Compaq Philly Sixteen County
NCAA's agent certification process draws concern, criticism

Golic & Wingo

02:58 min | 1 year ago

NCAA's agent certification process draws concern, criticism

"The NC double a trying to clarify something my about what went on with their new rule where you have to have bachelor's degree to become an NBA yeah and the NCAA released a statement after drawing criticism and they'll continue to draw they said although some can and have been successful without a college degree as a higher education organization the NCAA values a college education and continues to emphasize the importance of earning a degree we are guided by recommendations from the commission on basketball which spoke with the agent and advisor community that the NCAA certification process should be more stringent than the current process cool story bro agent an adviser committee that sounds like a bunch of haters that sounds like Hey listen let's make it harder for rich Paul because that appears to be the only correct and the thing I don't understand is them saying in this one that you're going to let's get to that line and this doesn't make sense which benchmarks are new rules against the requirements for other organizations that certify agents like the NBA which also requires agents to have a bachelor's degree rich Paul is an MBA agent we're talking about this rule so much because it clearly is trying to exclude one ridge Paul and so I don't understand I'm on the N. B. A. P. A.'s website right now and it's kind of inconsistent to be honest new NBA NBPA agent application check was sent a copy of the highest diploma received or transcripts in PDF format and then in the frequently asked questions section hints more at the idea that if you don't have your diploma yet you need to provide the dates by which you might have been so that part is right click but might is the key word there my in my eye and I would like some answers from somebody who would know or maybe we can reach out Dominic fox four through how this was the CEO of the N. B. PA right for a for a little while there somebody who might know this because again all of it even if the rule is written in clearly fires in the place of what is in practice because rich Paul is an agent yeah he represents the vast majority of players in the NBA and solve all the sudden you're trying to tell me that he's not not and be be a certified I would ask what is that certification really mean read that line again about the highest yeah just as the lights were just as high as degrees haulage no it it does but I'm telling you there's something in the frequently asked questions on this website that hints at the idea of a bachelor's degree okay yeah so I'm saying I don't know when I can't say for sure yet so I'm not going to and I like that clearly but regardless like we see it in practice presents half the major power players in the league yeah and and here's here's more justifica are but just rational for why a bachelor's degrees not a benchmark for any level of success we just brought a few billionaires who dropped out of college for you Bill Gates Larry Ellison mark Zuckerberg Ralph Lauren Steve Jobs Michael dell dell computers so somehow despite that vaunted bachelor degree they manage to ridiculous rule it every capsule loosely in saying and we'll try and get a clarification on what that actually isn't isn't according to the website that junior

NC NBA
"michael dell" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"michael dell" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Means firmly under the control Michael Dell the founder, chairman CEO and his private equity backers Silverlake Michael Dell owns fifty five percent of the oh by himself all the common stock shareholders combined. Only twenty two percent they can appoint just one board member yet Delile Michael Dell to care about a bell. Well, he's got his liberal good numbers for himself. I like his style strategy on not thrilled that he is basically younger state going on there when it comes to share on voting all that said, I think the posits your to outweigh the negatives for one versus reason dealt technology stock is third cheap at these levels. Cubbies there six thousand fifty one cents per share this year, maybe another similar number next year and seven dollars sixty three cents twenty twenty one. That means Dell's trading at less his six times twenty twenty one fiscal year earnings estimates, which is insane. Given that historically Michael Dell spin pretty good steward of his investments by comparison. You'll Packard sales at ten times says at these levels, I think they are mostly baked in your and the positives. They're not something that's even more obvious. When you consider the Dell stock actually managed to rally today, even as the rest of the market, crumbled and believe it or not I think they'll be people think about this like they do IBM and take it up again, the moral now Michael Dell will build squawk box. He's in Davos tomorrow morning. I think. Thirty exciting bottom line. Now, the Deltec publicly traded again, I recognize the company is far from perfect. But that darn stock is to keep to or you know, what it is. It's. Stick with Craig. Important this morning eight the big position EBay and talked about the idea that should be split up. Bring up to if you only please do not sell it. If you do not want to consider I think the unlocking that you made me worth as much as fifty dollars for this thirty three dollar stock. And I want you in there. I'm doing more work. So for my work Burr, FIS what Elliott is saying about so many divisions that I think it looks like a very attractive limited downside situation. Ebay, which I have not liked for very long time. I like say this. We'll market summer at finding just for you right here money. I'm Jim Cramer. I'll see you too.

Michael Dell Dell Cubbies EBay Jim Cramer Davos Packard founder CEO IBM Craig chairman Burr Elliott thirty three dollar fifty five percent twenty two percent fifty dollars
Injuries reported after jetway collapses at Baltimore airport

Coast to Coast AM

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Injuries reported after jetway collapses at Baltimore airport

"Government a jetway collapse Saturday evening at Baltimore Washington. International airport. Details from correspondent Bill Michaels. Dell's BWI airport officials say at least six people were injured and have been transported to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries. The calls of the jetway failure remains under investigation. The jetway is an enclosed walkway that connects the

Bill Michaels Baltimore Washington Dell
"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"It's not going to be fun. If it's not fun to begin with. That was also one of those things that we talked about Preston with him. We started that it have to be fun. First of all then see where where it takes us because going back to the old forum, which is not even online anymore. I wrote over thousand posts over thousand posts about accounting. Oh my God. And about oil. The also remember that that specific threat, you talked about in my defence if he were saying steak has no life. It's absolutely true. So it's really in. My defense is on the one year godly for a job of technically not permitted to work to do anything for year wasp Mitte though to sit and talk about accounting in the forum had a lot of time on my hands. And whenever stumble across this forum it with people who is just like minded, I was this. If you just kept on giving something good will come back to me. And that was you Preston though. And that's such a true statement, if you just doing something because you love doing it, and you're just trying to make a better impact. I think that everything else will fall in place. I think when a person is chasing money. Maybe they're starting a business because they want to make a lot of money. What you often find is if they're successful because sometimes people can be successful in their pure motivation was to make money in. But their success is usually short live what kind of falls out. Some of those motivations is the person was. The make even more money. So then they go out, and they raised venture capital next thing. You know, they only owned five percent of the business, and they got some venture capital person. That's breathing down their throat. They're absolutely miserable. They they're in a position where they've made a lot of money, but it was just a completely miserable experience for five years or ten years. Some people would say, hey, I'll take that. And that's fine. There's people out there that that fits their motivation. That's not something I ever want to go through. I want to be happy. I want to enjoy my time with my family. I want to have an impact. And so for us. This was a great fit, and it was very casually put together and just kinda happened. Listen to some Michael Dell's comments his sticks. Exactly, right. This is not about sticking high. But it's more about Michael Dell. I get the sense from his response that he absolutely loved this stuff that he was doing. He was having a blast. When he's telling the stories about back in the day when his in college, he wasn't enjoying his classes. He was enjoying the stuff. He was doing with reading hardware and selling. It and having an impact in that way. So you gotta take a look at yourself. What is it that you love to do? And really kind of make sure that something has centered around that. Because if it's not I just I think it's hard for people to sustain the motivation to go through it one thing or like to add because you specifically talked about how do you find that other part, a what kind of skills should he your sheet process? I would say that I would not find a person who would complement me. And the know that sounds counter intuitive, especially in this day nays where especially here in the western world. You know, we have a culture where everyone has to have high self worth. We celebrate diversity. Everyone is good at something. No one's is bad at anything. It's all about you know, complementing each other. There's other reasons why that's true. But I would think in terms of finding a business partner. It's okay to have a ton of different blind spots. You know, it's okay that you have a business partner, and you still don't know how to do accounting or. Combined. You still don't know how to do design. I think that's completely fine. I think the one thing you need to look for in the business partners having this narrow focus and how can you together become five percent better than anyone else? So you can get that ten x one hundred x return because you are better to that specific item. Alright VM thank you so much for asking your question. This one was really fun for sticking to respond to in a token of appreciation for asking your question. And getting it played on the show.

Michael Dell Preston partner five percent five years ten years one year
"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"I is because we have read so many books together, we have a very very similar mindset on how our business should be run. It's almost hilarious. How Stig will come to me and say, I think we should do this. I'm like, yeah. Absolutely. Let's do it and vice versa. I'll go to him and say, hey, I think this is a bad idea. Like, yeah, you're probably right. Let's not do that. And I. I think one of the reasons why in that can be bad at times because you need to have some friction points at certain points in time. But as far as the ease of running a business, it is really nice to have a person who's grounded in a lot of the same fundamentals. And so I guess what I would tell you is if you're looking for a co founder, you're looking for somebody to do the business with I would highly encourage you to try to read some of the same books, especially if they're good core fundamental books because is going to be in sync with each other. And I think that that's really important to kind of have that framework. There's a saying I don't know where it comes from. But it says if you wanna go far you're gonna go together if you wanna go fast, go alone. And I think that that's really Representative of whatever your interest are of starting a business. You got to kind of understand that mindset, if you're going really far, I think having a partner is really really good hits really hard to find the right person. And I just want to say this publicly. I really. Really treasure my relationship with Stig, it is, ma'am. I feel so blessed and so lucky so Stig. I know I all the time of your vantage point. So I experienced this completely different than you know. I didn't that all press. I think you described the store very well. Typically when people ask I always say that we met online because then P would always like, oh my God. What what what happened there? But we kind of met online in the sense that we met on the online forum, you know, you create it buffets books, and that's how we started to chat. And I think that was very fortunate and in the way also think we create own lock in the sense that who sits and talk about counting on an online forum. I think you set some something about it being serendipitous at some point in time. You know, just before we started the podcast, but you know, sometimes I think begging that it'd be like, no Preston if you can find two people in the world who wants to hug, it out, accounting and gap rules. On the online forum in writing Vits Dibba's you just to set people with too much time. Perhaps that's more. Ed, I almost feel bad about playing this question. You know at talking about how prison I met after having four questions about Michael Dell is probably not a fair comparison. The one thing I would say that the writ threat here is really that. He was having a lot of fun. He started this business up because it was a lot of fun. Then he realized he could also make money, and you know, he started growing amid a bunch of money, but it has to be fun. Whenever you start. Don't find business partner or stop by himself to to make money. If you start up by having fun, perhaps you will make money most likely not, but it's not going to be the other way around..

Michael Dell partner Vits Dibba co founder Representative Preston Ed
"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"This is my vantage point, I'm kind of curious if stick sees it the same way. So I started the buffets books videos, the website and stood up a forum and on the early days of the form. It was kind of mean in like two people talking on the form about accounting and one day this guy named Stig shows up, and you know, we're probably posting comments at our four sentences long. Like, oh, yeah. I like General Electric, or I like this company, and this guy shows up and all he wants to talk about his oil and. Not only is it a is it a post about oil, but it's like a five page analysis just going into detail all about oil, and he just kept talking and each post has got longer and longer and longer and as like who in the world is this guy. And so after I don't know after a few months of watching his posts on this forum and kinda talk and back and forth. I shot him a personal message. And I said, hey, tell me about yourself, whatever. And so he's like, oh, you know, I studied at Harvard and this and that and I was like, wow. This guy. He's pretty interesting guy. And so I was in the process of writing an accounting book at the time, but was really have. I was struggling with time. And I was not able to get it across the finish line. And it was just like this is never going to get done bit. Based on how this guy writes in? He seems really really aggressive in really wanting to be a part of anything finance related. So I reached out to I was like, hey, do you want to finish this book or work with me on getting this book done and he came back? He's like, absolutely let's do it. Then so sticking I finished writing the Warren Buffett accounting book together, and we ended up publishing that book together. And this was right at the point where the podcasting stuff was starting to become really popular. And so I said, the Stig, I said, you know, I think this would be a lot of fun. We could just record conversation like you. And I could just have conversations about finance about what stocks were looking at. We'll record it. And if we have five people that listen to it, we have five people that listen to it. I said at the end of the day, it'll just be fun for us to have conversations about something. We're learning if we're reading a book, we can talk about that or whatever. And so the stigler just like, I don't have like a real radio voice. But I'll do. And so we we just started recording our conversations in one thing led to another. And here we are in there's people that actually listen to this. So I would like to say it was something that we had planned, but it really wasn't. It was just something that we did for fun, and we kept doing for fun, and then it just slowly turned into a business. And so the thing that I would tell people about at least from our vantage point from our story is if it's not something that you are willing to I'll give you a perfect example this episode right now I woke up at four forty five to record this episode. You have to love what you're doing to do that. There is never been a day where I've just dreaded doing this like this is just fun for me. And I think Stig would tell you the same thing is just is just a lot of fun. This is what we love to do. We love the sit around and talk about an income statement that is not normal for most. People most people would absolutely hate that. And so you gotta find a person who just absolutely loves the business or the product or whatever it is you're working on just as much as you. Because if they don't is just not going to work in the long term two years in they are going to be so sick of whatever it is that they're doing that is just not gonna last. So I think finding a partner that has the same passion and the same interest as you is extremely difficult to do. Now. One other thing that I think was a big advantage for Stig in..

General Electric Warren Buffett Harvard partner two years one day
"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"It's a very interesting discussion in continuation of that. I think. It's interesting. How Michael Dell talks about this growth? But also, how there are some problems with that in terms of say the idea of the batteries, you know, sending up floor products. You know, how much you time shoes you spent on fixing the issues that you have how much time should you spend on just keep on going because you need that first mover advantage with us professional personally, I think it's very important. Stay humble, which was really what I took away from what Michael Dell was talking about here. Be the first one to fix it. We are as human beings, the very good at forgiving, and we really really good at people redeeming themselves. But we're not good whenever it comes to era Gance, it's this shelter pain a long-term game. Because of course, the extra cost is not fun and the media coverage the next day. It's you know, it might be quite embarrassing. The US Persian of you as a company but going back to the call. Apiece that you talked about before Preston, you know, what really remains that the organization is to be proud of what they do because they know that the quality's there, and even if it's not just going to be fixed, and then the image of the company who humble, it's whenever we stopped becoming arrogant. That's whenever you see politicians or celebrities really fall from grace. You know, you can't put yourself on that pedestal. But if you do the Dallas side is just going so much more harsh for you. So blitz scanning is fantastic high-growth is fantastic. But if you're not delivering the kind of Prague that you proud of and you want to deliver a don't see what the growth is useful for. All right. So we hope you guys enjoyed some of the questions and responses that we played there from Michael Dell at this point, we're going to transition into a question that was asked from the audience, and we think that the question has a good parallel to some of the conversations that were happening with Michael Dell because it relates the finding a business partner. Now this question was asked to us by YoM. This is what he asked I stayed. My name is via m- Joshi. I've been listening to your podcasts since twenty fifteen. You guys have been doing a great job. I've been loving yet. And keep up the good work. The question that I had was to do with the start of culture that we have going on these days where you recommend that we find a co founder who complements our interest in our skills. So I just wanted to ask you guys how both of you met each other. And how you founded that investors podcasts at more or less your journey on. How you got to where you are today. Thank you for sharing and keep up the good work. Thank you, man. I'd like to say was very strategic and we had like this whole plot. The fact of the matter is it was none of that..

Michael Dell US Preston Prague Dallas co founder partner
"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"So we had to really hone back. The limbic was a project that we created still it was there. And so we made the decision to recall all of those batteries. Now, the interesting thing if you go back and look at when we made that decision the popular wisdom was that. It was an issue that was unique to Dell and Dell's only coming the world that had this problem. It must have been because Dell did something wrong in the way designed computers several weeks later, another computer company announced a similar recall for the same Sony batteries, and then several weeks after that another come eventually all of the companies that use the Sony batteries announce recalls, we were very proactive in doing it. And I think our team's different tasks job and sort of doing the right thing, you could have had all sorts of arguments about well. It's you really small percentage or those kinds of things. But we actually knew the problem was there, even though there were debates about okay is it going to be six batteries of fail. Or is it going to be ten batteries fail? Doesn't really matter. One battery failing is one too many and my experience is that. When you find a problem, you fix it as fast as you find it and just move on. And whatever the consequences are fixing it you just deal with it. And just keep going his first response there in reference to growing too fast. I kinda see this from two different vantage points. So in tech, especially if you're not moving fast, you're going to get clobbered or you're just gonna miss the boat. There's a book called inside the tornado. And this is actually one of Steve Jobs is favourite books. If you're in tech. I would highly highly encourage you to read this book because it talks about how you can have the best product. If you missed the timing of where the rest of the market's at or you're you're just a little bit late to the market. You can just totally miss the boat. It's hard for me to. Put myself in Michael Dell shoes as to have why he was growing at the speed. He was growing and whether he could have dialed it back a little bit or he had to move at that pace. Just because of all the dynamics that are talked about in this book. And I'm telling you, this is a fabulous book, especially if you're in tech. But I think the downside of growing too quickly is the culture piece of your business. The long-term sustainability of your culture when you grow at that speed. You're basically putting butts in seats as fast as you possibly can. And you're not necessarily doing that filtering that you need in order to establish the culture that you truly want to have inside of your company. And so the long term impact of this this massive growth is that you might be dealing with cultural clashes within your company for a very long period of time in might not even be something that you can correct. And that might be a really extreme comment. But I think that for me personally, I think culture is extremely important if you have a product or, sir. Service. The doesn't need the move fast. You're able to sustain your competitive antigen because maybe it's something that's not tech related or the necessity to move fast is not there. I would tell people to go at a pace that allows you to continue to control that culture within your business because it's going to lead to a longer sustained a success and control of what it is that you're trying to accomplish is interesting that you should mention inside the NATO and the Adventists of scanning so fast. I am currently reading a book by Rehoboth men called blitz. Scaling talks about this concept. It's very interesting concept in terms of how fast you grow in especially if you in a winner takes all or win takes almost everything industry. Why that blitz scaling is is so important, and why you should sometimes, you know, ignore diffraction new products, and why you should ignore angry customers, and.

Steve Jobs Dell Michael Dell Sony NATO
"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"That's going to be providing a consistent cash flow. Whereas the rest of his business, which is hardware cell is more of a I sell it. I have to wait three years for some customers. I might have to wait five years for. Another customer before they make another hardware purchase. And then the half to be happy with the service. They have to be happy with the performance of that hardware in order for them. The by my hardware again. I think the service model was a great approach that a lot of people at this point in time. We're not doing, and it's they're providing this constant cash flow into then he's able to take that money reinvested into better processes, so he can make his hardware better. And you can kind of see how his model and the thinking kind of compounded on it self more so than a his other competitors at that point in time. So the last question we're going to play for you. He was asked which challenges and setbacks, if you had an how did you ever come them in this is his response, we had problems in one thousand nine hundred three that I think were multi faceted one big challenge that the company had grown so fast. You know, we had grown from one thousand nine hundred eighty eight you know, maybe one hundred and fifty million. To by nineteen Ninety-three almost two billion in revenues and the infrastructure in the systems and processes was not really keeping. In fact, one year, we grew from less than nine hundred million to over two billion. It was a real mess. We sort of had to stop reevaluate things we had real challenges in how fast can you build factories, and how fast can you hire people and put up new buildings, and hyper growth, you know, sounds really fun and exciting. But I learned the hard way there is such a thing as growing too fast where the wheels come off. And you have to sort of take a time out and say, wait a second here. Let's prioritize, and I was absolutely to blame. And we were going and doing so many things at one time because we really excited. I mean, we're like, okay, we're going to we're going to go in this business. We're going that business where this country and this new. Product and this new service, and it was just too much of a good thing..

three years five years one year
"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"So, but if you won't allow your kit to his eighteen years old, and you know, live in a dorm if he's not signing on company. I mean, when should he I mean, it's not whenever he is twenty eight and he has you know, kits and wife and that mortgage to pay that might not be the right time. But you know, you're eighteen years old. Why not give it a break for like six months, or so the reason why I wanted to play this clip, partly because of the story kind of like the story about like how he moved into a place where the idea was that he would just stack up the equipment that he was selling was quite a cool his story. But also studying so many self mid Bill, and as as we have here on the show, I've always trying to decipher how much of a role. Lucked place. How lucky was it? Then when then when he started up eighty four he could sell out, you know, specific IBM PC, competitor pots and upgrades to that. Was that just luck? Bill Gates, his talk so much about being born in nineteen fifty five how that was the luckiest time it could be boring because otherwise he couldn't have been successful in terms of acquiring the pope ring skills and really started a business based on that that was so big. And because no one else did that was that just lock a no that this by definition. You can't really answer. This. You can't say if Michael Dell was born twenty years before or twenty years later, how successful would he have been? We don't know. But I think that someone like Michael Dell you will get to learn much more about him here later in the episode a thing he would be very successful with the dry that you just has almost regardless of when he was born perhaps not where he was born. But when he was born, and if you wouldn't be twenty billion dollars. Festival which yes, I'm sure he would done quite well, and you probably still wouldn't have told his parents the next question. We have you started with almost no capital. How did you manage to grow so fast in this is his response? I started with thousands of dollars almost no capital. The interesting thing about the business that we started it because we were selling directly to the customer customer would pay us often. Right. The time we ship the product, you know, we were able to get credit lines from suppliers and we had what's known as a negative cash conversion cycle, which is a very good thing in a business like ours..

Michael Dell Bill Gates eighteen years twenty years twenty billion dollars six months
"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"michael dell" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"We study the financial markets and read the books that influenced self made billionaires the most we keep you informed and prepared for the unexpected. All right. Welcome to the investors podcasts as usual McCarthy. My co dig broder sin. My name is Preston pysche. Like we said in the introduction. We're going to be covering Michael Dell. And so we're just going to jump straight into the questions. Mr Dell was asked what was the story behind starting up del? This was his response when I was freshman with the university of Texas. I was going to school at every intention of going to school, and I was kind of playing around with this as a hobby while I was going to school. It was sort of a really fun hobby for me because you know, I was really interested in computers and kind of selling upgrade kits and, you know, Hansen computers, and, you know, my parents kind of go into this, and they were really upset because they thought that I should really only focus on going to college. My father's a doctor my brothers. Dr. What's doctors in the family? So I was. Going to be a doctor. And so they were very very upset with me, Michael, go, get your priorities straight. You know, so around thanksgiving of nineteen Eighty-three. My parents kind of made me commit that. I wasn't going to do this computer business anymore is only going to focus on my studies. And so for that lasted about ten days, and it was during that time that I decided that I was going to start a company actually, you know, my parents kind of telling me to stop doing. It is probably would cause the company to get created if they hadn't done that it might have just been a hobby, but what I kind of reflected on those ten days. I really love this, and it was enormously. Exciting tremendously fun. And so like any other eighteen year old who wants to do what their parents don't want him to do. You just don't tell them. That's what I did. I kind of went about path to start the company without really telling my parents. I kind of moved into a larger apartment that really high ceilings. So I could come to stack things up, and you know, manage to conceal it from for quite some time. I basically kind of came to arrangement with my parents. I said look I really want to go do this. And I know you don't do it. But I've checked with the university of Texas and the way it works at UT is that you can take a semester off and you can come back. And so I said we'll want you will agree to this all take the semester off the fall of eighty four no semester. And I'll go and do this. And if it doesn't work out go back to school, and if it does just keep doing, and so they they agreed if they hadn't agreed probably would have done it anyway. So may have eighty four I Inc the company and off ago. I just love the story. I don't really know what to say because the story till so much. I think my comment on this. This would be if you're a parent, and you have a child that is going against the grain, and you're trying so hard to push them in a certain direction. You might wanna just replay that story because sometimes the best way to exercise control is to provide free will right in this scenario the harder. The parents pushed the harder he went the other way. That's a cool story. I think for every time you would play a story like that the hit rate or the success rate might be one out of ten, and so I think that's hard for people to keep in their mind as well as like Stig, and I are providing an example of a success a major success like you couldn't get a bigger success. And that was a story, but we could probably go and record Joe shmoe who's now not owning his own business in working for some other firm who has that exact same story, and he wasn't successful. I think it's a great story. It's a cautionary story at the same time. But I think it's a common story that you see from the people that we study they almost all start out like that. It's really neat. Yeah. I also feel that s the Panera might be east for me to say..

Michael Dell university of Texas Joe shmoe Preston pysche McCarthy I Inc UT ten days eighteen year
Dell shareholders back return to the public market

FT News

06:31 min | 2 years ago

Dell shareholders back return to the public market

"We're taking a look at sales returned to the public markets in two thousand thirteen the computer company quit the NASDAQ in a controversial twenty four billion dollar buyout. But now five years later and after a fierce fight among some key shareholders. Michael Dell's technology company is set to listen to the new York Stock Exchange are US editor of the lex column. Sajida in that talks to Amy keen about what's bringing the company back to the public market. And why some shareholders resisted the deal? So G starts with what prompted Michael Dell to take his company private just a few years ago. So dull, obviously, it was the famous stop. He c- maker Michael Dell started the company in the eighties. When he was a college student and his dorm room at Texas. It was hot company for a really long time. But say ten years ago, you know, the PC became much less important smartphones were here, the the iphone and the like, and so he ended up spending like fifteen billion dollars between twenty ten and twenty twelve trying to turn delicacy off company, a much broader tech company, the market hated that. It's down shares like twenty five percent between twenty ten and twenty twelve and around the same time he had met this guy. Egon Durban who was a private equity investor to firm called Silverlake, which is a Silicon Valley based buy out firm, which is quite prominent both in Silicon Valley and in Wall Street and doing these buyouts, and they happen to be neighbors in a Wii. And so they had the idea that they could take Dell private buy out the public shareholders, and then reinvent this company and private so through the course of twenty thirteen the announced the deal and. By the end twenty thirteen they were able to tail private at a twenty four billion dollar valuation is very controversial a bunch of shareholders protested because they thought Michael Dell was a CEO, and he knew things that no one else did. And if he's buying why should we selling? But ultimately, they're all able to push the deal through and Dell became a private company in late. Twentieth. Thirteen and so if you fast forward five years Dell is going to be coming back to the public markets. What's changed? What happened over this period? Yeah. So the whole plan was to turn around and reinvent the company, which they did very dramatically Silverlake is a private equity firm. And so they have investors who are pension funds, and sovereign wealth funds and endowments who after five seven ten years want their money back. So it's natural for companies that go private like delta to relist again. And so what they've done in the last five years is that they really did till it turn del into this like one stop shop for corporate IT department. So they bought most prominently EMC, which is a tech data vendor for sixty seven billion dollars. They offload. A divisions that didn't fit anymore, and they've turned into this company that really can go up against Cisco HP and IBM and companies like that Sajid in order for Dow to have the backing to list again this time in the new York Stock Exchange, they company needed shareholder support. Can you walk us through what led to the vote that took place on Tuesday places start with that as we have to go back to the EMC deal, which happened 2016 EMC was a sixty seven billion dollar company. Dell was big it was perhaps thirty forty billion. Maybe at the time twenty five something like that. So it was private. So we don't actually know what the valuation was. But the point is he was much bigger. And so two by all of EMC offered their shareholders to things that gave them twenty three dollars per share in cash and the gave them a piece of paper called tracking stock to track. Another company called VM ware VM where was majority owned by EMC was also listed. So eighty percent of this company that was listed was owned by EMC Dell couldn't afford to buy all that for cash. And so they said, you know, what will give you this piece? The paper called tracking stock in VM ware, and it will reflect our interest in this company VM ware, and it should trade roughly in line with with VM ware. And so this piece of tracking stock which was publicly listed or traded called deviant t was created UNC shareholders got it. And for the last two years. It has traded has gone up quite a bit. The problem is it's always triggered a sharp discount to the pure VM ware stock big del wanted to go public again. And so the way to do that was not a traditional IPO where they just go out and sell shares of Delon people by that in like an under written offering what they wanted to do was take Dell shares a private and then swap it with Devi shareholders who would get the new Dell paper and through that transaction. Dell would again be public company. The problem was how do you actually value DVD, and that has been the fight for the last six months, let's say it's been particularly contentious who are some of the key sort of people fighting. It's interesting TV. Mt. Is like this weird security. VM ware is hard to understand. So not survey. Rising Lee its biggest investors have been hedge fund. So most prominently call icon had a big stake Elliott, the very high profile hedge fund that gets in these kind of fights. Was there a bunch of other kind of brand name twins were involved in the Soza a fight really between for the last six months to throughout the terms of this reverse merger IPO between these big hedge funds, and then Silverlake sedans had the benefit over these last few years of not having to answer to the public markets not having to release quarterly earnings. How's it looking like, it's gonna trait? That's a great question. So part of the fight that's gone on with this VM ware. Tracking stock called Devi MTA has been there's really two issues around it one VM ware. Let's say one hundred and fifty dollars per share company. The tracking stock has traded say around one hundred or one hundred and five so thirty forty percent discount. So the whole of that tracking stock one want to be made whole sort of get a value that approaches at one fifty the other half of the fight in the more complicated. Fight is a big portion of this. Deal is in this del stock which is suddenly going to be public. How much is that worth since it's private there's a big disagreement on how much that is worth. The delta worth quite a bit. The hedge funds have been skeptical. And so that was really the core kind of fight that just got resolved a came up with a clever mechanism to sort that out. But if you look at the actual numbers, and where Dell's going to trade at least initially the Cordell business businesses, not going to trade at a very high multiple. And so Michael Dell who was frustrated five years ago about his valuation is probably going to be frustrated now again, and so the question is do shareholders publisher holders now mutual funds, and the like do they kind of Dopp his vision on how Dell is going to really compete in this new IT market that they've been remade. And they're right up there with Cisco, and Microsoft, and the others or is this going to be thought of as a slow growth business that has this corporate governance problem with private equity firm who still there and Michael Dell who have super voting shares? We're going to take advantage of us. So the real question is now. Hey, the public. They got this deal done our daily at the benefit of the doubt or not. All All right. right. Thank Thank you. you.

Dell Michael Dell EMC Vm Ware Silverlake Cisco Lex Column AMY Silicon Valley York York Stock Exchange Texas
Tesla, Alon Musk and Samsung Group discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Tesla, Alon Musk and Samsung Group discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"That can be played with up to six friends. Don't smile is what it says. A challenge, not to smile and asteroid attack. Well, as asteroids that attack. Tuesday, Alon musk, tweeted, and considering taking tesla private at four hundred twenty dollars. He followed up with a letter

Tesla Alon Musk Samsung Group Michael Dell Facebook Dell South Korea Bribery Kurt Director LEE Four Hundred Twenty Dollars Nine Billion Dollars Three Year Five G
Amazon launches curbside pickup at Whole Foods stores

Todd and Don

03:45 min | 2 years ago

Amazon launches curbside pickup at Whole Foods stores

"Simple tweet can affect the stock of a company Tesla's CEO Elon Musk he surprised everybody yesterday when he tweeted that he's considering taking the electric car company privates that he has funding for his plan already secured the stock climbed more than three hundred eighty one dollars per share during the trading day still below the four twenty. Level must cities considering in an. Email employees must send taking. The company private is a much better. Path it's the best path forward now shareholder vote must be held before a. Final decision is made in it must moves ahead with this plan it it would be one of the largest go private deals on. Record seventy two billion. Based on four. Hundred and twenty dollars per share so there you go no. Real indication he's gonna, do this maybe and, just kinda just monkeying around, but, he, basically says when you have shareholders. You gotta answer to share Holders and sometimes that. Slows us down yeah yeah yeah but thanks definitely popped, up there. Significantly yesterday nothing new with this that's what Michael Dell did took his company back yeah you did. And and it's now turned things around big time there for a while Michael Dell probably was probably had the most amount of debt than any human being on recorded history there for a while I think he's I think everything's good now but so there you go also went tech news Amazon in its latest tactic to win. Over US grocery shoppers Amazon is. Announced today that it's launching. Curbside pickup at whole foods stores I'm. Surprised they weren't already doing it you can place orders via Amazon prime now. App and ask have your groceries loaded into your car upon arrival at the store the service is now available in Sacramento in Virginia. Beach with plans to. Launch it and. All the other cities later this year so often will be. Coming very soon well, that's a game changer, for them for sure that's Gonna be a big boost to their business I would think a lot of kind of behind the times HP HEB HEB targeting others have already been doing this for quite a while you were doing it very well, you would think so I guess. One, of, the. Things they, have to consider though it allowed. The locations is maybe. What the physical setup of the of the place. Gotta, have space. Not like you can just do this anywhere because it can cause traffic. The, thing I've noticed at HEB I mean how many times have you gone to the store and you see you see. Some kid putting, things in a massive cart, yeah a big three or four level cart those are the people that are getting the curbside orders together I. See and you might see two or three of those massive carts down. Down the bay Kyle on a Sunday. Afternoon you got ten or fifteen other. Carts trying to get, up and down that aisle they they kind of blocked the aisles. Well I won't do the curbside pickup at whole foods ever because one of the one of the motivations for me to go, to whole foods is that that's where. The, most attractive women go whole foods in my. Opinion That's how you determine what you put in your. Mouth that is Yes I guess so yes it how much. Time I spend in the store ever. Asked their names or anything I don't try to get. Phone number I don't do. That I'm a married. Man have you just very happily, married to stare I'm just I'm just human that's all, I'm, looking stare I have just noticed just just an observation what I've been in whole foods I seem to be the. Most attractive women in Austin listen, New York City council members are. Expected to vote today on changes that could revamp. The way ridesharing services are governed when this happens in, New York it could happen, here in Austin, we'll get into. That coming up, after the, news also an interesting, new way to get a new car a subscription to a cause not a lease but a subscription you can have you know a brand. New Cadillac Mercedes for a. Couple of weeks or couple of months or a couple of years. Really..

Elon Musk Amazon Michael Dell Tesla United States CEO New York City Council Austin New York Sacramento Virginia Bay Kyle Mercedes Cadillac Three Hundred Eighty One Dolla Twenty Dollars
China-US Trade Surplus Eases as Trump Tariffs Bite, But Weaker Yuan Softens Blow

America in the Morning

01:04 min | 2 years ago

China-US Trade Surplus Eases as Trump Tariffs Bite, But Weaker Yuan Softens Blow

"Watching, how Trump impose tariffs are affecting. Our trade with, China Steve Kastenbaum has done some numbers crunching exports from China. Not only grew in the, month, of July the growth exceeded expectations, exports rose twelve point two percent when compared to July of, last year despite fresh tariffs that's well, above the ten percent that was. Forecasted it seems like President, Trump's tariffs, on thirty, four billion dollars worth. Of Chinese goods had little impact on overall trade some of that increase can be attributed to. Frontloading customers placing, large orders with Chinese factories in order to get the deals done before the, president institutes deeper tariffs On two hundred, billion dollars worth of, goods manufactured, in China, the concern is that the escalating trade war in, a steep decline in the value of the you on versus the, dollar could put a significant dent on the economy China's government responded by releasing more liquidity into the banking system encouraging. Lending and promising a more active fiscal policy they haven't shown any outward willingness to give in to President Trump's

Elon Musk Tesla President Trump Donald Trump China Founder And Ceo Tom Good United States New Orleans Tom Elon Steve Kastenbaum Michael Dell Tom Busby South Carolina Seaworld Hurricane Katrina New Orleans Saints NFL
Massachusetts top court upholds 20-day voter registration cut-off

WBZ Afternoon News

03:07 min | 2 years ago

Massachusetts top court upholds 20-day voter registration cut-off

"Is a private company says is planning to offer common shares investment firm silverlake and michael dell took del private in two thousand thirteen companies still losing money but tells losses have been tracking and sales grew nineteen percent in his latest quarter business reports at eight and thirty eight past the hour i'm tracy jonky bloomberg business on wbz newsradio ten thirty tracy thank you and the white house has just announced that secretary of state mike pompeo we'll make another diplomatic trick to north korea it will be his third trip to pyongyang white house press secretary sarah sanders has pompeo will leave for the korean peninsula on july fifth so this week and you can expect fireworks if a different kind after president trump's announced been next week on his choice to replace retiring supreme court justice anthony kennedy the president says just this morning he interviewed four candidates for the post he plans on meeting with four others before next week's announcement cbs's steven portnoy reports abortion rights will be a key factor in the senate debate after the nominee is known in the campaign the president made it clear he'd appoint justices who would vote to overturn roe versus wade now he says he won't ask perspective picks for their views on abortion the list from which he's choosing has been preapproved by conservative groups cbs news has learned the two leading contenders are both pella judges brent kavanagh of the dc circuit court and amy coney barrett of the seventh circuit based in chicago the white house says counsel don mcgann will lead the overall nomination process as he did for the confirmation of justice neal gorsuch last year former governor deval patrick's brotherinlaw will spend the fourth of july locked up after making his plea for freedom while awaiting trial the prosecutor told the judge she wants former governor deval patrick's brotherinlaw bernard sigh of milton held without bail until he goes to trial he's accused of raping kidnapping and assaulting a woman last december in an apartment the two shared the victim claims he forced her to have sex and held her against her will cy has pleaded not guilty and ordered no contact with the woman but today milton police detective vaulter pirates testified that earlier this year cycle used a special app to anonymously send messages and texts and that he asked a friend to kidnap her so that he could talk to her the judge is expected to make a decision on bail on july eighteenth in norfolk county superior court sheri small wbz newsradio ten thirty in massachusetts the cutoff voter registration remains at twenty days prior to election day the aclu had gone to court arguing the cutoff came just when people's interest in the candidates and issues is peaking will the aclu argued that cutoff prevents thousands of qualified on registered voters from translating that interest into action in other words from voting well the supreme court did not agree ruling the twenty day cutoff is quote reasonable and their words wbz news time four forty two traffic in a minute tom cuddy right now in the as tikka dot com sports studio red sox nationals first of three washington rick pacelle oh starts day two of.

Milton Nineteen Percent Twenty Days Twenty Day
Europe warns of coming tariff retaliation

Pat McCrory Show w/ Bo Thompson

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Europe warns of coming tariff retaliation

"Dell's purchase of storage from emc in two thousand sixteen and dell owns eighty percent of palo alto based vm where do the purchase of emc that move signals dell's decision to re enter the public markets after founder michael dell took the company private deal with private equity firm silverlake for twenty five billion dollars in twenty thirteen trade concerns continue to dominate global markets with europe warning it will retaliate against us tariffs on car imports with tariffs and up to three hundred billion dollars in us goods president trump also told fox that his threat of auto tariffs or his biggest weapon to win concessions from other countries china did cut tariffs on imported cars of the weekend making good on a promise to the us however chinese officials are also preparing an additional twenty five percent tariff on us cars and trucks in response to the us tariffs and ahead of the opening bell dow futures down by one hundred twenty five points nasdaq futures falling fifty seven points and the sp is down seventeen points ahead of the open on the moneywatch.

Dell EMC Michael Dell Silverlake United States Donald Trump FOX Palo Alto Founder President Trump China Three Hundred Billion Dollars Twenty Five Billion Dollars Twenty Five Percent Eighty Percent
"michael dell" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"michael dell" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"To me keith had how do you be successful i say right get clear on the outcomes get clear on the priorities set your account her senate planet be protected and then have accountability without accountability i think it's almost impossible to be successful it's why you you look at michael dell mark zuckerberg the google boys larry ellison philip night warren buffett bill gates steve jobs you look at any of them these were not a bunch of cowboys they weren't at they're just firing their gun at whatever move they had a board of directors that they were accountable to and steve jobs screwed it up so bad they fired him because he was not doing it the right way and it wasn't until he learned the lesson that they brought him back and steve success is not from what he started is from what he built starting businesses about the easiest thing to do any idiot can start a business and most idiots do the key is not starting one the key is can build one and that requires skills into it's about how you do it not what you do on a rant about like it fell put the quarter let it go the that i have if i'm putting myself in in your shoes is asking the question where am i on the spectrum from the person on one end who wakes up asks what am i gonna do that goes in the email in the rest of the day flies by to what you said plan outcomes that drives clarity on priorities that drives what your calendar needs to look like and then accountability based on the activists to accomplish priorities to accomplish the outcomes where do you fall on that scale and at the regardless of where you fall if you feel like you need to move more toward the version that kief described understand this is exactly what we have been teaching it's everything that we've been doing in the membership it's why we have the four one one on the website if you aren't using a four one one it gives you clarity on your outcomes in priorities for the year so you can drive your priors for the month you can drive priorities for the week one thing dot com with the number one click on free stuff it's free.

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Tesla Bloomberg, Michael Dell and Facebook discussed on KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

01:07 min | 2 years ago

Tesla Bloomberg, Michael Dell and Facebook discussed on KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

"Which had outgrown its facility problems started though when white congregants blocked members of the black church from entering one sunday back in march job cuts coming at tesla bloomberg says nine percent of tesla jobs will be eliminated americans feeling charitable for the first time the four hundred billion dollar mark has been reached when it comes to charitable giving foundations gained more than fifteen percent the likes of michael dell and facebook's mark zuckerberg giving one and two billion dollars respectively education health arts environment and animal charity saw at least a six percent uptick in donations last year lots of washington capitals rag the crowd of today's stanley cup parade in dc the nhl nhl champs rallying after the buses rolled along constitution avenue on wall street the dow now down just over six points this is cbs news fisher investments helping people achieve a comfortable retirement for over thirty five years learn what makes fisher investments different at fisherinvestments dot com this is southern california's only twenty four hour local news.

Tesla Bloomberg Michael Dell Facebook Mark Zuckerberg California Tesla Washington NHL CBS Fisher Four Hundred Billion Dollar Two Billion Dollars Thirty Five Years Twenty Four Hour Fifteen Percent Nine Percent Six Percent
Bloomberg, Walmart and Michael Dell discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:03 min | 2 years ago

Bloomberg, Walmart and Michael Dell discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

"Bloomberg radio bloomberg the world is listing this is a bloomberg market minute walmart expects to record a noncash net loss of about four and a half billion dollars in the second quarter this is from selling a majority stake in its brazilian unit to advent international walmart will retain a twenty percent stake in its brazil unit upon completion of the transaction dell technologies reports a solid firstquarter revenue climbed nineteen percent and adjusted earnings rose thirty three percent ceo michael dell has been considering strategic options for the computer and server maker such as a combination with software affiliate vmware or an ipo for dell bayer is just days away from transforming itself into the world's biggest maker of seeds and agricultural chemicals saying it plan is to close its purchase of monsanto on thursday it's the third in a series of industry megadeals following dow chemicals merger with dupont and china national chemicals takeover of syngenta s and p futures up nine points gina cervetti bloomberg radio.

Bloomberg Walmart Michael Dell Vmware Monsanto Dupont Brazil Dell CEO Syngenta S Gina Cervetti Thirty Three Percent Nineteen Percent Billion Dollars Twenty Percent
Small plane with 4 on board crashes off New York's Long Island, FAA says

24 Hour News

02:09 min | 2 years ago

Small plane with 4 on board crashes off New York's Long Island, FAA says

"Wins news time three twenty two well right now there is a coastguard search underway on long island after a small plane crash so far to bodies of those aboard the plane has been recovered to others are still unaccounted for authorities say a small plane with four people on board crashed off the coast of new york's long island near indian wells beach inam against it the faa says the piper pa thirty one aircraft went down shortly after three pm saturday afternoon investigators have set up a command post at the beach the hamptons draws a large summer crowd with numerous private planes flying into east hampton airport dad was correspondent juliet walker will twenty eight racehorses were killed in upstate in an update barn fire early saturday this according to new york post happened around three am at the mount hope training center in orange county according to a stable worker worker told the paper they were not able to save any of the horses the man who was in charge of eight horses in the barn said they were brought back to the grounds around one thirty am after raising in the poconos dean ethically one of the trainers who lost horses in that fire said no people were in the barn at the time wins news time three twentythree will it's a tragedy for some bed owners on a delta flight from phoenix to newark their dog was found dead in its cage when they got to the airport wednesday the prime marine named alejandro was in a kennel in the cargo hold delta says the pet was found dead with vomited in the cage after a detroit stopover the airline said it's conducting an investigation on a michael dell grozny who was traveling with his girlfriend and moving to newark says he wants to know what happened and he said the pet was a member of the family well a newly released report from harvard university found the actual death toll in puerto rico after hurricane maria was more than four thousand six hundred people not sixty four people which is what the us government claimed dozens gathered at forty seventh street in i avenue yesterday to demand accountability judy sheridan gonzalez led a group of nurses on the ground in.

Long Island New York FAA Juliet Walker Orange County Phoenix Alejandro Delta Grozny Harvard University Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria Judy Sheridan Gonzalez Newark Detroit United States
"michael dell" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"michael dell" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Two two seven you know what else i thought about and you might know more about this than i do executive producer chris i'm sure you do apple and michael dell and you know the folks who started up apple and microsoft i mean did these people not live i mean michael dell created del out of his dorm room didn't he he started out of his dorm room apple wasn't what's his name in his garage working out of his garage how do you think they were changing their clothes every day and the dallas isd story from a reporter scott sid way he said from any he tweeted this earlier this is what i saw on twitter and you should follow me on twitter at chris crock show that's at chris crock show c h r i s k r okay scott tweeted out twentyfive disd schools offering free breakfast and lunch and activities for kids who may be stuck.

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"michael dell" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"michael dell" Discussed on Accelerate!

"And they got complacent well when you say they got complacent what most people i think here when you say that is they got complacent and so they didn't product innovate because all right one out in red clayton christian sins innovators dilemma clayton told us is we have to keep innovating with our products well clinton's right but clayton missed a hold giant part of this which is products don't live in space they living categories and said in it more simple way anti people only by solutions when they have problems in so clinton won a shock yeah clayton christians in is actually wrong in so far as he's he's co is bringing you to the wrong conclusion and here's my evidence for it in 1999 dell computer corporation so laptops servers storage and professional services and michael dell is on the cover of every magazine and and they you couldn't have a hotter company today there are are dying company michael dell couldn't get on the cover of any magazine and they sell laptops storage servers and and and professional services so what happened it didn't stop innovating they sell their laptops are awesome for servers are awesome they're storage capabilities are awesome nobody buys that stuff anymore there was category violence so in the storage market it shifted to virtualization in the server market is shifted to the cloud or and so when you hear this conversation about innovation most people think product innovation it's actually category innovation.

clayton clinton professional services michael dell dell computer
"michael dell" Discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"michael dell" Discussed on The Talk Show

"A part of this and again it's just the thing that popped into my head and is obviously a first world privilege type situation but i remember i've told the started before one of the vice go to south by southwest so i don't know it's for a these bentley's four or five years since i did but some time for five years ago roughly um uh we i was a tough by southwest and uh some friends i went out to uh a steak dinner uh and be a nice little meal and as we were leaving this is southbound alpha takes place in austin texas we're leaving peabody go to the restroom before we laughter uh uh waiting to get seeded standing by himself was michael dell and i knew who was i was like wow that's you know there's michael dell and he was poking at like a uh some kind of windows base cellphone and i thought wow there's michel della billionaire great one of the great innovators guy chait truly changed the world guy more or less invented the the pc columbus business um and a lot of supply chain stuff i'm michael management right it it all sorts of all sorts of stuff welldeserved tremendous success but there is using i don't know if it was i don't even know dow made a found pretty wasn't using an iphone he was using some kind of windows phone type thing so my i thought wow there's michael dell and then my second thought was holy shit i i have a better cellphone the michael dell yet and then i thought i presume them bill gates doesn't use an iphone that he was at least at the time because microsoft was still trying to to be a part of uh.

bentley texas peabody michael dell windows chait dow iphone microsoft austin supply chain five years