7 Burst results for "Michael Aubry"

"michael aubry" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

02:12 min | 4 months ago

"michael aubry" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"Just rings too. We were, uh Biggest back team across the world when we were in the doldrums, and we're getting Beat up weekend week out. He had Brown's backers buyers all over the world, and I was always one of those guys wearing Brown's gear that would have somebody say something to him and their airport or a gas station. Now that we're beating everybody up and We've got what seems like a solid coach with a solid plan and a solid head on his shoulders. Which to be honest, we had a bunch of times in the past. Everybody thought Mike Holmgren was great. Romeo Crennel came out is one of the Michael Aubry stole my mommy. Always a good guy. Romeo's Romeo is still a good guy. He's just little antiquated now. Yeah, it didn't play out like it should have. But even huge action you Jackson was supposed to be this incredible offensive mind just never worked out. And here we are. Here We are. Brothers. Look at us. The Browns are 10 and four And you finally you finally reach a point, Boyd. Thank you very much for the call. And I hope you have a very merry Christmas, The bronze or 10 and four and you're the point. We're right now. You're looking at your aunt, just like I would look at my aunt and I can't say it. You know what? I'm going to say her name? What the hell? She's dated a lot of men. My aunt Cheryl. Maya Charles had up Tana boyfriends and more than one husband. And I look at my aunt and I love my it dearly even though she's a Steelers fan. I do love my aunt Sincerely. And she'd bring a guy home when I was a kid. I knew that that guy was going to be a loser. It was the same thing when people thought what they thought about Hugh Jackson when the Browns marched him into the office. It was the same thing that people thought when the bronze march Rob Chudzinski, who was a good guy, by the way, but they marched him into the office. But you knew that it wasn't gonna work out. It was the same thing when they drafted quarterbacks X Y and Z before they drafted Baker Mayfield and we were even thinking that way. We're about Baker Mayfield for a time And now finally The Browns or as I like to call my Aunt Cheryl looks like they brought home a guy who's good with a job and good to the kids and good to everybody else and doesn't have too many too many Jack Daniels and tonics during Christmas dinner..

Browns Romeo Crennel Hugh Jackson Baker Mayfield Brown Cheryl Maya Charles Mike Holmgren Rob Chudzinski Michael Aubry Romeo Jack Daniels Boyd Tana
"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

The Candid Creative

06:45 min | 6 months ago

"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

"It's the same thing. It's George. It's just it's just a muscle that you have to work. But it is really good. If you can actually work it out and be strong in that department. It'll it'll play play. Well lay out well for years and in my but yeah, I know that I know that I know the feeling man, I I I'm I'm right there with you and it's just it's certainly you don't like maybe some people are genetically gifted to just like have like sort of being nam in that department. But I I suspect that a lot of people aren't I think it's a natural human tendency. I think it's just something that you you have to you have to work off one hundred percent. You have to get something that just takes time to get a costume get used to it and kind of just understand. I mean also just understand that not everything is a direct attack now, I don't want that to get confused with like just taking everything that people say to you and just taking it like that's cuz I mean there's time and there's people that Want to give you constructive criticism and then there's like the people that they're just being dicks about it. Oh absolutely everything in life. There's you know, there's that that that's true. And and yeah, you can definitely tell when people are disrespecting your boundaries, you gotta have boundaries. You have a spine you gotta stand up for yourself, but you know, like with feedback it's like, um, you know, when people are genuinely trying to but then like, you know, you have to catch yourself, right if it might being defensive here or am I just sticking my boundary and so you have to like internalized that and really like introspect and it's hard as a skill but I think that's really what like self-awareness is all about. If there any like developers coders anybody that that is kind of starting and in the similar field or isn't like thinking about creating something like related in the same like coding feel as you are. Yeah. Well be your advice like to them. Yeah. This goes back to my story page. Uh, and and this might just be you know, highly personal but I I think this could apply a lot of people in that is, you know, find a real world project that you can engage with them and and this might be something you know for yourself something amongst your friends something for your community something for social media. Whatever it is something that interests you and then use that as a project that you can commit to and be so curious these so determined to wage That that idea that project across the line, but at the same time they'll make it way too ambitious make it reasonable but do commit to it do be a permanent to finish it. Uh, you'd be determined to actually get people using it you'll learn so much with with being a developer following that that approach wage then just be curious ask questions, you know, we live in a great time where there are a lot of, you know mentors just around the corner of people on Twitter. That would be happy to to Mentor you you can find people and there's like sites like Mentor Cruise where you can find business mentors and maybe coding mentors and if that's not something we should make that a thing. That's great. I think having a mentor is amazing. But even if there isn't a platform it's so easy to like connect with people these days your social media so find find the mentors and dead. Pick a project and stick to it and it's it's fine to take a little bit longer than you think. You know, you're not going to be like all these developer bootcamps promise. You'll be a excellent coder and two months false. You'll you'll know how to do a few things but it takes time you need to commit for a long time. I mean, you know for me like I wanted to be a quarter, but I also wanted to run business page that going into my journey if that's you then realize that hey there's a point in your career where you can make a transition it might be you you need to figure out your thoughts. Are you just trying to be decent enough at coding to get things off the ground to get some Angel funding and then to actually like get some people that are committed to this full time on the project but that's the case then just should learn the basics. Learn what you need to know to get nbp's out there and then focus on on the other things and then and then follow that if you want to actually have a career and like in talking and be an engineer like off, I'm in the salaried and make the hundred K that you under k then you need to commit to that and then you you focus on you know, your GitHub making projects that you can share in the public building a little bit of a reputation talking to recruiters talking to CEOs talking the founders early-stage startups. Um, so you'll need to determine why are you using the the coding? What is it for? Do you just look really good and build some complex Black Box in the future, but really established that early on and then be patient me be committed and and show up as it's going to take a lot longer than you probably think. Now for people that that want to find you and I want to learn more about story Creator, where can they find all that at the getting contact with you? So it's funny. I used to be really active on Instagram. But now I'm sort of falling away from Instagram and getting onto Twitter really really enjoying Twitter. If you're if you're on Twitter, I'll give you a follow or give me a follow it off at Michael Michael Audrey a u vry and I'm really really enjoying engaging on there. It's great for people to share like ideas of its great place to find investors and and connect with investors. It's a great place to find other people attacked other content creators. Yeah. It's really it's really good community. So you'll find me on there tweeting some some late-night thoughts. And then also if you want to email me, it's Michael at story Creator app.com amazing and you can also check out sir created, and you can check everything that there is there and also dead Just learn more about the the wonderful project that Michael is working on to make you Italian. A very special thanks to Michael for being part of this episode and I want to thank you all for being part of listening to the podcast since the beginning for those cables coming from the beginning and for those originally joined in thank you so much. Make sure to check story cleaner app. I'll put the links in the show notes and as always stay creative and always make content that you love..

Michael Michael Audrey Twitter developer engineer Angel
"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

The Candid Creative

06:56 min | 6 months ago

"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

"Few different approaches that we can take. Let's just jot them down. Let's like do a decision tree. Let's let's look at the the pros and cons of each one off. Let's let's sort of reduce it down. And then the one that makes the most sense then we can Implement. So there's a there's a balance between okay. This makes clear sense of executable to do it. Sometimes that puts you in a month. Thank you situation other times it helps you accelerate, uh from point A to point B faster. So so there's a combination of things it is it is it is highly contextual but that's sort of like a, you know, a general breakdown of how I approach it. Love it. I think it's it's interesting to see different people's processes. I feel like some people try to act like there's like one way to do certain things like typically like like in school and stuff like that. So it's like oh this is how you do this how you do the processes like the steps that you need to take but in reality it's a lot more different for everybody. Each person has their own. Yeah. I think you have so many variables like, you know, yeah there I read this in a in a book once I think it was levels of energy and it was an interesting. I am probably going to butcher this be says off that the only absolute is is infinity and and so basically like what he's saying is there is no like black or white like wage. If you if you actually listen to the intro as book, he says there's no black or white like the way like reality works is by it's it's almost like like I think that a kaleidoscope like like a diamond where depending on where you look up the angles get reflected in many different ways. And and that sort of a life is I don't necessarily think it's like black or white. There's there's so many complexities and so many variables. So it's really a matter of this team what works can't actually works for you. We're works for the situation. There's still at the end of the day what matters is making decision executing and if it doesn't work, it's okay. Just just taking a step back and re-evaluate. That's fine. Since you're doing all the work in terms of collecting feedback from people you're doing all the like the entire business at the moment. How do you take the feedback from your like customer people that that are using your product to improve it? Like how do you take like the actual written feedback and turn into? Okay, how can I solve that and implement it into the system is back is one of the most important things of that that I could receive personally. I'm always appreciative of when somebody emailed me and says hey like this is this is not working or should I bring it to your attention that you know, I expected this to happen, but this happened that that's extremely valuable to me and then from there. It's basically I look for it's sort of like a pattern recognition off some some people don't necessarily describe it for like what it is actually like under the hood, but I get the I get like their perspective and what sort of their experiencing birth It might not necessarily be at face value from what they're saying, but there is uh sort of a common understanding as to what they're trying to communicate for from my end. And what was actually going on under the hood, right? And then you look at what that person is saying and then you sort of like cross reference across the board of what other people are saying you find the general pattern and the general actual like like problem. So and that's a great way to also do like user requests. Like if you're trying to validate sort of a market you want to talk to people and not necessarily like ask them like the specifics but you want to know the highest level or problems that are facing and not like, oh well like we go to this page this page and then click this button and like this button errors. That's that's too specific. You want the more like high level we want to be able to do this fascist, like right. So like that's kind of like you're trying to you know, just read between the lines understand the patterns. You can't see everything. You know, you you you're blind in in certain areas. And what feedback does is it just it opens up the door. It creates more transparency. And and yeah, there's no hard feelings at all. It's like you don't know what you don't know if they're like, you can only test so much and you try to write your code in a way that like is is you know, what proof but you know, there are you know, dark spots that you might miss and when other people bring it to your attention, it's just another data point that helps you understand the dark spots. So yeah so good. I mean yeah, like without like like nobody can can predict everything or be aware of literally every single like my new detail know and even if you you could somehow I would cause you to like blow a circuit because your mind would like you wouldn't even be able to enjoy a proper life. So it's not even worth it. It's not see. Otherwise, you'll be like, what are the things a little things that I'm trying to look for a job? Things that need to be like resolved what what might be like the like the top process of the people who are using it and you get into a rabbit hole Yeah just doesn't and yeah absolutely absolutely and actually like that, It just reminds me of Life Perfection as a disease. Like I I've had that and it really like Gary he talks about it and I thought about it like his right. It's just it's really insecurity. Like it's it's you know, how being able to handle someone saying oh this is broken or oh I you know, I don't really like this and that's you being insecure and and you not being able to to face the music off. Honestly that the better approach is ship something to the best your ability with the constraints that you have and if people don't like it cool get the feedback and and just you know literate on it and that's fine. You just need to be able to face the truth and that that's going to get you much more results that that you want in life following that approach. I found absolutely I mean I think for myself off The stinks like I have always taken everything personally. I think it's it's one of those things that I have always struggled with so kind of being in this environment. Now what I'm creating stuff and I'm always kind of now looking for feedback and a skin like, oh, what do you think could be best better about this or that it has kind of helped me get into that place where I can take more of the feedback, but that's that's just in that specific like area of my life, which is like the career path and all that stuff in my personal life is still sort of historical to take constructive criticism. And I think it's something that a lot of people thought with any comes from again security I struggle with that as well. I think I think it's just human tendency and it is definitely hard. But you know, it is something to work on Thursday. It's like it's like a muscle it's just like, you know, it's hard to you know, be really really fit and muscular. But you know, if you can put in the due diligence then you'll get there..

Gary
"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

The Candid Creative

08:03 min | 6 months ago

"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

"It's just you by yourself, right? And you're just yeah exactly and I would say that has been the the biggest challenge, you know, it's for me just learning, you know, it's a few things actually like I would say practitioning from what I know as an engineer to understanding, you know that code and and and and and products are just a utility and and you shouldn't be so. Yep. Read to the you know, the syntax the language all the all the coding cliches and and sort of like, you know, paradigms and mindsets in the coding culture don't matter when it actually comes to making sales and solving problems. It's sort of a different Paradigm. So you gotta make that paradigm shift, but it's actually in a weird way of makes you a better quote or two. So I would actually recommend anyone that is a coder to you know, try to like run a business or try to like create a spiritual product and and and actually like serve users and see if it changes your perspective on how bout you you code. So that was like one Challenge and then the other one is obviously just you know being on my own and having to do like content having to do sales having to do customer support juggling all that at one that has has been a challenge. So I'm trying to figure out ways to you know, really motivate people to want to work on this but I think that's hard. You know, I think I think people Deserve to be paying people need to be paid. So I'm I'm working on raising some raising some funding from from some angels and that's going pretty well have a lot of talks in the work I think off with like finding a co-founder. You need to find somebody that's like equally as local as you like, you can find somebody that's like willing to lose it all and probably like like crazy like and believes in that. It's rare to find that and how long does that person can stick around through the highs and lows and great you found about a great person, but that's actually hard to find I think like a lot of great Founders are able to motivate other page to come work for them. But I think there needs to be some sort of immediate incentive or some sort of like guarantee that hey I can pay your bills. I can help you. There's a lot of responsibility there. So I've maintained them so low, so I don't have to go on so much responsibility like guaranteeing a paycheck until I get some cash flow or some some angel angel money and then I'll be able to expand thing. But I think that would be really really nice to have dead. I think Teamwork Makes the DreamWork. I think you have done a fantastic job with creating sir Creator. And I mean I think to me all this is like it's it's very impressive to see someone just by yourself creating something at the level that it is. Yeah. Thank you that that it's very flattering and and I poured a lot of heart and soul into it, but I know you know going for you know, it's not sustainable and and I I really want to motivate people that are are inspired by this to to take part of the journey and and to be a part of it. I think, you know some of the greatest countries in the world, where were a formulation or a collection of really talented people very rarely. Is it ever ever a solo person like even in like sports like I'm a huge sports fan and even if you look at some of the greatest athletes, they had a great, you know support that great support around them and I'm a firm believer of that. I for I really I really excited to get some cash. Door and and and get some people working on the team that that's really exciting to me. Yeah. I mean, I think it's it's also like like I said, like like very important. I mean a certain point like you'll start to I mean burn off because you're doing so much and you're doing everything and then also, I mean like the more people that you have working around your or working for you or working with you the more feedback you can get the the better like more perspectives around it. Yeah. I mean, this is an interesting segment I think like talking about cuz like there's a few lessons here that I'm learning personally. I would like to share one is being that you know, having a having a team not only like is good for business from business standpoint because it offers you the ability to to be an operator as to be working with your business and like one of the the common things to come a piece of devices that you get in business as you don't want to really be working in your business too much you want to be working on your business you want to be working on the high-level strategies kind of like playing like wage. Don't want to be too much in the mud cuz then you can't really like innovate and and think of the future and actually operate the business and make it profitable and be able to allocate resources and stuff. So I'm having a team is great for that. And then also from a personal standpoint. It's amazing because if you can hire people that are smarter than you and like my theory. My principal life is I always want to be in find rooms where I'm the dumbest person. I want to be in a room where there are people who are you know smarter than me with business sales marketing engineering so that I can learn from them because that makes me a better person a much better engineer much better founder. So I I would love to be around people that are that are smarter and be so so yeah, like there's a lot of amazing benefits. I would say the downside of old team is yeah. There's a lot of responsibility you have to show up a lot of a lot of you know, like people that you need to really they hold you accountable and and you you hold yourself accountable. So so there's a lot of responsibility but it's totally worth the pros outweigh the cons for sure. Oh, absolutely. I think it's one of those things where we're at valuable all around for it a hundred percent off now as a developer, what is your process as a developer? Like what are the things that you kind of start looking way when you're starting like for example working on a new feature for sir Creator or just like developing the app itself? Yeah. That's that's good. I would say for me. It's it's worth looking at tools that that inspire me tools that I love using tools that give me go to motions tools that make my life a delightful and then I basically wage to be objective about those experiences as much as they can and I always ask the question. Why why does this make me feel a certain way like if I'm using, you know, Canada or sketch or no dead? Ask myself why like like I think a lot of non-engineers look at it like subconsciously like oh, this is great. Subconsciously. I try to bring it to the Forefront as much as I can while I'm using other tools. They actually sell why do I like this? Why is this good? And then from there I'm able to derive why I like what I don't like what's good. And then I have like sort of a library in my life had a component of user experience. Ugh Lowe's and I just sort of archive those and then when I'm actually working on the like a tool like story Creator, I think about the context like what am I trying to achieve here? What are the least amount of steps in in achieving that thing with like the maximum return and going back to the archive? What has this problem ever been solved by other tools in the past? How do they solve them? And then how can I actually integrate that into the current problem that I'm solving? So that's sort of like a high level job. Rundown of how I solve problems. And then from there, I just sort of test it out. I put it in code. Ideally I've learned that it is much more of a time-saver to actually sketch it out. Sometimes I just want to quote it out. I think I think it is good to sketch it out there. But again, it is contextual. It's sort of like, you know, if if you're just you know, there's there's a balance between like just hitting the ground running and executing and making things happen versus taking a step back and being like, okay, there's a.

engineer developer co-founder Canada Lowe principal founder
"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

The Candid Creative

07:28 min | 6 months ago

"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

"Is crazy like is what time is it goes up? Yeah. I was when I was twenty-three six years. So I work at 3 startups. And yeah, I think I think I gained the necessary experience. I needed in the six years cuz I actually dropped out of college. And so I think this was sort of my college my experience my learning experience. Where was the six years spent working at startups sort of gave me the the Acumen that I needed to be where I'm at now. Absolutely. I mean, I think it's it's very easy. Sing that basically you self-taught yourself to pack and then work your way through startups then make your way through like yeah. Yeah. I think it's just seeing opportunities like wanting a better life and then looking for the opportunities. The one thing that I noticed is it doesn't happen overnight but there are opportunities everywhere. You just need to follow your gut and and your intuition and I saw a lot of opportunity with you know, initially the pirated software that I had I did not take that for granted at all because I didn't have a whole lot of money $500 that time was like it was a lot of money that I was like, yeah. I'm going to take advantage of this somehow. So I would say as a piece of advice, you know, what career opportunities in life follow your gut and you know, it'll take time. They'll take time off. It doesn't happen overnight, but they're everywhere everywhere. We look if you look closely. Absolutely. Yeah. I think it's something that people sometimes just kind of feel like oh, well, I see other people are doing these things that are dead. Happened to to have been able to do it in a short period of time but in reality like many of many of the people that we know are many people that are doing a lot of things that are becoming successful. They've been doing a lot of things before that even like building up to it. Yeah. Yeah, that's a good point. Yeah, you don't hear the full story and it's I think that's like one of the things about social media. That's kind of dangerous because even I find myself falling into this trap of like, you know, almost like comparison syndrome or not syndrome, but the key like Harrison poppy where like you see somebody, you know and and precising a a, you know, a good moment of their life and then you're like, oh I want that now but like you don't realize all the groundwork that person put in and uh, that's like my vehicle just like staying in your own lane because I even with this space that I'm in there's like competitors and it's easy to see like there Mr are and and feel bad but then, you know at the same time the thing that I've learned with that is off your old main focus on what makes you happy focus on the customer and then you know good things will happen. Everyone's on their own path, right? So it's not it's not wise to compare ever. No absolutely not dead. We're just going to be on that race to like achieve the same things that other people are doing and then you forget about the things that you actually want to to accomplish. Yeah, I think yeah, it's it's you're destined to fail without absolutely. As always if you enjoy this episode, please consider subscribing and following us on your favorite podcast platform. And we also now have a YouTube channel mechanic creative TV. So check that out off the link in the show notes now with story creator app. I know you said that you can you started kind of like a while back and you kind of left it and and then you went back to it. What was your first kind of generation to to start start here represent know you mentioned. Yeah. It's a good question. So basically for me, you know, obviously very passionate about engineering out of like a squash all the tools that could build what's the most interesting thought. Well for me, it's the tools that I use a lot to actually feel creative to feel like I can I can share with um ideas of art inspiration emotions. What what tools accelerate that or like provide that for me? It's always been designed tools. Like I've always been fascinated by Sketch I've always been fascinated by Photoshop and now figma and so these schools have always inspired me that they're they're they're cool for the for the user because it gives them the ability to communicate to create but then on a technical aspect, it's really challenging and interesting and for me, it's sort of credit or something. I would want to use for myself. So I'm a user of my own product. So that makes it even more exciting. So it's just kind of a combination between those and then also from a market standpoint. I saw a gap. So so it just made sense absolutely wrong. Yeah, I think it's a very unique. I mean you mention like kind of like after effects for dummies. I think it's it's like the Simplicity and yet like the power of using animated without having to learn how to use After Effects over. How about having to buy a bunch of like different? Templates or things online so you can put it into Final Cut and try to splice it together and make it yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's a personal problem that I I had met. That's why I set out to to save that because I want to be able to create like a quick compelling add in just a few minutes. I don't want to have to dig for the resources and then figure out a way to support them in home and then cuz every Library every path that you use has their own sort of caveats. So so yeah, it's it's not a fun process for me. It's it's almost miserable to the point where I I try to Thursday actually avoid it just because it's not it's just miserable. But I love video. I love I love the end result, but the path getting the end result is not so pleasant. What has been your biggest challenge with the story creator app as you have been kind of growing at you have been doing it now for what like a little over a year. So so yeah, I would say the transition between working on client projects to store Decatur started. So I stopped working on client projects in January. I started life actually, uh contributing to Circular like like clothing store credit and it was like August so I was doing 80% client work from August to January down 20% story Creator and then from January to now I was doing a hundred percent story Creator and then I started actually like wise up and talk to customers in April, which I should have done that back in August, but I was just so like ready to tackle the problem and code code the tool that completely didn't do that. Like every business person would say you talked to your customers first name. Got problems forgot PIN pointed and created a very small a solution but I just went all out but basically yeah, I started getting customers in April. I started talking to people so you've been sort of a stagnated a path but really like started in January by going full-time. So I think I'm still really early in retrospect. Oh, yeah. So I mean, yeah, like if you think about it, yeah, like you start actually going full-on since like January. Yeah. That's that's that's a pretty short time to be able to like to get it to where you I don't know. I mean, I know that you're.

YouTube Decatur
"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

The Candid Creative

07:08 min | 6 months ago

"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

"Going into California amazing experience, especially coming from the Mid-West. It's a completely different territory with like the tall redwoods and the sun peeking through and just the greenery fountains. So I remember going in especially after a Nevada, which is just like a desert it was so cool. It was so strong like a cliche time here is awesome. I remember going into San Francisco and accident. That's a story off with like my brakes on metal on metal and like my windshield crack going up the San Francisco hills was not fun. Oh and then I remember I was cool. I got to come back here when I make some money, but yep. To get power out though, cuz that's where you it's actually illegal to sleep in your car. It's a little bit safer and actually read an article in Business Insider with somebody did something very similar. So I gave me the confidence. I knew I had to go to Mountain View plus Palo Alto and I knew there was like a bunch of co-working spaces and one in particular called The Hacker Dojo. Shout out to the hacker Dojo. It's a 24/7, hacker space where they have like a hardware section. They have sort of an incubator for like up-and-coming startups and then they have like the main room which is just open tables for programmers hackers people that maybe might be working on their side hustle that want to go and collaborate after after work. It was a great facility had a kitchen it was 24/7. It's just it's like Warehouse that they have ripped out. It's 24/7 and it's awesome. I met some of the coolest people ever like like hackers like Diehard Packers that were like so interested in, New Jersey. In the Deep inner workings attack, which a lot of it is very like capitalist and I think that's great. You need to make money but these are like the hardcore hackers that like built some off we will ship but we're so hacker. They like they didn't know how to make money but they were so so amazing and I just met some really cool people and then basically I just went from there. I slept in the car for a little bit worked on Thursday again, and then I just met people I talked to you know, some Founders in the incubators. And as soon as first got my opportunity to work in Tech was was from from talking to the founder of XY gaming Aaron Fletcher shout-out. Yeah, he was building a cool like online betting platform for for for video Gamers where you and I could go onto a website. I can play rocket League. I'll put my credit card down you put your credit card down. We put money in escrow and then it has an API. We're basically after the match is over if you win it'll automatically pay your bank wage. So it's really cool platform for all that and it had like ability to friend people and stuff. So that was good that got my foot in the door. And this is like coming from building the basketball stat tracking app. We're doing a little bit of freelance work to entering tachyon actually working with the team and and really like, you know collaborating on on get and and and actually like doing like scrum and and like handbags and and Sprints and novels like a newer thing to me at the time but that like gave me sort of the education that I needed that I was actually hungry for because initially going out to San Francisco. I wanted to build a company like that was off my initial ambition. But this I knew I needed I needed to be able to like be absorbed with like a really smart people focused on building businesses and they needed to learn from this is a great opportunity. And then from there I uh saw another opportunity in San Francisco, and I moved up to San Francisco finally got out of the car and I was living in an apartment. It was funny cuz like I go from page. And my mom's house who living in a car to to living in the most expensive city in the world. It was a weirdest thing ever cuz like my first apartment ever was a very nice small two bedroom apartment in the Castro San Francisco and it cost me I think like $2,200 for for one bedroom shared in a two-bedroom apartment. And that was my first thought it ever and so that was great. It was a really amazing experience and then basically got some momentum working and startups, uh work at one particular sign up for a long time learning so much there and then during that Journey, you know met a girl. We you know moved in together and another neighborhood of San Francisco. And then unfortunately, we broke up and then I quit my job and then I try to like find myself I try to actually build the initial version of circuit a long time ago, but then I was like got it I hit the trough of sorrow and I was like fuck off. What I'm doing here. How this is top, I'm running out of money and during the whole time my mistake. This might be valuable. My mistake was I had a plan B and I was kind of wishy-washy with committing the story criticized like I'll play around with 3rd grader. But as soon as like my bank account goes below like $8,000 or $5,000 and I'm feeling slightly uncomfortable. I'm going to go talk to her. I'm out. I'm out. I'm going to page to play around with my getting another opportunity cuz it was it was I mean, San Francisco rents were were super high. So it was It was kind of, you know, I felt a lot of pressure mean how long have some cash flow so so but that's that's an excuse. I was just bullshit, you know, the planet having the plan B was a mistake. So but then I ended up getting a job at a it would kind of cool because the the the first jar of the job that I worked at in San Francisco was very start up very bootstrap very we don't care about testing we don't care about like, you know, like great engineering practices. We just want to move That's right. So I learned a lot there but then the next company I worked out it's very is it had like a seed or an a round that they just raised like twenty-five million. They had like a world class c t o p like, you know actual like structure within the organization like pods and they have like sales department like it was it was a silver start up but like it was a completely different atmosphere that I needed to actually occurred. So I go in there and we're starting to use like best practices like typescript, uh, you know, like end-to-end testing so I learn a lot during that process. So now I feel like I have sort of multiple practice and and through that Journey I'll just I felt like I was itching to start my own company. It's just start my own company every day that I would walk in there. I would I would talk to my co-workers like hey like you ever want to start your own company and everyone seemed like dude we're working on this one. I'm like, yeah. I want to start real company and then eventually got to a point where I you know, I left and went down to San Diego. I started freelancing to get some cash flow off. Or and then you know, I got enough Runway. I was like, okay, I'm going to commit to Spring creator for at least a year straight. No questions asked no plan B, let's go. Let's just do it how many years ago they used to San Francisco was this like, yeah. I think it was it was when I was twenty-three. So it's been it's been about six years in total cuz I'm twenty-nine now. So take a 2020 - 6 so I think it was like 2014.

San Francisco Castro San Francisco San Diego Nevada California basketball New Jersey Business Insider founder rocket League Aaron Fletcher Mountain View Palo Alto sales department
"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

The Candid Creative

06:45 min | 6 months ago

"michael aubry" Discussed on The Candid Creative

"Hello, and welcome to episode 20 of the kind of creative. I seriously can't believe that we have been already twenty episodes, but it's amazing to be here. Thank you. Today, I'm joined with the founder and creator of story creator app. So without further Ado. Let's Jump Right In in today's episode. All right. Hello everybody today. We're here join with Michael from story creator app. How you doing? Michael doing good Antonio can't complain. I think we're both in Southern California and not the weather's nice. It's a Friday right or rock and roll. Absolutely. I mean, I know you mentioned that you are Creator and founder of Siri creator app, but for those who are not familiar with you tell us a bit about your background and how you got started. Yeah. I mean really quickly story Creator is like an after effects for dummies. It's basically an easy-to-use tool for Motion Graphics for trimming video for creating social media content and the quick too long did not read description of how I got here was basically I started hacking on things off when I was like Seventeen eighteen, you know, my mom's like home. I was raised by a single mother and yeah, I mean the stock in the midwest there wasn't much to do other than play bass. All in in in hack away at things we don't have a whole lot of money so but I didn't have time and I wanted to figure out ways to either make money online and at the same time it's very interesting gaming at the time you could modify Xboxes and you could burn video games on torrent sites to me and my buddy figured out how to do that and that just sort of opened up a can of worms cuz for the tourist sites, I found all these Adobe products that were $500 six hundred dollars and I could I could I read them. I probably should be admitting this but it is what it is. I think transparency is the way and so I did that and I was like, you know what like this is a serious opportunity there, you know tools that require learning, you know a month or two, but it's worth it because this is a $500 piece of software that gives me some of an advantage. So I basically just got into that I learned how to code. I wanted to try to make money online and I want to try to like Leverage these table Is that I had access to so that basically just LED down another, you know can of worms of you know, how do you code how do you put together databases. Got to to a front end and I was just very fascinated by that very curious with with code cuz it just felt like a superpower to me. And then from that point I was the basketball team we figured out. Hey, we can take our you know, thirst for learning how to code and apply it to our basketball league where we can build a stat tracking app. So that was actually the acceleration for my career right there by having a curiosity to code and then actually having a practical use case for the code that really like, you know moved away rapidly, but the problem was I wasn't making money from it, you know, I was living at my mom's apartment and she was like, what are you doing for your time? So I would lock myself up and I would teach myself how to code and wage. Requires like serious discipline, you have to be, you know, banging your head against the wall on some bugs for hours upon hours until you figure out what's going on. You know, there's a lot of of a learning curve to it, but I was I was a tournament I was there in in in in her house for a very long time to the point where she was like Michael what what are you doing life? And I got frustrated like Mom I I'm learning a code is going to be big. It's a cool thing. She didn't get it though. So I got a little frustrated and I just moved out of the house. I went went to live with my friend and I was in I was living in his basement at the time. I was like, you know, this is not this is you know, I need to make money. I got to figure out a way to do it you offer me a job at Verizon where I could cell phones and I did not like that at all. I had to wear a tie had to go in I had to like walk check the safe and scan the IMEI eyes and log that into the computer and then like I have to the customers that come in and talk to them and sell them and I wasn't my forte. I don't like this song. And the owners of this Rising came and they were actually from I think San Diego funny enough either like where the reports like how I was this quarter in as like, oh, that's not that's not up to par bath and then they just go back and to San Diego and in my head like they were just living on a beach and just like yep shouting out words and stuff and I'm sitting in the midwest were in high command like following his orders. Like this is the same old crap. I know how to code. Let me go out to where the coders are in San Francisco. I don't care what it takes this I don't like this life. I got a change things. I have this skill that have been working out for a very long time. Let me take advantage of it. Let me let me leverage it. And so basically I just picked up left one day. I left a note to my friends. Hey, I love you and Mandy thank you for letting me say I really appreciate that. But I'm on a quest I got to go. I know I know it's crazy, but you'll understand later and then I just took off so for long story short. Basically, this is going into like the whole Sure here. I don't really tell it from this angle though. This is a little bit more in detail that I normally tell it but yeah, so basically just went out to San Francisco and I had like no money down like okay, you know what? I have a skill that is valuable. I can figure out a way to advertise it and and you know just scrap up if I have two at the worst case scenario. I'll cut grass. I'll I'll do whatever it takes to get some cash in. I'm sure people can hire a mover. There's a need for that whatever it takes but as long as I have little bit of cash to put some food in my mouth, I have the bar where I could sleep in I'm good for for a little bit. So basically I put an ad online before I left strategically because I know it takes time and then I just took off and then you know one day passes. I mean in like Nebraska nothing to day passes. I'm in Wyoming nothing and then like on the third day second third day. I'm like going into Utah. Remember I was in YouTube. And then the customer replied is a hey I'm interested. I need to build a WordPress plug-in and then from there I was like, oh perfect cool. Let me like engage with this person was like, oh, yeah, I can do this for you. You know, I would like half the payment up front. Is it cool you pay me half payment up front. So I go from like $300 that money is doing down for gas and stuff. And then I'm like cool now. I'm at like eight hundred dollars a month vs. Amazing. And then I remember.

Michael founder midwest San Francisco San Diego basketball Verizon Adobe Southern California Motion Graphics Xboxes YouTube Mandy Wyoming Nebraska Utah Antonio