7 Episode results for "Michael Critise"

Byte Alan K Rode On Doctor X

Sci-Fi Talk

05:59 min | 6 months ago

Byte Alan K Rode On Doctor X

"Hi this is tony auto and welcome to bite here on the. Sat podcast network and so parenting an apocalypse. It's it's not the same way we would. Do you know how it works. Any views usually two to four minutes long but sometimes they can be a little longer. When you when you live long. All kinds of strange things happen very right in saying that. The greek heroes. Where the original superheroes in part because of the nature of genes but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. Helen k rudy is the author of michael kirk tease life and film and he talked to me about the fame directors beginnings in har in particular the film dr x. Mr rowdy great to talk to you about this This movie i actually never seen it until you know. It's coming on turner classic movies. And what a little gem of a movie and and really a director. Michael critise. Who in my book i think is overlooked. Plus you for writing a book about him. What stands out to you about this. Well a couple of things. I think the the style of the movie as a melding of the warner brothers house style which is Snappy smart back talk from reporters and cops and clipped off dialogue and so on and so forth in combining that with two strip technicolor warners had a contract with and had to figure out how to fulfill during the depression when musicals took a dive for a period of time And and movies that universal made popular but in nineteen thirty. Two horror was a film business. I mean mgm. Dr jekyll and mr hyde paramount. The island of lost souls and so on and so forth so and and James whale was doing his thing over at universal. So i think this was an attempt with a third of the theaters being closed With with a couple of the major studios going into receivership during their prussian. This was a way to get people into movie theaters. And they were desperate to do that and this was. This was basically xanax inspiration. 'cause he was he was the head of production warner brothers when he was twenty. Five years. old You know. His first his first big movie star was written by jack warner stanford. He always renton was my favorite star because he never asked for a raise nor complained about the food in the commissary so so This was a combined this was an attempt by warner brothers to sell. Tickets fulfilled their contract with technicolor. And and make money and critise at this. Point was as i in my biography of them. This was his general form in period where he was aching a film virtually every three months. He was starting on hill and between nineteen thirty. Two and nineteen thirty three. He made like fourteen movies. I i mean it's just he repeatedly because they needed to get the movies out into the theaters with new. There was a new movie playing like every every week or so. This was part of that. But i think a lot of this though in dr x. They were making stuff up the the the notion of making a film. Even in the pre code era having to do with serial killing cannibalism this horrific makeup that they went to. I guess to max factor and i i think purrs west more i tend to think he designed it but they use the factor resources because at that time the studio The studio makeup departments were not nearly as sophisticated as you would be come and so you know the the whole synthetic flesh thing president foster sitting there watching human heart in an abuser bobbling water. I mean all of this stuff. We look at these things now on a on a home screen and we're kind of like well you know that. That's that's pretty cool. That's pretty scary. But ninety years ago sitting in a darkened auditorium a darkened theater with a bunch of people. I mean this. This scared the shit. People in a lot of ways. And i think in another way xanax wanted the comedic episodes in us to to lieven the terror and goes there was a fine line in one reason. I think jack warner did not like horror films is he didn't want to offend people and more rural areas Unsophisticated audience and so forth. So they had to kind of make it funny where people would be frightened and they giggle a little bit. So i think that that that was kind of the the the melding of of two different styles. The warner brothers house style and and and getting on the horror bandwagon for only a short period. Because jack warner jack warner disliked two things any any movies about alcoholics because he thought alcoholic alcoholism was like a weakness and there was something wrong with you and he didn't like home movies as a as a general rule. Let but Jack warner could squeeze a nickel hard enough for the buffalo to fall over. So you know that was always the priority. I liked that casablanca. The adventures of robin hood even king creole without some of michael kirk films. Get alan kay roadies. Michael curtail life and film and dr rex can be seen on. Turner classic movies starting on may seventh and that is to bite. I'm tony till auto.

warner brothers michael kirk Helen k rudy Mr rowdy Michael critise jack warner Dr jekyll mr hyde paramount James whale turner mgm renton depression max factor lieven Point casablanca buffalo robin hood dr rex
Weirdhouse Cinema Rewind: Doctor X

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

1:20:46 hr | 4 months ago

Weirdhouse Cinema Rewind: Doctor X

"Hey everybody today's episode is sponsored by xfinity. Do you like free stuff. Well xfinity flex is a four k streaming box that you get free with xfinity. Internet plus peacock premium is included too. So you can bench complete seasons of shows like the office in family at no extra cost. So you know. That's that's a win win. Entertainment starts at free with flex xfinity. It's a way better way to watch everybody. Today's episode is sponsored by audible. Which i love because i am an audible user. I use their app. I listen to audio books at home all the time while. I'm doing chores around the house while i'm cooking. That's right and audibles the place to be because audible is the leading provider of spoken word. Entertainment all in one place so get started today visit audible dot com slash mound blown or text. Mind blown to five hundred dash five hundred again. That's audible dot com slash mind blown or text to mind blown to five. Zero zero dash five zero zero. Get started now. Hey welcome to weird how cinema. My name is rob lamb. And i'm joe mccormack and this is a A bit of a rewind here because we are off for this week This episode originally aired on january eighth. Twenty twenty one. And it's about the movie dr x. Yeah this one was was a lot of fun This one was film that i had never seen before. So it was all new to me and it is especially for What is this. Nineteen thirty two. This is a very weird film. This is this one's a lot of fun so it's a great one to feature once more as a rare out cinema rerun. It's time to rub the synthetic flesh. Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. Production of iheartradio pay. Welcome to weird. How cinema. My name's robert and i'm joe mccormick and today i think we're going to be doing the chronologically earliest film that we've done so far isn't that right. I believe so so today. We're gonna be talking about dr x. A nineteen thirty two american pre code horror film that the shocked my soul and conscience and i thought it was just a fabulous ride. Yeah yeah this. This one was a pleasant surprise for me as well. I was only vaguely aware that will get into the into some of that in a bit. Ives vaguely aware that it existed new. Basically nothing about it. You suggested it. I saw a couple of the people that were involved in it. And i just signed on sight unseen and went in without any spoilers or anything watched it this morning and it was fabulous so while it it might seem to start out as rather traditional film and it ends fairly traditionally as well. It gives just heavily weird in the middle in a way that they really has to be experienced. Yeah well there's one scene in particular. I mean i would say there is a five minute sequence in this movie that you should watch the movie for even if for nothing else but there's some other fun stuff in there as well anyway and we'll get into what that is later on but i thought i we should talk for a little bit about The historical context of this era of movies. So this is a pre code movie might have heard that term in Used by film historians before pre code and that code there refer refers to something called the hays code so basically from about nineteen thirty four until roughly the end of the nineteen fifties. I think sometimes The movie some like it hot in nineteen fifty-nine is is held out as sort of like the demise of the the hays code era But for this period from the mid thirties through the fifties american film studios sort of agreed to be governed by censorship guidelines. That were known as the hays code. So this prohibited a lot of stuff that you might automatically think of of course obvious r. rated content like nudity and profanity but it also banned content that was considered objectionable to conservative social values. So that might be all kinds of You know references to cannibalism and thing You weren't supposed to have movies in which the audience would be asked to sympathize with criminals or crime which is just a great guideline for complex. Cinema you. You weren't supposed to have movies that ridiculed the church or religion Or movies with interracial or same sex romance but there was a time before this code was implemented Before it was started before it started to be strictly enforced in around nineteen thirty four and that brief period between the spread of talkies so movies with synchronized sound which was mainly nineteen twenty. Nine and then the stricter enforcement of the code in nineteen thirty four that like five year period is known as the pre code period in american film. And it's characterized by movies. That experimented with more controversial content of multiple kinds so you had salacious content in terms of sex and violence and crime. The normal r. rated kind of stuff that the shocks morals. But it was. Also i think is worth pointing out a period of Increased experimentation with progressive social themes that would mostly fade from american movies in the following decades. Only to reemerge in the sixties so. I think that's an interesting parallel that in the same time you see this brief of kind of kind of racy r. rated content You also see things that we would. We would later think are like good social values that were prohibited at the time and And they're they sort of struck down with the same stick thirty four. Yeah it's interesting when you think about film. The film output cinematic output as an indicator of what the underlying culture is there. Was you know because once you have the the code in place yet. A certain extent. The code is the product of the culture Therefore you can see those films that come out of it as a reflection of what the culture wanted to see itself as but it also means you have this inauthentic view of what was actually going on in the zeitgeist of the time you know we watch films from the nineteen fifties american mainstream films from the fifties and you get this kind of vision. That's like oh wow it did. It looks looks pretty dry. And it's it's it's pretty. It's pretty square. It very sanitized in many respects. Will people often hearken back. They there was a time. Where movies were more innocent. Have you ever heard that there is a more innocent age cinema. Which i think is a horrible way of putting it. I mean that's not really what it was. What you're saying. There was a time when american movies were more censored right. Yeah because and certainly when you look at films from the fifties there's plenty of horrible stuff going on like socially that's reflected in those films but this this code in places preventing this racier content from taking place and it kind of limits. The pallet that artist of that time had to use that we're at their disposal to bring their message across at like a really highly thought out artistic message or the be cinema message which i think we discussed before a lot of times be cinema. That is where the genre cinema horror cinema science fiction cinema. That's sometimes the first place where some of these cultural ideas are explored. Yeah totally you. Before they reach the mainstream now. I i don't want to set. It was so we're gonna be talking about this movie dr x. Which is a horror movie in the pre code era and for that reason for its. It's time and place. It does feel very weird and edgy and unlike movies in a horror movies that would be put out by american studios a decade later. It feels much more dangerous than that but at the same time. I don't want to imply that. This movie particularly embodies any Any like at the time controversial progressive social themes that i can think of. I don't think it really does. I mean it's it's just like a horror murder mystery movie But it does have this this harder edge from being in that early thirties period. That i think serves it quite well. Yeah absolutely. it's just got a darker weirder more dangerous sensibility than stuff. You would normally expect to see From movies of thirties. But then again. I i would say you know there are some that are in the postcode era that that rival it in certain ways like i don't know mad love i think is sort of on the on the same level. Yeah but maybe we should Give the elevator pitch for this movie. Okay so what's dr x. About okay so imagine yourself at a medical academy where absolutely every member of the faculty is a prime suspect in the cannibalistic. Moon killer slayings murders. That are taking place at night during a full moon So we meet up with this character. Doctor xavier doctor xavier. We'll get into the various pronunciations. And he's had up the academy. The police have come to him and they say hey we think the killer is one of you guys and The doctor dr x. Says give me forty eight hours. I'll find the killer myself so the police don't have to get involved and we don't have to get a lot of bad. Pr for the academy is a pretty great setup. maybe we should hit that trailer audio. We all under suspicion of murder absurd particular team because thought that up taylor the daily world. Then you did. It gives you that horrible story in this morning's paper. Don't be afraid tonight. Be sure you keep your eyes closed and relax. i'm land ten bucks to a dime. It's another moon killer. Murder one of us may be a murderer murderer who killed with the light of full moon leaving his victim's body mutilated. Were sounds good. Sounds good now. We may have buried one of the leads here. Which is the cd. Nineteen thirty two horror movie about cannibalistic. Murders in synthetic flesh was directed by. Michael curtis the director of casablanca that. That's pretty odd fact so michael. Rt's was a hungarian american film director. Who made a lot of the most. Well regarded movies of hollywood's golden age. He made the adventures of robin hood in nineteen thirty eight with errol flynn of course casablanca and forty two. Mildred pierce in nineteen forty-five he did a at least one. James cagney crime movie so we are not dealing with a with a roger corman type here. This is not a scrappy schlock production. You know for kids at the drive in. This is one of the era's most high profile and successful directors but there are ways in which curtis i think was much like cormon and one of those ways is that curtis was prolific for roche ously productive. And he put out a staggering volume of film work of sort of a mixed staying power of it. You know is considered classics movies like casablanca. Other stuff is largely forgotten and he bounced all over genres directed musical's western swashbuckler horror movies biblical epics And and another thing. That's interesting about him. Is that basically everybody who chronicles his life. Points out that his personal habits took the idea of staying busy to an almost fanatical extreme There's one example of this I it's a paragraph that came across when i was reading an article in the la times. By kenneth turan that was a review of a book called. Michael critise a life in films by alan kay road and so turn writes the following both on camera and off critise wanted things always to be moving hurtling cars and trains and propulsive people figure prominently in his films. Even the dark factory smoke in the movie female moves purposefully across the screen rather than just evaporating lazily into thin air. Someone who is likely easily bored end reportedly needed only four hour sleep. Critise only wanted to be doing doing doing which led to difficult situations with his cast and crew. It's not just. The director believed lunch. Breaks for wimps road. Notes that kerr teases quote. Demonic work ethic approached. Savagery and working conditions on his sets are said to have been set or said to be one of the reasons that the screen actors guild was formed. Well so yeah just say just a hyperactive filmmaker who just wanted to be working all the time and perhaps just did not understand that other human beings either could not do that or did not want that as defining energy of their life. Yeah there is a whole other thing. I was reading about his war against lunch like he hated lunch. Thought lunch was a stupid waste of time and that actors were lazy after lunch. And so he encouraged people to skip lunch because then there would be more productive in the afternoon I don't know it sounds borderline pathological. I'm ultimately not super familiar with With his work. I saw casablanca once for film class in college and enjoyed it. You know it's an important film. But i've seen overdrawn at the memory bank so many times and so many more times than casablanca that the simulated casablanca scenes. You know overdrawn are the ones my mind goes to when i think of casablanca. I think julia as as as requested yes. Read greg. yeah single. Rick rick and fingal or one in my mind. Wait who's peter. Laurie overdrawn in the memory bank. They have some guy doing like a really really. You know Stereotypical peter laurie impersonation. That's funny this anybody connected to the plot role. Julia was actually a good actor. And i bet he could have done a good peter. Laurie impression. I'll bet yeah. He could have played a role in that film. But i mean brasilia's julia's great in that film. He's great and everything. But i would say Critise talent comes through in dr x. This is a this is a movie that is a busy it moves. I mean it's got a lot of action it is. It does not lag. Yeah there's not a lot of space to be bored in this in this film. Oh another thing about critise. I don't know if you ran across this. This is an imdb fact. so i don't know to what extent we can take this absolute truth or just a story about him but supposedly he fell out of a moving vehicle once because he had to. He had some idea that he had to jot down. He had to write down on some no pad abor He was driving vehicle at the time. That sounds about right so another interesting thing about this. This film is not interesting because of the names attached to it but for what it it tells you about about very storytelling mediums of the time. This was based on a play by howard. Warren comstock and allen c miller so back in the day when i guess you just had more genre plays you. You could have a cannibalistic. Serial killer play that one might view. Yeah that's interesting re today. If one goes out to see a play it's almost certainly going to be of you know either either a classical plays like you know greek or shakespeare or something or if it's a modern play it's like a character driven drama or comedy But yeah we forgot. The early twentieth century like genre plays in terms of like bloody gory. Horror productions for the stage where extremely common like the the green bean. Y'all in paris I dunno i in a way. I i miss this tradition. Like why don't high school theatre. Groups do viciously bloody grand guignol. I'm sure you can still get those scripts somewhere. They're probably even in the public domain. Yeah and they probably pretty fun to put on you. Get some kids To do the the special effects of the eyeball squirting out and stuff. I mean that could be good. Yeah well let's get into some of the players in this This this picture okay. Well you had an actor named lee tracy in one of the main roles in the movie. Now lee tracy is not one of. He doesn't play any of the scientists. Instead he plays lee taylor who is sort of the every man anchor for the story. He is a reporter for a newspaper called the daily world. He is a streetwise fast. Talking newspaper hack The the the kind of sardonic crime reporter character who appeared in a lot of movies of this era and then would later be sort of imitated or parodied for nostalgic re-creations. Look the character of alexander. Knox in the tim burton batman. Remember that guy. Oh yes yeah yeah. Play by the airless guy. Yeah a robert wool Yeah he that guy. I think is supposed to be a throwback to this stock character from thirties and forties movies. Yeah you instant. The instant a character like this walks on the screen. Because they're like. Hey what you got their partner. We are going to you about this murder. That's happening all over town. I am afraid to go out at night because right he has this rhythm this cadence. It's an obvious trope I will say that. That lee tracy is quite good in this role. Though and while it does contain all these elements of the trope. It seems to have some other fun. Quirks added to it as well so not only is he the snappy newspaper man but there's this whole thing where he's he seems to be a practical joke enthusiasts who often forgets that he's wearing one of these handshake buzzers where his wedding ring. He just forgets on there just forgets his and this gag actually works quite well in the picture and plays into the plot a bit so i applaud that for making for making a trope that i'm instantly not interested in actually entertaining. Yeah yeah i. I got hand it to him for that as well And tracy i mean he. Is this role i mean. He's just in his bones. You can tell. Yeah i i read that. He apparently played a lot of snappy newspaperman quote. I found a quote. I should have quit playing newspaperman after three or four parts in the movies but the money kept coming in. And i liked it he liked. It almost sounds like a line is character would say doctor. I should have done it in his voice. But even i can't do that voice to okay so then the next major player you've got his lionel who plays dr. Oh my god so. They pronounce his name like five different ways in this movie. It is like professor charles xavier. Xavier xavier is. How i think most americans would say today but in the movie. The call him dr exhau-. Va they call him doctors xavier. I don't know how many different ways they say it and then of course he is the titular dr x. the title also has another meaning. Which will get to that. Is dr axes in dr unknown. Right yes so. Admiral is one of these actors who played a ton of characters who are either inspectors or doctors in this. He gets to play both. He's he's a doctor who acts as an inspector and sometimes he played villains as well such as the role of moriarty and sherlock holmes and the secret weapon from nineteen forty-three and he's a string horror films in the nineteen thirties. He he played the one armed inspector. Krog in son of frankenstein in nineteen thirty nine Which i believe was with it was later. Parodied in What is it. The mel brooks film Oh in young frankenstein. I believe they parody that role bit in there. Oh i see okay gap at in this. Yes he is a doctor who acts as an inspector so he has a lot of screen time he's just constantly talking. Yeah and he's got A little bit Slightly off brand. Christopher plummer vibes. He's a little christopher plummer below slightly. Less dashing yes and then there's also he does have this quality to where you're not sure if you can trust him or not either a lot of this film's centers around who done it. Scenario and indeed. You don't know what. Dr exits deal is as well doctors. View steel is. Yeah it's great. There's a cast of like seven different creeps who were all testifying each other's integrity but they're all just like the most ominous menacing people you've ever seen. Yeah it's a real rogues gallery this medical academy well. We'll get even without getting into the details of their spoil. Forget you they all just look wonderful and grow grotesque in their own ways. It's a wonderful We're not going to list their name. The names of the actors because most of those names are probably not gonna really resonate with listeners. Worth looking up though if you're curious but yeah there's so many scenes where you'll have like our leading lady who are about to get to and she's talking like a foot away or less with one of these characters and their lie. The lighting between the two characters is so distinct because of course she is illuminated and beautiful like an angel. Various character actors are illuminated in ways like really bring out the the rugged definition of their face and all the lines and make them look like hollow gaunt skeletons. It's wonderful that that's very well put well. We should get to the leading lady. Because she i think is without a doubt the most well known Member of the cast here. It's fay ray. Fay wray plays joan xavier. The daughter. I think the daughter. Yeah the daughter of dr. Dr exhibit wasn't clear on that for about half the picture but the daughter yeah And i mean god his rave from king kong. That's right one of the original. Scream queens. That yeah she played and darrow in the nineteen thirty three film king kong so she hadn't fully exploded like king kong was the film that really launched her into the spotlight in a major way but she had a very long career so she she was born canada the raised in hollywood so she entered acting in an early age. At sixteen i believe in the nineteen twenty-three short gasoline love. She acted in one hundred twenty three titles up through nineteen eighty and as i stand out roles. She was in one thousand thirty. Two's the most dangerous game and a standout role for us. Anyway would also be mystery of the wax museum from nineteen thirty three which which we've mentioned on stuff to blow your mind before she was in the vampire bat in one thousand nine hundred thirty three and yes she she. She's a legend. You can't deny in fact. She is mentioned twice in the lyrics to the rocky horror picture. Show so there's the whole there's a whole bit at the start of one of the songs whatever happened to fae wray. That delicate satin draped rain as it clung to her thigh started to cry. Because i wanted to be dressed just the same doctor franken further saying that. Yes yeah okay. That's the one of closing songs there. But she's also mentioned in the lyrics to the opening number science fiction double feature as this very movie by the way dr rats dr x. yeah ra- goes science fiction double feature. Dr heck's will build a creature. Very nice as my riffraff so anyway like fairway. Hollywood icon and dr x. In its own way is also part of the the legacy of of genre filmmaking here. So i've been hearing dr x. All this time Watching and listening to rocky picture show. And i never really looked up what that was. But it's clearly a reference to this film. It almost sounds like it could be just a stock character reference. Like he wouldn't to be a real character from something. Yeah because it sounds it. Sounds like a stock character dr x. you know he's clearly a mad scientist of some sort right right now. There's another strange feature of this movie. That i wanted to mention which is that. This is one thousand nine hundred thirty two but the movie is sort of in color. It was made via a process that they were the that they were trying to get going at the time called two color technicolor Sort of a strange technical interlude and the history of film The movie is not exactly in full color and there are a lot of us that don't get captured. You're not gonna get accurate purples and blues and yellows and all that but it's definitely not in black and white Though there was an alternate version of the film that was shot in black and white I've read that. It's almost identical in content except for some minor changes to ad libs in the dialogue but there are two versions of this movie. That were shot one for black and white projectors and one for the the technicolor version. And this i think was the product of a deal between technicolor and warner brothers. Apparently technicolor was not happy with the fact that an alternate black and white version of the film was produced So it's kind of hard to describe exactly how it looks but it's sort of in color certain types of colors and shades come through the dominant ranges of the movie seemed to be sort of like green and orange and i think that's because the two color process used to filters one was green and one was red and i would say this to color spectrum would not be a good fit for every film but i feel like it sort of works in this. It's kind of appropriate because it suggests this diseased world of orange light shining through the glass of beer bottle but also with this atmosphere of green fog. It works for dr axe. Yeah it kind of has this dope fiend vibe to it which is fitting because there is a quote unquote dope fiend. In this film. Another thing that you wouldn't get with the code. Yeah so i agree. I think it absolutely works here. If i if you run across a black and white copy of this film don't watch it watch the technicolor one because if black and white is the spectrum of truth art for filmmaking of the time then it feels appropriate that we have this alternate on reality of technicolor in this film plus their elements of the flesh of the synthetic flesh. That i think really pop well with the color like i imagine they would have been equally creepy and in some respects in black and white but the color would really makes it work. I agree and especially because it's such an unnatural color schema by the way if you want more information on the two color process the george eastman museum has a video. I found that you can find it on youtube. That explains the technical details of of the process and one of the things that video points out is that the physical characteristics of the to color film made it especially prone to scratching. And as soon as i saw that i was like. Oh yup because dr x. At least the version that is streamed is full of scratches long lines running vertically across the frame for whole scenes. Same here i screamed it through. Itunes i believe and at same situation by. But i like seeing those flaws and especially for film from this period totally. We are so close to all being together. We can sense it from hearts beating out of our chest. They sense that whisper. I love you. Hugs and kisses from childhood. Getting closer and closer together is priceless. Learn more about the covid. Nineteen vaccines at mastercard dot. Us slash get vex support and start. Something priceless are you ready to take that next step in your career. But don't know where to start at johns hopkins carey business school. Uncover your business. Potential through world class faculty immersive learning opportunities and a legacy of innovation explorer our mba and specialized masters and learn how you can join a network of global business leaders who sees opportunity inspired change and create lasting value. Built for what's next with carey business school. Learn more about our in person and programs at carey dot j. h. e. u dot. Edu slash explore dash carry. Were you ready to get into full plot breakdown. Let's do it all right so we start with titling credits and then we we open a kind of cd warf. There's a a tugboat floating in the background. Policeman strolls by whistling in the dark and it's revealed that we're out in front of a building with a sign that reads the motte street morgue and then there's a man in a long coat and fedora skulking around outside. He's gonna hiding behind some barrels cigarette. The looks looks up at the sky and sees a full moon. And i think burns himself with his cigarette match and he says are you bad luck talking to the moon and it turns out that this is our hero in a way. Leigh taylor played by lee tracy. The crime reporter and bad luck is sort of his catchphrase. He says it like eight times in the movie And he is down here. The motte st more. Because he's trying to chase down a grizzly lead. There have been a string of horrifying murders in the city in recent months. I think it's supposed to be in new york city. I'm not quite sure but that was that the impression you got. I just got a sense of it being the city. You know that sort of eternal cinematic city that that could be any major metropolis of the day. It's dark city. Yeah basically basically dark city but so these murders apparently all take place on the night of the full moon and there's a full moon tonight so while he's hanging out outside the morgue. A thorn are bringing a body in and taylor thinks it might be another victim of the dreaded moon killer. Now there's an entourage that goes into the mortgage a bunch of cops and then it's this one guy in a coat with super silky furlough pels and i think that's dr x. That's going in there but it's funny because he's folding these first lapels under his chin while he's entering the and he looks like crew a. Deville yet they all have a very suspicious villainous look to them. Yeah so. Taylor tries to get into the morgue. But they won't let him in and then he goes down the street. Apparently to a brothel. I think that's what that's supposed to be. Yeah i think so. We're uses the telephone. He makes a phone call to To the night desk his paper the daily world and he's out here complaining and he's like i can't get any dope and the guy at the night desk is not very interested and then he says to the to the editor here. He goes listened. Yueh-lung head i'm not clowning. Look out the window and so the guy at the night desk looks out the window and it's a full moon and oh i think then he gets it He thinks oh it's it may be another moon killer murder and so the night desk editor is impressed by this. And he's like okay. See what you can dig up. And so then lee taylor goes around trying to get some leads. He tries to chat up a beat cop to see if he can get any info and In the course of their conversation. Taylor is as we said earlier revealed to be kind of a prankster. Because he's zaps the cop with a hand buzzer not a good idea. Luckily this cop is like the roundest softest copy of ever seen in your life picture. He's hard yeah and even in after after they're chatting he gives taylor cigar. He's like here's some guy gave me this. You know you can have it. And i think maybe taylor asked him for a smoke or something but he gives them and then we cut to inside the and then things start getting really interesting because here is an autopsy scene and rob. I know you love a good autopsy scene. I do and this one kicks it off right So dr zaba. Dr exhibitor is examining the victim's body while the police detectives look on. And there's this great shot of the silhouette behind a raise. Shroud looks they're lifting it up off the body and you just see him as a shadow operating behind it but with his reflector on top of his head and everything. I don't know it. Looks like horns or something and the police asked him. What's your theory doctor. And he says it's strangulation by terrifically powerful hands. And then they ask him about. Well what do you think of this incision that the base of the brain and dr eric says made by some type of pill used for brain dissecting. The words gal pell is said like that multiple times. So that's already shocking right strangulation and an incision at the base of the brain. Whatever that's supposed to mean But then you know here we get a but wait. There's more moment the left. Deltoid muscle is missing from the victim and one of the cops asks It was torn right out. And dr excess torn gentlemen this is cannibalism. How can you tell that like where. He doesn't say their teeth marks or that. It looks like he was chewed out. He doesn't go into detail and say well. This is a traditional butchering cut. Or something like no. I can tell this is cannibalism and it's firmly established and not question. It's the chuck portion of the human. But so elk here. We established the moon killers. Imo strangulation by terrifically. Powerful hands incision by scowl pell at the base of the brain and then eating victims left shoulder And it makes you think this is a really over achieving serial killer like. They're trying to get extra credit. Yeah but he stands out. You know it's like i'm instantly. I watch this. And i hear this. And i i think to myself why haven't come across exact combination before we're in fresh territory with this picture. I agree so they say this is the sixth murder in a row. All committed during a full moon by means of strangulation and incision with a strange surgical knife. So why is the killer doing this. The police want to know. And then dr axe gets into some brilliant speculation. he says The killer is quote a neurotic. Of course some poor devil suffering from a fix ation a not or kink tied in the brain from some past experience and then he says that that about of madness comes on for the killer whenever he's confronted with a vivid reminder of the past and the policeman the skeptical but dr x. Insists he says. I tell you that locked in each human skull is a little world all its own and And so the police want to know. What's the reminder. What's the thing. That's that's triggering. The killer to do this and doctorate says he says it could be anything. The site of the see the full moon every time he sees. He's forced to relive the original moment. That drove him mad now. This is great too because we learned that. This is dr axes specialty. This is the area of study and so of course. This is tied into his his hypothesis. For the murders is the same way if terence mckenna had been called upon to to inspect these murders. He would've said. I've believe it'd probably had something to do with psychedelic mushrooms. Yup yup yup yup very good comparison so anyway dr xs given his professional opinion. He's about to leave. But then the police flip the script on him turns out they were sort of entrapping him here. All of the murderers they reveal have taken place just in the vicinity of his medical academy. And what's more the strange incisions made on the victims At the base of the brain have been traced to a special austrian scalpels that is only in the possession of dr exhibitors facilities so the the medical supply companies. Confirm that no one else in. The country has a knife like this. Seems like it would be hard to determine that. But that's what they say. And i first dr. Va is indignant and offended. He says his students and faculty or exclusively of the highest integrity. This is impossible. Yeah so i guess. We're we find out that the murderer is definitely somebody at the academy but then as we begin to to meet the members of the academy we will learn and we'll get into the details here Everybody is highly suspect and has ties to cannibalism or the study of cannibalism or some other elements. So it's it's it's wonderfully put together like you can imagine a spreadsheet and you're like okay. Everybody checks off like two things on this list. There's no real standout candidate here. Yeah it's like you imagine hiring at this medical academy it involves like must have five years of experience. Must've eaten a human but so professor x offers a compromise. he says Look don't you investigate the people in my academy. Let me investigate my academy in my own way and the detective wanna know. Then they're like well. How would you catch the killer. And then i had to write down dr xs response. Because i thought it was great. He says by immediately studying the pathological reactions of every man placed under suspicion then trapped the guilty one by a brain examination science. There is so much science exclamation point in this movie. There is there is an awful lot of very funny implausible techno babble. In words being used in context that makes no sense. Yeah if you watch this film. I is you to not try to think too hard about anything. Scienc- that see any characters say because none of it really adds up. It will just hurt your brain if you try and make sense of it. Yeah so anyway the action the detectives agree. You know dr x. Will investigate the people in his academy on his own. There will be no publicity. The press cannot no and then after they leave the room one of the sheet draped corpses in the morgue suddenly sits up. Is it someone who has risen from the dead. No it's all lee taylor the fast talking reporter. He's been snooping disguised as a cadaver even got a little tag on his toe. He's just so scrappy. He can't can't keep them away from the story. Now i have to say. I think this is all pretty fun. Setup with the whole situation where exhibitors given the chance to solve this internally before the authorities move in because Weirdly having just walked the latest tv adaptation of the name of the rose. This is essentially the same predicament. That brother william finds himself in in the name of the rose solve the murders in the abbey internally before the papal inquisitor bernardo goulart shows up and makes a bigger to do out of everything right right. Now i will say Dr xs no william of baskerville. But but he's i don't know he's a clever guy though. He i if i have any major criticism of dr x. It is the doctor. X is far too trusting. I mean just like every like creep weirdo. He comes across these likely. He couldn't possibly have done anything bad. Yes he ate human flesh once. Not twice tops. But he's a good heart. I trust them completely. He writes poetry in his spare time. Forgotten that actually happens. So we'll get to that so so we follow and the detect. I'm sorry i keep saying different ways. We'll just say doctor x. The rest of the time I'll probably fail at that too. But we follow dr action the detectives to his surgical academy and we begin to meet the other characters. Now first we meet joanne or joan characters. Call her both names. And she is dr x. Daughter this is fay ray here. Yeah but she doesn't appear to be a suspect so the police are interested in in meeting some of the suspects and they want to interview these other faculty members so First up is dr wells and it just happens to turn out dr x. Mentions oh well he is a student of cannibalism He's written a book about cannibalism. This the attention of the police and then when they go to interview him he's hunched over a lab table with a jar containing beating heart and then. He claims that he has kept to this hard alive for three years. Through the power of electrolysis. I do not think that is a correct use of the word. Whatever they had in mind. I think electron assists is the decomposition of chemical compounds by the application of electric current. And not sure how that would keep a heart alive again. Don't think too much about anything science. That's brought up in this film okay apologize. He's generally said in a very nice british accident so just accepted. Say in a weird way like dr wells has a has a creepy vibe. but he's also kind of hung click. He's got wild hair and a five o'clock shadow and a deep voice And i don't know if this is ever remarked upon again. I'm not sure what this meant. But there's a pair of boots in the corner of the room that are leveling as they have been dipped in toxic goop the detectives and look at them and notice them. And then i don't on her there on a radiator doing yeah. I couldn't figure out are their boots melting on the radiator ensure what was happening there. Yeah i don't think that ever came up again or if it did. I i didn't notice it but it look nice it yeah it look nice but anyway it is soon revealed that wells could not possibly be the murderer because remember the murderer strangles with two ferociously powerful hands and in fact wells is an amputee and he wears a prosthetic left hand so he is not capable of having performed the murders so so the police exclude him at the beginning. Luckily though there is an entire faculty of of really suspicious characters to turn to next right next we meet this guy named hanes. The police want to know something about him and so they asked dr ex. Yeah tell us about this. Hanes guy dr x. I just have to reproduce the speech. He says dr hanes in two other scientists were shipwrecked off tahiti about a year ago. While making a study of the coral reefs for the killary foundation. they were adrift for twenty four days. Their supplies were exhausted. When they were picked up. Hanes and one other were delirious. The third had vanished. There was no explanation that the time hanes later claimed at the time that the man had died and had been thrown overboard so again. It's like it's as if the surgical college only hires people who have been suspected of cannibalism but but Doctor says he's sure that hanes cannot be the guilty party because this is reasoning one. The killer is a maniac and to dr hanes one of the most brilliant men in the medical world so see. it's impossible so they go to meet dr haines who is experimenting with new procedures in what he calls brain grafting. I tried to look that up to see if that's really a thing. And no i mean like a brain transplant which has never been performed. Never been possible. yeah And but sounds plenty suspicious. Like he definitely has his his toes in the mad science as as does wells with the the beating heart. How would you characterize hanes personality. I would say that he is He is paranoid like he is not pleased to have the police in his lab and while they're poking around they find kind of. I didn't couldn't tell exactly what it was. It looks like they found kind of risque magazine. among his things it's like ankles quarterly and yeah police is the seem to implicate him for some reason. It's like oh this guy likes you know risque magazines. Who else does moon killers. Ha okay so another strong candidate but there are more. Yeah and we're about to get to maybe my favorite guy in the movie so Next step we meet. Dr ruid dr duke. Now ruid is a tall ominous man in a white lab coat with what i had. I thought was an eye patch. But actually i think it is more like a dark tinted monocle. So it's like sunglasses but only one side of them. Andy when they first meet me smoking a cigarette and leaning over a globe and find out that he studies the moon and is obsessed with the effects of lunar raison neurotic types. It's like a board game this this picture. I love it. How all of them have these highly suspicious elements. They're not just a little suspicious. They're all very suspicious. And i say dr roy is god. I love dr roads. He's like. I want to be buds with him. Yeah he's great. Though in a way he's he's almost too suspicious. You know you you kinda get the idea. This couldn't possibly be the guy because he has he. He picked far too many items out of the villain accessory. Grab bag right. yeah. I i agree But then we meet the other guy. We meet dr duke who his main personality traits are that he is ornery and irascible. He just complains about everything So he comes. He uses a wheelchair and he comes into the lab Yelling at the detectives. They like ask him how he's doing and he yells at them for asking him how he's doing he's just always mad about something. There are elements of this character. That remind me of dr everett scott in the rocky horror picture. Show so i. I would not be surprised if there was a connection there. I i have nothing to go on. A other than dr xs has mentioned in the lyrics and therefore might have been in the mind of Richard o'brien when he wrote the thing. Yeah oh oh. And i almost forgot to mention that we learn. Dr roets was also in the lifeboat. With dr hanes the two of them and the third delicious man who disappeared and was quote thrown overboard though. It's funny how it's like. It's as if the robo story only applies to hanes and does not apply to rohit. So i'm not sure why. Even though they say he was the other guy in the boat but they start grilling row. It's about his moon research and rohit says if you suffer sunstroke might not suffer some similar evil from the rays of the moon and the cop says moon stroke and road says you know the moon is powerful. It lifts billions of tons of water twice a day. I guess he's talking about the tides. And then he compares the water lifting to what is done by an old scrub which is notable to the police because the last victim of the moon killer was at the papers called her an old scrub woman. I think the the paper headline you see is like old scrub woman killed by moon killer. It's great descript is just so well put together now. The police suspect roads again like every new guy they meet. They're like oh it's gotta be him They it's like that scene in Murder on the orient express where like every time they interview somebody the companions like. That's the one they did it but the so the cops are like that but Dr is like no roads. Can't be the murderer. Because here's his reasoning here. He has a lovely nature and he's the author of several volumes of poetry. I mean who's ever heard of a poet killing somebody. Yeah that doesn't seem very logical. So this is definitely an area where he's falling below the the sherlock and brother william Threshold i would agree so it looks like we've met our suspects in the mystery. Investigation is foot and dr x. Promises that you will complete this investigation within forty eight hours and then meanwhile you get some some side story with taylor the newspaper man and fay wray meeting up when she catches him snooping around on the fire. Escape outside the medical academy She confronts him and then shoves a revolver in his belly He tries to get some facts out of her but she rebuffs him Joan xavier clearly wants nothing to do with mr hot scoop like he thinks he's very cool and he thinks he can sweet talker but she just wants none of it right and she's more concerned about her father because he seems over ort right yes She's concerned about his health. She says several times. I think just because like he never gets any rest There's also i guess we could just throw a. We need more creeps. The movies just crawling with creeps. There's a scene where we meet this guy named otto who is xavier's butler and he's just a another one of the these ominous weirdos to round out the cast. Yeah again just a great cast of characters in this film so then we get a scene. That goes by pretty quickly. But i thought it was pretty good taylor. The reporter goes off to kind of kick rocks in the alley. Like he's upset because he's he he can't get any good leads. And he's moping around about his failure to crack the case and then we get very disturbing moment of suspense. Because behind in taylor's back you we see emerge grotesque figure in a hooded cape with a drooping sagging almost melted sort of face and in approaches taylor from behind to strangle him. Just as he's lighting a cigar the cigar that he received as a gift from the from his cop friend earlier in just as the creature is about to grasp his neck. You get this pop and it's a trick cigar explodes scaring away. The moon killer in the process and taylor never knows his life was saved by prank. Yeah it it's a great little sane because it's suspenseful it gives us our first very effective glimpse at the murderer the monster in this film but then also it. It redeems that whole ridiculous scene with the copper earlier again this at first glance this the script might seem kind of schlocky. But it's so economical and the way everything ties together like everything has a purpose. Yeah it is very tight So taylor snooping. He goes by xavier's house and meets a gullible maiden name to mamie who lets him inside. And he tried to steal a photo of dr acts and a photo of a ray and she catches him in the act and choose him out for writing a negative story about them and throw them out of the house and then after this we get a shift to the action retreats to a new location so everything moves to dr xs country estate on long island and he gathers all the various creeps from the academy there and he informs them that he has to perform an experiment to determine whether any of them is guilty of murder. And i don't recall it being established how figures out to go here. But mr hot scoop also shows up in our reporter hero finds his way out to the estate. He climbs up a drainpipe of breaks into the house to continue snooping around and trespassing as the plot develops and here. There is a scene where i think. Basically anybody will recognize the following sequence. That goes on with With the reporter because it's recreated so many times in other movies and tv shows character is nervously sneaking around in the dark and then is startled by a string of loud noises but all caused by an animated objects like an ironing board falls out of the wall than a cuckoo clock starts chiming in the auto. The butler walks by carrying a skeleton for some reason for the next ten minutes or so. There is a lot of lee. Tracy making wisecracks at inanimate objects like telling us skeleton. Cut it out. Well yeah yeah yeah. It gets very stingy there for a minute but anyway this is all working up to one of the big set pieces of film. Which is dr xs experiment to determine who the killer is I guess how would be best to set this up and describe it well. I would summarize by saying this is basically sci-fi shakespeare this is hamlet is the play is the thing right Because that's that's essentially what the whole scheme is. I'm going to show something to them. And then based on their reactions. I will know. Yeah like if like if you were hooking the king up to an electrode and a machine that would read his guilt as he watches the play. Yeah yeah and if it were elaborate took some explaining right had lots of tubes and liquids right so at this point it seems like the three main suspects are roets hans duke And they are strapped to electrical detectors. That are supposed to measure their heart. Rate may be. There is just some magnificent techno babble about how the machine works for some reason it will measure the person in the machine for a history of cannibalism and all three of them go into the they're going to get hooked up to the machine and we. Oh since dr wells could not be the killer because he does not have the to ferociously. Strong hands necessary for the strangulation. He helps dr x. Administer the test on the three others. And there's this great part where dr duke complains about being able to see the moon through the window shut ours. It's giving me a shar and again. It's wonderful they keep the potential guilt. That's the suspicion Just leveled out among all the candidates. Yes yes Well and so. They've got different attitudes. Like dr duke is complaining just because he's always complaining. He's just always mad about something. Dr hanes again is quite paranoid. He's very against the whole situation. He he just feel you can tell he feels. His privacy is being invaded and he's nervous about something and he says If you ask me dr sav your. That's how he says this time. Dr zavtra is using very unethical methods. And then rohit who of everybody is the most on board with the whole experiment. He just response. Necessity has no ethics. Yeah yeah he's straight up. Like i celebrate the chance to prove my innocence. Bring on the ridiculous science. Yeah but i think it's great because he might as well just said like the ends justified. The means So the stimulus for the test. They're hooked up to this machine's gonna test them for cannibalism via their heart rate and detect. The stimulus for the test is going to consist of them. Looking at wax figures of the victims of the moon killer murders. I don't recall them. Explaining how these wax figures were made where they came from and league created a commission them. Yes and i think it's also it's worth noting that so. This was one thousand nine thirty. Two michael critise. The director also directed a wax horror movie right around the same time that came out in thirty three. I wonder if he was double dipping with the prop department. Hey may have. I haven't seen mystery of the wax museum from thirty three but but yeah it was. He also directed that he was also into color technicolor. Two of the last films that came out in that but then it also starred atwal and favorite. So there you go. He was double dipping in multiple ways. I guess interesting. So there's a reenactment of the most recent murder so after looking at the wax figurines there's gonna be a reenactment of the murder and it's going to be put on by auto in maimi the butler and the maid and this for for some reason should reveal who the killer is via the machine and just as the reenactment is about to reveal the killer. Suddenly everything we the lights. Go out you know. There's a power outage and all hell breaks loose so a bunch of stuff happens. While the lights are out somebody's cannibalism detector device goes off and then doctor x reads it and declares its dr roots. But there's a twist when the lights come up. Dr roets is dead so roett's has been murdered and also suddenly. Dr duke can walk again he. He's up walking around and And dr Hanes points out. And he's like faker faker. And then we also find out dr wells who was helping administer. The experiment has been struck on the head by somebody in the dark. Who called his name and then hit him. And there's this part where fay ray quite rightly. Observes this experiment was a disaster. And then everybody's just like not chill-out calm down basically just like. Don't worry about it. You know you go get some rest will deal with the this dead body and everything. Oh and then other like a bunch of stuff happens all at once in the while. All this is happening. Taylor who is hiding out in the closet snooping around. He gets gassed like somebody pump. Some smoke into the closet with him and it knocks him unconscious and you don't know who did it. And then they discover him unconscious in the closet but they decided to let him stay for the night at the manor. I'm not sure why that is But after that follows some incredibly implausible flirting between mr hot scoop and fay wray suddenly. She's just responding to his flirting. She hadn't been earlier But anyway everybody goes to bed. And i did you notice like do. They explicitly say like now. We're not going to report. Dr rohit says death to the police. It seems like they just decide that they shouldn't do that. No i yeah. I think they decided we have to do a follow up experiment. We've can't stop now. We're close because i mean it's basically what happened is your like. They're testing to see who was stimulated the most by these the stimuli were presented with but then unfortunately the individual who was stimulated the most according to the readings is also now dead was killed in the dark so it must be someone else. So that's funny. Because that should indicate the fallibility of their experimental method right. Like if he wasn't the murderer and yet he was the person that the test identified. That should show that the test is not necessarily great. I agree but yet they persist today because ultimately he's thinking about publication. You know it's not about whether you catch the murder you well document your attempts to catch the murder. He's trying to get tenure. Yeah yeah oh and then also just get the little tidbit later that night like raise walking around and she comes across her father examining roads his body under a sheet in room in the house and then we learn that his body has been cannibalized in the middle of the night. Somebody at the manor here. Cannibalized him here's something good from the seneca women podcast network and iheartradio is a great way to start your day on the positive side of life. We bring you inspiration advice and practical ideas. So here's something good for today. Brought to you in partnership with don and swiffer. Did you know that. 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The world is going hybrid with ibm visit dot com slash hybrid cloud. So but yes as you say the murderer still has to be discovered in this all leads to the second test before that there is a scene of of hot soup and fay wray flirting some more down at the beach. The talking about swimming There are some lines in the scene. That are frankly hilarious. There's a great part where he's leg and forget that. I'm a newspaper man and feel like here. I'm wondering if maybe we should sort of leave off in describing the plot in too much detail after this because this is getting up to the climax and i feel like we should at least be a little bit circumspect. We don't want to spoil the mystery do we. Though there's a thing that is building up to that we have to talk about because it's the best thing about the movie. Yeah i think we basically have to have a wolf break your in the in the episode so we have to say look if you want to experience experience the wonderful twist for yourself and we recommend you do then. You should stop listening to this episode. Now go out and at your leisure. See the film for yourself and then come back and you can listen to us talk about it and then you can share your own thoughts on it etc. Okay but if you're ready to hear the end right now We absolutely must say that. The revelation of the killer's identity involves the real star of this movie. And the best thing about it a god mode plot device called synthetic flesh that even gets it gets announced in a voiceover segment. There's like a voice that is not spoken by a character on screen. It just comes on the soundtrack saying synthetic flesh. Yes yes it's it's absolutely wonderful and indeed. It's it's a fabulous plot twists and it really. I really got me too. Because i have to admit. I was convinced that dr x. Had to be the villain. He secretly villain the whole time in he made some sort of monster to do his bidding. And i believe this. Because that's what. Richard o'brien told me in the lyrics to science fiction double feature. He said dr mehta creature. So i'm thinking that's it. That's clearly where we're going with this. Why would richard. O'brien lie to me. Right richard o'brien wooden lied to you. But maybe he had it been awhile since he'd seen it got a little bit fuzzy There is almost a sort of creature creation but no one of the parties. There at the house is the villain and is revealed in a great sequence. Where so all of the suspects including dr x. Himself are handcuffed to chairs so that they can't live up and murdering other anymore during the second test. Dr wells handcuffs Hanes Duke and dr x. To these these chairs so they're held down and then dr wells reveals. I'm the killer and they're like well how could it be you and the answer is synthetic flesh and we get this amazing psychedelic body horror sequence where it's very much I don't want to compare it too much this because this came later. But it's kind of clay face from batman Where there is this putty that dr wells applies to himself. That i think is made from the flesh of the people who he supposedly cannibalized and this. This putty goes on his body and can make canoe flesh and organs as he likes. Smooths it on. Yeah it is fabulous. And other thing. I would compare it to again. This is something that came later. And i think was probably influenced by dr x. And that is sam. Raimi's dark ban. Yes because the main character played by liam neeson is a scientist who is create created synthetic skin which he kind of you know puts on a guy. We're going to be gobs it honor and he's gonna pulls it on a mask but at any rate is some sort of a fleshy do they can transform his face into the face of another but yeah the the. The essential premise here is that you can like mold organs and skin out of this clay and just smear it onto your body and then it becomes functioning tissue. Yeah so wells. His fantastic lengthy a mostly dialogue lists saying he puts i he puts on this synthetic flesh claw. This great monstrous hand that he 'attaches To to to to wear suffered his amputation and then he began. He begins to grab this stuff on his face. And it it is. It really turns the weirdness in this film up to eleven. You have the strange two tone technicolor affects going on and it really feels more in keeping with experimental cinema of later decades a modern filmgoing perspective again. There's no dialogue other than well saying synthetic flesh a couple of times. But as i said he d you don't see his mouth moving when he says it it's like he says it as if it's in his head like it's voiceover and it repeats and so it very much has the feeling of something that would be sampled in in a song or something. Yeah yeah i was thinking the same thing It feels like something that would be sampled in a mix and i hope has been sampled at a mixed deejays. If you're listening sample this because it's wonderful but also the background audio for this whole scene is just kind of like mad scienc- electrodes and i was absolutely digging this as i was watching and listening to it because i think in many ways it's an accidental early electronic music score so maybe something it sounds like a little post industrial like something something like nurse with wound would have created in fact. I would love that if we could. Actually just listen to a sample an audio sample from this scene you can get a taste for it in that he left synthetic flesh embracing. I want that want to pick up the single. A bit of of score trivia though credit for the first electric score generally goes to bb. And louis baron for their work on with the magnetic tape on one fifty-six the nineteen fifty-six film forbidden planet. So this isn't an example of an electronic score. Buddy that were an electronic score would be way ahead of its time. I i also have to say that the That the The sequence where he smearing the synthetic flesh his face and into his hair informing this noon. Face this face of the moon killer. It reminds me a lot of the later. The current the modern performance art of french artist all all other diesel geisen who Many of you may have seen. There's a one of these performances features into the two thousand eleven film. Sam sarah but you can also find a clips of his work online. Just look for all this sagoes. Sag in and you'll see his see what he does. Basically he sets up in front of a camera and then he the layers paint and clay over his own face and does a fair amount of performance art with it to transform himself into these various kind of monstrosities. There's an unsettling nature to his work. But it's wonderful and in this film in dr x. We kind of see a earlier version of that. Same performance art. Yeah i mean it makes me what are the other great examples of Of sort of extreme makeup effects in film from the thirties I i. I don't know of any other movies from this era that that have effects that looked like this. I mean i would have thought you know make up at the time was all basically just like realistic accentuation of the face. Not not the kind of like a horror movie makeup effects. We associate with movies of the seventies and eighties. Yeah i mean. It's it's impressive i. I'm thinking trying to like figure out what it we can think about what it's supposed to be. You know it's kind of like. He's cobbing himself down with sci-fi stem cells or something or some sort of flesh that instantly forges a connection with his own flesh. But i imagine it's probably a twist on perceptions of elaborate special effects makeup of the day you know the the putty is like flesh and then it seems to become the flesh and within the context of the film. I don't know it's like he's got this this this big old jar stem cells and he just grabbing it on and sculpting his flesh into the desired nightmare. But i think also we can find a possible connection here to sort of zeitgeist of the time when you look back at the history of plastic surgery which to be clear. Doesn't mean the use of plastic in sculpting flash but the overall plasticity of flesh bit can be utilized in reconstructive surgery. So you look at some of the achievements that were made even at that time and in the previous decades and they were pretty amazing stuff like walking lengths of flesh up to the face or down from the forehead. In order to slowly grafted inform it and to reform features that were lost Cartlidge implantation is another example if you look up images of a world war one facial reconstruction You can see examples of this because some of it is quite amazing. I mean it's you. It can be a little tough to take in but it's quite interesting. Remember remember this is nineteen thirty two so nimeiri's of the first world. Wars injuries are still raw as are likely the photographs of the surgical reconstructions. That were possible. There's even a great line from wells. That i feel like reflects this. Because as he's having his like supervillain rubio speech he says yes. Look at it a real hand. It's alive it's flesh. Synthetic flesh for years. I've been searching to find the secret of living manufactured flesh. And now i've found that you think i went to africa to study cannibalism. I went there to get samples of the human flesh. The natives e yes. That's what i needed living flesh from humans for my experiments. What difference did it make. A few people had to die. Their flesh taught me out of manufacturer. Arms legs faces. That are human. I'll make cripple world again. So again we get a very like ends justify the means things like look. I've had to kill a lot of people. But i'm going to create amazing new surgical techniques by what i've learned through doing so yeah and i think yeah you think about this film is coming out in post world war one and before world war two it. It seems like an it seems like that. Maybe what is lashing onto here. You know it's again. This is kind of the territory. This is the area in which john refill filmmaking off works. I think this is probably also a time where people were trying to figure out. The limits of what was ethical scientific experimentation like there is probably a lot of experimentation going on that we would today regard as unethical in its nature. But was you know it was not just people who were like. I'm trying to do evil. It was people who had this idea of like well. We'll think of all the good that we can accomplish exactly. Yeah and just continuing to to to roll with with what these technological changes meant for humanity. Suddenly were able to to wage war in ways that we were not able to previously. I mean one of the prime examples from the first world war. Would of course be chemical weaponry and we have a brief scene of chemical weaponry in this film. Is the the newspaper Guy is Is gassed their you. Know as for other ways. This movie fits into the history of science there. There's a thing that comes up several times which is Forensic experimentation forensic biometrics basically using your brain examination or Heart rate monitoring or things like that to determine the guilt of a person in Trying to solve a criminal case if you would like more information about the history of that kind of thing did an episode. I actually was christian. And i did. A couple of episodes several years ago about The failures of forensic science that where we talked about this big report that looked into the reliability of forensic sciences that are supposedly used to establish guilt in the courtroom and how some of them are in most cases pretty solid unique. Dna evidence and all that but a lot of them do not have a solid scientific basis as is often represented and may very well be sort of just sort of stealing the permit the imprimatur of science as a concept to placed on some kinda weak evidence. Yeah speaking of weak evidence. I do love that. Ultimately dr x. Was wrong you know there in the film he's like i'm totally sure. That the the the the killer sees the moon in it awakens these repressed feelings inside him and that is what i will look for and that is not what was happening at all. Think killer was like dr x. It was a researcher who was fanatically dedicated to his own work and was trying to end was willing to do whatever he could to further it. Yeah so you know. In a way would have been interesting to see where they would have gone with a sequel to this film right in that they could ask a where does dr x. Go from there. He's been kind of been proven wrong in a way he's in a similar place to where william of baskerville is at the end of the name of the rose where he realizes that to a certain extent his logic and his reason has failed him he wasn't able to actually prevent anything even as he was able to solve the mystery. Yes that's a good point. Well i hope that doctor xs learned his lesson and will no longer say that you can prove the guilt of someone suspected of murder by using a machine. Yes hopefully but i don't know he seems he seems rather stubborn and he's already invested in all that gear. Yeah we didn't even say how it ends. I mean so the other thing is after so wells is gonna kill fay ray. While they're all handcuffed to chairs then lead the reporter is like hey this can't happen and so he comes out. And does he gives them the old fisticuffs and punches punches wells in the face and they fight and then i think he kills him by throwing lamp on him which sets him on fire and we say that hits him in the face with a lamp and then kind of tackles in through a window. Oh i think he also hits him with his hand buzzer. Doesn't he possibly. Yeah he is looking at his hand buzzer after it happened so that may have played a row It would make sense because again. The script is very economical. And then we get a nice little spot a romance and that's the end of the picture. Yeah that's it. We get what he oh he like. He calls his society editor of the newspaper. He's like hey you know you might want to set aside. Some what does he say he's like. You might want to save some space for for doctor xavier to make an announcement about his about his daughter. I guess implying that like that. They're going to have a wedding announcement or something. Yeah so you get your happy levy. Wmd maybe ending again is very very mainstream. In normal beginning is fairly normal but man This the middle of this film. Into some serious weirdness and i love it so you might be wondering. Where can you get this film. Well you can rent or buy this one digitally most places you know wherever you get digital films you can rent or buy it. You can also pick it up on. Dvd either as part of a two movie packed along with the. Yes the nineteen thirty. Nine sequel. There is an actual sequel to this. I doubt that it needs my expectations. But it's called the return of dr x. Which started an up and coming actor by the name of humphrey bogart. I haven't seen it but we have brought it up on the show before just because they have to leave. It has a synthetic blood plot element. I think i've read that. It has little to do with this movie. Yeah i can't imagine it is. It really carries on the legacy. Well oh you also pick this up in a big box set that also includes mad love and a few other films so that's worth looking for as well man. Imagine a mad. Love dr mashup though that would have been some. Yeah now one thing. I will say that these movies have in common is that they're both. I think pretty great so far horror movies for their time both are sort of pushed over the edge into transcendence by one amazingly weird scene toward the end. In this case it's synthetic flesh seen in a mad love. It's the scene where he's dressed up as or lack in the brace with the sunglasses and all that that that costume Now the rallo costume. Yeah oh yeah sorry now. We're like the rallo costume you're right. Yes Those are like the scenes that make the movies in both cases but whereas mad. Love has peter laurie. I don't think this movie has anybody of the peter. Laurie caliber in it. Now i mean you know it's it's got it's got a couple of of of big names for the time we mentioned you got at will and you got a rate but in terms of bringing the performance like bringing something performance. Wise memorably weird. Yeah they don't really have it. I guess he gave kind of sprinkles of it though with the supporting cast dr row. It's he's i mean. He doesn't have enough screen time but he is. He's my hero. Yeah all right. Well we're going to go ahead and put a scalpel in this one gal. Hell it's done a scalpel and done. This has been another episode of weird al cinema. We're putting out weird house cinema. Every friday stuffed above your mind remains a science and culture show but friday is our data unwind a little bit and enjoy a little midnight movie goodness so let us know what you thought Did you see this film. Had you seen it grievously dr x. How do you feel about the twists and the turns and that crazy scene with the synthetic flesh. We would love to hear from you. let's see what else. Oh yeah again you can find this show in the stuff to blow your mind. Podcast feed and we just ask that you rate review and subscribe That's a The main way to keep in touch with the show and keep up on what we're publisher each. Thanks as always to our excellent audio producer. Seth nicholas johnson. If you would like to get in touch with us with feedback on this episode or any other suggest any topic for the future or just to say hello you can email us at contact at stuff to blow your mind. Dot com a stuffed blow. Your mind is production of iheartradio for more podcasts. My heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. 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lee tracy casablanca lee taylor rob lamb joe mccormack joe mccormick dr axe Michael curtis cormon kenneth turan Michael critise christopher plummer xavier taylor Rick rick peter laurie Warren comstock allen c miller
Archive: Maxs Movie Musts Ep. 21

Classic Movie Musts

47:47 min | Last month

Archive: Maxs Movie Musts Ep. 21

"What's up everybody. I'm your host max. Baril this maxes movie musts our top five movie list show over on classic movie. Must this is the final episode. That feels too committal. Let's just say max's moving must just like double feature is going on an indefinite hiatus. Now that we're going back to the free feeds. But i don't want to say that this show is never going to be revived or we might have special one off episodes because i do enjoy these episodes so much so when the time comes you'll certainly know when you can submit your topics again but for the time being it's our final episode for a while. Let's say that in case you're just coming in now right here at the finish line is our top five movie list. Show where you right in with topic. And i give you my top five. Whatever that fits. Your topic could be films. Actors performances directors soundtracks. Whatever the case may be are no objective answers to these lists. I'm just giving you might top five personal favourite that That meets your topics. Oh not trying to say that anyone else has i incorrect. Answer on their list. Or that. Anything i say better than anything else. Anyone else says so. It's all just meant to be fun and games here and we've got six excellent topics today which i'm very excited about it. So i think a very robust and fun episode of topics to close out. Max's movie musk's for the time being as always If you write in with your list. I will read that out and we will get a little conversation going. Let's start it off here with declan. Green declan writes in and asks for my top five pieces of editing and declan gives us his. He says the flashbacks in the meeting with mr x. In jfk very good. Tom hardy landing the plane on the beach in the dunkirk finale. Intercut with the other characters returning home and reading out churchill's speech very good the montage of the torture room in the passion of joan of arc. Yeah the final shoot out of the good the bad and the ugly Definitely and the shower scene in psycho will certainly be talking about hitchcock on my list. A quick aside here. I've only seen done kirk once but in that. Final finale montage sequence that you're discussing declan you see him and he's flying the plane and he's looking down at the beach where all of his Fellow soldiers arms are being evacuated. Why doesn't he landed on that beach and quickly get out and get on a boat with them. Why did he go and fly so far away and then land and get captured by the germans. That's what troubled me. It seemed like he could have just pulled a little quick landing and not been captured. But maybe i misread that scene anyway. I'm just Just messing around with you there okay. Let's get into my top five pieces of editing and time. Anyone asked me this question. The first thing that always comes to mind for me is to for the road from nineteen sixty seven directed by stanley dawn and a couple in the south of french south of france. Excuse me non sequentially spin down the highways of infidelity in their troubled ten year marriage I think this move so ahead of its time. I think i've talked about this movie and past episodes on this show let alone. We have an episode on it a proper episode of thing. It's like episode seventeen. i dunno. it's it's one of the early episodes maybe even earlier than that I love to the road and the way it just cross cuts. The weight uses movement specifically their road trips to Signal those co cuttings between different points in time in their marriage. I think is absolutely brilliant. It's no surprise that stanley on and directs this movie because of the movement he creates You know known so well as musical director And directing so many wonderful musicals. That are really so wonderful. Because of their movement and in this film he really creates tremendous movement through editing. And it's to me. It's just absolutely breathtaking. So that's number one on my list number two A little bit cliche choice. But it's brilliant nonetheless. And that is the godfather nineteen seventy-two directed by francis ford coppola and organized crime dynasties aging patriarch transfers control of his clandestine empire to his reluctant son. I think you'll probably know where i'm going with this. I mean it's the baptism. Scene is one of the great moments of editing in film history. michael on becoming the godfather advertising his nephew and Simultaneously carrying out the murders of all of his rivals. It's brilliant. it's absolutely brilliant. I could watch it. If as i say it's like it's almost become such a cliche of editing But who isn't like just on the edge of their seat watching that you know that those final scenes when When you reach that point the godfather. It's it's so great number three all that jazz from nineteen seventy nine directed by bob fosse director choreographer. Bob fosse tells his own life story as he details the sorted career of joe gideon a womanizing drug using dancer Obviously have an episode on this. That largely deals with editing Much like two for the road. Specifically i mean the whole all of the editing is fantastic but the sound editing in particular is out of this world and all that jazz When he comes to editing in general. Bob fosse comes immediately to mind And so it's really just a matter of picking which one you want to put on this list if you only want one bob fosse because you go to any of his movies and the editing brilliant but all that jazz is really. I think When it comes to editing specifically on another level in his work so that's number three on my list number four. I mentioned that we'd be getting back to our friend. Alfred hitchcock and my list my pick is actually rear window from nineteen fifty four and directed by hitchcock of course a wheelchair bound photographer. Spies on his neighbors from his apartment window and becomes convinced one of them has committed murder. so much. Like bob fosse where you could pick any number of his films and put it on the best editing list similarly with hitchcock and Declan you picked psycho. A great choice The the shower scene specifically. I think it is for you and makes a lot of sense. It's very famously edited scene and you know. I think hitchcock in general so many of his scenes our brilliantly edited and it doesn't always get a recognized first and foremost we talk about him in terms of suspense. And what wonderfully suspenseful films. But they're suspenseful because of the editing. It's the ability to compare you know two things through editing and their relation in time and space that creates suspense so all of his films are brilliantly edited. I mean i could pick notorious. I could pick psycho. You could pick north by northwest and pick out various scenes in any of these films and be In totally sing their praises when it comes to editing. I love rear window just because of how isolated the film is in a specific locale So i think the whole film is brilliantly edited but you can certainly go to specific scenes Like where jimmy. Stewart is is watching grace kelly Lisa fremont go in to the other apartment. Mr thorwald apartment But we know that he's coming back and the the way that edited his brilliant but the whole film Cutting creates such tremendous suspense And in real window where you know. The characters are contained in an apartment The sense of movement and dynamism is so key. And because you're not actually traveling anywhere really. You're doing it all through editing. So that would be mine. Hick from the hitchcock filmography and last up on my list You know. I was torn and a lot of different directions but the one i ended up going with here is memento from two thousand drafted. Christopher nolan a man with short term memory loss attempts to track down his wife's murderer this film such kind of a landmark in non sequential storytelling and editing I think you know it's still holds up we did an episode double feature episode on mental. And so i think it's still holds up A little dated in the sense of just this film became kind of so well known for what it did with the color and black and white Telling the stories in complete you know in reverse order and all these things that It's become more predictable now but at that time. A brilliant stuff Really intriguing and i think specifically in the early two thousands. I found it Incredibly stimulating And enjoyed it so much so while. I don't think that you could keep doing this over and over and over again Memento holds a special place because of Just doing it so well when it did it so there you have at those top five pieces of editing too for the road. The whole film in general the godfather specifically the baptism scene. All that jazz You know when it comes to the sound editing. Brilliant rear window The whole thing. But also lisa going to throw walls apartment and then memento really the whole movie Good stuff good stuff okay. Next up more mcpeek writes in with a very challenging topic. And she says her topic is the top five greatest movie characters from silent films up through the nineteen forties haw best movie characters from the silent era through the nineteen forties Maura gives us her. Top five. hers are 1931. Charlie chaplin the little tramp nineteen thirty. Three's king kong great choice. Nineteen thirty nine. Judy garland as dorothy gale from the wizard of oz. Of course nineteen thirty. Nine lee as scarlett o'hara from gone with the wind and from nineteen forty two humphrey bogart as rick. Blaine casa blanca She says that she's got to Bonus characters but from the nineteen fifties Bette davis as margo channing. And gloria swanson as norma desmond All excellent choices more. This is a doozy of a topic league. This is the kind of i mean. 'cause how many great characters do we have from the silent through the forty are you kidding me So this is really the epitome of topic. Where i have to just clear my mind and really focus on the first things that come to mind like some sort of ink blot tests like what you see right now go So i think because otherwise you can over analyze this into oblivion So let's get into. These are the ones that really as soon as i read your topic. came to mind immediately. And this one the first one was like super immediate For me number. One without a doubt is mildred pierce from mildred pierce direct by michael critise and released in one thousand nine hundred forty five a mother inches towards disaster as she divorces her husband and starts a successful restaurant business to support her spoiled daughter. joan crawford are you kidding me the the nuances of this character. All her motivations The you know just the absolute highs lows of parenting in all of these things. I mean what a character. What performance So that's number one on my list for sure and then that immediately led me to my second pick and we did these two episodes back to back at the time. So maybe that's partly why they're in my head. But i really think they would've ended up both on this list anyway. It's taking the motherhood in a different direction and that is stella dallas nineteen thirty seven director king vidor. A working class woman is willing to do whatever it takes to give her daughter a socially promising future. I was not going to pick a barber. Stand with movie from top five list. Are you kidding me. You're lucky didn't get five barbara stanwick performances anyway. Stella dallas here obviously a different depiction of motherhood but at the same height. Same time a very similar In its complications and nuances and incongruities. I love the performance Stanwick is the best and the way she just kind of go depict the entire emotional rollercoaster over. The course of this film is it's breathtaking in its own way so Yeah those those. Two mothers are right there on the top of my list when it comes to greatest characters of Silent era through the nineteen forties number three on my list came to me and i just couldn't get off my out of my head so it really had to go on the list and i'm going here with the little foxes and specifically bette davis character. Regina giddens directed by william wyler. A ruthless monied hubbard clan lives in and poisons they're part of the deep south at the turn of the twentieth century released in nineteen forty one I know that ted. Walter and when we're doing our wiler with welsh series and we're talking about this film are really talking about regina's being one of the great villains and and all that she doesn't and the my my thinking on this film in terms of like the greatest characters. I was really thinking about her as time has gone on. And just you know yes. She's kind of despicable over. The course of this movie absolutely ruthless heartless woman and the same time you. I'm thinking about her as his character. Born into a society where women are You know not counted even in a semblance of equality to men Her brother's gain all of the inheritance over her. She's left with nothing and she's forced to marry potentially a man. She doesn't really love just to secure her future. And then in that in that marriage obviously we think we sympathize. So much with. Herbert marshall's character horace. Because he seems like such a nice guy that we've you him as good guy and she's the bad guy at the same time. Think you can view it another way and that he's you know kind of Patronizing towards her And does not view her as his equal in this marriage in their finances or anything despite her Clearly being a very intelligent woman's you know she's still viewed As not being in control so between these two things first her family and then her husband You know she's. She has to advocate for herself. And if she doesn't have her own agency no one else is going to give it to her and so You know she takes on this kind of ruthless Mentality but she's kind of forced into that situation So i think while it's easy to kind of hate her character I think to a certain extent. Maybe it's a little unfair and we're not judging the social system around her as being more at fault than she is and obviously when she's there and she's Let's her husband die on the stairs. It's incredibly troubling. And at the same time you could see how she would sit there and let it happen for a little bit too long and then potentially even regret that choice. It's it's a little bit. I i dunno. I read that cnn. More ambiguously or are with more nuance than i think i originally did So regina from the little foxes is number three on my list. I think there's a lot of depth there now more. I'm going to agree with you with gone with the wind here for my fourth pick. But i'm actually going in a different direction. I'm going with rhett butler clark gable's character from gone with the wind directed by everybody a manipulative woman and a roguish man conduct. A turbulent romance during the american civil war and reconstruction periods Released in nineteen thirty nine doing the episode With stephen smith on gone with the wind. I just was increasingly intrigued by by our friend. Rhett butler how much we learn about him and all of the kind of contradictory interesting aspects of his character that he kind of pushed away from his own family that he you know kinda dabbles in these nefarious business practices but also can be incredibly honorable. And then i'm just kind of blown away by the end of this film. How willing he is to just walk away from of realizing that. There's no happiness in this path. The way he just walks away at the end Is incredibly powerful and speaks to the death of his character You know what he's able to do. Obviously he is troubled in so much of the film by the same things that scarlet is know. He's he's equally unwilling to move on from her just like he. She is unwilling to move on from ashley but he does in a way that she doesn't and not say he's a perfect character by any means. makes a lot of very questionable decisions but i think all of these things just kind of contribute to a very full an interesting character last up i couldn't have the final episode of max's movie musts without citizen kane. I'm gonna go with my final pick as charles foster kane from citizen kane draft by orson welles released in nineteen forty one following the death of publishing tycoon. Charles foster kane. Reporters scrambled to uncover it the meaning of his final utterance rosebud I i don't think at any point. It's secret now. That i love citizen kane i find it incredibly entertaining Breathtaking to watch But i think charles foster kane is a wonderfully complex character All the hypocrisies of wealth and Just everything right. I mean the scenes at the end where hill finish writing the scathing review to his wife's performance. But then fire the man who was gonna write it in the first. I mean all of this. What a tremendous character who can be charming Who can be a hateful who can be easily despised. I mean all of these things. It's all there and it's all completely justified within the story so i think an incredibly powerful character. So those are my top five characters from the silent era through the nineteen forties Mildred pierce stella dallas regina from the little foxes rhett butler from gone with the wind and charles foster kane from citizen kane. Very good topic three. Let's go. Justin davis writes in and says top five. Greatest film soundtracks any genre anytime he gives us his choices. Footloose from nineteen eighty four. He says i have personal connection to this one. I had a junior high teacher who played this on a number of occasions on low volume while we were working on assignments and while i never had had seen the movie i had always taken in how upbeat the tunes were. Some of my favorite tracks. Include kenny loggins is singing the title song as well as i'm free holding out for a hero by bonnie tyler and let's hear it for the boy yes absolutely great choice. Justin number two on his list. The great gatsby from two thousand thirteen using modern day rap and pop music for a film set in the twenties seems a bit audit. I however i think the way. That director baz luhrman uses it. is great and helps convey the overall extravagance of the decade in a small way. Some of my favorite tracks include no church in the wild by kanye west and bang. Bang my will. I am number three top gun. Nineteen eighty-six another truly great film soundtrack of the eighties. Almost everyone should know danger. Zone by kenny loggins or even playing with the boys from the same artist other great tracks include but are not limited to take my breath away by berlin and lead me on by tina marie Yeah topgun amazing. Choice number four guardians of the galaxy from two thousand fourteen. He says i am neither a big fan of classic pop or rock music Nor did i think this movie would be all that great in the theater. I was proven wrong but About the ladder. The film turned out to be quite amazing. And i think the way that the classic pop and rock music That was used in. The film played a small part in that. Some of my favorite tracks include coming. Get your love and hooked on a feeling who doesn't love hooked on a feeling and last up. Justin picks saturday night fever. Nineteen seventy seven. He says as he said earlier he's not a big fan of classic rock or pop music but this is an exception. John travolta's disco moves. Really do pair. Well with the music from the bg's favorite tracks include night. Fever jive talkin and of course staying alive Great picks justin Footloose i totally agree with you. There topgun for sure. Four guardians of the galaxy is a lot of fun and saturday night. Fever absolutely I i can't even argue with a single one of your picks but what's fun about. This is that i have five different picks And that's just obviously no news. There there are a lot of truly great film. Soundtracks out there all right number one on my list. The graduate in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. This one Is an immediate choice for me. Director mike nichols a disillusioned. College graduate finds himself torn between his older lover and her daughter. I mean this To me has some of the most iconic timeless moments of image paired with soundtrack Of all time and Know whether it's him rushing. Driving to mrs robinson or in the opening the closing. Gosh so good Anyway so the graduate is an easy choice for me. Number two Midnight cowboy Directed by john slesinger and released in nineteen sixty nine. Eight and naive hustler travels from texas to new york city to seek personal fortune. Finding a new friend in the process This one again to me Is is just a a given choice The way the way everybody's talking at me is kind of integrated throughout the whole film is just perfection to this to this film. So that's those two were immediate choices number three on my list. Do the right thing. directed by spike lee and released in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine on the hottest day of the year on a street in the bedford. Stuyvesant section of brooklyn. Everyone's hate and bigotry smolders and builds until it explodes into violence. I'm not gonna sing. Fight the power to you I'm i'm actually trying to really check myself. Make sure i don't sing. Various songs from all of my picks. I'm going to spare you that. But i think you'll know what i'm talking about when it comes to do the right thing all right number four my list you gotta when it comes to soundtracks and pairing music pre existing music to movie image. You can't have a more martin scorsese film in your pick to me He is kind of the master when it comes to that and i think his the best example to me that i'll always come back to when it comes to these. Things is goodfellas directed. Obviously by scorsese released in nineteen ninety. The story of henry hill and his life in the mob covering his relationship with his karen hill. And his mom partners jimmy conway and tommy devito in the italian american crime syndicate. I mean. it doesn't get much more Cliche when it comes to soundtracks than scorsese and specifically goodfellas. But it's just so good. It's just so well done that. It's hard to ever pick something. Like i don't wanna pick goodfellas nothing. I don't like the movie but yacky wanna pick something else just to be original but goodfellas is that good. So what are you going to last up on my list and then this is fun. Because i don't actually usually love this movie in our. You know I don't i don't it's not a movie. I'm like eager to watch. But at the same time you have to recognize it's brilliance in certain ways and that is two thousand one a space odyssey direct stanley kubrick released in nineteen sixty eight after discovering a mysterious artifact buried beneath the lunar surface mankind sets off on a quest to find its origins with the help of help from intelligent supercomputer. Hal nine thousand This movie The studio did not want Kubrick to set the film to classical music and he even Was prepared to compromise on that but then when he was editing it and set it to all the classical music he wanted that was playing in his head. He ended up going back on his compromise and said nope this is how it has to be and there was. I don't think there's ever a movie that you could set all of this brilliant classical music to written so far before this film was released and have it feel like that music was just written for the movie If that's how well it goes you just you watch certain scenes set to that music and it feels like it was written for the film. It's that's how well it pairs and that's really saying something And i think it also reinvigorated a tremendous love interest in that classical music and that's great too so that would be my final pick Because it's just so brilliant anyway there you have it the graduate midnight cowboy do the right thing goodfellas and two thousand one a space odyssey. Great topic justin. Thank you so much. Next up bernie wrightson with fun. One top five fights in non boxing movies but his caveat is we can include sword fights. Okay i love this. His picks bernie's pixar robin hood. Scaramucci the quiet man. The spoilers and shane all right bernie. This is a this was a fun topic Yeah a lot of fun. A lot of a lot of picks that were hard to To to let go. I you know i'm gonna just. I'm gonna give you my honorable mention here right off the bat. I give you a couple honorable mentions because they were very close to making the list and you can only pick five I up on. The honorable mentions is raiders of the lost ark. The fight between indiana jones and the nazi mechanic. I just i like. I couldn't bring myself to drop one of the other picks for my top five otherwise that would have been the next one But what a great fight and just like one of the greatest endings to a fight ever Also old boy from two thousand three. You can't ignore it's a contribution to fight scene history Just an absolutely grisly horrible fight scene. All shot in one long brilliant. Take if you haven't seen the two thousand and three Korean version of old boy And you like fight scenes. You're in for a doozy. They are so those. Are the my of to go to honorable mentions that i really wanted to put on my list. But i couldn't drop these other ones all right. You said we're allowed. Sword fights the number one. The first thing. I thought of bernie is the court jester. drill directed by melvin franken norman panama released in one thousand nine hundred fifty five a hapless carnival performer masquerades as court gesture as part of a plot against an evil ruler has who has overthrown the rightful king. And there's a lot of funny fights in this film but specifically at the end danny kaye fighting against a basil rathbone sir raven hearst and Obviously at this point in the film. Danny kaye is under a spell. Where if he snaps. He shifts his personality between The fearsome black fox and the hapless court jester and obviously they keep snapping while they are fighting as they taunt each other so danny cages brilliantly brilliantly shifts between A stunning swordsman an absolute fool. And it kills me every time. I love the court jester. If you haven't listened to my episode on the court jester do it. it's Again one of the early ones in the teen somewhere. I think sixteen. Maybe i love the court jester so much. I can't tell you how many times i've seen it So anyway that's number one on my list. That's the only kind of comedic choice but it's just too good. It's just one of the great fights all right number. Two another sword fight gladiator from the year two thousand directed by ridley scott. A former roman general sets out to exact vengeance against the corrupt emperor who murdered his and sent him into slavery now again. This is another film where you could pick from any number of amazing fight scenes but the one that i particularly love is in the coliseum when when russell crowe character maximus unites the other gladiators and they are actually kind of fight as a military unit I love that That love that specifically in that you know they've kinda break out of their tight formation and maximus jumps on a horse in his twirling his sword and the score kicks in the score is actually in that moment. The exact same score from pirates of the caribbean. Because they're both written by hans zimmer. It's anyway that's number two on my list but you could pick any number of amazing fights from this film all right number three. We're talking fight scenes. You can't have something from the Can't not have something from the marvel cinematic universe and when it comes to the amazing Fights in the marvel. Cinematic us nervous across you. Know twenty one. Twenty two films lost track at this point. there's there is only one favorite in my book. I mean there is like the very top of the list and it comes from my favorite m. you movie and it is the elevator fight scene. From captain america. The winter soldier released in two thousand fourteen directed by the russo brothers as steve rogers struggles to embrace his role in the modern world. His team He teams up with a fellow avengers offender of issues. Me a fellow avenger and a shield agent black widow to battle a new threat from history and assassin known as the winter soldier I mean what was so brilliant in. Its this similar to what old boy does. Right was so brilliant in that fighting is that we expect fight scenes to be expansive and big especially in superhero movies. Big grand fight scenes and this was the fighting You know one man against eight opponents inside an elevator It's so and oh it's funny about. Actually the old boy seen the. Oh boy. fighting culminates in fight in the elevator. But we don't actually see it and it's like a great visual joke but it almost set something like this up like what would the fight in the elevator. Look like and it's awesome I love just the absolutely claustrophobic setting for a huge fight Isla kind of books all the traditions that way So that's my favorite fight from the you all right number four here. We go and other film where you could pick any number of fight scenes. But there's only one that would be the top of my list. And it's from the matrix Directed by lana and lily wakowski Released in nineteen ninety nine when a beautiful stranger leads. Computer hacker neo to a forboding qasimi forbidding underworld he discovers the shocking truth. The life he knows is the elaborate section of evil cyber intelligence and my favorite fight scene from this particular film. And it's just one. That's so entertaining to watch. Is actually when neo and morpheus fight each other in the simulation I know confu-. I know kung fu show me It's got the Wonderfully iconic Laurence fishburne doing his Come here pose. It's got all the great stuff that the matrix did so well was so revolutionary at the time with its Camera movements and stop Slow motion all sorts of things that it did just so well That is like kind of corny now but at the same time was just unbelievably awesome in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine so that is my pick for number four and finally Sorry raiders of the lost. You couldn't make the list. Because i think one of the most beautiful fight scenes of all time. It's not number five because it's my least favorite of these list again ranked lists Just a little something special here at the end and it is crouching. Tiger hidden dragon released in the year. Two thousand directed by ang-lee Another film where you could pick any number of tremendous fight scenes but for me. And i'm sorry. Obviously mispronouncing this. But you shoe kin against genu When they face off at. I mean it's unlike anything else like it. It makes other fight scenes. Look so amateurish. Almost in comparison what he's able to do. It's so brilliantly done the way they're kind of teasing each other while they do it the way that You know that that they're kind of switching between Weapons It's the yen Yen You know the way she's going from weapon to weapon to weapon as they all break against the sword. Oh my god it's so So that is certainly my final. Pick so there you have it. My top five fight scenes including sword fights but not from boxing movies. The court jester gladiator captain america winter soldier. The matrix and crouching tiger hidden dragon two more topics to go folks. Hope you're doing all right there My voice is mildly tired. But this is the fun stuff. So here we go. Lance writes in And he says For max's movie. Must you covered your five favorite walter matthau film performances last month so i thought it only fitting ask you your five favorite jack lemmon film performances. Of course she did lance for me. This is a tough one because he gave so many memorable performances memorable and diverse performances over his long career but here his picks some like it hot days of wine and roses the odd couple the prisoner of second avenue and the apartment I love jack. Lemmon so much and So this is as you say lance a very difficult topic and You know as you guys right in with your topics Often times if it's kind of like a toss up and you include something on your list. Maybe i'll include something else just for the sake of diversity and talking about more wonderful films but there's some times where there's just no choice but for us to have tremendous overlap Because the movies are just that good. And i would be being completely dishonest if i were to not include them on my list so lance Forgive me but we have Three of the same films on our less all knock those out right out right off the bat here number one Is an easy one. Some like it hot. Nineteen fifty nine directed by billy wilder after two male musicians witness a mob hit. They flee the state in an all female band disguised as women but further complications set in. Of course they do love this movie. I think it is I think it's probably the greatest of all time. Or it's my favorite comedy. All time i will say So that's an easy one Jack lemmon is amazing number. Two on my list is the apartment released in nineteen sixty. Also billy wilder. A man tries to rise in his company by letting its executives uses apartment for trysts but complications and a romance of his own in su Another brilliant film that combines. Just so well jacquelyn jacqueline's ability to be both Very earnest sad and hilarious all at the same time The apartment is a film of so many conflicting emotions But that's what makes it. Great number three The odd couple. We talked about this last week with walter matthau so i won't belabor it but if it's certainly on my walter matthau it's going to be on jack lemmon list so there you have that now. Let's let's go our separate ways here Not to discredit your list. Because they are excellent choices lance but the one number four my list that I just could not include would be glandular. Excuse me glengarry glen ross released in nineteen ninety-two director james foley. An examination of the machinations behind the scenes at a real estate office. I mean what a cast of a film But you know at the same time jack. Lemmon jack lemmon and So he's on there And and it's just. I love this film. I love the story. Love the play all of it so that would be my pick for number four and number five This is a little bit of nostalgic choice because this was the film that taught me who jack lemmon was the first film. I ever watched a jack. Lemons as a kid I'm sure i rented it at whatever You know pol even slightly before blockbuster. Whenever rental store was king it's time and it opened. It opened my eyes to the wonders of Jack lemmon and walter matthau and their comedy brilliance and then took me down the ways of of each of their filmography. So i go this film quite a lot because it just it opened my eyes to these wonderful wonderful performers and that is grumpy. Old men from nineteen ninety-three directed by donald petrie. A lifelong feud between two neighbors since childhood only gets worse when a new female neighbor moves across the street So yes. I couldn't not include grumpy. Old men Special place in my heart now. Let's take a moment here. you guys. has submitted those wonderful five topics that we just done. But i wanted to give you guys a bonus topic Just for funsies. Because i've always thought it interesting. We've now done. This is the twenty first episode of max's movie must and in twenty one episodes of doing this where i solicit your guys as topics and you guys come up with all these brilliant things. I've always thought it interesting that nobody has ever asked me what my five favorite movies are. Just the generic told what are your favorite movies. And maybe it's because you guys are all so You know cinematic adept that. You're really just getting at far more interesting questions. Perhaps you know as i know now after having kind of finished this list how incomplete you feel after saying well. These are my favorite movies and then ignored all these other movies that you love so much but whatever the case may be i wanted to do it anyway. just for fun And just as it seemed like an a fitting way to kind of close out. This max's movie must series until whenever we bring it back in the future so for fun. I'm gonna give you my top five favorite movies of all time number one singing in the rain released in nineteen fifty two directed by stanley don and gene kelly. A silent film production company and cast a difficult transition to sound I'm i'm almost curious at this. If you guys having listened to my show for this long naxos movie specifically if you guys can probably predict a large number of the top five. So maybe that's why you haven't asked me number two on my list and these go hand in hand is just might utter favorites of all time. The umbrellas share borg released in nineteen sixty four direct bayrak. Emmy a young woman separated from her lover by war faces a life altering decision. If you haven't watched movie please watch it I think jackson meals so brilliant in what he did and i was almost tempted to include The young girls of rochefort also on my top five less because these two movies off hold such a special place in my heart but I couldn't quite go that far There were other movies. I wanted to recognize That i couldn't ignore i. So umbrellas gets the nod from jacques. Demis filmography number three on my list. Swing time from nineteen thirty six by george stevens roguish gambler dancer. Lucky garnett is challenged by his fiancee's father to come up with twenty five thousand dollars to prove he's worthy of her hand but after but after he falls in love with a dance instructor luck. You'll do anything to keep from earning the money This is just a film yet. It just fills my heart with so much happiness fred astaire and ginger rogers are To me they are like the epitome of classic. Hollywood they are. I think what. What kind of helped foster my love of movies in the first place Their chemistry that these films are just so elegant and beautiful and they're dancing is is truly out of this world and i just i could watch their movies all day but if i'm only going to pick one for top five list it's going to be swing time so there you have it. That's number three on my list. Now lead the musicals aside And these last two men talk about going back and forth and back and forth and really just trying to again clear my mind and just say the things that come to mind And and this one perhaps is further up on my list because we recently didn't episode on it but that's how much i enjoy watching this movie. And it is the sting from nineteen seventy-three directed by george roy hill to drifters team. Up to pull off the ultimate con. I love heist movies And i think it doesn't really actually get better than this thing for me personally. Specifically with the chemistry of face entire wonderful cast but robert redford. Paul newman are so good but the whole cast just totally brilliant. The twists and the turns. I love this film So that was. I'm going to say i'm going with it here. Nineteen seventy-three as i said and then let's fast forward one year and this was a tough one. This was a real toss up and I'll give the honorable mention the one that just got booted off the list. Was the maltese falcon directed by john. Houston And i'm gonna go with its noir You know sibling or child. Because it really comes down later but I think i'm to go have to do it number five on my list. Chinatown nineteen seventy. Four direct by roman polanski. A private detective hired to expose an adulterer finds himself caught up in the web of deceit corruption and murder. And the reason. It's a real tossup. Is because. I love the maltese falcon so much Sam spade is the superhero of his time. And it just it. It helped establish the language for noir. But then chinatown takes it in propels it forward in a way that you know the maltese falcon just couldn't do and it's time And chinatown obviously capitalizes on the entire history of our up until that point and and it's rich legacy and is able to therefore reference things in so many different ways and take things further And and to me you get richer more nuanced experience and so that's why intimately it gets the pick for me So as of today right this moment it'll probably change tomorrow. Because i'm still wondering how a place in the sun is on this list But it didn't quite make it but my top five films of all time singing in the rain. The umbrellas of share bourke swing. Time the sting and chinatown. Thank you so much guys. I've loved doing this show Your topics have been so thought provoking so fun. I really feel. I'm just having conversations with you on that brings Just a lot of happiness. Thank you so much for supporting the show. I hope you'll obviously continue to still listen on free feeds as the show continues. Hopefully well well on into the future and And as i said you never know when max's movie must might come back Even just an occasional one off episodes. And i might just email all of you asking for some fun topic so By all means. Let's all stay in touch. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you to our patron producers. Eleanor b max. Re pedro r&d jonathan bernie stephen scofield. Abby winslow and bill ryan. Thank you so much for listening until the next episode. keep up with your classics.

bob fosse charles foster kane hitchcock declan Baril mildred pierce Green declan stanley dawn Bette davis joe gideon grace kelly Lisa fremont Mr thorwald kane rhett butler mcpeek Nine lee Blaine casa blanca margo channing michael critise max
Alan K Rode On Doctor X

Sci-Fi Talk

14:47 min | 2 months ago

Alan K Rode On Doctor X

"Now another addition of tony tomato on scifi talks. This is katie. sack us where you are. You're on game. You're listening co co-creators. I was like what am i promoting. Do all right okay. Three to one. This is my dirty and the fisher. We're the co creators. The brown coach redemption. And you're listening to suck fi top jump on the bandwagon. Everybody else has gun another. Hey ride hi. i'm tim daly the voice of superman right here on scifi talk. Hello i'm doctor rodney mckay. David hewlett hi. This is don davis. I'm the composer of the matrix. Matrix reloaded and the matrix revolutions. Hi this is. John delancey kind of the things that aren't there. Well you know. Sometimes you have that experience anyway but people at all day thanks in part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision but also because of its message of diversity and inclusions. Mr rhody great to talk to you about this this movie. I actually never seen it until until you know it's coming on turner classic movies. And what a little gem of a movie and and really a director michael critise. Who in my book i think is overlooked. Bless you for writing a book about him. What stands out to you about this. Move well a couple of things i think. The the style of the movie as a melding of the warner brothers house style which is snappy smart ass back talk from reporters and cops and clipped off dialogue and so on and so forth in combining that with two strip technicolor. That warners had a contract with and had to figure out how to fulfil during the depression when musicals took a dive for a period of time And and horror movies that universal made popular but in one thousand nine hundred. Thirty two horror was a film business. I mean mgm dr. Jekyll and mr hyde paramount island of lost souls and so on and so forth. So and and james wale was doing his thing over at universal. So i think this was an attempt with a third of the theaters being closed With with a couple of the major studios going into receivership during the depression. This was a way to get people into movie theaters. And they were desperate to do that and this was. This was basically xanax inspiration. Because he was. He was the head of production at warner brothers when he was twenty. Five years old You know his first. His first big movie star was written ten. It was jack warner staverton. He'd always said renton was my favorite star because he never asked for a raise nor complained about the food in the commissary. I've heard this was combined. This was an attempt by warner brothers to sell. Tickets fulfilled their contract with technicolor. And make money and critise at this. Point was as i in my biography of them. This was his general form in period where he was aching a film virtually every three months he was starting on new and between nineteen thirty. Two and nineteen thirty three. He made like fourteen movies. I mean it's repentiti because they needed to get the movies out into the theaters with new. There was a new movie playing like every every week or so. This was part of that but I think a lot of this though in dr x. They were making stuff up the the the notion of making a film. Even in the pre code era having to do with serial killing cannibalism This horrific makeup that they went to. I guess to max factor and i think purrs west more i tend to think he designed it but they use the factor resources because at that time the studio The studio makeup departments. Were not nearly as sophisticated as you would become and so you know the the whole synthetic flesh thing preston foster sitting there watching a human heart. In an abuser wobbling water. I mean all of this stuff. We look at these things now on a on a home screen and we're kind of like well you know that. That's that's pretty cool. That's pretty scary. But ninety years ago sitting in a darkened auditorium a darkened theater with a bunch of people. I mean this. This scared that. The people in a lot of ways. And i think in another way xanax wanted the comedic episodes in this to lieven the terror and goes there was a fine line in one reason. I think jack warner did not like horror films is he didn't want to offend people in more rural areas Unsophisticated audience and so forth. So they had to kind of make it funny where people would be frightened. And then they giggle a little bit. So i think that that that was kind of the the melding of two different styles. The warner brothers house style and and and getting on the horror bandwagon for only a short period. Because jack warner jack warner disliked two things any any movies about alcoholics because he thought alcoholic alcoholism was like a weakness and there was something wrong with you. And he didn't like these as a as a general rule let Jack warner could squeeze a nickel hard enough for the buffalo to fall over so you know that was the priority that hey thank you for listening to sifi. Talk stick around. I have more. Here's more sci fi. Talk with tony to lada. You mentioned that. I think critise handled lee tracy's performance really well balancing the uber in erotic heroic aspects. And thank god. We got to see a rom com a little bit with fay wray and lee. You know in some of the scenes. It really showed that she could have done a lot more in king kong than she did so speak to that aspect of it talks about balancing. I think you know you have some really good actors in their lee tracy Invented and i don't think that's too strong. Work invented the created the template of the smart aleck thirties reporter. I mean yeah. He was he was he was. He was the template for that. And i think fe I don't think fe really thought much of this film. She certainly did not like michael. Critise very much at all In critise in many ways was not a loveable. Man he was. He was a task master and he vented pressure and he was under considerable pressure. jack warner was not an artistic man and i think Any assistance that he provided any filmmaker Could be summed up with two words and those are hurry up that that was about it But i think fay is capable of a lot more. Certainly than what she had in these films. And i made she. She made a doctor x mystery of the wax museum. king kong. Most dangerous game made all those horror films and she got away from that. And i think if you go to The mystery of the wax museum. Blu ray or victoria riskin excellent book about her parents Favorite robert riskin. You'll see the fay. Wray was really not only a really good actress but a very admirable person as well. And so so i think you you have you have these type of performances and of course lionel atwill who who watches horror movies or classic movies doesn't appreciate lionel atwill. His character in this is a little more a little more ambiguous lettuce say than some of his other stuff. But you still see the elegant style and so on and so forth and and They got good performances out of the. I think critiques got good performances out of the whole cast and the other thing is i don't think he needed to really coach The actors too much. I mean these people were pros and they. They knew what they were supposed to do. And and of course dr x. Has fair raise for scream onto damning point what i really liked to. Is there the way. He plays a camera there. Several shots were. He gives it deaths where we're essentially the mad scientist is poking around. And you see that famous thing where the two leads and the current goes up and down and he's behind it talk about how. He used a camera really at a time. Where cameras were not that sophisticated like. They aren't day critise and was kind of like a person in perpetual motion so in the days now wherever he made his first film in nineteen twelve and he made his last film in nineteen sixty one. He made It in the days where the camera couldn't move in this was before rotating heads or dali's or any of that he would have the people move in the shot and have the ad the characters move around. He always wanted movement In his cinema but his movement always came with a purpose. It was always to tell part of the story and to reveal something about the plot and so forth. It wasn't just a for lack of a better term. Artsy fartsy it. It it had. It had an objective and There's one scene dr x. Where fay walks into the room and to introduce that. They have a walk in the room and he always shoots her reflection walking in in a mirror yes he always. He always went for stuff like that and the way i think. Part of this is being a silent film director. And you're used to getting a point across and Without dialogue and telling a story without dialogue all of those directors most of them that came up through the silent era. Murnau ford Critise so many of them. They knew how to do things with the camera to advance the narrative. And now sometimes when you look at movies it's like two people doing this a lot of time and there's a lot of talking and And critise was a master with the camera. If you ever watch a film that he made in i believe nineteen Nineteen thirty eight called four daughters. John garfield i know and the film opens and the camera. You hear music playing and somebody's singing and the camera goes through this dogwood trae and it goes through the window of the house and the volume of the music is plays longer and then it goes onto a claude rains Professor lamp in his degrees on the wall. So you know now know that he's a professor of music and then it touches on each one of his daughters playing instruments and so forth so in the first thirty seconds you're introduced to the main characters where they live who they are what they do and there hasn't been a word of dialogue spoken and that was just how good he was with the camera and using it for storage l. as a star trek fan. I do have to point out. His adoptive son was john meredith. Lucas who worked on the second season of the original star trek and kind of you know forged his own path on television. You read jack lucas book. No i haven't. I'd love down the way. You should read that book. And you should read this one on mike because most many of the photographs that i got were from michael lucas. Who is jack. Lucas's son the late michael lucas. Unfortunately and mike glenn. I were great and he gave me. He ended up with most of his grandfather's a lot of his grandfather's stuff. Oh man i've got a probably about eighty photographs in there that some of them were published before and And jack lucas really admired his stepfather And certainly micro. Critise was not a stepfather Out of central casting whatsoever. He had a lot of kids out of wedlock and he. All he cared about was making movies and then below that was saxon below that was full and that was about it with what he did but I really recommend jack. Lupus book John miras lucas book and I also knew. Joe peberdy who spoke very highly of. Oh yeah great. Star trek director very much very much. I have to save before we go. it's It's really the book is really amazing to again. Shed light on a director that you know people. Don't people have seen his work but don't know him personally. I gotta say mitt with mystery of the racks museum. Which was the forerunner to house of wax. Tailored by vincent price. He did some things that house request should have done in their version. It was that good and so ahead of. It's time for the thirties. Just an amazing director. That i'm really glad you wrote this book. And her shining a spotlight on. Well thank you very much. I appreciate that and thank you tony. It was a pleasure being with you and thanks for giving me an opportunity to answer your questions. Anytime definitely catch it on turner classic movies. I'll probably watch it on. Hbo max care. Now my name is alex zahara. And i've been in eight episodes of stargate played a raven. God's zales to iron shirt the one eyed bricky regulators coca code josh josh and lots of crazy stuff outer limits. Everything else and you listen to talk.

jack warner warner brothers lee tracy tony tomato David hewlett John delancey Mr rhody michael critise lionel atwill james wale preston foster rodney mckay lieven tim daly don davis depression mr hyde king kong warners Blu ray
Noirvember: Panic in the Streets (1950)

Ride the Omnibus

51:35 min | 11 months ago

Noirvember: Panic in the Streets (1950)

"Welcome to ride the abyss. I'm your host aerial baske-. And today i am joined by kirin cowan othello noir enthusiasts to discuss elia kazan's panic in the streets a film from nineteen fifty that has both historical and artistic importance. But it perfectly presages this moment right here in twenty twenty somehow seventy years ago. It was done and we are here to discuss. Why and how so welcome gearan. Thank you for having me. Thank you for coming in. Your capacity is a human being and not a chairman. Here usually is our chairman on the just a minute at the sows so i was bitten inspire radioactive chair and my life in ways that can barely be described. You asked me to find a film suited the themes this podcast discussion. That probably wasn't going to get talked about enough. And the first one that came to my head somehow immediately. Just obviously now. This is the movie we have to talk about. Twenty twenty the movie from seventy years ago in going over it again. I stand by that. Joyce oh absolutely i mean there is no other choice that makes sense and there are so many other cross the matic titans to other of november. That are incredibly important to talk about when we talk about this moment. Historically nineteen fifty as well as this moment in twenty twenty so eager to dive in now the first thing i want to talk about is how divisive a character ilya kazan. The director happens to be of. This movie will suffice it to say his reputation less than three years after this phone was released started with the word traitor and didn't get better from there to the facts that when he did get his honorary lifetime. Achievement oscar many people refuse to stand or applaud and people were chen. Rulli scorned for apply. There was clearly an individual decision on the face of every single person in the auditorium weather. They were standing or not warren beatty. People spent a lot of times. Speculating what he would do. Because he had worked his annan's wondering the grass and at the same time was so famously politically outspoken. That people were shocked and angry when he applauded someone. He worked with years ago for his lifetime achievement. Oscar kazan was divisive from the start and kept being that way often Directions and he would do things that seem brilliant and other things that jeter hetty and bizarre as you go through his career but one thing you can absolutely say is that people were vaguely forced to talk about him even when they didn't want to not at all residence for twenty twenty other areas as well absolutely not absolutely not but he had an ongoing parallel with the chain of events led to this namely the blacklist. It started really in nineteen forty. Seven but the blacklist and his odd connections to it although his infamous actions didn't happen until nineteen fifty two but in nineteen forty seven when the blacklists started the first group of people to find themselves on employable were mainly screenwriters but it was closely connected with the nineteen forty seven oscars because the nineteen forty seven oscars the best picture race. That year had a front runner when the nominations were announced and that film is one of the few wars to get nominated for best picture. A movie called crossfire direct by. I believe every metric. I recommend see it's brilliant. Hence robert mitchum ryan. It's a film about antisemitism. And how the discussion of anti-semitism. Start with the we're talking about murder here. People angle of it is a very angry confrontation war about murderous bigotry. Yes it is. No gentlemen's agreement people cattlemen's agreement or as many people for years. Call it until about crash. The worst best picture winner one primarily because elia kazan's much much less honest view of what anti semitism consists of had the great sudden advantage of all of the people. involved in the making crossfire being blacklisted. The week after the best picture nomination the oscar. Nominations came out and suddenly late. People were very keen to not look anti semitic while the same time very keen not to seem prematurely anti-fascist i just did air quotes there. Even though people can't see them there is a very strong level of antisemitism. Especially in the first wave of the blacklist where the people involved were mainly speaking out against issues that made people uncomfortable from positions of power while that and the screen writers guild being a primary target for richard nixon senate campaign when he was a congressman on the hugh committee. Suffice it to say with the help of the mob richard. Nixon got elected to the senate by blackmailing screenwriters to keep their name off the list in nineteen forty seven forty eight. It was fun. The whole ongoing arc of yulia kazan being somehow the one man inadvertently rewarded for the blacklist existing than reached a crescendo when he was coerced but not very hard into naming names in one thousand nine hundred eighty two in a manner that is widely agreed to of ruined a lot of lives and the question of just how many people he made behind closed doors is an open. Certainly there are two major actors in this film who were blacklisted. For very long time and while no one can directly prove kazan ruined their careers at the very best he elevated their work to a level where it was doomed to get attention that they had had political leanings that they were going to be blacklisted. For that is the best case scenario. Both zero mastel embargo. Mogadishu's didn't work years. Yes and i actually not known that about margaret vogue. Eddie's i just remember turf for the longest time as the matriarch from dallas which i had a family member that was obsessed with when i was a kid but no they spent about eighteen months after panic in the streets working quite a lot and then not in the slightest in nineteen fifty three after on the waterfront which is kazan sec investor winner in classic it after it one basically all of the oscars kazan was no longer an acceptable person. To most of the restive. Hollywood society orson welles literally in an interview. That year called him a traitor and on the waterfront. A celebration of the righteous informer. And it's very hard to get away from the fact that his work comes from a point of view that we are not going to agree with almost all of his major films are focused on a chain of events and characters. Not recant like but that we can bring ourselves to agree with even in this film. The protagonist things that are not all right extremely problematic and while this steady stream of work that he had after on waterfront would lead to some major important work both with tennessee williams and then in nineteen fifty seven face in the crowd which again everyone should really see because it's twenty sixteen in the movie in the same way that this is twenty twenty. There is just an ongoing recognition. Maybe this man's sense of values are unrecognizable to us that there are things that grove ilya kazan. We can't begin to comprehend. And i don't know how to deal with that but i'm curious to see if you have any suggestions. It's really really difficult. Because there are so many arguments that people make about the artist versus the man and out of you separate the film from the director. How do you separate the project from the producer. How do you disentangle these. Very tightly interwoven webs. And i'm constantly going back and forth on this issue to be quite honest. Its authority one. And when elia kazan's case can you remind me in terms of his biography. Was the immigrant story. That elia kazan had yes. He was of greek extraction and possible turkish-iraqi as well. I'm sure i'm probably going to get some of these facts base wrong. He wasn't american immigrant and his family. History was one of having a fundamentally different relationship to the state in its actions and the rest of us. That's safe to say personally. I believe that personal history and biography make a huge difference in how one reacts to individual events and given what was going on in greece and turkey at the time my working theory was always that he was a first generation immigrant to america and coming from the background of greece at the turn of the century right then knowing everything that we know historically about what was going on in that particular part of the world between greece and turkey with the ottoman turk empire and so forth. It's a big stretch to say this. But there is a very different kind of government that he would have grown up with. That was of a much more authoritarian. Nature is true and my theory is that he might not have even thought of any other possibilities that he might have just expected being an immigrant he had no other choice and then was rewarded so highly for that choice that but at the same time. It is almost impossible to ignore that. In his autobiography for example he talked about the people whose connections to him let the destruction. he talks about zero mostel as a lovely dinner party companion and seems to show no acceptance or understanding that working with him was not a positive for cells point of view. Yeah because to him. It would not have reflected as a personal thing when you are growing up in that part of the world where neighbor is informing on. It almost doesn't compute necessarily and this is an evil in america. Certainly that i think is easier to wrap your head around if you're living in a place like stacey germany for example under that kind of a regime. That seems to be sort of the feeling. That kazan seem to immediately a that. He was willing to go to these places because he was perhaps this is my theory because he was from another part of the world and had lived under a different kind of regime that treated it citizens in a very different way. This is my theory and this is a perfectly valid interpretation but at the same time when you extend it even just two other notable directors and you look at some. They're terrible behavior. It fails to valid is in analogy on any level auto parameters treatment of women for example. Isn't something you can accept. Because he was german. No he was hired more as a professional torture as director in several of his films howard hughes literally had an actress who had rejected him who we hired crimminger to break onset there are genuinely unacceptable behaviours from directors off the ford but at the same time i agree with you but we have to juggle a lot of factors here yeah. There are countless different approaches to hubris in the art of filmmaking. There's a lot of it and most of them weren't at the time honest at all. I call this tarantula autour syndrome. I actually came up with a turn for it. Taas there are people who go mad with the power of being in charge. I agree but there are also some who reveal that they probably were always wrong. I mean a decade for casablanca. The reason hollywood have stunt people in unions is because it making twenty seven. Michael critise was directing a film called noah's ark and decided this shot will look better if i don't tell anyone i'm about to flood this building. there were several funerals as a result but he was never charged with a crime busby berkeley. The most famous of hollywood choreographers and directors was so not punished for his actions when he got very drunk and decided to drive. Through a crowd of people the studios in order to rehabilitate his reputation. Created a new oscar category. They invented the dance choreography. Oscar category thirties so that they could raise his pri- profile during the course of his multiple trials but agreed it would look like a fixed if he ever actually won it. So for the four years that oscar category exists busby. Berkeley is nominated every time but doesn't win because only existed so that the studios could salvage an asset. Wow there is an ongoing degree of directors are sometimes monsters and we have to accept that too even though every time we want to make excuses for them and we do over and over again. It's true it's true. But i'm not trying to make excuses for kazan and i just wanna make sure that's clear. I'm just trying to share. Where i think his perspective comes from. Because i'm always interested. In where the historical perspective that creates that mindset would come from and his perspective is important because as equality in arch. There are very few things that you absolutely have to set aside from bad behavior but presence is absolutely one of the iliad is an open and over again had an understanding of society and of human nature in his work. That is frighteningly ahead of its time and you can build a career and be hailed as a genius for doing that a few months. Where you are jerry. Seinfeld is a comedian is someone who is mainly considered brilliant for being able to foresee ins will be like six months ahead. He can see trends and ideas that people are going to have a few months ahead when they do iliad. Kazan could do it. Seventy years ahead of time. That is undescribable and this film is riddled with things that feel like now in a way that had to be utterly baffling and deeply unappealing contemplating nineteen fifty. Yeah so let's talk about those things that he incorporates into this movie that it seemed completely off the wall in one thousand. Nine hundred fifty. Oh yes you start with a very criminal. Sort of prototypical norrish plots. Yes you start with a scene in the streets of new orleans that the first voice you hear is a jazz singer which is an opening you can get. Maybe the only line of dialogue given to any african american person in the film. Because vox made it and then you pan up to witness on stream. Lee nervous sweaty man who immediately recognizes some low level professional criminal who is in the middle of a card game that he hannity leads and that panicked leads the man who was slightly cheating at cards to hunt him down and murder him. That man is jack. Palance or walter. Jack palance playing a gangster. Called blackie with a look that can be best described. I think as a menacing gothic cathedral of face that would soften in later years but it's startling to look at when he was young. Imagine a collection of flying buttresses. Trying to smile at you and picture how nerving that would be jack. Lanson this movie from the start to the end and we then witnessed this extremely panicky man. Being gunned down by plants and a couple of his cronies. One of whom is played by legendary comic and broadway. Actress zero mastel in one of his first film roles. We then almost immediately do we. I'm trying to remember. Do we cut to the police. Finding the body yes. It's sweet to the police. Finding the body and then the body being taken to the morgue or mortuary attendant plans his lunch ovary perfectly regular autopsy. And it's such a wonderful seen. It so reminds me of the grave digger and hamlet. You know it's really. It really has echoes of that for me. Because there's this little bit of comedy as he's chatting with his buddy over this dead body and you see the toe tag in the corner of the screen and this movie is constantly questioning whether or not it's characters are doing something that they're even good at but the coroner in this film turns up. Does his job completely correctly and then more or less leaves the story but he's great and it's a lovely small performance as we then hand off to a scene of high action cabinet repair at a front yard somewhere suburbs of worlds. I think we actually should take a moment to recognize one of the most amazing things about this movie is that it is all shots in new orleans and that apart from the half dozen main principles. It's with new orleans locals as almost all of the cast asked of film which is very unusual. Almost no one in this movie even a lot of people with one owner two whole scenes feels like an extra or anybody who you normally see. This is a film hacked with actual human beings. Some of whom the camera liked enough to give them a few lines. And you never quite know what any of them going to do her. Say when and we're realizing there's something very odd about the visuals of this film because people look different from movies and it's all filmed on location. There are no sound stages even a nail flop house apartments there real flop house apartments in the slums of north. We then go to the most fake setting movie. A suburban home outside of town where richard wit mark is repairing a chest of drawers with his son. Or yes it's sun. It's some wooden cabinet. Holy thing you know. And that's technical term and his five year. Old son is staunchly critical of everything. He's doing in the repair. And painting of this wardrobe and minor characters. Come go only for us to witness him arguing with his wife in very domestic way about his son's allowance and paying bills and all of this on his day off is then interrupted by a phone. Call hey we think you should come and see this and he is then preceding to be summoned to the more where we learn. Why is that he is unofficial of the department of public health. He is a lieutenant colonel and he is a doctor and that dead body had the plague and all of a sudden this movie becomes very much about now because this is a movie about mass contagion. It isn't a murder mystery. We know who the criminals are from the start. This is a movie about trying to contain on airborne pulmonary disease outbreak specifically the pneumonic plague. There are three strains of play the bubonic plague with the rats and the blue bows and the bites is spread through the lymph nodes septic plague's spread through the blood pneumonic. Plague is spread like pneumonia. It is airborne is frighteningly like cove nineteen in la ways and can kill a lot of people buried very quickly and and what's interesting. Is that for the setup in this new war. They decide to go with the idea of a forty eight hour. Man hunt to find the man who is responsible for murdering this victim but not because he is a murderer not because he's a murderer but because he has the plague and he has forty eight hours before he becomes contagious to everyone around him. There are mars as sub-themes about all kinds of john johnson subjects there are other medical. Noirs there are no western. Moore's courtroom north. This is the only contact tracing more that i know and it is all of a sudden about explaining to a room full of people who don't know this man in a uniform. Why it's tremendously important. They stay where they are and then do exactly as he says and they don't want to agree with him. We spend ten minutes of the movie with most of the the police just refusing to necessarily trust a doctor and the distrust of doctors is a clean. This movie it is at is that so so resident to right now. And i i got to this point in the movie and i was like oh man. Oh man karen's a little too on the nose here. I was worried. I was because what then happens. Is it transitions to richard with mark urgently. Inoculating a lot of cops who don't know why and then proceeding to ruin their investigation by burning the body before they've identified it and destroying all of his possessions because getting rid of the contagion source is more important than being able to find who. This person wasn't who killed him even though that acts incredibly important and you have two sets of cash unable to work with each other because the needs of their respective tasks are just different and in the subsequent meeting with the mayor and series of officials. Richard with marks character. Seems like a crazy person. He is basically offering a portent of doom saying in nineteen twenty four. There was an outbreak that wiped out a small town and every suggestion that is made by people. Doing their jobs normally does not work letting the police do. This on their own does not work because all of their evidence to find out who this dead man even was is gone. Any attempt to request information by going to the press is met with panic because people who've killed this man will not be found if they flee town if they flee town they will not be found in time and they will spread this to other cities and a lot. More people will die and everything that happens in the next sequence of watching someone. Explain to people who've never dealt with this before is about barely contained while the mayor of new orleans watches and only has the judgment of this man is not wasting our time to go and the police don't agree the chief of police and his chief of detectives the captain who will be spending a lot of time with plane but played by douglas. Outright say you seem like a smart man. And i'm sure you aren't wasting everybody's time to make yourself feel important in a way that were not entirely meant to believe that this is probably not sets and of course it's not we've just spent a year learning the extent to which this is not not Yes exactly and one thing that comes through throughout this film. As the doctor is repeatedly proven correct and is constantly urging conformity to his restrictions and so forth. we keep getting this particular point of view that unfortunately also seems to align with kazan's pointed view outside as eight director and informer that of conformity rather than individualism. And we see this pop up later on as well when the chief of police is able to then lock up a reporter who wants to report specifically on what he's overheard and when you get to that point and the idea is you can protect the public at the cost of individual freedoms and that the freedom of the press doesn't matter as much as everything else then you get to kind of very sticky questions about where we are as a country right now when we are looking at conformity versus individual freedom in a way that unfortunately parallels the problems that a lot of people have with basic things like mask wearing proper hygiene saying six feet apart from each other staying indoors going about their business trying to earn their living. You they track the ship. The dead man had come off. It is a normal freighter crew. People whose only crime really is having a rat problem but every member of the crew of that ship has been frightened in silence for fear of losing their jobs over having to go into quarantine and not really understanding the scale of what he's about happened don't and our main character is bad communicating. Why this is important. He's terrible asset. He's not someone whose job that should be. And he knows it and the film as it goes on shows him making decisions that are more rash and abrupt because he is panicking when other people are and because as this goes on over forty eight hours. He is increasingly tired. I have a soft spot for films in media show sleep deprivation honestly and effectively and there are very many. There's a brilliant episode of the thick of that takes place over Of one panicked long night as everyone just starts losing their minds from lack of sleep. Yes this film actually stops in the middle of the desperate chase of the main character to go home talk to his wife begged her for a cup of coffee that he needs more than he can even explain and then realize that what he's the communication he's having isn't working. She wants to hug him because she hasn't seen him in a day and a half and he has to explain. Why isn't usual reaction is. Please don't come any closer to me. And there's this sequence that went mark played really of a man with information. He should not tell his wife that he asked to parcel out. Because there is no path through the conversation that can realistically work unless he offers some of what is going on and where he's been for the less stand now and why he can't go to sleep. Why more than anything else. He is not going to be going to bed. Like a sane person really ought to at that moment in his life and this moment i have to say this particular moment in the movie really also resonated for me with the experiences. I've been told about from my friends who are in nursing and other aspects of the healthcare profession right now who are experiencing burnout and fatigue at levels that are absolutely mind-numbingly high and also the cost of what they've given up in terms of their personal contact with friends and family and at the same time it is a film compartmentalized to be about the things that have defined life in america in twenty twenty public health panic sudden death and the realization that while the medical profession absolutely has a incredible self-sacrificing focus on their obligations to society to the point of self-destruction. The police don't get that at all and it's only as we gradually spend more time with police. Captain who has been forced into a buddy cop movie. He never wanted that. He starts to realize what is going on is more important than is murder investigation or murder. He didn't particularly care about Again he has no information to work with and he is portrayed as competent well-meaning with who's a gruff cop going to learn the like this guy. The problem is they're in a situation that does not afford standard narrative and so it becomes a very confrontational six of conversations about not being able to explain to the world what they do in the moral ramifications of it and the fact that neither of them have anyone to really talk through some moral choices. They have to make in a way that feels realistic. But they certainly can't do that with each other because they are just too alien disciplines as as they go on both of these performances are really entertaining to watch and then we switch back to the criminals repeatedly spending a good part of the movie with jack palance of michelle and the third gentleman who had been the cousin of the dead man and spending time watching them go about their day not knowing exactly why the world is shifting around and the thing is these petty criminals and griffin who seemed to believe they're legitimate but we immediately learn are fooling note fairly early in the investigation they start harvesting every petty criminal they can find and no matter how much they believe that they're running a series of laundromats a straightforward legitimate enterprise completely covers them of course. Zero mastel is hall the end with the first batch of petty criminals. They're fooling no and that group of murderous drifters are running around all of this. Doing a bunch of things. They think are incredibly clever because they've realized everyone seems to be looking for something i got. There's money to be made off of this somewhere. That's a hard thing to watch without feeling a pit in your stomach just grow and grow and grow this year. Isn't it yeah. The healey is because those warehouses full of hand sanitizer stockpiles of all kinds of stuff. That people keep hiding everywhere especially hard not to look at zero mastel a particularly pathological liar. Who is basically incapable of telling the truth even to his own boss just because of who he is as a man just constantly desperately running between one situation. He shouldn't be in another. You can't help. Think of certain real people that i'll let you assign for yourself because it's more fun than way than to say their names aloud but yeah the criminals decide that we shouldn't play town the cops have descended unrelentingly on the entire city over this guy. No buddy had ever heard of they know something of value. He was acting funny because he had a line on something. And we are going to find out what it is. You need to go find his cousin. The guy who brought him here go find him. His cousin is lying in bed increasingly terminally ill but this is not occurred to them because the idea of a plague matter doesn't really sink in very quick with a certain type of person as we have learned somehow over the last nine monks yes and additionally the fact that the plague in the film only really strikes the cousin and then the barkeepers wife and is only really affecting people in these impoverished circumstances. Also not resident at all to today. There is just a constant stream of this movie being about separating certain people from the rest of humanity the most distressing scenes in the movie apart from one scene of genuinely astonishing some violence in the last half out there is a straightforward sequence. Where the doctor and the cop are trying to have a conversation as they walked through a hallway only for it to become an unmovable mass of people surrounding in the closest possible contacts and after even the imagery from airports at the very start of this. That sequence gives physically undescribable to watch. I started feeling kind of choked up in the sense of like literally feeling like i was suffocated watching that sequence. There were lots of times throughout this film. That people were coming close enough to each other. I was like what are you doing. Stop being so close to each other. Move away move away but that sequence just it is just increasing. Compare the people in this crowd specifically get enough dialogue. That they're all people that this is not just a generic richard attenborough crowd shot. Every one of these people doesn't know why they're there. What's going on or why they been jammed into a hallway and that sinks in as the horror of that massive humanity acted together is settling in and then he does it a couple more times in slightly different ways. There are other act crowd shots. That are never quite. There's this constant oppressive proximity to other human beings that says about the fact that the main character is feeling. This is intentional that this is genuine artistic intent between the director the writers who won an oscar for this spring hams just all of the performance. There isn't very deliberate intention. But the fact that it resonates so hard now really just makes us wonder over over again. How did kazan. note out. infamous for his lack of empathy in his present day. Understand the things would turn our stomachs. Now that's a big question he's Moving it's fascinating to me. Because i can't imagine where that kind of creativity comes from like after watching this film i went back and reread albert. Camus la passsed or the plague to kind of see like if he took ideas from there. It was forty. Six or forty seven was a similar in there and and there are some individual pieces that resonate. But it's the doctor's perspective. Yeah i mean. I mean it's entirely from the doctor's perspective so in that way it does connect but it's so outlandishly specific ten now in a way that can never was no from what i've read. It can move is almost a timeless remove final. it is. it's very it's not. Yeah who's tangible. No it's not tangible in the same way the details are mostly an ellipse in most of us writing. It's very down. But i feel like one thing that i hated about this film. Though is the way that it ended its ending. Shockingly that spending time where everything is life or death. The ending of this movie as it is a sitcom ending with no. There is a minor character who comes back to criticize that. He should spend more time with his son. There's a level of trying to be the odyssey about finally getting to go home after l. My gosh it. I wanted to be bar out that. It's so it's a phenomenally. Weak in studio product would have that there are movies that are ruined by more. But it's it really glares because it's not it doesn't suit richmond. Wittman is an act. It doesn't suit the story or it's it's just they are to provide this return to normalcy. As the way this ends and seventy years of subsequent horror cinema for a start telling the world that is not how you effectively an end to end story. That's ever creepy is just part of it. But the the blandness of returning home returning to argue with his wife about indulging their five year old son's allowance too much and all of these other things are details. Do not matter after you have spent a lot of time watching jack palance scheme completely below the surface and no one is reacting to this movie events in this field it should have ended with order restored at him going on with the cop and walking out car they shake hands. Right will be fine. A little weak. But that would be an at least the parting of the ways would make more sense than the you're such mushy dame. That's like the worst. That's maybe the line i've heard in november and i've been watching some not so great noirs go through noir. Having new ideas about it is quite difficult. Because it's it's very much a fandom that was embraced first and foremost by film writers who sold the meta of this non They explained the worldwide matter so effectively that there are only a handful of things that you can really find that are new to say a lot of ways. This movie ninety five percent of it has moved forward in such complex ways that there are new things to say about them but there is a five minute long sequence right at the end that there was nothing to say about then. There is nothing compelling about it. There is no material for any of the actors to work with it. Just this random man who is not a good actor. Insulting is parenting and some dialogue of casualties zanjani. Which we're going to get another place. I think the only one. I've ever come across worse. Is a movie called miracles for sale. Which was tod browning. Who made dracula last film. It is a particularly cream impossible. Crime in which a satanic ritual murderer takes place in the locker room and it devolves into this duel between magicians. But somebody at the studio decided that five minutes actually explaining the mechanics of the elaborate impossible murder. That had happened would be too boring for the audience. So instead you get several minutes of idiotic sit commenting slapstick. Basically at ending with the police squad. Everyone throwing up their heads laughing hard. Cut wow only one of these. i've ever run across. That is worse and it couldn't fit that film totally much harder. But yes this. This movie's Off and it's such a shame because there are so many wonderful performances in this film in addition to the very interesting artistic choices that went into the screenplay and the directing. There's also this wonderful performance from particularly jack talents and zero mastel are the ones that to me are the standouts other than richard. Wit mark would mark was always great in war but when you're finding it with people that are new people who basically first major roles palance were here. It's just striking and the reason. There are a lot of reasons. Pounds is performance here has lingered off. Yeah yeah so. We should talk about how is performance here has lingered on in the works of donald westlake. As a matter of fact. I know you are an avowed fan of donald westlake. He is my favorite writer. And the problem with your favorite writer. Is that when you want to talk to someone about why. Your second favorite writer is your second favorite writer. You can go on for hours when you want to explain. Why your favorite writer. Is you sound like a lunatic. Every single you don't have to explain why he's your favorite writer but yes when he was starting the phase of his career that led to him no longer being an author mainly earning a very basic living writing cheap pornography and generally trying to get anything published. He launched the series of parker novels. That probably most famous for now and when he wanted an image in his head for who is character was going to look and sound acts. Light blackie in panic in the streets was his model jack. Palance was his initial mental picture of character that he wrote two dozen books about that. There have been nine or ten different film adaptations of that countless different directions dawn and while he later would comment that so far my main character has been portrayed on film as short tall whites black at least one french model. I'm beginning to fear. My characters lacked definition. The simple fact is when he started the intelligence. Jack palance brings to this role someone who is analyzing a situation that he can't win in for things. He cannot control this performance. Touchdown for that series of books and for the many other narratives that were is particular unique messier but american war grows out of that whole era of writers. All of them have important residences to the films and performances. That really stand at that. You don't get patricia. Highsmith ripley novels without one or two very key performances. You don't see lawrence blocks scudder novels without very particular. Mental touchstones forming those characters. This movie is one of those and at the same time. It is all over the place and containing a bunch of things that are hard to entirely believe. You're seeing it's really stunning. I recommend watching it at night when all of the lights turned off as almost like a midnight screening. Because you get that urgency that you need in order to watch this film when you are in that mindset. This is a hugely powerful film. If you can ignore the ending a little bit. I feel like the power of the film is so interesting and then knowing the back story of this film to and just how important it is in terms of understanding where we've come as a country because of things the anti semitism that has been a part of the blacklist which has fueled a lot of propaganda related to what we define as value use in this country and how. We look at polarizing concepts and anti-intellectualism with who is in a lot of ways about. Yeah but which. The blacklist was driven primarily l. Absolutely just fear of people more intelligent than them. Not having the right things to say again. Not a metaphor for twenty twenty in any major way. That i can think of so for you. Other than wires you would recommend for people in november oak goody. Let's see i mean my favorite is probably the killing which is a more pure heist film. But everyone should see it. If you want another richard with mark movie there are several choices. He never played the same character in war. Unlike so many robert mitchum playing robert mitchum and a lot of ways but when mark every time you see in hissar death up on south street a fun movie about how communism this that nonetheless more. They're all different. The one i'm going to urge you to is night in the city which is british war about a wrestling promoter whose life is just completely going down the drain as he gets more desperate very entertaining the other one we should probably talk about is seventy s mar. That was not directed by nick zan. It was directed by his wife barbara london. And if you haven't seen one that s you really should see one. Wanda was directed by the actress. Barbara london who was ilya kazan. Second watch and his an bought to stop her making it. He was very petty about it and after she died a few years later having directly only one feature film he tried to take credit for it as soon as anyone started saying that they like it was not a movie that got scene at the time it is in the criterion collection it is about a particularly despairing housewife whose life takes some turns and it's well worth it is well worth your time. It is also well worth your time. If you have the criterion channel or if you can find the criterion desk all of the extras are definitely worth consuming on that one. I will definitely say. I wanna thank you so much karen for this conversation. This was wonderful. You are a bond of knowledge as always. This has been a lot of fun. It has thank you so much. Thank you for listening. And thank you to our editor. William dass join us. Next time is more continues but right now please leave us a five star review on i tunes or pod chaser. It helps us grow our audience and improve the show. You can also help us out by following us on twitter instagram or facebook where we are at omnibus ride. He safe will do good work. See you next time. You catch a ride on the omnibus.

elia kazan ilya kazan kazan plague oscar seventy years kirin cowan forty eight hours Joyce oh Rulli Oscar kazan greece robert mitchum ryan new orleans oscars screen writers guild hugh committee kazan yulia kazan Jack palance
Let It Roll: Bing Crosby Ruled The 1940s

Pantheon

54:05 min | 1 year ago

Let It Roll: Bing Crosby Ruled The 1940s

"WHO's in their vote amount? Of Water election as. The biggest swain here from deeper digs and rocker archaeology on. Are you registered to vote? I know I am. Headcount is a nonpartisan organization that works with the music and entertainment industry to get fans to vote. Top date or check your voter registration status go to headcount dot org or you'll find all the information you need to be ready for election day. At Headcount Dot Org, you can also check your registration status because I don't know if you know this, but millions of people get purged from the voter rolls every year. Everyone should check their registration status every year. The deadline to register to vote in some states is as early as October fourth. So you want to check before that. You can also request an absentee ballot get INFO on early voting finder polling place and see what's on your ballot. Headcount is a nonpartisan nonprofit that tours with musicians to help concert attendees registered to vote. But you don't need to leave your house to register to get voting impo just head to head Count Dot Org. And I'll see you at the polls. Ya. Brain from new. Star. Welcome to let it roll the podcast about how and why popular music happens hosted by nate. Wilcox. Follow the letter role podcast on twitter at. Let it roll cast check out our website at. Let it roll podcast dot. com. Let it roll is a Pantheon podcast and you can listen to more great podcasts at www dot pantheon podcasts dot com. Today author Gary Giddens Returns to tell nate about his book being crosby swinging on a star, the war years nine, nineteen, forty, the nineteen, forty, six, native Gary Disgusting Crosby's incredible run during the World War Two era a period when being set still unbroken records for single sales won an Oscar for his acting saying for a radio audience in the tens of millions and lead Hollywood's war effort pop in those ear buds and enjoy. Time to let it roll I'm your host Nate Wilcox, and we have the great pleasure of Talk Me Back Gary Giddens the bing crosby biographer, and today we're gonNA focus on his second volume of Bing crosby biography, bing crosby swinging on a star the war years nineteen forty to nineteen forty, six scary. Welcome back. Thank you nice to be your. And so why did you choose to write a biography focused just on the warriors on it in that six year period that merited a full town. Well it was. Really the central part of his career. I mean it's when he achieved the most triumphs. As, a singer as a certainly as an actor and But I, think mostly because of his war work which nobody knew about crosby was. As I've often said modest to a fault the entire. War is hard in it gets about a half a sentence in call me lucky memoir. He didn't feel the editor right to. To Trade on on what he did then and so most people did not know the extent of it. They knew that he had raised a lot of money selling bonds and Entertain the troops but I don't think anybody really understood. The, they'll the length then and the the amount of commitment he made to it and especially hardly anybody knew in fact, no one when I first started researching it was nothing about the Foxhole tour that he did in England and is a very dangerous part of France not long after d day. but would really motivated me to do the book just on the on the warriors was that after the first volume came out. Kathryn crosby. Widow invited me out to the House and She liked the first of all. And had not spoken to me before void made many attempts, and now she was incredibly gracious. Invited me out to the House and gave me access to basically everything and as I started going through. File Cabinets, and and I found hundreds if not thousands of letters from families of servicemen who had been killed and the fact that they wrote you crosby too because the last letter they got was about a tour that he gave in France and how it's your them up and they just wanted to thank him and they'll I mean hundreds and hundreds of these. Extremely Moving I was moved to tears. was in tears reading some of them and I kept going through it, and then I found all of this material that about how complex a complex this period was and how he really took control of his film career at this point and how fascinating the the the choices he made. and then There was a a cachet of material found in a storage room in in Nevada. That this is gross be said I could have access to as soon as as they were vetted. Had A research you're in La and she would go to. A place where they were being vetted and send me. Of photocopies every few weeks and among the most amazing things that we found. There was this Letter, many pages about his attempt to get out of his radio contract and the changes you wanted to make, and it just opened up a whole new way of looking at being. So I went to my editor at that period of Little Brown. And I said look I, WANNA make this entire volume about the forties. And I They weren't happy about that. But a couple of years later when I had a I, three, hundred, zero ages, they read it and they liked it and and so we went ahead. And it's an incredibly powerful book and as. Know as a Gen xer I'm not a bank crosby native my first memories of. As a doddering old man on TV every once in a while joking back and forth with Bob Hope, and it was very hard. You know came to appreciate the road movies as a kid and had some friends who are into his music and I I sort of understood that you know he was comparable to Frank Sinatra. Presley that he was enormous singing star and and a movie star but I didn't realize until I read your books, the length and. Breadth of his career I mean, this is a guy. It says if the Beatles had stayed together through the seventies eighties into the nineties. This is a guy who is the top singing star in the late twenties who become too massive radio star movie star in the thirty saves the record industry in the thirties as we discussed last time. And then goes on to be even bigger in his third decade of stardom and not just big as a performing star man he's selling tons of records. He's got a top ten radio show I mean and being heard by tens two, twenty, million, thirty, forty, fifty, million people a week weaken week out and starring in not just being crosby vehicles but moves up to ails, pictures and Academy Award winning pictures but also takes on this cultural leadership role announced thinks I found most inspiring about this book was You've done a great job of sort of reclaiming being crosby who's been whose image has suffered greatly from from I don't. WanNa say slanders by his son in things were mostly true that that Gary Crosby said, clearly, the first four sons had very difficult lives and suffered greatly through largely the alcoholism of their mother but also being attempts to discipline and and his sort of remote Irish personality. But this was a man who deliberately. Embraced his Irish Catholic identity at a time when that was very controversial and served as a counterweight to people like Father Caughlin the Vile Demagogue anti-semites of the thirties sorta the rush limbaugh of his day. Even worse I mean basically vowed Pro Nazi America first type and I hadn't. Realized really the maturity and the cultural impact that being had, and there's really been nothing comparable sense. Well that's true. crosby was way ahead of the curve on on all those issues of race antisemitism gay people I mean he you know. Never Forget Anthony Quinn saying to me that the being was diverse. Person I ever met in Hollywood didn't treat me like a mix and I interviewed a number of. Choreographers and week maker and people who were now openly gay or when I interviewed them in the nineties who were just astonished at how live-and-let-live he was and and of course, you know before he became a star he gave part of his salary hasn't checked to help the Scots. Borough boys he he risked being fired from the woodbridge show by. Singing with the mills brothers on the air. It was one thing to have them as a guest but to be singing with that was a big. That was a big thing when he produced his first film. In nineteen thirty, six pennies from heaven insisted that his I Louis Armstrong be given top billing, which was the first time for black artist and. Essentially white film even though he's only in it for seven minutes he's he's up on the top of credit card a car you know the credit is a Gar- actually sounds strange. But he he was really extraordinarily in that respect now he was He was quite a libertarian on the other hand. He was favorably those aged pot. You know he had his own way of. thinking. One of his. Secretary told me that In. Nineteen Sixty, the the office, his brothers mostly was very Republican, very conservative and she came to work wearing JFK button because she was a big supporter of JFK. And Things brother I think it was Larry started screaming. We don't wear that in this office and crosby bounded out of his office said, you don't tell somebody else You know what to think what to wear, and of course, he turned out to be a JFK supporter because he despised Nixon. And he just you know he didn't. People always think before of him as a sort of conservative middle of the Road Guy. But he really he was quite extraordinary in that way. He also came out against the war in Vietnam and It was because of that that hoover opened up a file on him looking for potential blackmail material and all they find is that he played poker with A. Guy Named modality two in the thirties was a major gangster in the. Midwest. Classic unless you're a little bit of Bing crosby. One of his first Irish songs this did you mother come from? Ireland but composer Jimmy Kennedy Your mother comes from our. House, there's something in you. Where you tell me where you get again. Before Sheila. Did. Your mother now was being crosby singing did your mother come from Ireland Song by Jimmy Kennedy who wrote a number of other Irish songs but also read stills sunset and and probably the greatest pop composer out violent in this period but that's part of Jack Kennedy. Jimmy Hannity is considered the most successful. British. Composer before McCartney and Lennon. Songwriter before McCartney and Lennon. A ton of heads and this was part of Jack Kapp who was the head of Decca Records and beings mentor for his recording career the guy who guided of career and helped select the material. This was part of cap strategy of making being an all round entertainer being started out as a red hot jazz guy with the Paul Whiteman, Orchestra and singer with big spider bag and others it was very much on the cutting edge of. and Cap. In the early thirties helped him transition into a all round entertainer and sort of the Americans pop singer that candle any kind of material and and his Irish ethnic material as I said, was heart of a political stance that that being Tokar. Complimented political stance that he took. But he was also singing a wide variety of other musics including country music and had a big hit with Bob Bob. Wills New San Antonio rose. Well, yeah he he he did every kind of song but this one correction I have to make, which is that cap who wanted him to sing a lot of nineteenth century songs and you know Stephen Forced to things that were in the public domain songs from the early part of the century country songs, cowboy songs, French songs Spanish songs the one thing that he was a. We're worry of with the Irish songs. Crosby is the one who insisted on that and cap in fact, didn't even release it right away. He was worried about where to put it. He was thinking that you'd be a b side on something and when those records went through the roof it became part of crosby's persona. You have to remember that before crosby made this this. Stance against father. Cau- Glenn and all the Anti Semitism was rife in his country, the American I and and you know Lindberg and all of those people he was known as an Anglican Star he never played an Irish character in any of the two dozen movies. You'd already made all of them had very obvious Anglican names his father was You know part of Church of England not to Catholic in any way as mother was, and then all of a sudden he made this transition from the the Anglican side of his family to the Irish side and made himself you know in a sense. A minority figure he he was siding with the people who were being killed for for who they were all over Europe and It was extraordinary the degree to which he made this this turnaround after the Irish songs. Of course, he starts playing father o'malley frequently plays Irish characters he starts doing. Irish. Access he had some of his biggest hits in the in the mid forties with you know things like McNamara's band and from that point on to the rest of his career people started to think of is an Irish American but that did not exist in his persona before about nineteen forty. That's fascinating and. Really highlights what a mature individual bing crosby was and how he had come into his own as a force, and you mentioned his business negotiations with the the radio. Sponsors, and the networks and also his business associations with the movies I really can't think of very many comparable figures I mean somebody like Paul McCartney has come to take a very strong role in his business hand lane and Irving Berlin who is a little bit earlier and a contemporary of being definitely was was a shrewd businessman but crosby really had the reins of his career in a way that Mo- celebrities doubt and to me speaks of maturity. In his approach, which is odd because it was also period when pop music wasn't self conscious and so there's no. Baynton have a view of himself as an artiste. He just viewed himself as an entertainer who loved music and wanted to make good music, but he didn't put a lot of came so easy to him he in the studio and. Learn the songs after one or two listens and delivers a knockout performance more often than not he basically played himself movie after movie even while stumbling upward into a-list oscar-winning roles he just. Being in this very. Casual home steady as she goes way and it's really an incredible persona like almost nobody else and there's another factor though that I think might inhibit some people's enjoyment appreciation being these days in there you refer to him as a living bridge to older. America of minstrels E, and variety. What did you mean by that? How did the rim reference the ask cap versus radio suit that was going on at the time? How did these different factors play in to being doing things like Stephen Foster songs and performed in black face and Holiday Inn and At the same time, you know making a point of mentioning Paul Room addressing Paul Robeson by name on his radio show which totally outraged southern racists. How do we reconcile being as progressive for his time and yet also? Harkening back to the past past that we've now view at a great deal of distaste-. Well, it was a different time I mean by the time crosby became along Minstrel was part of the American show business tradition. They weren't thinking of it in terms of were making fun of black people that would that may have been that was a part of it in the in the eighteen forties and fifties, and and certainly during the civil war. But after the war, a lot of the midstream, most successful Mistral troops in the country where in fact. Entirely Black, even though they had to wear the same menstrual makeup and they outs. Sold a lot of the white minstrel troupes because they consider more authentic. Hilarious. But the by the time he came along it was it was part of what he had grown up with these started You know he loves showbusiness when he was a kid and he started out pulling curtains and working back stage at and spokane where he I got to see Al Jolson perform twice and that was life changing for him. So for him, it was part of a tribute to Jolson and to that era. But the thing is a lot of things contributed to the fact that crosby. You have to remember that crosby and Louis Armstrong the they're both the same in this they were very close and they're about the same age. And to this. When they were kids when they were growing up the. Records were brand new and the phonograph just been interrupted a introduced, and in fact, the first one that the Crosbie family had was played Edison cylinders, which you know you can only play a few times because they were rather fragile and then the lateral disc was introduced but the thing about records was was so exciting it was so stimulating to be able to hear whatever John Phillips Sousa in your living room Even though today, it's a level of fidelity that least sort of find. Difficult to listen to it was thrilling in those days in every rocker record was a mystery until you've played it. So it a bias wasn't a prejudice about what was cool and what was what was hit when what wasn't and you know A few decades later your taste and recordings and music with the fine which social group you're in high school or but that didn't exist and they just wanted to hear everything. So crosby listened to Irish tenor you love John McCormack had Jim Bruins on him. He loves Jolson had a huge you listen to the white may record here the Jolson influence. Then he discovered jazz and that really did it for him when he finally saw Louis Armstrong and person in nineteen, twenty six, that was another life changing moment. So he was able to take all of these influences without bias and he was able to to use them in. Wall, completely remaining himself he always sounds like crosby. He is influence speaks for itself because there's nobody else who quite sounded like more raised like him he had a tremendous sense of rhythm. always knew where the first beat of the measure was, and so he was always swinging even when the range wasn't I remember the late great saxophonist Jimmy Heath said to me that. He was he said he was looking forward to the first volume of the Crosby of crosby biography and I said, well, you being fantasies said, well, where do you think we got all the songs from he was the only guy on radio at time. With meaning the only white guy because all of the major show, really every network show was white show. Louis Armstrong was the first to have a show, but it was only as a summer replacement. So you know we're talking about if you're when. was was just pandemic all over the country and certainly on radio but but. Crosby was the one guy who just had the always had jazz musicians in his band. He always had Louis Armstrong Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald Arteta is guests and so he mainstream jazz for a lot of people who would not otherwise have been as willing to listen to it. He also mainstream even more remarkably opera and classical music because he always had opera singer who loved him and he routinely opera singers on the air and he would make it entertaining. He would have them saying one. Legitimate short opera but then he would do a duet with that one some pop tune, which made the opera singer seem more human and. And so he had an enormous impact in popularizing different kinds of music the on what was the nineteen thirties and forties version of the top forty. And he's also kind of. A prescient perform that he. I think you've got a quote from another rider saying that when crosby expropriated material like country and Western or Blues that he sort of laid the groundwork for popular acceptance of these forms and as part of. A number of factors that lead to the ascension of figures like Bob Wills, likely Jordan, who we do ended with throughout this period, and that's another fascinating thing is not only is he doing? Irish songs and Hawaiian songs and country songs. But hit in this period, he's still keeping his reputation as a swinging singer particularly and duets with the Andrews, sisters and with Louis Jordan who is. Absolutely on the cutting edge in this period. I mean, this is the father of rhythm-and-blues the guy who takes swaying. Swing jazz for to, by case this period Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, take it off into bebop and Louis Jordan takes it takes swing and simplifies it makes it more rhythmic and more. Pop and entertaining and Bang does this duets with Louis Jordan. Well. That's right and he also. In addition to doing the recording duets, which was a which was what got. cap to raise Louis Jordan from the so-called race. Label. On Decca to the expensive black label deck is we're crosby and the Andrews Sisters and the mills brothers and more popular acts were but he also recorded Jordan songs. He did he Andrea this it is you is or is you ain't my baby which was an enormous hit and so he popularized that a country music the same thing Roy Rogers who then was known as the King of the cowboys. said to me before being everybody thought If you were going to sink cowboy songs, you had a sound like Gabby Hayes and showed everybody that you could be smooth voice singer gene autry came out of being Roy Rogers Jimmy Wake Lee later Eddy Arnold So we had an enormous sense even though he never was at the grand old opera opera or never considered part of country music he had a tremendous influence there. was, the first white singer who was routinely included on Black Juke boxes in Harlem which many many people told me about That was he was the one White. Cat. Who's stuff was always on the on the uptown juke boxes. And I want to play a song here that I first became aware of through reading your book at this was something recorded around the same time as he recorded new San Antonio rose. This is floyd. It makes no difference now by being crosby. Makes no difference now what kind of life eight hand? I'll get along without you now that's. Juicy. I don't care what happens next. Get by some. I don't worry a president. Difference now. That was being crosby saying it makes no difference now, which I really had no I need I knew that he had done new San Antonio Rose I. knew he had done a lot of cowboy songs but I didn't realize he was covering the Carter family and Riley Puckett and Floyd Tillman and just the the debray dig into bing crosby the more treasures I find I, WanNa. Thank you for. Your. Curation of the collection because you know it's it's a big deep puddle and you've really picked out some gyms in their. Favorite of his records I love his phrasing on that I love the way it swings Ray Charles also did a great version of that and You can tell that he he news across be version from his arrangement But yeah, he he had a he he had a good year and sometimes cap would give him novelties. They weren't very good. But if you compare what he recorded at Decca with what he did on the weekly radio show and we have you know most of the shows of survive after kraft kraft. It's very mixed bag, but we also have the list of what he's saying. So we know what he did on every single show and on the radio show, he chose the songs and the level of the songs is just extremely inconsistently high hardly ever since junk on the radio. On. Recordings occasionally you would but never on the radio. And Will it into a couple times I want to dive into this? Dispute between ask CAP, which is the publishing organization that represented most of the songwriters of the great American songbook you know are being burland Gershwin's. Is Very important. Yeah. the ads cap people who basically had a monopoly on American popular music. They got greedy and they raised their licensing fees I, think something like four hundred percents something ridiculous and the radio's just protested and and basically they were forbidden from playing as as was. So confident of its power that they figured, you know they'll run out of material in a week and they'll come back begging to pay their licensing fee. Well, the radio people put their own a music. Publishing Company together called Broadcasting Music Inc be I, which still exists not one of the two most important Blitz for publishing music as a cab still huge and BMI well. When BMI came along during the strike, it was an opportunity. For a lot of songwriters would been. Sort of turned down by us cap because they were considered you know regional they weren't considered to be the George Gershwin Irving Berlin Cole Porter class which. but they were also there was also a bias against them because the people who wrote southern Songs Country Songs Blues Songs and they had been. exiled or outlawed from from ask Cap. So they all came to be my and suddenly BMI was huge because we rock and roll came along that was the place where everybody went and So it really it didn't help as caps case at all, and the other thing that happened then was everybody started looking for public domain songs that they wouldn't have to pay royalties on that also warrant protected by Aska. So suddenly, there was a rediscovery of a lot of songs that had been written during in the nineteen th century. Carrie Jacobs Bond, of course, stephen forced to became huge. Stephen I. It was not as big in his brief lifetime and she was in the nineteen forties during the strike when everybody was recording his songs Louis Armstrong the mills brothers Crosby of course he was in her they were what half a dozen movies about. Stephen Foster made I mean anything to get a remember the mighty Joe Young that the song is beautiful. Dreamer runs through the whole movie because they didn't have to pay for that Stephen Foster Song. So it it just it just mixed everything up and instead of just hearing the top of the line ask songs you'll be getting to discover something about American traditional music evergreens from the nineteenth century the early part of the twentieth century, and at the same time you have beginning to hear country Blues Hawaiian August, Spanish Latin flavor all kinds of songs A lot of Latin classics would now for the first time translated into English crosby, a great many of those. So it just opened up the whole field of what popular music was. That was not the intention of. Not, at all and a couple years later, and so that was a strike whereas wouldn't let their songs performed on the radio but a couple years later, there's a different strike, which is the American Federation of Musicians put on a strike. The did not allow artists to record our musicians instrumental musicians. or singers could record the whole time and you had some performers who did a lot of acapella songs in this period. But how did being cap deal with the AM FM? Strike? Well. At the same time that we were fighting a demagogues and dictators in Europe the AF I was taken over by a demagogue named Petro sort of reverberate name in the history of American popular music he took over the Union and he wanted. He wanted to strike of musicians and he he went about it not never clearing exactly what he wanted in return to avoid is he just he liked tapping his name on the Front page of the newspapers you liked having power he liked telling people what to do. So he started this strike that went on for two years, and this was only the first three, the second and third strike also in the mid forties only lasted a few months each but the first one was two years would that's why we have We don't have the evolution of bebop on recordings. Charlie. Parker. Dizzy came up and those two years when they were really defining their art. nobody could make recordings, musicians Trillo at one point said that he would allow recordings to be made for. Servicemen the this but it was pointed out to him that that was legal. You can't decide who can buy your records and who can't. So everybody thought he was completely not cine wouldn't go along with it but he did and this forced the rental companies basically out of business for a couple of years until cap was the first one to come up with the idea of crosby actually, he just made a record cold dixie. and Johnny Bergen Jimmy Venues. It had written a song for quote Sunday Monday or always, and and everybody knew it was going to be a big hit and he couldn't put out a record. So. crosby did a Cappella version which Sinatra covered in the same acapella arrangement and those are those records which you would sell. COSBY's was a million seller and This sort of. Well. What he did was very smart he. Bing when started out his career, he used to play drums. So he went to the Union and and signed up as a as a drummer. And patroller said Okay you can make a recording that you're a member of the union, but you can't play trump something which he had no intention of doing it all. So he made an occupy these acapella records. which gave a certain amount of power to a Decca, and then he jack cap was in a very different situation than the other record companies the other record companies, all had an RCA Columbia the two main ones had symphony orchestras under contract A lot of their output was classical music. They could reissue all of that they. They had tons of recordings they could reissue for years to come with deck only been around since. The late nineteen thirties. So at far less to reissue and he had to keep business. So he made a special separate deal. He agreed to pay a higher royalty to the musicians union and when when he made that deal the other record companies, we will never do that but they now had no choice because Decca was back in business. He was basically the only guy who was making A. Lot of money selling records so RCA folded in Columbia folded and they all may deals but better deals than they would've otherwise made because cap it set president and during that period. Again it was you know when you combine that with the cap strike, you really have a have to figure out different ways to find music. You can record and the way to use a way you can use That have the Ordina ordinary you know. Castrol arrangement when when being finally after deck assigned its deal. He announced that being was coming back with the Andrews. Sisters which was a big deal then because he only made one recording with them back in the thirties and this was the beginning of the new relationship and the press was out in droves to to watch the session recorded in La and it was a big deal. Because again, a singer was in the studio with US editions with a with a band aid or ten musicians accompanying them and that sort of. That's really again the end of the strike. and. The book described that being basically had three pillars to his career. In this period, he stopped doing live concerts in the early thirties. So he had records which we talked about, and he had radio, which we talked about and movies were really the prestige media at the time and you describe the process by which being who had starred in a number of profitable and successful movies in the thirties but they were seen as be pictures as being crosby vehicles in the forties. He has since two analyst actor what were the movies that helped make that transition. Well, the first thing that happened that was really of a major consequences. He a couple of pictures in nineteen, thirty, eight and thirty nine that did not do very well singing centers that did well, it's unfortunate that people don't know that today because it's an extraordinary film, but then he did a by a bio pic about Gus had words in the school days kids and that when we didn't do well. So his career was at a strange place because he was in his you know he's in his mid to late thirties he couldn't be twenty something crooner forever. What you? What is a former like that? Do he wasn't gonNA play cowboys? He wasn't gonNA play. You know. Detectives like Dick Powell did when he stopped being musical star So He makes this film with Bob Hope The road to Singapore which was a one off and it was an enormous hit nobody anticipated was the top grossing movie of Nineteen Forty. So that began that series and suddenly everybody realized I mean being always was famous for his win his ability to Ad Lib and it was part of his persona on the radio and he could be very funny and some of the movies here is my heart. He's he's brilliant far sir in that film and and also in, we're not dressing and others. Going all the way back to the big broadcast but here, he's really playing one on one with a famous comedian Bob. Hope. who wasn't known in the movies but was well known in New York for his Broadway Aradio work and not only hold his on own but he occasionally just deals the scenes right from under hope. So everybody started to look at him in a different way but he wasn't GonNa just play comedies either. So he begins choose very carefully the kinds of arts he does he's very careful about the scores and the film that really changed. I guess the the first big Negga hit is the the film it introduced White Christmas Holiday Inn He plays opposite Fred, astaire Fred Astaire to his Somewhat Chagrin found this to be the top grossing movie in his career. Exceeded only by the second movie made with crosby several years. Later, these these movies made a lot more money believe it or not than the the records the film's Fred did with Ginger Rogers. And This was a again it was in irving Berlin score, White Christmas which was unknown until the film came out in that summer of nineteen, forty, two it was the first Hollywood film that actually knowledge the war and use. Some stock footage to to show that we were now in it after Pearl. Harbor and It was a monumental hit ironically and I go into this some detail in the book If you look at the original film reviews nobody's singled out except for one writer in New York then. I was given credit for this. She was the only one who said why Christmas is going to be a huge issue that'd be hearing long before Christmas. The only one everybody else thought that the big hit was gonna be Abraham the black face number which they called a swings spiritual, which it isn't a spiritual swinney but thing it was hugely popular when the movie I open audiences would applaud after Abraham and nobody minded the the black face. Even. Black Columnists who really offended by the fact that Berlin used the word dark in the lyric and There was a big article in Time magazine Berlin to his credit said, I, if I had known, it was offensive I would never have used it and I ordered my publisher to take out my the sheet music to change the word Dorky to people I think or something like that. And and it was never used again but it was course too late for the film. It's already in the film but nobody complained about the black face. Many. Famous Black Comedians in that period were also performing black face I. Mean. If you look at the movie stormy weather, which is an all black cast, you see some of them actually in the dressing room putting on the burnt cork. So that was not considered an issue. And in fact when A the head of the end up CPI and Wendell willkie. Who would run against FDR came to Hollywood to demand better roles for black artists before the camera but also behind the cameras writers directors et Cetera et Cetera that wouldn't come for a long long time and it still hasn't completely calm But when when they were complaining about the language into the the stereotypes of wax always playing maids and porters the question of black face with was raised in Willard white the head of the N. double ACP said, well white folks want to. Pretend that they're black you know. Go for. that. That just wasn't something that was particularly bothersome then. Thing to me watching that movie recently was it was clearly well intentioned I mean, it's it's attributed to Abraham Lincoln and it's an attempt to celebrate Lincoln free the slaves and it's attempted to be a Pro African. American. Statement. But because of the black face in particularly the female leaders in a particularly ridiculous Alpha with picking any hair and the whole bit. And you know it's kind of thing where I'm showing my daughters who seven years old, who loves Judy Garland musicals WHO's getting to enjoy being and iino know I had forgotten that scene was coming up and you have to stop and explain the whole thing And and interesting that the black face in that film and in most nineteen forties films, they always use it as some plot issue. You know why she wearing black face so that Fred astaire won't recognize her. There's always some dumb. Plot justification written into the script what all they really WanNa do 'cause irving. Berlin love, minstrels. He wrote a Lotta miserable songs and they just WANNA do a black face number because audiences loved it as I. Point Out in the in the book there were some sixty feature films and short subjects many of those short subjects made for children by the three stooges and and and you know ten, twenty one and two reeler comedy things like that that used black face it was It was revived in the nineteen forties because it's was said to represent some kind of continuity with a and the stalled for you know white people who grew up with it and remembered it and so everybody did it Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland. John. Wayne. Does black face and a film I mean it's hard to think of a major performer in and out of music who didn't somehow got. Caught up with it in that period, and then when the war is over nine, hundred, forty, six, the third top grossing movie of the year is the Jolson. Story with half of which is in black face and then nineteen, forty, nine, the number one grossing movie in the country is Jolson sings again. So you can see that this country had an attachment to black vase they went way way beyond. What what seems a just an active nostalgia during the war and it was really wasn't until the early fifties and everybody just wait a second. This is appalling. We have to stop this and interestingly the the one. Film that really sort of. Put. A you know full stop to it was things of film directed by Michael critise again with an irving Berlin score called White Christmas which is today crosby's biggest grossing film. It's Christmas staple, but there's a big minstrel Senate the film and it's very Definitely. Done in white face it's it's it's it's. It's very consistent with the minstrel practices jokes out of minstrels. See the dancing everything is very authentically minstrel, but there's no black face and guess what? Obviously you can do this without it doesn't lose anything because they're not made up to look ridiculous. Yeah the whole show Hee Haw in the seventies is essentially recycling menstrual beds and. I didn't realize this until recently learning more about mental see. So the fundamental. Comedy Variety American comedy variety fundamentally comes out eventually. It's it's very difficult to extricate American music from. This tradition that we now find so problematic, but I want to switch to. Another pair of song writers that wrote most of beings material he worked with Irving Berlin three pictures and obviously white Christmas. This incredible mega hit charts literally every year from nineteen, forty, two to nineteen, sixty two. With one exception I mean this is by far. They must successful record of all time. So I want to be sure listeners understand the magnitude of the success of that thing. But most of the time in beings movies, he had his own personal songwriting team of a bark and venues in and they wrote songs for the road pictures and going my way talk about that partnership and how that worked. Well. It really begins with Johnny. Burke who's a very close friend of crosby's in the thirties johnny burke initially came to Crosby with the different partner he was Jimmy Monaco who's Bid Older. Man Who had written songs for Jolson and it didn't quite a number of hits over the years and they wrote things first independent feature which was pennies from heaven. So Johnny Burke and and Monica wrote pennies from heaven itself and is actually a wonderful score. It's a terrific very underrated movie. That's the one Armstrong introduced a skeleton in the closet and and. then he he wanted to work with a younger composer burke somebody is own generation and somebody who thought could move him ahead and he heard about the venues in New York who is basically a song plugger couldn't get arrested and they wrote a couple of songs together to basically show being what they could do and There were a lot of reasons why it was difficult because they were all kinds of contracts and everybody loved Jimmy Monaco, personally including being But when he heard the kind of thing that they were turning out Eventually was very happy to facilitate the change in Berko love to American venues and loved each other and they just had an amazing career for you know, a decade more than a decade and the songs that they wrote swinging on a star moonlight becomes you just you know hit after hit after hit not just for Crosby also Sinatra Sinatra's biggest hits like imagination also and and a Lotta the songs they came they just became standards and Actually I'd say they were probably the leading new songwriting team of a war and of the nineteen forties and then burke had some trouble with pills and alcohol, and he became unreliable and he moved to New York to write for the Broadway stage in venues and continued the partnership this time with Sammy Cahn, and now they became being had pretty much You know stopped his full scale movie career although he still use them a convent, use it but basically, they became Sinatra's song writers interestingly when Bergen van using started to team. Sinatra you know was dying to have them but so not your was you know he was he was Tommy Dorsey singer, he was nobody in terms of power and industry and Crosby was you know paramount pictures I mean it was no. No choice between the two of them. So venues and moved out to California, and for the next two dozen years although he occasionally used a Berlin as we said or Johnny Mercer did one of his films, Hoagy Carmichael but most of them, and certainly all the road pictures were. A little bit I wanNA play ain't got a dime to my name from the road to Morocco. Ain't got a dime to my name. What a terrible. Found a hole in McHugh, win my and shows through. And that was added onto my name written by Johnny Burke and Jimmy. Van Heusen or did I get that backwards I was getting Jimmy and Johnny Makes out that was Ain't got a dime to my name being crosby from the road to Morocco and. Pretty much. I've hit all the points I wanted to hit. You have any concluding thoughts about crosby or is there a third volume in the works you're going to go into the fifties sixties into the his death in nineteen seventy seven? Yeah I. Hope to Um. It's on. It's definitely a my plan I have a couple of other books I have to do I contracts that long overdue but yeah it's I have all the research already. So it's just a matter of finding the time to put it all together. and. Really looking forward to that and thanks so much for coming on the show and tell us about being crosby. He was just a mammoth figure in American music. WHO's kind of lost today your watched your American Masters on PBS that you did recently, do you feel like you've had any success an in reuniting interest and respect for crosby's accomplishments as a musician? Well I hope so. Twenty five years doing these two volumes. It's hard to say I mean we don't really. We have a cultural Amnesia in this country that is. Just, impossible to fight off. The you know the infrastructure for the music business is based on what you can sell, and that's always somebody who's alive that you could manage in produce, and so we don't have a way of We don't readily recycle or history and most people don't know performance from before the way they no longer know movies from before That's really unfortunate. But we write books and we tried to call people's attention and Sometimes you know people discover it and they're very happy to say, wow, I didn't even know about this guy and now I can't stop listening to him. So that's always very gratifying for a biographer and historian and That's really all you can do. And much appreciated. Gary Gibbons in the book is being crosby swinging on a star, the war years nineteen, forty to nineteen, forty six and I hope we can have you back on the show when you publish your next book. Pleasure. Follow the letter role podcast on twitter at let it roll cast and check out our website at let it roll podcasts Dot Com. Come back next week when Jesse Jarno returns to tell nate all about pioneering indie rockers yield go in the season finale. Let. It roll as a Pantheon podcast and you can listen to more great podcasts at www dot pantheon podcasts, dot com. Hall. Being crosby swinging on a star the war years in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, two, nineteen, forty, six is published by Little Brown and company. Please support our show by ordering via the Amazon referral link on our website. Let it roll PODCASTS DOT com.

Gary Disgusting Crosby crosby Louis Armstrong Bing crosby Decca Records Al Jolson Sinatra Sinatra crosby Berlin Hollywood WanNa Nineteen Forty twitter Nate Wilcox Stephen Foster editor Bob Hope La
#833: A Clockwork Orange at 50 / Roadrunner / As Tears Go By (Wong Kar Wai #1)

Filmspotting

1:49:32 hr | 3 months ago

#833: A Clockwork Orange at 50 / Roadrunner / As Tears Go By (Wong Kar Wai #1)

"Support for this. Podcast comes from invent together. I bet you didn't know that inventing activity by black inventors peaked in eighteen ninety nine and it has never recovered black and hispanic college graduates patented half the rate of white college graduates. That's just one of the reasons why you need to know about invent together. When our patent system gets more diverse our nation will get stronger and more successful. Find out how you can help. Diverse inventors and unleash economic opportunity at invent together dot or miss episode is brought to you by made. Well ready to step up your denim game. The experts at made well us premium fabric and the latest denim technology to make super comfy. Never wanted to take off genes in fits and styles for everyone but kind of jeans. You'll reach for again and again get twenty dollars off your online jeans. Purchased by using code spotify twenty at made well dot com terms apply. Please see made well dot com slash promos for full offer details. What kind of show you guys put not here today without interested in going to do this thing going to have conversation from chicago. This is film. Spotty i'm josh larsen. And i'm adam kempner. The cova mill basso new plus plus set a sentiments or dren cream. She's been drinking this shopping. You thank you ready. Took the old ultraviolet that's malcolm mcdowell with some of his iconic opening narration to nineteen seventy one's a clockwork orange which celebrates its fiftieth anniversary this year this week on the show a sacred cow review of the stanley kubrick classic. So just a little warning. I've had six glasses of milk. Plus just to sharpen me up a little bit for the review ready for a bit of the old ultra film. Criticism are you. We will see also on the show. We kick off our world of one car y marathon with nineteen eighty as tears. Go by that more. Take my breath away at them. I didn't really feel that josh ahead on film spotting thanks to mint mobile for supporting films spotting for people that hate their phone bill and are ready to cut ties with big wireless mint. Mobile has your new wireless plan for just fifteen dollars a month. Get the plan ship to your door for free. Go to mint mobile dot com slash film spotty. Welcome to film spotting josh. I don't wanna give away. What might be the most entertaining part or most insightful. Part of our review. But were you prepared at all for the cover of take my breath away in one car. Wise as tears go by. I did not see that coming. i'll admit But i'm very glad. I got it because now adam whenever i hear that song was a cover but still even if i hear the berlin version i won't be thinking of all those tongues that we saw recently when we revisit a top gun instead. I'll have wong's film battle come to mind that'll be much better okay. Hong kong director one car. Why is the subject of our next film. Spotting marathon probably best known for chungking express from nine hundred ninety four and two thousand in the mood for love. Wong is a filmmaker. We've long wanted to spend some time with and we're getting to it now because he's got a new luscious criterion collection box. Set the world of one car. Why and all seven of those titles in the collection are currently streaming over on the criterion channel. So later in the show we will get to the first film in our world of one car white marathon nineteen eighty-eight as tears go by also got a few thoughts on the new anthony bourdain documentary. I was highly anticipating roadrunner. But i a sacred cow review of a clockwork orange. Are we going to get a nas. Scrap over this one atom. What exactly is the treatment are going to be. It's quite simple really just some films not going to the pictures something like that. Well that's good. I like to video films. Down again and vide- films. I would what i was taken to. Brothers was like no senio video before i was bound up in a the gulliver was strapped to a headrest with light wires running away from it. Then they clamped lid locks on the is so the not shut them. No matter how hard. I tried seem to be crazy to me but i let them get on with what they want us to get on with. If i was to be a free young again at four nights time. I would put up with much in the meantime. Oh my brothers josh. Would you believe this is the fourth stanley kubrick movie. We have given the sacred cow treatment here on film spotting we did the shining. We did two thousand and one a space odyssey. We also did more recently. Eyes wide shut part of our nine from ninety nine series. I appreciate the opportunity to revisit a clockwork orange. A movie i listed in two thousand thirteen as my favorite kubrick. Movie over on letterbox. Much to my surprise. Because i would not have been able to provide a single substantive reason. Why yes that list is. Due for updating what i will always regret though is not having the time or to prompt you with the intro that you and our listeners and stanley kubrick deserve which is one constructed entirely in the language of net set or i could have gone the route of the terrifyingly jolly intonation of mr deltoid. Yes well. I think we've already reached our limit of nad. Set a references. So that's probably good. You didn't do that okay. Well i'm instead going to feature some worcester feedback because we haven't gotten this much initial feedback to a review. A longtime many listeners invested in this conversation many listeners wrestling with their own complicated reactions and recollections of a clockwork orange. David road. And i know a lot of people love clockwork. Inhale it as among kubrick's best. But i haven't last on my kubrick rankings. Now kubrick is probably my all time favorite director. And i still like and admire the movie quite a bit but with the possible exception of full metal jacket second half. It's his only film that has never quite worked for me. I've tried but i can't get on this movie's wavelength and at times the tones simply feels off. Here's josh taylor. With the story it was the summer of ninety five. I was either fourteen or about to turn fifteen in my freshman high school english class. The previous fall we had to pick a character or real life person dress up as and give a presentation about what of my classmates. Nick lockwood that neck. What a scoundrel was really into a clockwork orange. Really is capitalized here to perfect and he came to class addressed as alex. I wasn't a sinophile yet. I doubt i even knew the word growing up. In a pre internet rural east texas town called. that's right paris. But i was intrigued by nick spectacular presentation. I don't know if it was actually that spectacular but you know i was fourteen that next summer slipped out of the local video rental store. I think it was called sight and sound video with the copy of kubrick's masterpiece like adam. My parents let me watch just about any movie. I wanted as long as i didn't quote. Repeat anything. I heard or saw unquote in them. A clockwork orange terrified me for the next several weeks i had a recurring nightmare. Alex was locked up in an insane asylum. And i stood helplessly. Bhai is these successfully escaped and continued his violent crime spree from the movie. I was not ready. It's been at least a decade. Since i've revisited it. I read the book about fifteen years ago but it still haunts my mind with its unimaginably. Gleeful violence can't wait to hear. Your thoughts cheers droops. Josh says here's michael green. He's in dover delaware. I'm excited to hear your thoughts on stanley. Kubrick's nineteen seventy one film as part of my personal af. I top one hundred marathon. I'm halfway through so far i rectify this blindspot recently. It has all of the hallmark traits associated with kubrick emotionally distant and dehumanize main character check symmetry bold colors. He has cleared the bar and houses. The fluid camera the music shop dangerous world and stare. The film was great in coober pulls off the impossible by turning the source material into a film. But my main point question for you is how do you grapple with and judge the film's rape scenes. There are three. I believe i get their part of the world and story but they made me feel uneasy. Which i guess is the point. But i'd like to hear how you both process these in the grand scheme of the film and specifically how well or not you think kubrick handles them finally. Here's isabel bishop. Who express some of michael same concerns concluding like many of kubrick's films specifically the shining and eyes wide shut. I find clockwork far too cynical for its own good. So i'm going to ask you to tag yourself josh. When it comes to a clockwork orange are you david. You can respect the movie but it doesn't quite work for you. Are you like josh. And you'll be now forever haunted by. Its unimaginably gleeful violence. Are you michael. Who appreciates it as a work of art but like many great pieces of art. You find it problematic or are you isabel. Who wishes stanley could be a little less sarcastic and sneering i resonate with each of these To certain degree to different degrees. Free to them. I should say and i think if i'm hearing them all correctly i liked this movie better than all of them really like it now better than all of them. I don't know that that would be the case. I think you know. If if i had seen it at josh's age i think i would have had a very similar response. I don't know the context or obviously the kid. He's not a kid anymore but hearing that a fourteen year old is dressing up as alex is the scariest thing. You'd wanna hear to me about a clockwork orange. You know that the people who would denounce this film. That's exactly what they're worried about right. So it's the fight club thing which we recently revisited. And i think both really liked as a satire while recognizing that at least i recognize that others may not see the satire and take from it. Exactly the wrong things. I think a clockwork orange has that potential it's not last on my rankings. Because it's risen in my esteem on this rewatch I agree with isabelle. That kubrick in general is maybe too cynical for his own good Or just to has dark of a view of human nature But i think this is one of his more interesting dark views on human nature and yeah we should touch on the rape scenes. Absolutely i don't know that we need to start there. That michael asks about so. I think i hit everyone there Adam what surprised me watching a clockwork orange. And the reason i feel like midlife i probably finally ready for. It is when i saw it in college either. I hadn't taken enough theology classes yet. Or i don't know what it was. I had forgotten. How theological this film is. It's basic concerns are original. Send the idea that those those are the two things right. The idea for original sin that were born as broken people into a broken world and then free will what ability do we have to turn from that broken nece to choose or reject. God's offer restoration. How are we going to respond to that I think this film is absolutely fascinating. In the ways it explores those ideas every piece of provocation in it is geared towards exploring those questions And at the same time. I find a little. I don't hold this against the film. Because i don't go into a movie saying i needed to share my world view for me to appreciate it but if maybe i don't have the sort of all in love for something like a clockwork orange while recognizing the you know the incredible piece of work it is is because i do as i did with two thousand one. I feel like kubrick's cynicism about the human race is kind of it kind of turns here more than two thousand one turns the movie into a big joke And sometimes you can take that personally as a viewer But we're a clockwork orange to me. Is kind of like yeah. I've been really exploring all these questions. This movie has been asking them providing provocative answers this way way of a million different ways of looking at it but in the end you know. Humans aren't worth it. Humans are worth humans. Don't deserve an answer to these questions because we we are just so inherently broken. So it's it's close to nihilism. It's very cynical but man is it well-crafted and it's the thing for me. The question i have for myself in revisiting the provocations that i remember Are they backed up by thoughtfulness and for me they were on this revisit. I remember talking about this. Same basic dilemma. I think when we did our lewis brunell marathon. Which is sometimes this notion of cynicism. That's lobbed at some of these filmmakers of the idea that they think the human race is beyond saving. That's fair and yet. I always want to counter with the idea that if that was really the case why would they even bother expressing it at all you know. I think the fact that it's a preoccupation for these filmmakers ultimately proves that they ultimately have maybe deeper feelings or at least a little bit more sentimental feelings about humanity than their work may be sometimes suggest but man. I am with you overall on a clockwork orange. Josh i remember of course the overall tone of it and certain scenes and images but as often happens with these sacred cow revisits. It ended up being quite different than i expected in that. I was sure. I was going to see the dystopia in social satire that i remembered a movie exploring to quote joker from full metal jacket as i often do. When discussing kubrick the duality of man the young in thing you've got alex with his barbarity and viciousness and and lust for the ultra violent and his wit and intelligence and charm. Even somehow a little bit of innocence and his appreciation for ludwig van and that then is this representation of society as a whole. It's baseness and sadistic bent under the guise of progress in civility. And while i think. That's all there what i didn't recall at all was how strange 'love' in. It is not just because of all the phallic imagery either. It's in how darkly comic it is perhaps jokey even at times but also how politically satirical it is in its rejection of authority and institutions and it's explicit insinuation that no matter how you are affiliated or what you claim to stand for nobody is above exploitation and enacting a little suffering for you perceived to be the greater good or to ensure that you stay in power and when we do these revisits and sometimes we do the series like nine from ninety nine or seven seventy six. We always highlight. What was the biggest surprise for us. Had we ended up choosing seven from seventy one instead of seven from seventy six and we discussed this movie. Is we surely would have a serious contender for me. Would have to be the way alex to large becomes. Dare i say it a sympathetic figure. All smarter and i say josh almost only because it's so hard to reconcile the brutality of his actions and the pain he causes with the notion that i could in any way on any level. Feel sorry for him but isn't that kubrick's trick here isn't that his true provocation here. And i'll borrow to go back to what you were saying about the movies theology to borrow from kubrick's own imagery and alex's own deranged imagination in the story of christ's crucifixion. Alex goes from being the roman soldier. Delighting in the flagellation of jesus to being jesus a man whose whose message if you will. Whose will is there to be manipulated and used by those who profit from it. It really surprised me on that level. That's the question you know you'll notice. There's a text detail another detail when he's in jail i when he's first arrested. I think that's the first time we get a camera. Shot from his point of view Where otherwise so far. It's always been kind of like a removed distance even from the the acting a little bit removed from it. This if i remember correctly as the first time we're aligned with him we see the police who have arrested him and even the family lawyer who comes in but isn't there to help obviously kind of towering over him and that's the first time you think of him as a victim so i do think that's there I do think it fades a little bit. As as the movie goes on and it shifts into its other sections where he becomes obviously. He's still a victim when he becomes the experimented on with the ludovico technique. That the movie famous for right But i think it also kind of starts to to see him as the movie actually sees him as just like an experimental figure to. He does kind of become this figure to hang these questions on that i was referring to sure but but we are asking you know at this point. We're asking about him. is he an outlier psychopath. Like are we just getting at the beginning of the movie. You you wonder like. Are we going to spend a couple of hours in a deranged mind or as you suggested is he. A symptom of this decadent society that seems to surround him. is the guy possessed. I mean the first when that lawyer the family lawyer. Mr deltoid right that's that's the name asks him like his parole officer. Is that what it is okay. I wasn't quite sure. What okay that makes more sense. He asked him at one point. Is it some devil that crawls inside of you and so yeah you were wondering what is what is the situation here and how much back to the free will. And once the experiments begin how much of his this is his option to transform to change if even wants to he has that vision of the crucifixion that you reference because he ends up working alongside the chaplain in prison. A play by going quickly and this is a guy. Who's a little sketchy himself. He's not only a fire and brimstone preacher but we get a sense that he's Might have some other errand interests of his own. Let's say but he also says this. Alex at one point goodness comes from within goodness's chosen so we get that possibility thrown into and right in the midst of this. Alex is having that vision. I love how he says you know. He prefers basically the sex and violence of the old testament to the to the preaching at some of the new testament and at that point. Alex is still like you know. He's still the alex we knew before. He's just restrained. He's restricted by prison then. We have the ludovico technique. And that is kind of where it's forced upon him his obedience right and so then we have the question. Can you transformer. I if it's forced upon us that real transformation and i think that's just fascinating to watch throughout the film. How alex gets bounced around by these things but to go back to your the way you described him at the start and how can we ever find sympathy with this character. Even if we don't go all the way from sympathy. I think thanks to mcdowell's performance. We are constantly mesmerized. And this has gotta be you know one of the absolute best performances in kubrick's filmography. I don't think he's thought we talked about nicole kidman and to another degree. Tom cruise in eyes wide shut. But i don't he's thought of as an actor's actor at first thing but man is this performance by mcdowell so crucial because he is in sync the first time you see him do that stare in that opening shop close up pulls back to show the whole milk bar But we see mcdowell stare you know that he is in sync with everything in this film the camera techniques but also the character the ideas and this is frightening given the material to see an actor so instinct with this sort of troubling material. But you can't take your eyes off him to no matter what he's doing. It's the performative nature that he has that he gives even to his horrible actions. Obviously everyone knows about the singing in the rain routine during the early home invasion and rape but even less demonstrative sequences like that or showcase. If you wanna use that term sequences how about when. He's back in his bedroom and he wants to just fall back on his bed. He does this like baletic. Toss of himself. So everything mcdowell does every move he makes is is just. You can't again take your off him. Even though you know you should there's malevolence there's a mischievousness. And i really think that is what makes us movie work as well as it does. It's almost it's almost crucial to a transgressive film as deniro in taxi driver which we talked about recently. You know that it's anchoring what the filmmaker wants to do in the performance. I am so with you. Here on mcdowell and i'll get back a little bit to that notion of free will to because i think that's the larger theological question if we want to assign it that term. But i think that then connects do the larger sociopolitical question at the heart of this movie. Which goes back to that preacher character. That minister character as easy as he is to mock. He's also the only one we see who does seem to care for alex. I think we can say that. Who protests his punishment. His his treatment. This idea that then comes through. Is ken reformation. Can redemption actually happen without choice. And i think the movie says that that without choice alex is in a man at all he becomes totally dehumanize his will is basically programmed and he's just driven by self-preservation not unlike another very infamous stanley kubrick character. And the big difference between hal. Of course and alex is that performance not the not the disembodied voice but this majestic presence that really is malcolm mcdowell there is i think you said a grandiosity to him and his his behavior but there's that gentility the comes through somehow there's that sophistication said innocence and i think it's because when you watch him early on as terrible as those actions are the childlike joy. He takes in the the wonder almost at the idea that he gets to perform these acts and he can revel in this violence like a kid who's just found a new toy that's there and then by the end of the movie i think. His victimhood only evolves by the end of the film and that childlike reveling in the violence. Become something different. It transitions into him just becoming kind of like an actual child. I think about the scene the very end. Where he's he's waiting for his his dad basically right to feed him the bites of the the food and acting just like a kid who's ready to take another one so i'm with you completely josh that i don't see how this works especially because i also feel it is accurate to say that the movie at some point does become about that provocation and wanting him to be a character who represents something kubrick wants to hang these questions on him more than. I think we ever really feel like alex made this goes back to the free will idea. More than alex ever seems to be exerting his own agency. We don't really know how he truly feels about a lot of this stuff. He's there as i said to kind of put some of these questions on him and that's why the performance is so crucial to have a who won't yourself and a very lonely place tusa when i wake up in the middle of the night when pain his anyway. Good to see you on the mend. I kept in constant touch with the hospital. Of course now. I've come down to see you see how you're getting. I've suffered the talk of the dancer taught of the damned. Yes i i think we might read the ending a little differently as i hear you talk as much as we agree on some of these some of these points when i see him he sitting in bed in the hospital recovering from after throwing himself out the window And the minister who assigned him to be experimented on. Is there apologizing trying to get him on his side right. The the the gesture you mentioned is so perfect. He needs to be had. And the way mcdowell pops open his mouth is to me. It's not helplessness. it's not victimhood. I think i think this is where his victimhood and sexually is in this scene to me. It's another provocation. It's it's an insult. Almost to the minister i am going to. It's a power play. I going to you differently. I'm gonna make you feed me in order for my cooperation to not say what the government did to me. That's what that whole scene is about. The minister wants to get him on his side. And that is kind of alex making that it's almost like insulting. He's making such a display of popping mouth open and talking so nicely to him and this kind of ties back to the word innocence. You used which i think is really interesting adam because i agree there is something there are moments where you wonder. And it's tied to what you mentioned beethoven's symphony number nine the fact that he has this love for beethoven. You wonder if maybe that's his saving grace. Okay now. he's obviously soiled it. This this is what is fueling his his master batori session where he's imagining people dying in his bedroom listening to the music and he even imagined himself there with fangs vampire so obviously he soiled beethoven's music but you still wonder if there's a route there that somewhere underneath does his love for the music is does it show appreciation for the beautiful and goods somewhere under there. And here's where. I think kubrick kind of gives the final really dark joke of the film. It's in the fact that the scientists use beethoven's ninth during the ludovico technique So what happens then it becomes associated because he's getting pumped with all these drug nausea inducing drugs whenever hears it now it is going to cause him to be nauseous. So they've in a way ruined his last glimmer of goodness. If you look at it this way what does he say. What does alex say when it's happening to him and his eyes peeled back by the clamps he scams out repeatedly it's a sin. It's that in. That's the point where what they're doing to him crosses the lie. Come a sin. And the way i'm looking at it is it because even he recognizes that. There's something actually good about his apprecia- appreciation for beethoven. All right so now. Let's go back to that final four or really's just that what's good is beethoven. It's goodness there's goodness in the world yes human produced. Let's let's even go even further human produced goodness in the world. Okay so yeah we go to the ending. He's back in the bed being fed. And what else does the minister due to get him on. His site brings in the speakers. Says i understand you like this music and plays the ninth and this is our final clue also that that fall falling out. The window has knocked the ludovico technique out of them. He is now back to how he was before he got arrested. We know this because he here's the music and has no response to it. he's not. He doesn't get nauseous. He enjoys it and it's ringing in his ears triumphantly but again transgressive and so we've kind of come full circle which i see as kubrick's final joke is like yeah. We've explored all these possible avenues but by the end of the day. We've still got a possessed psychopath. No there's there's no doubt about that. But i think here's my counter one is even though i agree with you. I liked the layer. I like the fact that i think. He can be both helpless and provocative in that moment and can be gleeful in the way he is enjoying the food. In kind of prodding. The man defeat him there. Is i think still the fact that he didn't really have any choice in what he's doing there and it is at the end of it. A photo opportunity. He is being exploited in that moment and didn't have any say in it. But here's the other thing that maybe speaks to why we see the ending a little bit differently. There's one detail that i may be entirely wrong about josh. But i saw his transformation as not just being tied to the fall in other words accident. But being tied to some re-programming they did on him to to reform him now to the way they want to reform him because now it serves them to have the old alex. Because there's that really great scene with the roszak tests with the sentences you know and the the diagrams the people in those different scenarios. Yeah and he points out that he had that really bad recurring nightmare about something happening in his head. And i interpreted that as oh. They've been they've been doing something on him. I've been having this. Very nasty dream nasty. It's like well when i was all smashed up. You know half awake unconscious light. I kept telling this dream and like all these doctors were playing around with me. Gulliver inside of me brain. I seem to have this dream over and over again. Just think it means anything. They've been working on him a little bit in his brain and she is now just testing to confirm that it worked that he is back to the old guy so that is who he wants to be so in a way. It's a victory. There's no doubt about it. That's that's the triumph for alex at the end of the film but it's tinged with the fact that he really didn't have any say in it see i found that that roszak it's not exactly a robotic but a little exercise is to me. I found it a battle between the old alex and the ludovico alex. Where there was still he was. He was essentially because he kept going back and forth. He'd give one you know. Fairly benign answer and then he'd give one gig lee violent answer. No the each of these slides needs a reply from one of the people in the picture. You tell me what you think. The person would say right roddy. Right isn't the plumage beautiful. i say. What the other person would say yes. Plumage beautiful didn't think about it. Do love just say the first thing that pops into your mind coverages neko's it's not gonna a week the boy. You always quarrelled with his seriously ill. My mind is a blank. And i'll smash your face for you yabloko's and so you kinda see like he shake to me. He was shaking the cobwebs of ludovico off. And then by the time we see him the next time with the minister. He's pretty much back to where he was at the beginning. And this is probably this. Goes back to where i think we split on kubrick and what sort of a filmmaker he is in general and your point about you know why would someone make films at all if they were that pessimistic about humanity. I just say well because there a filmmaker so it's it isn't a prerequisite to like have any sort of affinity for people to become a filmmaker. You're filming a little bit to hate your better care enough date filmmaker and i don't know if i would say i would ever say kubrick hates but it's you know this is why i still say that star baby in two thousand one is coming to gobble up earth. It's you know it's not like this new form of humanity. And i think that's what we're seeing here we're seeing another kubrick ending where it's explored possibilities of humanity but the end of the at the end of the day and maybe he just likes it as as a punchline to his film you know. There's so much dark humor on this. I want to get to the humor that you talked about to you that he just liked it as punchline is like we're going to give one last light kind of darkly comic punch in the gut as we go out here so yeah. Let's get to that humor. Because it wasn't it was one of the things that did kind of hold me back a little bit and here comes another difference. I think we have about kubrick Particularly in dr strangelove. We haven't done a sacred cow that we should some time But i know we've talked about it a little bit. I think this is another case of kubrick being the smartest kid in the room but not necessarily the funniest and i don't mean that the humor here isn't funny. I laughed at a lot of this but it was almost like as i was done laughing. He doubled down on the joke. And let me give you a couple examples. Here there is early on the painting in alex's bedroom like apparently this is the painting you know how in the seventies it was all the big. Is kids paintings that apparently everyone had will in this futuristic england. Everyone has a painting of a naked woman with her legs. Spread open facing the viewer. Almost every room. We go in a variation on this painting. So alex has one two and you notice the first time you're in his room that he also has a sculpture that sticking out of the wall kind of adjacent to the painting so not on the same wall but the adjacent wall and the way the cameras positioned. This is not what we're meant like. This isn't the focus of the scene. Alex's doing something else we're supposed to be focusing on but if you look in the corner you'll notice that that sculpture is poking it looks like it's poking directly into the between the women's legs right uh-huh so again chuckled. Like man the production designed here is so meticulous. Look at what kubrick is doing. Sure enough what does he do. Thirty seconds later we get a close up. Not only now. Is the whole screen filled with the painting and the sculpture. But alex has the pet snake. The snake is on the sculpture crawling between her life. So it's like okay kubrick. We didn't need that too and then quickly. There's a couple more. How about in the other home invasion where there's the giant penis new new you going to say. It is so funny the first time we see it because alex comes into the doorway and it's jet to the right of the screen right this giant ceramic penis and it's again composition production design brilliant. But the cnn's with he has to pick it up after pressing it up and down a few times very funny. Then he has to pick it up and chase her around with at. And it's it's even in little moments like when the parole officer Sits down and the bed. In alex's parents around takes a sip of water. Yeah the has before him. Yeah we see before we see him. Sip-it that's the joke you don't we don't need the spit. Take thirty seconds later. You so repeatedly asked all the scenes that i point to as wonderfully comic. They're all comic. But you see my point. Like i don't know if kubrick doesn't trust us because he smarter and his like i i need to make sure they get this or if he just thinks thinks it's funnier to double down. I mean you know. I love gags that go on forever in a lot of other situations. I'm still laughing about peewee. herman You know in the balloon gag. That goes on and on forever. But for some reason. Kubrick's films i feel like the humor can be just kind of sat on until it starts to squish the funniness out. See we agree that it's comic but what you call overkill or going too far with it. I call a certain wonderful inevitability. I don't see how that scene ends. I agree with you. That i love the fact that you've got alex this brooding character this malone character who we know is going to do something really terrible and yet the way. The cameras framed with him in it with that woman yelling at him about what. He's doing there that that penis just keeps kind of rocking into the shot. It's in throwing everything off. It's great well for me. The only way that can go then is he's going to have to pick the thing up an attacker with it you know. And so the joke. The joke keeps escalating a good way for me. Josh versus maybe devolving there. I also think as i tie back to this overall kind of strange lovey and political satire. it it hit me that there. Is this overarching sense of comedy. To even in how the plot plays out it becomes almost like scrooge and the ghost of christmas. Past i mean. It's so ludicrous. That the day he's released from jail you know he runs into the old man. He runs in to dim. And i think billy boy right to men that he that he attacked in that hate him and then where does he go home to goes home to that that site of the attack. It just keeps getting worse and worse for him in a way again. That is not remotely realistic and of course. I know you're not suggesting the movie needed to be realistic. But it's it's beyond a lack of realism. It's it's total absurdity in this time i guess. I embraced josh well. The scene now the scene that plays out long that i did actually like for its comic. Potential is when he does go home and meets the lodger whose parents have brought into the to live in his room. That's like a slow boil humor where it takes like maybe a minute before they even acknowledge that this other guy is sitting on the couch. I think he finally has to ask himself. Like what's with this guy dad. This is strange fellow sitting on the sofa. Monchy when she takes of toast. That's joe he. He lives here now. The lodger tease it. Rents your robe. So i think that's a very funny scene that worked for me. Well we'll just touch on. Or at least i would like to touch on a few of the kubrick moments. That stood out to me in terms of shot references. I know some of these occurred after this movie was made but just in terms of those goto images for kubrick. Not only did we get that stare and that opening which is just so disarming and you're instantly just magnetized by where in the world are we. Yeah there's also the moment and here's jokey kubrick coming through. How can you say he doesn't have a sense of humor in the. That's what i'm saying. That's not what you don't mis-characterize. Just go with it but people will repeat that like i said it so. Watch yourself in the record store and one of our listeners reference this earlier in the record store we get kind of two thousand and one moment it reminded me of two thousand one and other movies to that followed but that tracking shot through the store that nice motion that made me think of. I think it's frank pool when he's running shadowboxing on the ship and the way that it's moving in that circular rotation but vertically and then he goes up to the counter and what we see in the little compartment right in front of the cash register. Two thousand one. There's there's a record actually two thousand one so there's kubrick referencing himself but that whole crew of a milk bar of course makes you think of what you're going to see later in eyes wide. Shut sure that imagery the slow motion violence by the river when he attacks his own droops and at one moment he bends down and throws his whole arm into one of the men's attacking and that's straight out of two thousand one right and even an another example. Another example of alex making everything performance and kube kubrick in the filmmaking. Aiding him in that. Yeah yeah. there's also the seizure like face that the man at the end the man whose wife he killed and who he left to be confined to the wheelchair when he shakes. It's of course. Reminiscent of what we see later. In the shining when the sun is experiencing the shining that feeling of it so there are definitely those kubrick in stamps. Not just on some of the overall kind of messaging and the tone but within the camera orcas well. Let's return to michael question. Because i do think it's something that should be addressed even though it'd be a lot more comfortable to go by. But he asked you know what we thought of the numerous rape scenes. That are in this film. I mean ones that were seen in the action prospers. The film that alex is forced to watch we see one that's a recreated and it is. Yeah it's very rough stuff. It's one of the reasons i was. You know one of the things i would. I look forward to revisiting this four. And i think what you could you would probably say the way people will discuss shooting something like this and i've learned from others writing. It is that you know i. I don't know if it's necessarily attentive to the victims experience in a way that it should be. I wouldn't say that any of them are exploitative. I think they're actually you know fairly clinical in terms of their depiction and vantage point Maybe the first instances of the woman being attacked in the theater by another gang that lx his drugs come upon That one you know there. There's a lot of unnecessary unnecessary nudity. I would say for for what is actually happening. Almost makes it more of an act of sexuality than violence which i think is where some of the issues become but it's not necessarily from the attackers point of view. I think we get a little bit more of that in the singing in the rain sequence which is why that is one that is notorious and so many people find troubling is because it is bringing the level of entertainment to what's happening and it's making us more aligned with what alex's doing then with what the woman is suffering so so i do think you know today. You would demand a filmmaker too if they're going to film something like that. Give as much attention in time to what it meant for the victim as well But i do. I would never say that these were exploitative sequences that kubrick filmed. I think that's all fair. And i think i would just add that. I was actually surprised as difficult as those scenes. Were to watch and they surely were. I remembered them differently. In my head. Josh in the sense that i thought that they really were much more graphic and gratuitous and and troubling than a than they were. It's actually surprising as explicit as they are. how much kubrick leaves to the imagination. When he does choose to cut away and he does it in moments when he forces us to reckon with what we know is happening but he doesn't rub our nose and what's happening. And as i said that that was different than my than my recollection of the film. It brings up an interesting question about the ludovico technique itself. Because you're right often. What we imagine is is worse than what we see so you know if this were to be done to someone it were the impression we get is they are seen horrible things which is what's going to transform them right but it's often the gap between the horrible things that would affect us the most. That's neither here there with you. Know the film itself but it did as you're talking. It did make me think of that actual technique and how that might play out in real life. Let's let's hope we never find out. A clockwork orange is currently available on. Hbo max and through the end of the month. Anyway it's on netflix. You may also be able to video it at your local bibliophile or get it through inter library. Loan judge sorry. I don't care if there was a limit. I had a do it if you have seen a clockwork orange recently. Or when you were fourteen or fifteen and that's good enough for you. Tell us what you thought of it. Feedback and film spotting dot net safe to say the world of stanley kubrick is a bit harsher than the world of our long marathon. Kicks off next with a review of nineteen eighty-eight as tears go by that's next plus a new film spotting poll asking for the best movie set in the middle ages. The stay with us smiling can gone so i have a new fourteen year old at home going off to high school. And you know what that means. Yeah it's probably time to get him a cell phone and what that means is it's time to pick out a wireless provider which is not fun. Because there's always a catch. 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Who also directed the twenty eighteen fred. Rogers documentary won't you be my neighbor. He won an oscar in two thousand fourteen for the backup singer. Doc twenty feet from stardom now. The road runner trailer. Adam just saw this. I was over at the music. Box catching their lord of the rings series and it was one of the two trailers they showed beforehand and definitely suggest. This isn't going to be just about the life and work of ordain celebrity chef tv host but really ask questions about this complicated guy who did take his own life in two thousand eighteen when he was sixty one. Now you're a fan of neville stuff. Adam i know you've seen both of those films and a fan of so that what you get here. Did they give you a new perspective on. Bourdain your understanding of him. This documentary yeah. I think that's accurate. It definitely wants to ask those tough questions and it wants to paint a full portrait of this really complicated men now. Here's the problem josh. With my note taking. And i did share with you and sanmar producer. A photo of my yellow notepad notes that i scribbled down watching this movie completely unintelligible. I'm sure i had something really profound to say about this movie. I didn't know right in hieroglyphics. I was really an elegant. Maybe it will. It will come back as i watched the movie later in the year. I'm forgetting the specific context of this moment in the movie but some locals during one of his television shoots. Ask him if he's ready and if he's willing to really commit to this journey and kind of wrestle with some of the past transgressions i think by united states it might be when he's in vietnam and he says the least i can do is see the world with open eyes which very likely was a key line for neville to include in the movie. Not just because it's such a sinked sober insightful. Expression of the way bourdain approached that project and perhaps all of his work but also as an expression of what neville was hoping to accomplish with this project to see bourdain with open eyes and that that translates in a few different ways including in the overall kind of visual style and structure. There is a real pace to this film. The the cutting is quite fast. And there is a bit of a amana kness to it almost amid and exhilaration that you feel watching the movie. Almost like you're following boarding. On one of these escapades title. Roadrunner really becomes very appropriate in the sense that you're dashing around in time and going to these various spots and you're definitely not preceding in any linear chain of events fashion. There's no dates onscreen. That i recall. No real milestones largely skips over his childhood completely and begins where our collective experience with him began. Which is the publishing of kitchen confidential. And we only get sort of glances at who he was getting to that point and from there it follows this incredibly charismatic. Brilliant troubled man who was full of contradictions. He's a man who always wants to be off the road which he was on two hundred fifty nights a year. He wants to be home with his wife and his daughter and then of course as soon as he gets there he can't wait to leave. It's this feeling that that something is happening out there that he has to be part of and that that chaos is something that he embraces and really can't live without he's tv personality who's also incredibly shy and reserved and he's known as this kind of culinary luminary a culinary giant despite not really being he would be the first to admit an incredible chef themselves so all those contradictions and many more are explored in the movie and novel grounds movie right from the very beginning in his ultimate deaths from suicide. He acknowledges that there isn't going to be a happy ending. And i think he does it through ordains own words as the movie is largely constructed upon if you were going to download the audio file of this movie and build a word cloud from it appropriately. I think the most used word in the movie the one that would be the biggest on the screen is and that's not just because of bourdain himself so again it feels like it's in keeping with this man himself. In the way he kind of approached the world and i mentioned the sense of mortality and that tragic ending looming all over the movie as sad as the end of the film is the final moments of the movie are myth shattering in a way deliberately and also triumphant. So there's just a lot of layers to the film just like there were a lot of layers to the man himself now before we get to that ending. What gets us there. This final act covers his relationship with the actress. Aguilar gento and neville connect the dots in a way from the disillusion of that relationship to his suicide. And there's something in the moment. I'll acknowledged that feels a little bit. As if he's putting the blame on our gento and might have been her choice but she doesn't have a voice in the movie except for the one that we see in different pieces of footage so it feels a little unfair but also offer this that. It's not just a matter. Be of neville the filmmaker connecting those dots like an investigator to his done all the research and he's come to a conclusion. Now i'm gonna lay out what i think really happened. It's all being expressed through the voices in the perspectives of the people that were dane is interviewing the people who actually knew bourdain the best and who knew the details and the problems with this relationship. Of course it's documentary. And he's the director neville still choosing who he talks to and who gets what screen time and what. Parts of their interviews. He's going to use so it's tricky as it always is with documentary but i'll also add that the whole movie seems to be a testament to the idea that there was a certain darkness always present in bourdain and that his mental health issues. Nor anyone else's can be reduced to a single relationship or a single action. So it's definitely something that i think will continue to be a dialogue around this film and justifiably so i've started to see it seep out a little bit on twitter as more people are seeing the movie. I will just close by saying josh. That i do consider myself a fan of boredom but i was thinking about it earlier today and it occurred to me that i only became a fan. Unfortunately in-depth it was. It was only when he died. And i started to see all the tributes to him. Of course i knew who he was i had seen parts of episodes. I didn't really have any relationship with them. I neither had any negative feelings toward him. Nor did i necessarily feel like he was someone whose work i needed to consistently follow. And when i saw those tributes and i saw how strongly people felt about him in the relationship they had to him and his work. I kinda had to see what it was all about. And i'll always appreciate the fact that you can not only read kitchen confidential but you can listen to the audio book is i did. You can hear boardings voice. You can hear his voice. Says you can hear the way he embellishes a story and recalls his own passed in his own experiences and i immediately started to feel that connection and i talked about this a little bit when we were looking ahead to summer movies and our questions about the movie year. I'll just always appreciate the fact that. When i started to enjoy his work and i started to watch and read more of it. It opened up an attitude in me a feeling in me a spirit to be more adventurous to be more willing to try things especially when it came to food and quick funny story that i may have shared with you before off air but my wife and i years ago went to san francisco and so i'm like well i gotta see what boron recommended in san francisco when he talked about it on the show. What did he talk about. What restaurants should i hit and a link to it in our show notes if people out there a curious and have seen it he goes to the place he goes to every time he's in san francisco it's a place called swan oyster depot and. He always gets the crab back now for the longest time josh. I wasn't even into seafood. Much less willing to try the crab back which he even describes as all the stuff people throw out once they take off the legs and stuff. It's in his own words the brains and fat and magic lovely and it really is kind of like this stu in the crab back as a bowl and you did bread into it in the swan depot. You have to wait in line for and it's just a counter. I don't know how many spots but probably around twenty certainly no more than thirty in the place and i waited and we got in before it closed. Some people behind us got shut out. You felt kind of grateful that you had the opportunity. And then i get in and i say well i need. I need the crab back. And i need an anchor steam. Of course just like anthony. Bourdain would order when he was there. And they're like we're all out of crack and your heart sinks and then they explain well actually. We're not out of the crab back. We just don't have any right now. You'd have to buy the full crab to get. The crab back is just a little bit more money. And i'm like well i'm willing to spend it. I stood in line. I want to try it if i walk out of here without having the crab back like bourdain recommends then this is a failure and we're sitting there eating and you're right next to other people and there's this woman sitting next to me with her boyfriend or husband and she heard this whole conversation and then i get the crab back and i'm trying it. And she kind of leans to me she says. Can i try that. And we didn't acknowledge and we didn't say it. But i knew that of course she was another one just like me who came in there probably only because bourdain recommended it and said you had to have the crab back she probably was told sorry not available and then she saw that i got it and she said oh. I'm going to ask him. can i have some. And of course. I shared it with her and then she shared some of her oysters with me. And we just had this kind of lovely little moment together again. Not explicitly stated but a nice kind of communal experience all because of anthony bourdain and his love for that place. And the idea that i would even be. They're all trying. That food is really just a testament to how charismatic and talented and i think ultimately generous boarding was so is roadrunner. If you're like me similar to where you are you know aware of day and seen some of his shows but not really totally familiar with his work. Would you say roadrunners. Good place to start. Would you recommend going the path you did kind of like getting to know some of that work and then seen how the documentary presents them. I think you could definitely go the route of just watching roadrunner because i think it encompasses his life in a way that as i said feels right i know there are many ways someone could approach a movie about anthony bourdain and i don't want to suggest that this is the only way to do it but it felt like neville tapped in to something. That was really kind of primal and felt like you were experiencing an extension of his own kind of psychology and own approach to his work. That said if you have the time. I would get the foundation of something like kitchen confidential. Which gives you some of that background that pathway to the first restaurants he started working in and to his work as the executive chef of lay all basically all the things. The movie leaves out. So that then you can kind of have that experience of living in the moment with boarding on onscreen in a way. That's completely different. Obviously than reading about his past so. I think that they would go perfectly together. Josh if you can do it all right roadrunner about anthony. Bourdain is currently playing in limited. Release as i said here in chicago. I know it's at the music box next week here on film spotting we are going to get to the second movie in our world of one car y marathon it's nineteen ninety days of being wild. We do also have a top five a week. Or so ago. I went to the film spotting spreadsheet i penciled in top five dot dot dot and we all kind of took a shot at it. We've got 'em night shamlan old coming out. I'm not sure. I really care too much to see josh or devote a whole segment to it so i thought maybe we could do for sure. It's pretty sure. I sat next to you when the trailer for it play. I'm sure i forget exactly what you said but yeah we're clear that's true so instead i was thinking. Well what if we did like our top five movies about aging or top five movies about kids in some way you also throughout. I think maybe it was me shamlan scenes or wants and you were into that. And then sam. Our producer threw out some ideas that i promptly ignored you. You pitched beeps. Tell us about beach scenes. What was the inspiration i mean. Sometimes it's just they're right in your face so he takes place on one. That was the case here right of according to that trailer some stuff goes down on a beach. So let's go with that and the more i've been thinking about it posted on social media twitter and facebook today looking for suggestions. There are a ton of options. People are point war even to now think about how to limit them. It's become very daunting Pretty much every genre film has a memorable beach scene. I think it'll be fun though. Trying to come up with our criteria already. Some debate has arisen about. does a beach have sand. It seems like no you could have a rocky beach pebble beach right that count. So we're not strictly doing sandy beaches here unless you want to take that route to narrow your list down atom. I don't know we'll see. Yeah every top. Five is fraught with these types of perils. Isn't it to make these distinctions. Define your criteria. And that's what makes top five seconds so next week we will have our very fun. Top-five beach scenes and one car wise days of being wild which who knows might just have a memorable each scene of its own. I wouldn't doubt it. I call it coincidence. Spotting happens all the time here randomly on the show of a beach scene you want to suggest sent a note to feedback at films spotting dot net. You can also find us on twitter. I'm at film spotting. Josh larsen on film you can also leave us a voicemail. Three one two two six. Four zero seven four four also next week show. We'll get back to massacre theater. The part of the show where we perform a scene from a movie. And you get a chance at winning a film spotting shirt in case you missed it. Here's a bit of our last massacre and there's something out there something underneath that sand yes. Well i'm hoping to find a certain artifact a book actually what do you think is out there in a word evil all right if that sounded familiar you know what film we massacred. Go ahead an email. The movie's title along with your name and location to feedback film. Spotting dot net deadline is monday. July nineteenth and the winner will be selected. Ramle from all the correct entries at announced on next week show. We've had some listeners. Daring to question your performance josh and whether or not this actor really was low voiced and growly as you. I'm not happy with my performance. I thought i would get closer. But i was surprised. How low he is in this movie to be honest. I don't think that was the problem. I think as you astutely pointed out i just had a little too much stallone you did. And that's good. That's just the power of stallone. It's week two of the canned film festival. We are not recording from wes. Anderson's french dispatch premiered. If you google. French dispatch wes. Anderson doubled down. You get approximately seven million results. So you're overjoyed. You can't wait. I read here google. Lean anything no less anderson french dispatch. I don't wanna know so. Watch your step. Here's tread carefully booze. Apparently but also a nine minute standing ovation but also we know. Standing ovations at can really are meaningless. Yeah i mean the the booze to standing ovations. I i really don't take anything from any of that okay. Other films getting raves. Out of the festival at least according to what sam is put in front of me. Coconut is after yang he. The director of columbus the golden brick winning columbus todd haynes village underground dock me a handsome loves bergman island pallbearer hogan's erotic lesbian nun drama benedetta. Now i've seen some contrarian takes on benedetta as well on social media if othman's animated whereas and frank he's the director of two thousand eight's waltz with bashir and julia do cornell your beloved raw Her follow up to raw titan. David from indie wire said do cornell has made good on the promise of her debut and then some which you are just laughing up oh like her previous main character devours a raw steak. Yeah i think it was like a rabbit kidney or something like that. If i'm remembering correctly not dwell on it but yeah i. This is what i love to hear still to come as we are sitting here recording sean baker's new red rocket and memoria from fbi poupon roster coon. Of course the festival jury is headed by spike. Lee the awards will be announced after the festival closes this weekend this week. Over on our sister podcasts. The next picture show their new pairing is quest. Loves great summer of soul along with nineteen seventies with stock. Both festivals took place in the summer of sixty nine. They had our friend occasional contributor to film spotting steven hyden the great music critic and author on the show. I just another reason to listen. Nps i thought he only did guest spots on our show. No he does other. Okay well you know in fairness i only met stephen through the nps host. Like tasha robinson. Keith phipps got to by genevieve kofsky. So i suppose it makes sense that he appeared with his friends on that podcast. New episodes of the next picture show post every tuesday. Wherever you get your podcasts more info at next picture show dot net speaking of friends. We've got some great friends over on patriot on we call them more than friends there. The film spotting family and for amir five dollars a month as a family member you get a host of benefits including monthly bonus episodes and i am excited to have a little bit of an easier time a purely entertaining watch get maybe turn my brain off. Dare i say turn my brain off. I know his critics were not allowed to say that. But i'm gonna shut it off a little bit. Maybe actually put the notepad away. I know you won't josh. But i'm gonna put the notepad away and i'm just gonna take in from russia with love. The movie voted on by our listeners. By our family members as the bond movie the connery bond installment. They want us to start with as we get ready for. No time to die. I think it's a blind spot for me in the bond uvira so i am looking forward to it. Are you implying that a bond movie is knocking to function as a meditation on original. Sin and free will. I mean yes. I think you're maybe selling him short there. Well you know what. Let's see if we can still find a way to get to forty minutes about russia with love josh. Okay that will be that will be quite the feet you also get. Access to our monthly trivia spotting events. We were celebrating our twelfth edition of trivia swatting. We call it. Todd's twelve in honor of thomas. Todd are quizmaster. Who does such an amazing job. We have guest captain special guest captains. Who are there to lead. Every team groups of six to eight family members in this spirited competition returning captains mariah gates michael phillips nick allen for roger uber dot com steve green from india wire and then not only do we have katie rich from vanity. Fair join us. But josh. How big lou in josh waldman from minding the gap and their new movie all these suns which played at tribeca hopefully will be coming out soon so we can see it and our listeners can see it. They joined us and had a blast and they were great guests and not only that joshua oltmans team won at all yet. We've had this a couple of times. Where a first time captain roles in it's true takes on the big price. Yeah mariah gates won her first time and then won two more times. Kristen lopez from india wire won her first time. I know there are others. Their team name was called two seconds late to pierce brosnan which is a name reference. You would only get if you've participated in the previous trivia spotting the month before we congratulate our winners andy mitchell mitchell beaupre brett merriman britain zinger and we also had paulo yama dave ferriss and devon. Josh larsen is my muse walmart. He has so much fun with you. Josh and his backgrounds. Yeah on zoom. I just do want to say for the record. not every team is just dudes. It's really not we had. it's true. Wonderful rotating group of women who join us every month for trivia spotting. That team was obviously very guy heading. Yeah i don't think i've been on it all dude team yet. So i i think i let down You know he. He likes to photoshop. backgrounds based on something idiotic. I said or an answer i gave. This is not to say that. I did well. The last trivia spotting but i. I don't think i made quite enough of a fool of myself. As time for devon we will see if you would like to be part of the film spotting family and if you'd like to participate in trivia spotting tickets are on sale yet but we're going to have that event we think on friday august twenty so save the date petri on dot com slash film. Spotting warner brothers presents funny they just might save the world space jam. You've never seen anything like it pop quiz josh. What's the plot of space jam. Oh the original. oh my goodness either. One indulge me. Well i think. I think this the new one is. Yeah the most insane plot. I did read a synopsis. I think we might have on the show and we both had instant headache. So i've forgotten that the original something about mon- stars know obviously i know jordan is in it. I don't think alex's drew are in it which from what i understand. They are in space jam too. So really right for coincidence spotting adam. We should've reviewed space jam to on this show along with a clockwork orange. Good point very good point. I'm just gonna pretend you didn't say it. It's time for some poll results. A couple of weeks back looking ahead for some reason to the release of space you not to a new leg. I'm sorry. John come on and the nba finals. We asked what is the best basketball movie. The options we gave you were spike. Lee's he got game steven soderbergh's high flying bird. Steve james hoop dreams. Hoosiers gena prints by towards love and basketball. You could go a space jam through there at the ninety s kids or what about the eighties. Kids like me who adored. Yes adored white. Men can't jump directed by ron shelton. Finally if none of those work for you you could go off the grid. You could go with other and right in your pick. Josh saturday come out well. Film spotting nation not living up to reputation by the fact that high flying bird the soderbergh picture last place to percents But then next came other five percent of the vote space jam only six percent of the vote love and basketball received eight percent. He got game nine percent and then real tight up here a little bit of a jump between hoosiers and white men can't jump. Only one vote separated. Those two but white men can't jump did get second place. It had seventeen percent of the vote compared to hoosiers sixteen percent film. Spotting nation does redeem themselves though with the winning vote. Adam steve james hoop dreams took this poll. Thirty seven percent of the vote. Now the mention of soderbergh does remind me that i need to point out an egregious mistake. I made out now. I think it was on our last show. When we talked about steven soderbergh's new film was so he's infallible know. That actually wasn't the mistake josh. When i suggested that maybe our producer and original costa to film spotting sam ban hall was not as big of a soderbergh fan is me now while it is true that over the years he may be has started to wane in his appreciation or willingness to believe that he's infallible. Sam claims he started off as an even bigger acolyte than me and went on to further. Suggests that if you go back and listen to our review of bubble. I think from two thousand five which i would just say please. Nobody do that. He was way more enthusiastic than i was. So sam. my apologies duly noted we get to feedback from ian macfarlane. Who says have you guys ever met a nineties kid you know. We don't actually loved space jam right. We're just gonna go with the legend not the story there. Okay or whatever. The man shot liberty valance quote actually is just going to go with what we prefer and just because we're nostalgic for it doesn't mean we can't see the light you don't see us asking adam and joshua kroll ranks in the top ten favorite films. That's because it's number eleven for me. Crawl adams never seen crawl. Come on no. I haven't it was on a lot. I skipped by a lot on my way past. Hbo cinemax but i never watched it. Yeah right past lady hawke and crawl. That's what casting. Sometimes the heart and mind don't agree and that can never be reconciled. Cut to the shot of cold. Indiana sunset over the rustling corn stalks. On what had to be a chilly november night. That's where basketball heart is. I played high school basketball in indiana at a small school. Cliches are true fan buses to the big game a small town all but abandoned on game night and a team that a community lives dies with hoosiers. Gets it all exactly right. Every autumn around the time high school basketball season starts up. I go back in time. I watch hoosiers sometimes alone and sometimes with my family by the time we get to the final game. I can smell the popcorn and the hardwood for me. That final game is the greatest sequence in sports movie predictable. Sure it's a true story. And i've seen that final shot go in fifty times by the time we get to individual reactions of the townspeople people in the crowd. I'm in tears. Every time in my mind i know hoop dreams is the best basketball movie. But it's hardly about basketball so let me follow my heart on this one. Let me lace them up every november. Let me run the picket fence. I never get caught watching the paint dry tree. There shouldn't poetry from zack. An impassioned poetic plea from zack casting. Well done hate. I like hoosiers and is largely because gene hackman is gene hackman and he is watchable and better than watchable in everything including hoosiers. I think he's really good in that film. And i also like to watch dennis hopper and think of him as the dude from rio bravo the drunk. He was being redeem. Whether that's what the filmmakers were going for at all or not so yeah. I dig hoosiers. I'm with zach andy. Boucaud from casey says. My child of the eighty self would have chosen. Hoosiers hands down my college self. White men can't jump my budding sinophile self hoop dreams. And then eventually he got game. This is great. This is really accurate. So far for me to judge but the one that i've thought about more on the past decade and the one. I most definitely want to watch with my teenage daughter. And tween son is love and basketball while it many sports movie tropes her semi autobiographical tales clearly imbued with an authentic and underrepresented vision in the world of sports films. So i hope. I can continue to evolve like andy that film from gina prince. Beith would is one. I have not seen josh. I don't believe you have either but you could correct me on that. I have not so. Yeah we gotta get to it. Indeed we do. Here's albert mela front from pasadena. Last year my comment for the best jazz movie. Poll was yeah. I'll take the one. Starring denzel washington directed by spike lee with a vote for mobile blues. I will use this comment again now for he got game and probably reuse in future best. Bio-pic poll vote for malcolm x. Which i just saw for the first time last week in stunning seventy millimeter spike. Really nails. whatever genre he goes for I gotta look this up. He's got so many good films but he got game might be in my top spike lee movies. It's at least in the top six or seven. I also loved the movie. Our sean means and salt lake city says if limited to the poll options obviously it's hoop dreams though love and basketball rings highly too. But how could you forget the fish. That saved pittsburgh this ridiculous. Nineteen seventy-nine comedy starring. Julius erving dr j. himself as the star center of the failing pittsburgh pythons whose owner jonathan winters is convinced by a psychic stockard channing to hire only players with the centers same astrological sign pisces. The fish well. I i am aware of this movie. I had no idea. That's actually the plot. The resulting team is of course a rag tag bunch of oddballs including harlem globetrotters legend meadow. Lark lemon is faster than reverend who become title contenders a lot of familiar basketball faces and cameos kareem abdul-jabbar jabbar chick hearn and marv albert among them. And one of channing. First big roles post greece. It may not be the best basketball movie but it's probably the silliest which counts for something does it josh. Does it count for something. I mean i have not seen the fish that saved pittsburgh and i have also not seen kyrie irvings uncle drew. But i'm wondering if uncle drew this generations of fish. That's pittsburgh off to do a double feature and report back at them all right. Here's tom morris. I voted for other to nominate blue chips. A great undersea movie with nick. Nolte shack and penny hardaway directed by william freakin. Being an orlando magic fan. This is required watching. Maybe that disclaimer is important here. Because i don't otherwise think anybody has to watch blue chip. Sorry your orlando magic. Well that to josh. Josh miller says i just have one question for everyone who voted for something other than white men can't jump. What is a quince. We'll play josh. I got it me and like seven others got it. But that's good enough. One more from alex cartman. Can we include all ten hours of the last dance. I dunno adam. All the rules are getting broken these days with streaming tv and movies should we have put it in. I'm going to say that this now proves that sam's poll question was one of our patented deeply flawed film. Spotting poll question last dance should have been considered thanks to everyone who voted in the poll and left comments. It is time for a new poll and a couple of weeks. We'll finally get a look at dave lowry's feverishly anticipated the green nights starring dev patel. Got us thinking about other films set in the middle ages. I love the sam had to do so much homework just to do this. Poll question getting into all the definitions really a college class here is defining anyone the middle ages as a period of european history defined as between the fifth century and fifteenth century or from the fall of the western roman empire to the renaissance. Did you get all that josh. Yeah i i'm totally with it. Just give me the options. So like top gun does it. Does it qualify. I'm my understanding. If i if i'm following sam correctly top would not qualify okay. Well it's not here. Among the options. The options are the adventures of robin hood. This is the thirty eight version with airflow. Olivia to havilland directed by michael. Critise mel gibson's best picture. Winning braveheart is an option. John boorman's excalibur monty python. And the holy grail. How about this one. Carl theater dryers the passion of joan of arc from nineteen twenty two bergman's the seventh seal and the category of other. So if you did want to go with lady hawke adam. The richard diner film. How about kenneth. Branagh's henry the fifth We've got beckett lion in winter ridley scott's kingdom of heaven more recent option there on knight's tale. That's the one with heath ledger. I believe yeah. I think that came up recently on the show timothy. Shell may in. David me shows the king another option. I believe you saw that one atom so liked it. Do you have an easy pick. Well of course it's not easy. You've got the passion of joan of arc in the seventh seal to alzheimer's to cinematic masterpieces. Yeah sense in the time period but a little different. If we're using the green knight as a model. I feel like i need. I need more swords. And i need some sorcery. Okay you've personally. Given this a lot of thought and then along those lines the answer would be the seventh seal then at least over the passion of joan of arc josh. Is that where you're going. I like that logic. I might go with boorman's excalibur here. I mean it's just kind of like the epitome of the genre and really well done okay. Well i'm dismayed and shocked the go other for your beloved lady hawke directed by richard donner but there will be other polls. I'm sure we'd love to hear your picks we'd love to hear your comments. You can now vote at film. Spotting dot net. it is a early voting case josh. That's rare the comedy. Edging out the classics. And of course by comedy i'm referring to passion of joan of arc. Yes i assumed this episode is brought to you by hp plus in a world full of smart devices. Shouldn't your printer be smart to it is with hp plus these printers know when they're running low so you always get the inky me delivered right when you needed. Plus you save up to fifty percent on inc so you can print whatever you want as much as you want anytime you want. That is pretty smart. Get six three months of instant inc when you choose. Hp plus conditions apply visit. Hp dot com slash. Smart for details. See high fall over now. Everyone understands why. I've got top gun on the brain this episode that sandilands cover of berlin. Take my breath away as heard in one car wise nineteen eighty-eight directing debut as tears. Go by. It's the first film in our world of long car y marathon as we mentioned earlier on in the show. This marathon is inspired. By the criterion collection's new world of one car white box set which collects seven of the director's films all recently restored by wong himself. The collection is also currently streaming on the criterion channel. The seven movies made between nineteen eighty eight and two thousand four represent most but not all of the directors work not included are his ninety four wushu film ashes of time twenty thirteen's kung fu at the grand master and it's two thousand seven. English language debut my blueberry nights but these seven stories of tragic romance and unfulfilled desire all told in wong's lush poetic style. Mark him as one of the most distinctive and influential directors of his era. The films in this collection also shared number of the same collaborators cinematographer christopher doyle editor production and costume designer william chang suck ping and actors maggie chang. She's in four films antoni long. Who is in five films. We're going to get to six of titles in the collection over the course of the marathon the seventh one two thousand and four twenty forty six. We won't give a full proper review but we are going to fit it in and it'll be in consideration when we do our awards but let's start with wong's debut as tears go by lots of people have described as wong's riff on martin scorsese's mean streets. The title is even taken from one of scorsese's favorite bands. The rolling stones as tears. Go by was a huge box office. Success in hong kong back in eighty eight based on what you know of wong kar why adam. I think you've seen in the mood for love. And you've seen chungking express masters dick's we did that on the show and twenty six. So you're pretty familiar with him. I would say given that any surprises here when you went back and saw his debut well. I don't know if they were necessarily surprises. But being able to see how wong's filmmaking career began starting to see the foundation of some of his familiar tropes and concerns start to be explored. Was exactly the reason why we embarked on this marathon. Even though i said there are four films that i have seen there are some big titles here that we're going to get to that. Both of us need to see. And what's great about. These marathons is seeing them in order and then being able to properly and truly contextualized films that are rightfully revered like chungking express and in the mood for love. It's funny before. I knew anything about this movie. Or how it did fit into his body of work and his influences. I was watching the character fly. It was maybe about halfway through the movie. And you're seeing that energy where he just is always getting into trouble completely unable to be calm or quiet or rational in any situation the bravado the totally unfounded bravado and fearlessness despite being in precarious situation after precarious situation more accurately putting himself in precarious situation after precarious situation. It's always of his own. Doing almost always. I'll say exclusively his own doing and there's that bit kinda masochism in self hatred and delusion to them and the whole time. I'm watching josh. I'm thinking which character does this remind me of. Is this guy in cinema history and it finally hit me. of course it's deniro's johnny boy from mean streets. There's even a big pool hall brouhaha just like there is in mean streets that there's one scene and there's shirley multiple where the camera follows him through an alleyway when he's going in to have a conversation with his big brother his his protector. The main character played by andy lau way and he's down an alley and it's not a steady cam shop at its hand. Held the way it follows behind him. And there's definitely shades there of score says that you're feeling the mean streets influence and inspiration all over this movie. It all fell into place for me then. The crime milieu the complicated relationship between the two men. It's presentation of fragile masculinity in general the way these characters can never back down they can never really be vulnerable the use of popular music not just take my breath away. But there's a needle drop of the end of this movie. That's pure score says rock and roll. But here's the thing as tears go by isn't a scorsese movie. The same way mean streets wasn't just a compilation of all of scorsese's influences. These are distinct unique pieces of work by to really great artists. Even if they're both fledgling in their filmmaking careers there are two paths here for way he can. He can continue the life in the city on the streets. This life of crime or you can go to the the country. He can go straight with the woman he loves live this life of propriety and respectability an option that i think is not only one that seems illusive to him this movie but it's never really one that even seems to be actually something he can choose but none of it is framed theologically the way scorsese frames it in mean streets. It's not about heaven or hell or sinner. Redemption like it is for harvey. Tell in that film as michael then. Of course there are those distinct stylistic touches as well that i think will get into. So what did you make of esters go by. Yeah you've well laid out. You know the the references here to mean streets in particular and they are right there. I had the same experience. I hadn't read anything about the film. So i wasn't aware that it was commonly understood as slightly a riff especially the character of fly. But as soon as you know maybe flies. Second or third. Seen i was like. Oh that's that's deniro. So so that. Nicely frames it in conjunction with mainstream but slebi moved to waitz distinct. Because as you said it's also incredibly idiosyncratic and i think that's maybe the main way is scorsese's more interested in theme possibly Whereas wong is i. Shall we say and foremost interested in the aesthetics. Obviously scorsese connecticut aesthetic filmmaker. That's not to say not but here that seems to be the priority for long and what surprised me about this film knowing at least that it was his debut and knowing i didn't know it was you know a gangster film. I thought okay. So maybe he got a genre simon and as happens with eventual masters of cinema. You're going to see little flashes here. Their of their early voice working within the confines. This is pure wong. That's what surprised me. The this is like no one else would have made. Including martin scorsese a gangster film. Like this you know. He's not as interested in plot. He's not as interested in dialogue. He's interested in pure movement. He's interested in the music that we've already talked about. He's interested in color before he's interested in theme and then as we see across his career. This is going to be the same no matter the time place or story that he's working in so i was astonished at how you know. Even though there are other films of his that. I'd like better. I think are more of an achievement. At how much of a pure one kawhi experience this was and it starts early on. Consider the scene. Where the mega chong character noir. She goes two ways apartment her distant cousin who she's gonna stay with while she's receiving these medical treatments that's how they come together. Get the sense that they may have never met before if they did. He was long ago when they were kids. She's she's laying on the couch in his apartment. I believe the tv is on. We don't see what she's watching but it's just casting this rose glow like a glow that tv wouldn't cast really we. We're not used to it at least in movies. We're used to like the blue light right but this is almost a rose and jumps out at you right away and as they become a romantic couple. You get the sense. It was hinting at that right. It's this blossoming that the color is doing and throughout this movie we can talk about and we probably will the ways that composition framing and color do the work of dialogue and plot. And that's something that. I think wong would only go onto perfect but it was so thrilling to see it in really such. You know incredible form here. I agree with you. i will say that. Maybe the less charitable view of your distinction between wong and scorsese with this movie. And that idea that. He's focused more on aesthetics than theme would be that you could say. Well maybe he just doesn't quite know yet how to marry story and theme with aesthetics as well as score says he does even mean streets and i do think means rates is the better movie but when you say yeah would you say going forward interested in that. I don't think that he more. Closely weds those two things in his later films either. It's so that we can watch as the marathon goes to me from what i've seen. He's always kind of prioritized getting to the theme through these purely cinematic elements. Yeah and i do want to talk about the color red specifically a little bit more here because obviously the films we've seen well known about wong's work he loves that neon aesthetic and the way read shows up here in the neon lighting but also in all sorts of ways including the way you just described. It really dominates one conversation in particular. Stood out to me watching this movie. And it's when those two men the two friends the one who is always getting into trouble in the one who's always having do come to his rescue and put his own life in danger and really who remain stuck in this life because he always has to care for this man. That's the the great dilemma. They're having a conversation. After another one of these outbursts where fly has made a fool of himself and harmed someone even if it wasn't actually physically harm multiple people or at least insulted them at this wedding reception there up on a roof and the red light coming from a nearby building or even from the roof of that building itself it. It's so overwhelming that bathes these men. And it's not. it's not a pure bred. it's kind of this pinkish red hue and actually that dominates every seen those two men are in together. Read is the dominant color. And i think that it's by design. Obviously that we get that dichotomy were. We'll get those splashes of red in scenes like the one you mentioned with his love interest when they have their first night together and then they're walking the next day and she's wearing that white skirt and that bright red sweater redken of course signify passion. It can signify love and romance it also in this movie often. Red is the color of blood. There's plenty of blood in. This film was also at the core of his relationship with fly. And the thing sort of tethers into this life in the city it is just riddled with violence and punishment. Here's where the score says he comes into. There's some of that same use of red very memorably in mean streets. Though skar says the again it takes on this kind of hellish context and that really isn't necessarily the case here. Even as i think the movie wants to suggest that he is sort of stuck in this violent world that he can never really get out of again. It's not so much about sin and not sending as it is just a different way of life. An alternative way of life away to be a better man that never really truly presents itself to him but that color red really underlines everything about the key relationships in this movie. I also like these have read in the moment where the two of them they both been beaten up at this point for again trouble fly has gotten them into their in a dark alley and fly kind of gets up and stumbles away towards the back of the screen to exit the alley and notice. Everything is dark around him but at the end of the alley. Where is this glowing red. It's kind of like. He seems like he thinks he's escaping but he's not he's heading toward it further violence and that's an example. I think there are basically two. Two pictorial frameworks going on here. compositions of doom and compositions of longing and red is so often not exclusively but often used as in that alley to signify doom and then the longing which we associate more at least i do with wong are in moments like The one i mentioned which is a variation read by the tv. But also i think you see it in the compositions to and i love. How long uses staircases. In this movie. There are two shots in particular. Probably more but that stand out to me when your and way. He has followed her back home to the island where she lives on They've had this tentative night together hanging out He's staying at a hotel. I believe her family runs the restaurant below. The hotel is how it seems. At any rate you walk up the stairs to go to get into the hotel and there's kind of this moment of what are they going to do now. What what's what's going to happen in their relationship and they separate they're going to go their separate ways you think. He walks up those staircases and then she just kinda lingers at the bottom and wong lets the moment rest there where we wonder what is going to happen and then sure enough. She slowly trails after him. So it's it's kind of a moment of longing and then implied consummation right but that's the the consummation that's never a sumptuous as the expectation in a film you get the sense. The longing is more exquisite than the actual love and that moment captures it and then it's nicely paired later with a staircase at the harbour. Where he's going to get off the boat. She's a waiting for his arrival. This is either the next day or two days later and again. She's at the bottom of the stairs looking up waiting to see if he's going to come down from them so those are just two other examples color. They're used very well. Also you know. I believe the staircase at the harbor. Has this kind of yellowish glow to it That were just kind of through the actual composition and the use of the production designed. We know everything emotionally. We need to know they don't really have to say anything to each other. I've got one more for you. And here's the impact that a smart critic even just by implying or suggesting something can have on you. I normally don't want to have anything in my mind at all. When i'm watching a movie like this but i couldn't help that i'm looking at twitter earlier in the day and see your tweet josh. That yeah i put these images up wait. You can't wait to talk about the staircases in the movie. That was in my head watching the film. It made me pay a little bit closer attention to it. Then maybe i would have and this episode. We mentioned coincidence spotting a few times. We'll go back to a clockwork orange and we were talking about free will and choice. That's how i really see the stairs in this movie. It comes back to this idea again of the two paths that you can take and the stairs are the literal path right near the bridge between the two worlds the literal worlds of the city coming from the city to come out to the island the more metaphorical idea of leaving that life behind to come embrace a new simpler way of life a more romantic way of life. But then you see it in other ways as well it's not only in the comings and goings of those two characters when he comes to visit nor it's also in the scene you mentioned where she goes up the stairs to be with him. She pauses she linger. She goes slowly. That's her in that moment. Choosing which one of the world's she's going to inhabit she could stay in the world her world which is the opposite of his world. The one he's coming from she's coming from ruled that safe and everything is understandable and she knows exactly what everything means and who this man. Is this doctor that she says at one point. She probably mary if he hadn't come back to the island to visit her if if we hadn't and in that moment she's making the decision walking up those stairs isn't just the decision to sleep with him right or to spend the night with. Its am i willing to go here my willing to potentially move to the city to give myself over to him in the way of life that we're probably stuck in together because he probably can't really leave it. He's probably not actually going to come here. There's another moment to josh. That i wonder if you noticed. It doesn't quite have the same visual resonance these other. Staircase scenes do that. We're talking about words very clear that wong has paid particular attention to how they're lit and kind of the scale if you will of the staircase but when he goes back. Maybe i don't wanna give too many spoilers about this movie even came out in nineteen eighty eight but in this moment where he makes a pretty fateful decision to go back and yet again rescue his friend. He has to walk staircase in order to get to him and i would propose that. That probably wasn't by accident. Probably not yet the i. I like reading lack good stuff. Nice stuff there adam. Thank you all of course prompted by you so you know what this is. This is the give and take that we get here on film about. Why can't i really. I'm so excited to go through these as we said we've seen a couple of them already but we've given evidence that these are movies that deserve to be watched very closely which you can always do better in a second time So yeah. I can't wait to do that. This is gonna be really fun. Well even all mention just real quick that the aesthetic choice to do that kind of half speed technique which i think is double printed to give that effect of these action scenes like everything is sort of other worldly smeared. Somehow it looks. Yeah yeah if you watch. It's not just something that wong is utilizing in the action set pieces themselves. it's even use. I think the first time we see it. It's used just when way walks out of his apartment. It's like the moment he opens the sounds right. Yeah to go enact. Vengeance it's as if he becomes a different person and everything around him then changes. He walks out the door and he walks and approaches the men who hurt fly. And that's all even in again. He's just walking at this point walking in we're seeing the men just kind of having fun going about their lives and pretending that what they did to fly isn't really that important to them he's already in this mindset this other worldly sort of perspective that one gives us through that visual choice so yeah. I think there's gonna be a lot to dive into here as we get this marathon. We haven't even mentioned the fact that not only does the movie us take my breath away very prominently. This huge hit from a movie that came out a few years earlier. Obviously top gun. But i'm not crazy josh. The moment when take my breath away starts playing. I'm pretty sure andy. Lau is sitting on a bus or the train and he's wearing over the same shirt. A white t shirt and he's wearing. Yeah ray-ban aviators. Yeah no it's it's another. It's obvious as the deniro reference. E w what. He's tom cruise now. So yeah definitely intentional. I'm going to say. India looks even better in short shorts than tom cruise. I mean can you imagine a volleyball match a one volleyball match between the two of them i can i can. That's the best movie of the year that you're describing josh. Alright as tears go by is currently available on the criterion channel next up in the world of one car marathon nineteen ninety days of being wild. Another blind spot for me. Not for you josh. I have seen days of being wild and also we should clarify because a listener clarified for me. How about this. I've also seen chungking express i in my defense. I speculated when you ask this like. I think i've seen that but i'm not sure i'm gonna have to watch it. Listener pointed out. Yeah you listed among your top five films of nineteen ninety four so with three ninety so many many shows ago so give me a break there. And i did watch it just for that list obviously never wrote about it. I should have that would have been a good reminder but yeah i've seen chongqing express i've seen days of being wild cannot wait to rewatch both. I'm going to call your editor complain that you didn't write a review more information about that marathon film spotting dot net slash marathons. That is our show all right. If you wanna talk to us on facebook and twitter adams at film spotting. I'm at larson on film. In the show archives at film spotting dot net you can find reviews interviews and top. Five's going back to two thousand five and you can vote in the film spotting poll. What is the best movie set in the middle ages. You must also submit a dissertation that defines exactly what are the middle ages to order. Show t shirts or other merch. Visit film spotting dot net slash shop. And you can subscribe to our weekly newsletter at film spotting dot net slash newsletter out this weekend in limited release pig. I'm being told it's john wick. Meets truffle hunters with nick cage. I'm also being told that early reviews are very positive. And i can tell you this. The trailer at the music box before fellowship of the ring went over like gangbusters people were hooting and hollering. I almost want to stand up and say. But i've heard it's actually really good because it didn't play that way okay. Summertime is also out. This is a movie that takes place over the course of a hot summer day in. La the lives of twenty. Five young angelinos intersect carlos lopez estrada the director of blind spotting directs summertime and roadrunner a film about anthony bourdain which i highly recommend in say worth seeing whether you feel like you know much about him or his work or not in wide release escape room tournament of champions sequel to the two thousand nineteen film. We didn't see or discuss and space jam. A new legacy. Oh we've got here at. We have a sophie's choice scenario. Which sounds like you have to see one of these films. Which one is it gonna be escape. Wild herman veteran amid of champions. That was that was a one car. Why style pause you right. I mean we just had a spike. You hate a new legacy you too i do. We gotta get to the bottom of that next week. Not only will. We have days of being wild. We will have our top five beach scenes. Films biden is produced by golden joe. So and sam van haugen without salmon golden joe. This show wouldn't go. Production assistant is cat sullivan. Thanks else to. Kansas griffiths and the listeners of the film spotting advisory board and special thanks to everyone at wbz chicago or information is available at wbz dot org. Four films spotting. Josh larsen and i met him on our thanks for listening. This conversation can serve no purpose anymore by sorry. I love couscous josh. It's hard not to eat it. Go for it okay.

kubrick alex josh mcdowell stanley kubrick Alex malcolm mcdowell josh larsen adam kempner beethoven senio mr deltoid David road roszak josh taylor Nick lockwood isabel bishop adam michael Josh