18 Burst results for "Michael Bitzer"

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:05 min | 6 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KCRW

"Is stopped because only with a free press, you know, can our democracy floors We have to stop demonizing, you know, immigrants and different people for democracy to flourish. Ah, I'm an optimist, and I really hope That this will come to pass. Philip Halpern was a federal prosecutor for 36 years in San Diego. Thank youfor speaking with us. Sorry. It was my pleasure. Thank you, and we reached out to the Attorney General's office. They declined to comment. Tens of millions of voters have already requested and received mail in ballots. Millions have been returned. But some of those ballots might not count because of problems such as missing or mismatched signatures. Now, voter advocacy groups and others are rushing to help voters fix or cure their ballots before it's too late. NPR's Pam Fessler reports. Dana A. Belson spent hours this week calling voters in Florida whose ballots are about to be rejected. High is Sean, Germany, there This is Dana. I'm a nonpartisan volunteer with common cause and I was just calling because it seems like your mail in ballot might have had a problem with the signature, she says. The signature is either missing or doesn't match the one on record. The good news is there's an easy way to fix it. So are you near a computer because I can walk you through the process. Awesome in Florida. Voters just have to sign and send in an affidavit verifying their identity. They could even do it online. If they have a computer like this voter does. Okay, that sounds wonderful. And thank you so much for being an early voter, and I hope your ballot gets fixed more than 1100. Florida ballots so far need to be fixed or cured, as it's called Not a lot of votes, but in a close race, it could make a difference. And NPR analysis found that more than half a million ballots were rejected in this year's primaries because of similar problems, and the numbers could be a lot higher in the general election. We're not leaving anything to chance, a Dean Lynch ners with next Jan America, which mobilizes young voters to elect Democrats. Hotchner says. After all the time and energy they've spent getting voters registered at mailing in their ballots. They don't want those ballots rejected for mistakes that are pretty common for people who have never voted by mail before. It's confusing. You have to sign it and in such and such place and on market just right, you gotta put it in your secrecy envelope and sign that one. The process is confusing, especially if you're a first time voter, so his group is also making calls. The political parties are doing the same to make sure their supporters votes count, too. Michael Bitzer, a political scientist at Catawba College in North Carolina, has been tracking mail in voting in his state, he says. So far, many more Democrats than Republicans have ballots that need to be fixed. He says black voters also have a disproportionate share about 40%. He notes that mail in voting is new to many of them. Typically, the voter forgot to sign the back of the return on VA lope, or they failed tohave the witness fully complete the section of witness information. And that's a problem in North Carolina, one of the few states that requires absentee voters to have a witness sign their ballot. The state's ballot curing process has also been tangled up in the courts, leaving voters confused and with limited time to fix any problems were basically changing the rules of the game in the middle of the game, similar legal fights or being waged in other states on Lee, half of which allow voters to cure their mail in ballots. If you make a mistake and others you're out of luck and probably won't find out your ballot didn't count until after the election. You have a couple more weeks, but it's best to do it as soon as possible so he could make sure to iron out any problems that come up. Dana Able sin of Common cause says most people are happy. She called. They're eager to have their votes count. Although one man did tell her that if the county didn't like his ballot, they could go shove it. Okay. I hope you have a great rest of your day. Not everyone can be helped. An elderly woman said she was homebound and didn't have a computer. A Belson encouraged her to call the election office. Florida is one of 18 states required to inform voters if their ballot has errors, But it could take a few days. I later asked voter Isabel Campbell if she was surprised to get Abel since Kol. I wass. Yeah, because I reviewed the instructions on that. Mail in ballot and I, you know, made sure to really slowly go through it and do what I needed to do to get the ballot counted, so I'm still not sure what the issue is, but she's taking no chances. She'd already filled out her affidavit to get the ballot cured. Pam Fessler. NPR news One side.

Dana A. Belson Florida Michael Bitzer Pam Fessler NPR North Carolina Democrats Lee San Diego Philip Halpern Isabel Campbell Germany Attorney Hotchner Dean Lynch Catawba College High scientist
"michael bitzer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:19 min | 6 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KCRW

"The process is confusing, especially if you're a first time voter, so his group is also making calls. The political parties are doing the same to make sure their supporters votes count, too. Michael Bitzer, a political scientist at Catawba College in North Carolina, has been tracking mail in voting in his state, he says. So far, many more Democrats than Republicans have ballots that need to be fixed. He says black voters also have a disproportionate share about 40%. He notes that mail in voting is new to many of them. Typically, the voter forgot to sign the back of the return on VA lope, or they failed tohave the witness fully complete the section of witness information, and that's a problem in North Carolina, one of the few states that requires absentee voters to have a witness sign their ballot. The state's ballot curing process has also been tangled up in the courts, leaving voters confused and with limited time to fix any problems were basically changing the rules of the game in the middle of the game. Similar legal fights were being waged in other states on Lee, half of which allow voters to cure their mail in ballots. If you make a mistake and others you're out of luck and probably won't find out your ballot didn't count until after the election. You have a couple more weeks, but it's best to do it as soon as possible so he could make sure to iron out any problems that come up. Dana able sin of common cause says most people are happy, she called. They're eager to have their votes count. Although one man did tell her that if the county didn't like his ballot, they could go shove it. OK, I hope you have a great rest of your day. Not everyone can be helped. An elderly woman said she was homebound and didn't have a computer. A Belson encouraged her to call the election office. Florida is one of 18 states required to inform voters if their ballot has errors, But it could take a few days. I later asked voter Isabel Campbell if she was surprised to get Abel since Kol. I wass. Yeah, because I reviewed the instructions on that. Mail in ballot and I, you know, made sure to really slowly go through it and do what I needed to do to get the ballot counted, so I'm still not sure what the issue is, but she's taking no chances. She'd already filled out her affidavit to get the ballot cured. Pam Fessler. NPR news.

Michael Bitzer North Carolina Lee Pam Fessler Catawba College NPR Dana Isabel Campbell scientist Belson Florida
"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:23 min | 6 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To enforce the laws and defend the United States, not the president of the United States, however. In our society. We had A lot of other problems. We need to make sure that this constant is salt on press is stopped because on Lee with a free press, you know, can our democracy floors We have to stop demonizing, you know, immigrants and different people for democracy to flourish. Ah, I'm an optimist, and I really hope That this will come to pass. Philip Helper and was a federal prosecutor for 36 years in San Diego. Thank youfor speaking with us. Sorry. It was my pleasure. Thank you, and we reached out to the Attorney General's office. They declined to comment. Tens of millions of voters have already requested and received mail in ballots. Millions have been returned. But some of those ballots might not count because of problems such as missing or mismatched signatures. Now, voter advocacy groups and others are rushing to help voters fix or cure their ballots before it's too late. NPR's Pam Fessler reports. Dana A. Belson spent hours this week calling voters in Florida whose ballots are about to be rejected. High is Sean, Germany, there This is Dana. I'm a nonpartisan volunteer with common cause, and I was just calling because it seems like your mail in ballot might have had a problem with the signature, she says. The signature is either missing or doesn't match the one on record. The good news is there's an easy way to fix it. So are you near a computer because I can walk you through the process. Awesome in Florida. Voters just have to sign and send in an affidavit verifying their identity. They could even do it online. If they have a computer like this voter does. Okay, that sounds wonderful. And thank you so much for being an early voter, and I hope your ballot gets fixed more than 1100. Florida ballots so far need to be fixed or cured, as it's called, not a lot of votes. But in a close race, it could make a difference, and NPR analysis found that more than half a million ballots were rejected in this year's primaries because of similar problems. And the numbers could be a lot higher in the general election. We're not leaving anything to chance. A Dean Lynch dinners with next Gen. America, which mobilizes young voters to elect Democrats. Hotchner says. After all the time and energy they've spent getting voters registered at mailing in their ballots. They don't want those ballots rejected for mistakes that are pretty common for people who have never voted by mail before. It's confusing. You have to sign it and in such and such place and on market just right, you gotta put it in your secrecy envelope and sign that one. The process is confusing, especially if you're a first time voter, so his group is also making calls. The political parties are doing the same to make sure their supporters votes count, too. Michael Bitzer, a political scientist at Catawba College in North Carolina, has been tracking mail in voting in his state, he says. So far, many more Democrats than Republicans have ballots that need to be fixed. He says black voters also have a disproportionate share about 40%. He notes that mail in voting is new to many of them. Typically, the voter forgot to sign the back of the return on Vel Ope. Or they failed tohave the witness fully complete the section of witness information, and that's a problem in North Carolina, one of the few states that requires absentee voters to have a witness sign their ballot. The state's ballot curing process has also been tangled up in the courts, leaving voters confused and with limited time to fix any problems were basically changing the rules of the game in the middle of the game. Similar legal fights were being waged in other states on Lee, half of which allow voters to cure their mail in ballots. If you make a mistake and others you're out of luck and probably won't find out your ballot didn't count until after the election. You have a couple more weeks, but it's best to do it as soon as possible so he could make sure to iron out any problems that come up. Dana A. Belson of Common Cause, says most people are happy she called. They're eager to have their votes count. Although one man did tell her that if the county didn't like his ballot, they could go shove it. OK, I hope you have a great rest of your day. Not everyone can be helped. An elderly woman said she was homebound and didn't have a computer. A Belson encouraged her to call the election office. Florida is one of 18 states required to inform voters if their ballot has errors, But it could take a few days. I later asked voter Isabel Campbell if she was surprised to get Abel since Kol. I wass. Yeah, because I reviewed the instructions on that mail in ballot and I, you know, made sure to really slowly go through it and do what I needed to do to get the the ballot counted, so I'm still not sure what the issue is. But she's taking no chances. She'd already filled out her affidavit to get the ballot cured. Pam Fessler NPR news One side effect of co 19 on medical studies. Researchers have.

Dana A. Belson Florida Lee Michael Bitzer Pam Fessler NPR United States North Carolina Democrats San Diego Philip Helper Vel Ope Isabel Campbell president Attorney Germany Hotchner Dean Lynch High
"michael bitzer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:36 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"2700, journalists and analysts in over 120 countries. I'm more cramped in this is Bloomberg. David, Thanks so much Mark. Each week in the run up to the election. We're going to take a look at one of the critical swing states last week it was Arizona we looked looked at this week. It is North Carolina and to give us a sense of the politics of the state and how they may be changing. We welcome now, Professor Michael Bitzer. He is chair of the Department of Politics at Catawba College. So, Professor Thank you so much for being with us. Give us your sense. A snapshot right now of North Carolina. And And what is it? Is it blue? Is it red? Is it purple? What is it? What is it? We are a purple state with a very slight tent. Two ribs were center lean right, but it's all dependent on who shows up. And what has happened here in North Carolina, after 2008 and particularly 2010 is that North Carolinians have basically sorted themselves into the respective partisan camps, you know, in 2000 for George W. Bush won the state by 13% points and the Democratic governor who was running for re election. Also one by 13% points. That day of North Carolinian, splitting their tickets as now shrunk to probably 3 to 5% of the electorate. Most North Carolinians have their minds made up going into November 3rd. So that's true sort of cost. The country appears there's a low number of undecided. Give us a sense of your campaign in North Carolina is a geographic difference. What he what do you really want to focus on One of the key counties, for example, are the key counted. You have to get I think certainly out of the 100 counties in North Carolina, 12 of them will deliver 50% of the vote. And those are the major urban counties. Mecklenburg home to Charlotte, Wake County, home to Raleigh, the state capital. But it's critical that within those urban counties, the suburbs within those urban counties are indeed the true battle grounds. Central City's like Charlotte and Raleigh, voted for Hillary Clinton to tow one in 2016. If you go to the surrounding suburban counties, Donald Trump won those counties to tow one in 2016. It's those urban suburbs that literally split 50 50 slight edge to Hillary Clinton and 2016. I'm going to be watching those to see if there's any slippage among the Republicans in those areas. And how deep is the margin in the surrounding suburban counties? Can Democrats eat into that Republican advantage? How fast is it growing? That is to say there are a fair number of voters today that there were unique there to 2016? There is and nearly two million new registered voters since 2016. So this state is continues to grow exponentially, as does our registered voter pool slightly over seven million registered voters so far, and out of that we already have nearly a million North Carolinians. You are registered voters who have requested an absentee by mail ballot that is unheard of in this state. So the interest in the enthusiasm is certainly through the roof here in North Carolina, so just looking at the real clear politics average of the polls, which is one way to look at it, it looks like it's like 1% for Biden right now in North Carolina, which is essentially a dead heat. Effectively. How do you play right now? Is it a dead he and it's really fighting over that very small number of people that are undecided. It truly is, you know, I heard one political consultants say if a candidate wins by more than 5% in the state, that's a landslide. And so Donald Trump won the state a little over 3.5% points. Thom Tillis in 2014 by a point and a half, so this is going to be a very tight election. It's all dependent upon again who shows up and how do the campaign's motivate and energize their respective basis. And what are the issues Because there's some speculation right now, with the passing of Ruth Bader Ginsberg, that is really elevated the importance of the Supreme Court. Is that true in North Carolina, and if so, which way do you think it cut? Honestly, I think it's too early to determine that here in North Carolina, but I think the key voting bloc will be suburban women. How does the president's pick? Play to them. Are they willing to look past is other issues and concerns that they have about the president and vote purely on the court and the court nominee that he puts forward? I think that's just going to be the critical component white suburban women in those competitive battleground states of North Carolina. You mentioned Senator Tillis give us a sense of how that race is doing, because again, looking at the real clear politics average at least He's losing about 3.5%, which was probably within the margin of error. It is certainly within the margin of error. But interestingly he's playing behind the president's numbers here in the state, and early on, he made a concerted effort to tie himself to President Trump. When President Trump's approval ratings started to slip in this state, So too, did his numbers as well. So he needs to hope that this Supreme Court pick really energizes and pulls the base back to supporting him. Come November, 3rd, Okay, because they're really great to have you with us. It was very instructive. That's Professor Michael Bitzer of Catawba College coming up here, We're gonna take a look at how much political risk.

North Carolina President Trump Professor Michael Bitzer president North Carolinian Senator Tillis Supreme Court Catawba College Hillary Clinton Raleigh Bloomberg Charlotte Arizona David Professor Ruth Bader Ginsberg Department of Politics Mark Mecklenburg George W. Bush
"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:18 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That will help propel it. So you see the governor's race? Certainly reflection of that debate. We have to take a quick break more with Rusty Jacobson. Michael Bitzer in just a moment. Take away supported by it last year. Fortune 500 companies use collaboration software like Kira and Trail Oh from it last year, enabling teams to keep a line two key goals and connected to one another. That's how business is the size of small countries. Stay agile. Learn more at it. Lesson dot com. Rest of Jacob's just mentioned the governor's race. North Carolina is one of just 11 states holding gubernatorial elections in 2020, and you can bet voters think those governors handled the response to the pandemic is top of mind. I asked Rusty how Governor Cooper is faring at this point. Overall, his policy in his approach and his steering of the state through this pandemic is still supported by a majority. Of people that would be pulled. I mean, Elon University and MEREDITH College and Rollie did polls recently, and those indicate there were indications that if not, the plurality were not the majority of plurality. Ah, voters of registered voters expected voters to support Governor Cooper's decisions. Even though big counsel restraint and it's still there are still challenges to the economic curtain, the economic community, the business community, but overall, but he does not seem to be damaged by those positions. Michael let's get to the point. At risk you brought up in that we talked a lot about with Damon Circosta about absentee ballot requests. You are following this more closely than certainly. I think anyone in the country so here we are. It's September. What can you tell us about the voters who have been requesting thie absentee ballots if you can break it down into the kinds of people And the parts of the state that requesting these ballots. Yeah, well, typically for those folks who don't know much about North Carolina in 2016 less than 5% of all the ballots cast came from absentee by mail, and typically, that boat method tends to be more Republican, then the electorate as a whole. What we're seeing now is Basically 10% off. The seven million registered voters in the state have requested an absentee by mail ballot that 700,004 years ago. This same day, the total number of ballots requested was a little over 40,000. So, basically, we're talking about 16 times what we saw this time four years ago. Now the breakdowns in terms ofthe party registration is really interesting because it is overwhelmingly coming from registered Democrats. They are over a majority of all the request. Registered unaffiliated or almost a third and registered Republicans that typically tend to dominate or only 16% of all the request. So something obviously is driving all of this. This is probably Covad infecting partisanship. To a level that I haven't seen. And I don't think anybody in North Carolina politics has seen this level of interest in terms of having a ballot in your hand in case something happens over the next two months how this plays out. I'm not really sure the request are actually quite representative of the electorate racially. It's skews older, which is traditional. But it also very much skews too. Urban counties and particularly some congressional districts that are very competitive, most notably the 11th congressional district, Mark Meadows Old District, which is now on open seat in the mountains of North Carolina. Rusty Jacob's Michael bit, sir. This has been great. Thank you so much for taking this time with me. Appreciate it..

North Carolina Governor Cooper Rusty Jacob Michael Bitzer Rusty Jacobson Mark Meadows Old District Kira Damon Circosta Trail Oh Elon University Rollie MEREDITH College representative
"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:27 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Politics with Amy Walter on the take away. For most of the last 40 years, North Carolina had been a rather reliable Republican state. Since 2008. The state has become much more competitive. Barack Obama narrowly won here by less than a point in 2008, Mitt Romney. He carried the state by just two points. Trump won it by just three. This state is big and diverse. It has fast growing urban centers like Charlotte in the research triangle, but it also has huge rural stretches as well. And reaching voters here is incredibly expensive because there's not just one main media market that encompasses the majority of voters. Understand OBIT more about the political dynamics at play in North Carolina. I spoke to Rusty Jacobs, a politics reporter at W. U. N. C. North Carolina Public Radio, and Michael Bitzer, a professor of political science. Catawba College. I asked Michael. If it's an influx of voters to the state that has made North Carolina more competitive. It is certainly in migration. We're seeing more and more people registering unaffiliated. That does not mean that they are independent or non partisan. But they are just choosing to go unaffiliated in this state because they want to have options, particularly when it comes to party primaries on affiliated voters. Khun Vote in either one I would also add that there is a geographic in a generational dynamic that is playing out. Really, that mirrors kind of the national dynamics. I think what we're seeing geographically. It's urban vs rural, But in the suburbs of North Carolina, you have to kind of think about it. Suburbs that are inside urban counties versus the excerpts. The surrounding suburban counties two very different dynamics. Playing out there is also the generational component. There's 37% of our seven million registered voters are under the age of 40 and so millennials and now Gens. Ears are really going to reshape this state, and I think if they play true to the national Dynamics, we could go from center lean right to center Lean left in terms of North Carolina politics, moving forward. First I want to get to you talk to us a little bit about the political environment right now in North Carolina, When we look at national polls, it's the economy. It's Covad. Issues surrounding policing and racial reconciliation. What is going on in North Carolina? What you think you're the driving issues and how do you see it playing out? Across the state. That, as Michael pointed out, is so big and so diverse Lot of those same things were happening. A lot of those discussions were happening. Just in the past few months. I and my colleagues here at W. UNC have covered protests really, If you go towards the beginning of the pandemic and the public health restrictions that were imposed, there were gatherings outside the legislature by people who wanted to see some of those restrictions lifted and some of the economy of the reopen. Prote protests that you saw here and in other states, But then, after the killing of George Floyd, you saw even bigger, more widespread protests, Definitely with more diverse crowds with younger crowds. Those protests continue. I would say, just comparing numbers on and you know broad array of citizenry. The reopen demonstrations kind of pale in comparison to the size and the volume of the demonstrations that have followed that ensued after George Floyd's killing, So in that respect You've got this. You've got the police of the demand for police reforms on the one hand and you've got Uh, you still got a loyal, probably Republican electorate that wants to see some of those restrictions lifted in easing or in helping the economy get restarted, and you'll see that in the governor's race. Dan Forest. Who's the card? Lieutenant governor challenging incumbent boy, Cooper is hoping that will help propel it. So you see the governor's race? Certainly reflection of that debate. We have to take a quick break more with Rusty Jacobson. Michael Bitzer in just a moment..

North Carolina Michael Bitzer W. U. N. C. North Carolina Mitt Romney Barack Obama Amy Walter Rusty Jacobs George Floyd Catawba College Covad Charlotte Rusty Jacobson Khun Vote Trump professor of political science Cooper
"michael bitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:12 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One another. That's how business is the size of small countries. Stay agile. Learn more at it. Lassie in dot com. Rest of Jacob's just mention the governor's race. North Carolina is one of just 11 states holding gubernatorial elections in 2020, and you can bet voters think those governors handled the response to the pandemic is top of mind. I asked Rusty have Governor Cooper is faring at this point. Overall, his policy in his approach and his steering of the state through this pandemic is still supported by a majority of people that would be pulled. I mean, Elon University and MEREDITH College and Rollie did polls recently, and those indicate there were indications that It's not the plurality were not the majority of plurality. Ah, voters of registered voters expected voters to support Governor Cooper's decisions. Even though big counsel restraint and it's still there are still challenges to the economic, the economic community, the business community but overall, but he does not seem to be damaged by those positions. Michael let's get to the point. At risk you brought up in that we talked a lot about with Damon Circosta about absentee ballot requests. You are following this more closely than certainly. I think anyone in the country So here we are. It's September. What can you tell us about the voters who have been requesting thie absentee ballots if you can break it down into the kinds of people and the parts of the state that requesting these ballots Yeah, well, typically for those folks who don't know much about North Carolina in 2016 less than 5% of all the ballots cast came from absentee by mail, and typically, that boat method tends to be more Republican. Then the electorate as a whole what we're seeing now. Is basically 10% off. The seven million registered voters in the state have requested in absentee by mail ballot that 700,000 Four years ago. This same day, the total number of ballots requested was a little over 40,000. So, basically, we're talking about 16 times what we saw this time four years ago. Now the breakdowns in terms ofthe party registration is really interesting because it is overwhelmingly coming from registered Democrats. They are over a majority of all the request. Registered unaffiliated or almost a third and registered Republicans that typically tend to dominate or only 16% off all the request. So something obviously is driving all of this. This is probably Covad infecting partisanship. To a level that I haven't seen. And I don't think anybody in North Carolina politics has seen this level of interest in terms of having a ballot in your hand in case something happens over the next two months how this plays out. I'm not really sure the request are actually quite representative of the electric racially. It's used older, which is traditional. But it also very much skews too. Urban counties and particularly some congressional districts that are very competitive, most notably the 11th congressional district, Mark Meadows Old District, which is now on open seat in the mountains of North Carolina. Rusty Jacob's Michael bit, sir. This has been great. Thank you so much for taking this time with me. Appreciate it. Rusty Jacobs is a political reporter at W. UNC North Carolina Public Radio. Michael Bitzer is a professor of political science at the college. To hear my full conversation with Rusty Michael and North Carolina State Board of Elections Chair.

North Carolina Rusty Jacob Rusty Michael Governor Cooper Michael Bitzer Rusty Jacobs Rusty State Board of Elections Chair Lassie Damon Circosta Mark Meadows Old District Elon University MEREDITH College Rollie professor of political science representative reporter
"michael bitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I think if they play true to the national Dynamics, we could go from center lean right to center Lean left in terms of North Carolina politics moving forward. I want to get to you talk to us a little bit about the political environment right now in North Carolina, when we look at national polls It's the economy. It's Covad issues surrounding policing and racial reconciliation. What is going on in North Carolina? What you think you're the driving issues and how do you see it playing out? Across the state. That, as Michael pointed out, is so big and so diverse Lot of those same things were happening. A lot of those discussions were happening. Just in the past few months. I and my colleagues here at W. UNC have covered protests really, If you go towards the beginning of the pandemic and the public health restrictions that were imposed, there were gatherings outside the legislature by people who wanted to see some of those restrictions lifted and some of the economy of the reopen. Prote protest that you saw here and in other states, But then, after the killing of George Floyd, he saw even bigger, more widespread protests. Definitely with more diverse crowds with younger crowds. Those protests continue. I would say, just comparing numbers on DH, you know, broad array of citizenry. The reopened demonstrations kind of pale in comparison to the size and the volume of the demonstrations that have followed that ensued after George Floyd's killing. So in that respect, you've got this. You've got the police of the demand for police reforms on the one hand and you've got You still got a loyal, probably Republican electorate that wants to see some of those restrictions lifted in easing or helping the economy get restarted, and you'll see that in the governor's race, Dan Forest who's the card? Lieutenant governor, challenging incumbent boy, Cooper. Is hoping that will help propel him. So you see the governor's race? Certainly reflection of that debate way have to take a quick break more with Rusty Jacobson. Michael Bitzer in just a moment. Takeaway supported by it last year. Fortune 500 companies use collaboration software like Kira and Trail Oh from it last year, enabling teams to keep a line two key goals and connected to one another. That's how business is the size of small countries. Stay agile. Learn more at it. Lassie in dot com..

North Carolina George Floyd Michael Bitzer Covad Cooper Rusty Jacobson Lassie Prote Kira Trail Oh Dan Forest
"michael bitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Back climate change each day we bring you fresh insights, unique voices, one of a kind reporting Join us for an hour that takes you around the globe. It's right here. It's the world you can hear the world this afternoon at two. This's cake, San Francisco and cake. North Highlands, Sacramento. The time now is 1 30. It's politics with Amy Walter on the takeaway. For most of the last 40 years, North Carolina had been a rather reliable Republican state. Since 2008. The state has become much more competitive. Barack Obama narrowly won here by less than a point in 2008, Mitt Romney. He carried the state by just two points. Trump won it by just three. This state is big and diverse. It has fast growing urban centers like Charlotte in the research triangle, but it also has huge rural stretches as well. And reaching voters here is incredibly expensive because there's not just one main media market that encompasses the majority of voters understand a bit more about the political dynamics at play in North Carolina, I spoke to Rusty Jacob's politics reporter at W. UNC North Carolina public radio. And Michael Bitzer, a professor of political science at Catawba College. I asked Michael if it's an influx of voters to the state that has made North Carolina more competitive. It is certainly in migration. We're seeing more and more people registering unaffiliated. That does not mean that they are independent or non partisan. But they are just choosing to go unaffiliated in this state because they want to have options, particularly when it comes to party. Mary's on affiliated voters, Khun Vote in either one. I would also add that there is a geographic in a generational dynamic that is playing out. Really, that mirrors kind of the national dynamics. I think what we're seeing geographically, it's urban vs rural, But in the suburbs of North Carolina, you have to kind of think about Suburb Center inside Urban counties, versus the excerpts, the surrounding suburban counties two very different dynamics playing out there is also the generational component. There's 37% of our seven million registered voters are under the age of 40. And so millennials and now Gens. Ears are really going to reshape this state. And I think if they play true to the national Dynamics, we could go from center lean right to center Lean left in terms of North Carolina politics moving forward..

North Carolina North Highlands Mitt Romney Michael Bitzer Barack Obama San Francisco Amy Walter Catawba College Sacramento Charlotte Trump Suburb Center professor of political science Rusty Jacob Mary reporter
"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:18 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That will help propel it. So you see the governor's race? Certainly reflection of that debate. We have to take a quick break more with Rusty Jacobson. Michael Bitzer in just a moment. Take away supported by it last year. Fortune 500 companies use collaboration software like Kira and Trail Oh from it last year, enabling teams to keep a line two key goals and connected to one another. That's how business is the size of small countries. Stay agile. Learn more at it. Lesson dot com. Rest of Jacob's just mention the governor's race. North Carolina is one of just 11 states holding gubernatorial elections in 2020, and you can bet voters think those governors handled the response to the pandemic is top of mind. I asked Rusty how Governor Cooper is faring at this point. Overall, his policy in his approach and his steering of the state through this pandemic is still supported by a majority. Of people that would be pulled. I mean, Elon University and MEREDITH College and Rollie did polls recently, and those indicate there were indications that if not, the plurality were not the majority of plurality. Ah, voters of registered voters expected voters to support Governor Cooper's decisions. Even though they counsel restraint and it's still there are still challenges to the economic curtain, the economic community, the business community, but overall, but he does not seem to be damaged by those positions. Michael let's get to the point. At risk you brought up in that we talked a lot about with Damon Circosta about absentee ballot requests. You are following this more closely than certainly. I think anyone in the country so here we are. It's September. What can you tell us about the voters who have been requesting thie absentee ballots if you can break it down into the kinds of people And the parts of the state that requesting these ballots. Yeah, well, typically for those folks who don't know much about North Carolina in 2016 less than 5% of all the ballots cast came from absentee by mail, and typically, that boat method tends to be more Republican. Then the electorate as a whole what we're seeing now. Is it? Basically 10% off. The seven million registered voters in the state have requested an absentee by mail ballot that 700,004 years ago. This same day, the total number of ballots requested was a little over 40,000. So, basically, we're talking about 16 times what we saw this time four years ago. Now the breakdowns in terms ofthe party registration is really interesting because it is overwhelmingly coming from registered Democrats. They are over a majority of all the request. Registered unaffiliated or almost a third and registered Republicans that typically tend to dominate or only 16% of all the request. So something obviously is driving all of this. This is probably Covad infecting partisanship. To a level that I haven't seen, and I don't think anybody in North Carolina politics has seen this level of interest in terms of having a ballot in your hand in case something happens over the next two months how this plays out. I'm not really sure the request are actually quite representative of the electorate. Racially, it skews older, which is traditional. But it's also very much skews, too. Urban counties and particularly some congressional districts that are very competitive, most notably the 11th congressional district, Mark Meadows Old district, which is now on open seat in the mountains of North Carolina. Rusty Jacob's Michael bit, Sir, This has been great. Thank you so much for taking this time with me. Appreciate it..

North Carolina Governor Cooper Rusty Jacob Michael Bitzer Rusty Jacobson Kira Damon Circosta Trail Oh Elon University Rollie MEREDITH College representative
"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:28 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Public interest, 93.9 FM and AM 20, NPR News and the New York conversation. It's politics with Amy Walter on the takeaway. For most of the last 40 years, North Carolina had been a rather reliable Republican state. Since 2008. The state has become much more competitive. Barack Obama narrowly won here by less than a point in 2008, Mitt Romney. He carried the state by just two points. Trump won it by just three. This state is big and diverse. It has fast growing urban centers like Charlotte in the research triangle, but it also has huge rural stretches as well. And reaching voters here is incredibly expensive because there's not just one main media market that encompasses the majority of voters. Understand Obit more about the political dynamics at play in North Carolina. I spoke to Rusty Jacobs, a politics reporter at W. UNC North Carolina Public Radio, and Michael Bitzer, a professor of political science. Catawba College. I asked Michael. If it's an influx of voters to the state that has made North Carolina more competitive. It is certainly in migration. We're seeing more and more people registering unaffiliated. That does not mean that they are independent or non partisan. But they are just choosing to go unaffiliated in this state because they want to have options, particularly when it comes to party primaries on affiliated voters. Khun Vote in either one I would also add that there is a geographic in a generational dynamic that is playing out. Really, that mirrors kind of the national dynamics. I think what we're seeing geographically. It's urban vs rural, But in the suburbs of North Carolina, you have to kind of think about Suburbs that are inside urban counties versus the excerpts. The surrounding suburban counties two very different dynamics. Playing out there is also the generational component. There's 37% of our seven million registered voters are under the age of 40 and so millennials and now Gens. Ears are really going to reshape this state, and I think if they play true to the national Dynamics, we could go from center lean right to center Lean left in terms of North Carolina politics, moving forward. First I want to get to you talk to us a little bit about the political environment right now in North Carolina, When we look at national polls, it's the economy. It's Covad. Issues surrounding policing and racial reconciliation. What is going on in North Carolina? What you think you're the driving issues and how do you see it playing out? Across the state. That, as Michael pointed out, is so big and so diverse Lot of those same things were happening. A lot of those discussions air happening. Just in the past few months, I and my colleagues here at W. UNC have covered protests. Really. If you go towards the beginning of the pandemic and the public health restrictions that were imposed, there were gatherings outside the legislature by people who wanted to see some of those restrictions lifted and some of the economy of the reopen. Prote protests that you saw here and in other states, But then, after the killing of George Floyd, you saw even bigger, more widespread protests, Definitely with more diverse crowds with younger crowds. Those protests continue. I would say, just comparing numbers on and you know broad array of citizenry. The reopen demonstrations kind of pale in comparison to the size and the volume of the demonstrations that have followed that ensued after George Floyd's killing, So in that respect You've got this. You've got the police of the demand for police reforms on the one hand and you've got You still got a loyal, probably Republican electorate that wants to see some of those restrictions lifted in easing or in helping the economy get restarted, and you'll see that in the governor's race. Dan Forest. Who's the CART lieutenant governor challenging incumbent boy, Cooper is hoping.

North Carolina Michael Bitzer Mitt Romney NPR News George Floyd Barack Obama Amy Walter Catawba College Rusty Jacobs Khun Vote Charlotte Covad Trump New York professor of political science Dan Forest
First 2020 ballots issued in North Carolina

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

First 2020 ballots issued in North Carolina

"Carolina start sending out what's expected to be a record number of mail in ballots. As of now, North Carolina elections officials have received 600,000 avail and ballot request. Michael Bitzer teaches political science at Catawba College. The numbers just continue to grow an exponential rate. Karen Brinson Bell heads up the state Board of Elections. This isn't the first time that we've done absentee by mail. It's just the first time we've done it at this volume. Registered voters who have requested a mail in ballot in the state are overwhelmingly Democrats and independents.

Karen Brinson Bell Board Of Elections North Carolina Michael Bitzer Catawba College Carolina
"michael bitzer" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:55 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on WTOP

"W T O P News and coming up here We'll have answers to questions on how to vote through the mail in Virginia and North Carolina today will begin sending out what's expected to be a record number of mail in ballots for the November election. As of now, North Carolina elections officials have received 600,000 avail and ballot request. Michael Bitzer teaches political science at Catawba College. The numbers just continue to grow an exponential rate. Karen Brinson Bell heads up the state Board of Elections. Isn't the first time that we've done absentee by mail. It's just the first time we've done it at this by the registered voters who have requested a mail in ballot in the state are overwhelmingly Democrats and independents. Jim Krystle, a CBS News, Greensboro, North Carolina. The Corona virus is having a significant impact on college campuses, according to a New York Times survey survey shows over 51,000 cases of Cove in 19 at more than 1000 colleges since the pandemic started. The state with the highest number of infections is Texas with more than 6100 at 63 schools. Recent outbreaks have led to shutdowns of campuses, including SUNY Oneonta in upstate New York, which is sending students home for the semester. I kind of thought I was going to happen, but I think it's gonna happen this soon More than 500 people have tested positive following several parties. Wendy Gillette, CBS NEWS New York The Trump Administration plans to enforce federal standardized testing requirements for K through 12 schools. Despite the pandemic, political reports, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos told state School chiefs in a letter that they should not expect the Education Department to again wave federal testing requirements as it did this spring amid sudden school closures. She said the decision to suspend testing requirements in March and April was the right call at that time. But as the new school year begins, the Trump administration expects states To carry out the assessments as required by law, DeVos says. Without a measure of whether.

North Carolina Texas Betsy DeVos state School chiefs New York Times Karen Brinson Bell Catawba College New York Michael Bitzer Board of Elections CBS SUNY Oneonta Virginia Jim Krystle Wendy Gillette Greensboro Education Department Secretary
"michael bitzer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:27 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KCRW

"69 year old Alan Kronk is visiting a used book store. He's a Republican voter. And while the Marine Corps veteran is worried about the current state of his retirement benefits, like Social Security and help from the Department of Veterans Affairs, he's sticking with Trump. He ain't my greatest thought of president. He does a lot of good things. Does some There are but Biden. He just does it all wrong wax eyes in Union County, a GOP stronghold. But not all Republicans here are sticking with Trump resident Stephen Sharon Smith were lifelong Republicans until a new political force took over the party. Trump Trump is president. I'm embarrassed. Now they're voting for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. They're part of a worrisome trend for the GOP party members who don't think Trump is what Republicanism is supposed to be. I mean, I tell people if they ask, say, I'm a Republican, but I'll never vote Republican again. I mean, this Corona virus has got me so worried. That's the Smiths at their home in wax, all, which is surrounded by lush green ways and new developments. It's also one of the fastest growing communities in the Charlotte metropolitan region. So we're seeing little pockets of change that are ticking towards blue. That's Pam De Maria. She's chair of the Union County Democratic Party, she says. More than 20 years ago, Democrat was a dirty word in Union County. Now she's pumped about Camille. Nitties like wax are bursting with new Democrats. Danbury, Union County resident and a longtime area Republican official disagrees. I think Union County Republican vote will hold. Barry thinks the new residents are escaping urban centres and values in search of a conservative lifestyle and will add to the GOP roles. But politics Professor Michael Bitzer TKO atop a college says Union County is showing clues of softening Republican support, and that could spell larger trouble for Trump that to me sends a signal that maybe they're slippage in other staunch Republican suburban counties, and that's where the Republican base is back at the historic wax district. Three generations Grandma Cindy Carol and daughter Lauren, Hera are about to visit the antique store with 11 month old granddaughter Austin in tow. Yeah. Carol and Hera are not bite and fans. It's like he's relying.

Trump Trump Union County GOP Joe Biden Union County Democratic Party Pam De Maria Alan Kronk president Cindy Carol Marine Corps Department of Veterans Affairs Hera Charlotte Professor Michael Bitzer Austin Camille Stephen Sharon Smith Danbury Barry
"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 7 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"69 year old Alan Kronk is visiting a used book store. He's a Republican voter. And while the Marine Corps veteran is worried about the current state of his retirement benefits, like Social Security and help from the Department of Veterans Affairs, he's sticking with Trump. He ain't my greatest thought of president. He does a lot of good things. Does some that are But Biden. He just does it all wrong wax eyes in Union County, a GOP stronghold. But not all Republicans here are sticking with Trump resident Stephen Sharon Smith were lifelong Republicans until a new political force took over the party. Trump Trump is president. I'm embarrassed. Now they're voting for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. They're part of a worrisome trend for the GOP party members who don't think Trump is what Republicanism is supposed to be. I mean, I tell people if you ask, I'll say, Well, I'm a Republican, but I'll never vote Republican again. I mean, this Corona virus has got me so worried. That's the Smiths at their home in wax, all, which is surrounded by lush green ways and new developments. It's also one of the fastest growing communities in the Charlotte metropolitan region. So we're seeing little pockets of change that are ticking towards blue. That's Pam De Maria. She's chair of the Union County Democratic Party, she says. More than 20 years ago, Democrat was a dirty word in Union County. Now she's pumped about Camille. Nitties like wax are bursting with new Democrats. Danbury, Union County resident and a longtime area Republican official disagrees. I think Union County Republican vote will hold. Barry thinks the new residents are escaping urban centres and values in search of a conservative lifestyle and will add to the GOP roles. But politics Professor Michael Bitzer TKO atop a college says Union County is showing clues of softening Republican support, and that could spell larger trouble for Trump that to me sends a signal that maybe they're slippage in other staunch Republican suburban counties, and that's where the Republican base is back at the historic wax Saw District three generations Grandma Cindy Carol and daughter Lauren, Hera are about to visit the antique store with 11 month old granddaughter Austin in tow. Yeah. Carol and Hera are not bite and fans. It's like he's.

Trump Trump Union County GOP Joe Biden Union County Democratic Party Pam De Maria Alan Kronk president Cindy Carol wax Saw District Marine Corps Department of Veterans Affairs Professor Michael Bitzer Hera Charlotte Austin Camille Stephen Sharon Smith Danbury
"michael bitzer" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:46 min | 8 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KOMO

"It does I have to say it, but, you know Hey, really doesn't have much support there in Washington to back him up. Rural voters like Ford helped Trump carried the state in 2016. North Carolina, very much reflects the urban rural divide that is playing out in the country as a whole. Catania College politics, professor Michael Bitzer says. What should concern Trump now is those suburban areas. He won the surrounding suburban areas very handedly over 60%. But if there's any slippage in his margins, and those urban suburbs move even more democratic, I think that's going to make things even Mork competitive in North Carolina. Cassandra Brooks, a daycare center owner south of Raleigh, is part of that slippage. You voted for Donald Trump. In 2016 of You voted for Donald Trump in 2016, because I felt like he was a business owner since Cove in 19 hit in March, nearly 1.25 million have filed for unemployment in North Carolina. And more than 150,000 residents have tested positive. We lost lots of income, immediate loose some staff because they were afraid to work in these conditions. Economy approved in the next couple of months, and you heard some things from Donald Trump that sounded hopeful or or on the job front around helping people out on unemployment. And Covitz numbers started going down. Would you then consider voting for Donald Trump? Again? I would never vote for Donald Trump again ever in my life if my life depended on it, I wouldn north of Raleigh is a man caught in between. Have you always voted Republican? And This year. I've decided Right now. That's right, Ross turn. Meyer is the type of suburban voters trump needs to keep. And Biden needs to court. I think a lot of people looking and go how can you be undecided at this point you've got Donald Trump has been president for four years. You've got Joe Biden has been around for a whole lot of difference. So what is it? You know, it ends up being kind of Policy versus person in my mind, I've always kind of really more aligned with the Republican Party in terms of their ideas about the platforms that they run the country from But then you look at President Trump the way he kind of acts personally. He's very disparaging the people but former vice president projects a sense of leadership that you kind of expect from the role of president. We're going to be right back after this from our ABC stations. Okay, let's take summer inventory. Vacation's canceled weddings, Post bond Be beacuse. Maybe. Maybe later. It might seem like summer 2020 is.

business owner Trump North Carolina president Joe Biden Raleigh Michael Bitzer Washington vice president Republican Party Cassandra Brooks Catania College Ford Mork 150,000 professor ABC Ross Meyer
"michael bitzer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:03 min | 8 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KCRW

"Makes it that much more difficult for Republicans to win statewide because they have lost so much ground among younger voters. That's politics Professor Michael Bitzer atop a college, he says, while the vast majority of young voters don't embrace party labels, the likely vote with Democrats and they also Mark the most racially diverse block of voters that the state has seen. I'm probably going to be pulling for fighting. That's Lisa Griffin, the 28 year old financial accountant, his joining friends for a picnic and painting at a park in Pineville Afar south Pocket in Mecklenburg County. That will be a key competitive region come November. It's unclear how much Biden's pick of Kamala Harris has energized the base of African American voters. But Griffin and her friends say there are other critical issues at stake. My biggest thing about presidency is alone. That's 28 year old Asia. Crockett, who's joined Griffin. They're both, admittedly not thrilled feeling that Biden is their only choice now, but Crockett says there's one mission somebody go. Roommates, Alan, Olivia and Jorge Ideas who live on the north side of Charlotte couldn't agree more so we can't let him have another four years or he'll continue to this mantle. The way. How are the markets? Iwerks asshole. Diaz wasn't originally abiding supporter. But he says there's too much at stake now, when faced with the potential of a trump reelection 31 year old Alleva does. Outreach is a vice chair of the Hispanic Democrats in Mecklenburg County, another growing demographic this Saturday, they're hosting a pandemic style voter drive The Zion Church in South Charlotte. With a giveaway of 1000 masked freak over testing and signing up voters because we've been getting sick a lot with over 19. So it is affected directly. So that's exactly why we need to vote. Given that young voters are a large and growing piece of the electorate here. Olivia says that if all the energy he sees right now translates into participation. This group can elect anybody they want. Claudie Salis. NPR NEWS, CHARLOTTE, North Carolina..

Lisa Griffin Charlotte Hispanic Democrats Biden Mecklenburg County Crockett Professor Michael Bitzer Olivia Claudie Salis Pineville Afar Kamala Harris NPR Mark Alan Asia North Carolina Diaz accountant Zion Church Jorge Ideas
"michael bitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:25 min | 8 months ago

"michael bitzer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Starting at six. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Leyla. The federal government is in charge of distributing one of the few treatment options for Kobe 19, a drug called from death severe. But how does the federal government decide which states needed most NPR pharmaceutical correspondent Sidney Lumpkin looked into that question and joins me now? Hey, Sidney. Hi, Lena. So Sydney first remind us what Ram death severe is and why the federal government is allocating it in the first place. Sure, Rhonda Severe is an experimental cove it 19 drug made by Gilead Sciences. It's an antiviral, given the patients in the hospital and it's one of only a few treatment options doctors have for these seriously ill patients. The federal government secured nearly all of Gillian supply from July through September and has been sending weekly allocations around the country based on a series of data points like how many patients in the state are hospitalized with the virus, But Ramdas severe is in short supply. So that's why fair allocation is so important. So what did you set out to find in your reporting? Well, I wanted to take a look at the federal data and see for myself how the allocation was going. Was it fair? What I discovered was that there are a lot of missing pieces of that data that are simply not public Hears infectious disease position. Michael Ison of Northwestern University. I don't know that we can say they're doing a good job. I don't. I don't know that we have the data. Okay, so it sounds like there are missing pieces. Did you learn anything from the data that was available? Yes, we saw that. Every week, HHS was allocating less from disappear to some states than the week before, even as covert 19 hospitalizations in those states were trending upward. Meanwhile, we learned that sometimes HHS allocated enough of the drug to a state to treat everyone in the hospital with this virus more than once, while others were offered. Enough to treat less than 10% or none at all. Overall, we found that hospitals really can't predict how much room disappear. They're going to get from one week to another, making it really hard to plan ahead. Do you treat all your eligible cove in 19 patients with severe or do you just save some in case HHS decides you don't get any of the next week. Wow. So go into some specifics for us. What's an example of a state that's not getting enough? So in early July, North Carolina's Corona virus cases were climbing fast. Over the prior two weeks on Ly five states had more new covert 19 cases that North Carolina did. And on July 9th, the governor announced that it was seeing its highest number of hospitalizations yet. Meanwhile, HHS is allocating room disappear to 31 states, but not North Carolina. Here's infectious diseases position. Cameron Wolf at Duke University Medical Center. To suddenly be told. Okay. You're not getting any of this time on get when you have prices were going up certainly gave us pause to be diplomatic. The state Health Department tells me this was a shock. It still doesn't know why it wasn't allocated any that week, but fortunately got an allocation the following week. Well, that's good, but we have a really long way to go in this pandemic. What's going to happen moving forward? Overall, I'm told HHS seems to be getting better at allocating the drug. For instance, it's now weighing a new hospital admissions more heavily, which makes sense. But when I asked HHS why it doesn't make all the data involved in rendez severe allocation public, it said. State health departments can access it, but that still leaves a lot of people out of the loop. One thing is for sure we might face the same issues with vaccine allocation. That's NPR Pharmaceuticals correspondent Sidney Lumpkin. Thanks, Sydney. Thanks for having me North Carolina is key to President Trump's aspirations to winning another term. A Republican has not reached the Oval Office without North Carolina in more than 70 years, and young voters could play a decisive role if the battleground tips to the Democratic column come November. One key swing area includes the suburbs around Charlotte, where millennial and Jen Zy voters of color could play a prominent role. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Chrysalis has more timer. Colon is an engineering student at Davidson College outside of Charlotte and a registered independent voter. The 22 Year old has been on a political journey of sorts this year, starting out as an Andrew Yang supporter, then Bernie Sanders and finally landing on plans to vote for Joe Biden. He's not as progressive as I would like. That's Colin outside the David In public library on an open law, known locally in this town of more than 10,000 is the green, but realizing that a lot of voters really just want to bring things back to normal. I I agree with them and empathize with them, and I don't and I will vote because I know that there's a bigger threat out there. Colin says the threat is President Trump, and he thinks it will take years to undo his policies. Colon, who is African American, has lived most of his life in the northern part of Mecklenburg County. He's part of a key demographic as a young voter that could play a decisive role in whether the state goes blue in November. Nearly 40% of the state's seven million registered voters are now under the age of 40. If they show up at their respective political weight in the state. It makes it that much more difficult for Republicans to win state. Why, because they have lost so much ground among younger voters. That's politics Professor Michael Bitzer atop a college, he says, while the vast majority of young voters don't embrace party labels, the likely vote with Democrats and they also Mark the most racially diverse block of voters that the state has seen. I'm probably going to be voting for fighting. That's Lisa Griffin, the 28 year old financial accountant, his joining friends for a picnic and painting at a park in Pineville Afar south Pocket in Mecklenburg County. That will be a key competitive region Come November. It's unclear how much Biden's pick of Kamala Harris has energized the base of African American voters. But Griffin and her friends say there are other critical issues at stake. My biggest thing about presidency is alone. That's 28 year old Asia. Crockett, who's joined Griffin..

HHS North Carolina federal government state Health Department NPR Sidney Lumpkin Mecklenburg County Sydney Joe Biden Charlotte President Trump Lisa Griffin Rhonda Severe Sidney Elsa Chang Lena Gilead Sciences Kobe Michael Ison