9 Burst results for "Miami University Of Miami"

"miami university miami" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

07:16 min | Last month

"miami university miami" Discussed on From Scratch

"I used to speak to her three times a week. And what's her name Shirley rosen in fact all of the my codes and all you know you now need to have codes on. Everything is my the year my mother was born so i always can remember her now. I know what. You're typing on your. Atm ignore atm machine instinctively. You're drinking up the the fashion industry just by being around your father and your grandfather. What are some of your most prominent memories of being with him at work. you know. Even before i went to work. I remember running around my my grandfather's trust factory in waltham and going through the dresses and just experiencing sort of that whole factory part of the business. I remember my dad bringing close home us rummaging through them and i also remember when i was young. My dad would always have business people over the house and just sitting there and observing and not really understanding what was going on but just soaking it all in so to speak so it's true like from an early age And i don't think my dad ever. He never wanted me or ever said anything about me. Going into the business to follow him. In fact he said quite the opposite. There were some flirtation with becoming a professional golf player. You dropped out of college You went to the university of miami university miami and I'm a college in palm springs california. I'm basically to play a lot of golf. Where's there a a pivot moment or turning point where you said. Okay i'm i'm leaving and joining. The business was actually my uncle who said to me. One day I was playing golf with my uncle and california. And that's basically what i was doing was playing golf. I was nineteen years old in mongo said to me when he when. When are you going to get serious and go to work for your father and stop playing golf every day. That sort of how that happened. My dad sort of put together an interesting career for me because I started working in a knitting mill in long island and From there i went to a address factory in new bedford massachusetts and sort of got to see the industry from a from an angle. That people wouldn't get the opportunity to see Today and and and very rarely Learn sort of the way everything worked from the inside out and You know was able to spend time on the sewing floor with with the pattern makers with With the cutters with the in the warehouse shipping. And and really you know understand technically a lot of not only what happens there but how those people think and how to relate to them and so i i spent like a year and a half doing that and then i came to new york and It was at the time that my data done the deal with. Calvin klein came to new york and worked in the showroom. Just as a as a sales assistant really or salesperson it was one of the most revolutionary things that happened back in nineteen seventy seventies and with brooke shields commercial and all that kind of thing and so it was just an amazing experience and exposure and wanna speak more about this. Jeans was the changing agents for the business in a away. Puritan did a licensing deal with calvin klein that really caused the company's profits to escalate. And you speak about that My dad had a company that in the in the nineteen seventies was doing around three hundred billion dollars in sales and every year would eke out a small profit and was made up of ten different dress companies and a lot of factories. All over the us and lots of employees. And so on and you know it was a good living and a good business. But it wasn't anything special but in nineteen seventy six. He did this deal. With calvin klein and i think nineteen seventy seven. We started shipping the first jeans and within three years. My dad had closed down every single business. He had went from like four thousand employees to eight hundred employees. No more manufacturing facilities or anything and and had a company that was doing the same three hundred billion in sales and making ten times the prophet he was making the other way and interestingly enough in my my dad said it to me that it never registered and recently did is that you know we said to me you're at the forefront of a whole new revolution in our industry designer labeled apparel before that who designer identified apparel was not really what was going on in american fashion. Calvin klein and ralph lauren. And so on with. We're really the pioneers of designers having their own label and owning their own business. It really wasn't like that before. People like my father that controlled the business. And so i. As i said i never really really never really appreciated a registered with me and maybe i think four or five years ago i said yeah now i remember my dad saying that he was right in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. He got what kind of cancer. My dad had a kidney cancer but he never stopped working till that tell really really the very end and really spent as much time as he could preparing me for something that i mean. Frankly i didn't understand at the time but was virtually you know very difficult and impossible situation to prepare before. So you're twenty six. When you took over the company barry schwartz and a calvin klein. They bought your company in. They bought puritan in a hostile takeover. And you were there for for a few years and then you spend time at incline as the ceo and divorced from them but then in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven Is sort of like this new era. Where theory was born. Could you tell me about your encounter with eliot o'hara who is ultimately our our market sorta tell you a little bit about the you know even the events that happened before that i'm very open about my career and I don't believe that success is just a straight line of accomplishments. You know my dad passing and having to take over the company and and ultimately ban calvin buying the company was war ended up being a good thing and i stayed on Worked for for bearing. Calvin for four or five years actually was going to leave a very shortly thereafter and i had got a job to run one of ralph lawrence businesses and i went to the guy that had brought in to run the company and i said to him. You know i'm gonna. I'm gonna leave..

golf Shirley rosen university of miami university calvin klein waltham Calvin klein california mongo palm springs new bedford brooke shields new york long island miami Puritan massachusetts ralph lauren kidney cancer barry schwartz
"miami university miami" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:17 min | 7 months ago

"miami university miami" Discussed on WTOP

"Matt Roush joined us earlier to talk about some big stars in new sitcoms. Well, the first big name is Wayne Johnson, who has become quite the movie stars and dropping the name the Rock. But here he sort of embracing again. He's got a new NBC sitcom called Young Rock, where he's sort of the narrator of the piece. You see him and every episode, But he sets up stories about his coming of age and apparently had such an eventful childhood that he has three young actors playing him in different timelines. One 10 years old when he's living in Hawaii with his wrestler, father and all those other wrestlers and then 15 when he's moved in Pennsylvania, and he's almost drifting into delinquency, and then it 18 when he's in Miami University, Miami as a college football draftees, So you see all these different life lessons that he tells the framework is that he's running for president the year 2032. Then he's telling us all these little life lessons and stories. Not terribly funny, but it's a sweet show. And if you like the rock, you're probably like this. But to me the bigger deal is that Keenan Thompson is coming to prime time after all those many years on Saturday night Live. He's the longest running cast member on that show, and he's got a show called Keenan where he's playing a widow. Dad got two adorable daughters. He hosts a morning show in Atlanta, and he's processing his grief. But he's got a big family around him, including, in a big surprise, Don Johnson playing his father in law, who's really funny, really laid back and fun. Here a nice surprise there. But Keenan, you know, he's just got a great personality. That's a good fit for him. Yeah, he does so well in SNL. I'm really rooting for him to do well on this show as well. Yeah, Me too. Yeah, and who else? Well, we also have Kevin James, who's had a couple of big hit shows on CBS. And he's got to show that set in the world of NASCAR very well timed, coming right after today's scheduled running of the Daytona 500, the show is called the crew and he's the chief of the crew of a struggling racing team that's in turmoil caused. The owner of the team just stepped down. Lee has his daughter running the team. Him. It's a workplace comedy, really, But Kevin James is right at home in the world of NASCAR. So if you like NASCAR, you like Kevin James. It really feels like a kind of show that could be on CBS. But Netflix is all things to all people. First season drops on Monday. Okay, and finally briefly, Mad, something that's making you happy. And Disney. Plus oh, so much the whole five seasons. Never before all five seasons available of the Muppet Show from the 19 seventies made Kermit Miss Piggy, a star. All the stars who were stars in the seventies, played backstage with the Muppet.

Matt Roush Don Johnson Wayne Johnson Kevin James Pennsylvania Monday Hawaii SNL Keenan Thompson NBC five seasons Atlanta Disney CBS Young Rock Saturday night Live Netflix 2032 Lee 15
"miami university miami" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

07:23 min | 9 months ago

"miami university miami" Discussed on From Scratch

"Not really understanding what was going on but just soaking it all in so to speak so it's true like from an early age And i don't think my dad ever. He never wanted me or ever said anything about me going into the business to follow him. In fact he said quite the opposite. There were some flirtation with becoming a professional golf player. You dropped out of college You went to the university of miami university miami and I'm a college in palm springs california. I'm basically to play a lot of golf. Where's their a a pivot moment or turning point where you said okay. I'm i'm leaving an joining. The business was actually my uncle who said to me. One day I was playing golf with my uncle in california. And that's basically what i was doing was playing golf. I was nineteen years old. Bongo said to me when he when when are you going to get serious and go to work for your father and stop playing golf every day. That sort of how that happened. My dad sort of put together an interesting career for me because I started working in a knitting mill in long island and From there i went to a address factory in new bedford massachusetts and sort of got to see the industry from a from an angle. That people wouldn't get the opportunity to see Today and and and very rarely Learn sort of the way everything worked from the inside out and You know was able to spend time on the sewing floor with with the pattern makers with With the cutters with the in the warehouse shipping. And and really you know understand technically a lot of not only what happens there but how those people think and how to relate to them and so i i spent like a year and a half doing that and then i came to new york and It was at the time that my data done the deal with. Calvin klein came to new york and worked in the showroom. Just as a as a sales assistant really or salesperson it was one of the most revolutionary things that happened back in nineteen seventy s and with brooke shields commercial and all that kind of thing and so it was just an amazing experience and exposure and wanna speak more about this. Jeans was the changing agents for the business in a away. Puritan did a licensing deal with calvin klein that really caused the company's profits to escalate. And you speak about that My dad had a company that in the in the nineteen seventies was doing around three hundred billion dollars in sales and every year would eke out a small profit and was made up of ten different dress companies and a lot of factories. All over the us and lots of employees. And so on and you know it was a good living and a good business. But it wasn't anything special but in nineteen seventy six. He did this deal. With calvin klein and i think nineteen seventy seven. We started shipping the first jeans and within three years. My dad had closed down every single business. He had went from like four thousand employees to eight hundred employees. No more manufacturing facilities or anything and and had a company that was doing the same three hundred billion in sales and making ten times the prophet he was making the other way and interestingly enough in my my dad said it to me that it never registered and recently did is that you know we said to me you're at the forefront of a whole new revolution in our industry designer labeled apparel before that there who designer identified apparel was not really what was going on in american fashion. Calvin klein and ralph lauren. And so on with. Were really the pioneers of designers having their own label and owning their own business. It really wasn't like that before. People like my father that controlled the business. And so i. As i never really really never really appreciated a registered with me and maybe i think four or five years ago i said yeah now i remember my dad saying that he was right in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. He got what kind of cancer. My dad had Kidney cancer but he never stopped working till that tell really really the very end and really spent as much time as he could preparing me for something that i mean. Frankly i didn't understand at the time but was virtually you know very difficult and impossible situation to prepare before. So you're twenty six. When you took over the company barry schwartz and a calvin klein. They bought your company in. They bought puritan in a hostile takeover. And you were there for for a few years and then you spend time at incline as the ceo and divorced from them but then in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven Is sort of like this new era. Where theory was born. Could you tell me about your encounter with eliot o'hara who is ultimately our market sorta tell you a little bit about the you know even the events that happened before that i'm very open about my career and I don't believe that success is just a straight line of accomplishments. You know my dad passing and having to take over the company and and ultimately ban calvin buying the company was wa- ended up being a good thing and i stayed on Worked for for bearing. Calvin for four or five years actually was going to leave a very shortly thereafter and i had got a job to run one of ralph lauren's businesses and i went to the guy that had brought in to run the company and i said to him. You know i'm gonna. I'm gonna leave. I got this job opportunity. And he's turned to me and he said no. You're not going to go anywhere. You're going to stay here with me. You're one of the best things we have here and You're going to run this company again one day and i said are you sure. Have you been reading the press. And he said you're gonna stay stay with me and work together with me and I stayed and ultimately i Was promoted to running that. The company can and I think with that happened. I sort of had a different point of view and and said to myself. I don't have anything more to accomplish here. And maybe in some ways. I wanted to just prove that my dad was right and those guys were wrong and I i left the company And interesting an interesting enough. I'm still very close friends with barry schwartz and When i see. Calvin calvin rava very nice relationship anyway. Then i got offered the job to be the. Ceo van klein. I had known the fellow that that was the part owner of the company. Part part of the company was american guide. Another guy was was..

eliot o'hara new york Ceo van klein california Calvin klein three hundred billion calvin klein eight hundred employees Bongo four nineteen seventy s five years four thousand employees ten times nineteen seventies first jeans ralph lauren Today five years ago Puritan
"miami university miami" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"miami university miami" Discussed on WTVN

"Political philosophy into a nation, another country first demoralize them to stabilize the economy. Normalize your Way of thinking and then disarm those in Power. Moralize. Well, First thing we did is we We ripped the church, TJ, a Christian backbone of our country. Away from our Children. We got the church out of schools for 150 years that religion Plus civic duty was part of the American schoolhouse. That's how we raised young citizens. We took. We got rid of that in the forties and fifties. This kid's went on into college in the sixties, and many of them became radicalized, of course, that the very Noble civil rights movement of the sixties was not to be diminished at all in what I'm saying. But the the education level for several decades our state houses and governors and congressional federal level have fully invested in throwing our tax dollars into higher education without a second thought as to what their funding Now I saw the beginnings of this in the middle eight eighties when I was at a public university here in Ohio Miami University, Miami University PC culture. Now Campus PC is coming to your child's school. It's trickling down into this school systems across the country as our schools are being urged to adopt political and cultural objectives into the core curriculum. That's going to be a problem. Many, many school systems, the United States are set to roll out BLM themed lesson plans this fall. I am not going to say black lives matter. It's a burn loot murder. I'm going to say BLM because black lives do matter. BLM is different than black lives matter. We're going to learn a lot about being Lim, its founders, their self proclaimed Marxist training. And their funding. Memory corn. According to Ah! New York City Department of Education. Teachers are going to delve into systemic racism, police brutality and white privilege in their classrooms. Assuming the kids are back in school. These these projects. We're gonna have this something like this in our schools here in central Ohio. I think it's already on their way. And I think our administration is being spoon fed this stuff. They're being bullied there being silenced and there's no pushback. But let me tell you what these projects are. Number one. They're not presented the parents for pre approval number two. They're encouraging teachers to address social injustices in the eyes of the other side that exist way beyond education. And it and it encourages advocacy work, okay? That if you want to be on campus, you're over 18. That's fine, but we're not gonna have indoctrination in public schools. Encouraging. Students to identify and condemn racism and encouraging eight year olds or 10 year olds or 12 year old Racism is undeniably a laudable undertaking. That's fine. That's not what's really happening, and that's not what's gonna happen. These things are Trojan horses. Conceived to incubate and channel This movement's attitudes for political ends. Just check this out. Kids recognize your white privilege. I reckon I don't know what that is. Maybe I'm supposed to know. But take a moment and research one of the founders of BLM, Patrice Color C U L L. A R S. You're gonna hear a lot more about her and her other co founders. She is a self proclaimed trained Marxist and a very, very vocal anti Israel activist. Her words, not mine. We are going to learn a lot more about him. Founders, Financial backers and George Soros. Research that guy So today's culture so demoralize Culture leads to politics. Politics follows culture, the entire construct of American culture. Has been for centuries symbolically represented by the flag of the United States of America, the national anthem. There's only one Apparently represents an insult to a small fraction of our Brothers and sisters of our country. No. I don't know how many millions of black folks in America really? I'm going to buy into this. I guess we'll find out Today's sports The NFL. We all now know. Are going to have decided to play. The black national anthem. I didn't know there was one Apparently, it's a song that's been around over 100 years. Lift every voice and sing What's that do to unite our country? Also Players and both the NFL in the MBA, maybe wearing decals or patches. Calling out police brutality and systemic racism. I didn't think the N B a could even comment on what was going on in Hong Kong. And some players get in trouble with that. And he also I've read that the NFL is going to give $250 million to Social justice funds. The problem is, they don't realize they're feeding into this leviathan of another political thought. Which is communism. A form of communism that may sound radical. It's not guys a tear step to disrupt the economy. Well, cove it comes out of nowhere. Man. We have covert shutdowns. We have a precipitous decline in death rates. Testing ramps up. It's clear the virus is no longer a significant threat to the health of Americans who don't already have serious medical issues. Get covert hysteria is increasing rather than decreasing. Why now? All of a sudden we're wearing masks. What happened with March 20th wearing masks. We were told not to wear masks. Now we need to wear masks. Step three Normalize. The new normal Yeah, the new normal We've all probably said that at one point in time in the last 90 days. Statues and monuments are gone, the ballgames air out or at least you're not gonna be allowed to go to the stadium to watch. Man, And if you do watch you're going to be you're going to be watching the these names and narratives. At the ESPN zone, NBC's of the world want with their Madison Avenue pals. I want.

BLM NFL United States American schoolhouse Ohio America George Soros murder NBC Ohio Miami University Lim Hong Kong Miami University City Department of Education New York ESPN Israel Patrice Color
"miami university miami" Discussed on The Nat Coombs Show

The Nat Coombs Show

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"miami university miami" Discussed on The Nat Coombs Show

"That fought join World War Two so haskins a permanent vocal supporter. Likely Change. Do you think of the generals? The. Generals. She's. A little bit a little bit more generic for me a little bit I think all you can have. You can have like the Patriots Games. You can have those guys with the muskets and the long flowing. Nice right. Fire! Safe Meyer, non loaded rifles I think. I think those are cap guns basically when the Patriots scored touchdown. Tampa Bay. I was GONNA say. Account? It does that does that. We buy that. Well Yeah, red cells seems to be the the most likely cause. SNIDE is going to I guess. Obviously can like some kind of continuity if nothing else, and that seems to be the best option round. Miami Miami University. Miami University of went went Redskins to Red Hawks about twenty years ago. And the logos more like a you know kind of a proud you know bird as it were but yeah, it's I. I wonder about that sort of ripple effect. I mentioned with the other teams in watching this You know watching this sort of developed. There's there's a lot of pressure on Snyder, and that's the thing he's you know. Sometimes we judge actions more than words, but I think Snyder's gotTa. GotTa Get up there in for when he and he's got to be there when they announced the name change, and he's gotta be like again as we were saying earlier, you know I was on the wrong side of this and I've been you know he's got to say I've I've I've seen some sort of awakening I've you know I want our fans to feel comfortable? I want people of all. Creeds and colors to be comfortable cheering for our team coming to our games, buying our merchandise and and you know making sure that people understand that this. Wasn't you know he didn't have a gun to his head, and and made the change just because he thought about losing millions and hundreds of millions of dollars. We watch that one Keane Leeann by this time next week. will that story might Wanna progress that Jackson will suddenly and I wonder whether the deals that Prescott and Shawn Watson will have got done or at least. Further. The further move forwards Greg. Brady's always a pleasure chatting to you I way through the thinking about this ten fifteen minutes of political material, GonNa. Get a drop in. That's for a spit of poll that we could work great to see him at and of course you. Going great guns with a radio show, so that's where it loses catchy. Where else can talk sports on the Night Cincinnati? Where else can they catch you? Well all over the place right now. In Toronto I'm doing some work with Global News Radio six forty Toronto, but all all future announcements future stand up gigs, nat at least for the next month and a half. 'til. Solidify a few things you can find me a greg. Brady T on twitter. That's. Loved you get to see about take. Banks. CAST, the host, the Neill Reynolds podcast and something called Sky Sports NFL gotTA rings a bell. Welcome back to the show deal, Reynolds! The Pleasure I. I love the Marino the background that. I put it up just a second ago. Is it right and it was covering up? Shot might cost less efficient a bit too to. Have met. Up and then Marino fell cloudy. Again! This show it didn't want to talk. About? So. You've got rivers on the left as a program, the bobblehead next game. Andrew? Luck. Nine play. The Vikings made up for me. My Book I again. Yes by sued. Dog just a couple of. This is actually the. Completely. Shelf was completed for the toys until about two months ago when. It kind of matched. I'd be doing more of this stuff from. Out Cable the toys in Kane. NFL Two which was in the office than strictly business rental strictly business. is going to see a week at a talk in particular today about about the Miami Dolphins because on the show. In recent weeks we'll be looking at teams that we think are amongst the most improved in the NFL and I think the dolphins suddenly are in the conversation that shore, so we want to joe down a bit more as to exactly what to expect this season where the upgrades all wedded deficiencies still are and try walkout what when it comes out in the wash that dolphin season's GonNa. Look like so. Let's start well. Let's start with with the dropped. He's something I've been thinking about. Going to I guess became almost a no brainer. Because of the three first round picks right. Do you, think the dolphins. If they'd had let's say, they had like most other noble teams only had one first rounder. Would they go fatuity think if they'd had less first round picks. I still think they would I, think they feel he's that guy. I think they're not worried about the medical concerns too much and. Look. We've been through this as dolphins fans. How many quarterbacks like being very since Dan Marino Scotteri so that time beyond said. They think he's the onset and I think they would've dice on the him. Regardless United, she thinks they will fill the business. We kind of expected around the draw that. Might trade off the might have to go out to win Detroit. Weather might move fend off charges at the weather. draft picks an I. Go like does make install straightaway, and in fact I think is in their best interests does. It looks like they feel like they were dressed that position. They would have gone. Interest, who's your favorite dolphins quarterback post.

Dan Marino Scotteri Patriots Brady T NFL Snyder Miami Dolphins Miami Miami University Toronto Tampa Bay Miami University haskins Neill Reynolds Cincinnati Detroit Meyer Keane Leeann Vikings Greg
"miami university miami" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

10:52 min | 1 year ago

"miami university miami" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"In the hall of fame for so long and I'm like coach is ridiculous and you had the the glass half full you're like well at least I'll be the first raider Las Vegas raiders to go in the hall of fame and I was like you know a coach that's good stuff I like that right there so looking forward to that coach and I can't wait so I'll be in canton there and I know you've made it there many times and when you go in hopefully they recognize our good pal in yours or your your amazing friend cliff Brad not interpret cliff branch number twenty one people don't realize that you were a wide receivers coach for a while there for that rate organization from seventy two to seventy eight so I would think that he'd be a one year price pupils yes he was my first year there I go to use by he was a rookie that took him under my wing and for awhile there it all right we'll wash of matured as a player as a human being as a person and as a dear friend and let in recent years the whole life big smile and that if you look at what he did if you look at his statistics let me move some of those guys that are involved a month away would would would either especially in the playoffs so you know there is there is a there is a problem with the selection right about the whole frame body system but there is is broken and they need to fix it then there's a lot of upset people because of what they did this this past year and Mandla and the way they did it exactly and for you folks that don't know why they have the a senior class so you know we're waiting to find out and coach floors was one of those and we all anticipated for sure he's going to get in but what do they do is they go to the NFL on this really irked me as well and a lot of people look it's one thing if you were truly fair and square going to look at blind resumes and say alright you know what bill Cowher Jimmy Johnson they deserve it but that wasn't it both these guys work for NFL network's they carry the games and instead of waiting the allotted time that they were supposed to to make the announcement each network that those gentlemen were on takes it upon themselves to convert you know with the league and they're in cahoots and the whole thing happens to where they make a big announcement and they make it earlier than was supposed to be expected to where if I'm somebody like coach Flores's family I'm watching and I'm just devastated and coach I felt that way and I know all of raider nation felt that way like are you kidding me because we know after your playing days after your coaching days how many years you dedicated to radio broadcasts in your life I have incredible better than six decades tied to this league and for them to die you know just let that go by the wayside and look no offense to Jimmy Johnson I really think a lot of it is because he did such a bang up job there at Miami University Miami the hurricanes won the national titles you know took care of business there and you can say look that didn't come into play but that's bogus because there's no way that his resume from the culture that coach of the Dallas Cowboys is is something that should put him in the hall of fame above you first of all coaching wise but then you also have the player and the broadcasting as well it's absolutely unbelievable Bryant blind resume coach you have been a one seed A. N. Jimmy Johnson been S. five C. world strong for me to comment on that because we don't want you to realize a good bill and they're both good guys may be pulled up standing careers but their long ago developed any groups in the present careers and you know the white white you can't they wait a little longer baseball is but that way baseball you have to wait a long time to get the baseball hall of fame I don't know that much about basketball and let you know it's just a it's a different world I don't know yeah everything seems to be publicity focuses Google close it up skip the most popular or it's not a popular account is is you got to earn the right to be in in I mean I felt good about earning the right to be a finalist and that was a very brief Eurovision you earn and that was gonna sure but Brea oil the on my way I thought they could make it this year because no format there but was told such later by one of the people from all payment you're probably you got a great chance next year because of the way we're going to do things well didn't happen there anyway I don't even get a call I was one of the final severity would get a call to tell me that I said here in palm springs older but those discounts to add classes right there and that that there are several things throughout the years that really irked me about the shield and about the league look it's it's great entertainment that's one thing we enjoy it we get together we supported Thursday nights Sunday nights and Saturdays late in the year Monday nights throughout the year but at the end of the day there's a lot wrong still with the NFL I'm really with the criteria in the way the procedure as far as for hall of fame voting and you know had it been for the fans you know doing all this voting culture to been in a long time ago well let me go back to your playing days let's say let me start it out though well it when you're when you're playing QB for the raiders talk to me a little bit about those early days in and it give me give me a game that you remember that really stands out to you as far as playing quarterback there for the raiders well probably the war who won a game justice is we nineteen sixty three well the users first year but as it goes here and and I'd just come off of builders resident are you when I had a lung infection so I was making a comeback in a way and and Conde was fire were the quarterbacks yeah me and me a final game of the we played the ball we played the Houston and he said that the drug plan and drug plan and had a great year and we had a good year and a winter up what eleven games a year and then gave his me coming from a ward gave when senior and I had a pretty good you're in Georgia I work you talk about a shootout it was an app that was thirty five thirty five in Georgia that walked in the locker rooms together if they were right next as you grow up in Christendom it thirty five point similar to you and I have you in trouble a good approach by myself and then after the game if it came down the lines who had the ball on us with the bullets and Mike Mercer kicked a field goal to win the game fifty three fifty two to forty nine the he was a hero I threw six touchdown you throw six touchdowns are carrying this guy off the field is beautiful no it was a bike well it was an old woman the life of the life of a kicker yeah I mean I knew we had a little stated being Frank you'll feel what we're waiting for the calls to be built and we had about twenty eight twenty thousand standing room only people eighteen yeah the deal yet with current on the club five five right there there right behind it and the place went crazy you are call we wanted a championship game the whole city of Oakland gonna walk up and that was what I think we we really became a pretty good they should know that because when you look at why the raider fans are so close and so loyal if we start off with a little tiny family opens their Cisco with the three top bands and then we went to get the keys are cinnamon Celtic park and then sixty two Cape Oakland well a little makeshift stadium all the calls it was started to be built and the people were closed so they were it grew from three above the six thousand to ten thousand eighteenth out okay because if there is hello getting a shoulder posted the group the group still better leverage family along with the you know internationally where you played a lot of the abuse it by about well that's that's why we're such a parkland and tight world you know it was just a close put bolo alumni no doubt of that and you see if you go to sports radio dot com under coaches you know name knowing that he's gonna be on tonight at that once a raider always a raider and that is a coach Tom Flores yes he played a little bit with buffalo finished up with Kansas city and then of course to to make coaching was Seattle we remember those years after a long tenure with the raiders was also quarterbacks coach for the Buffalo Bills back in seventy one the assistant coaching job how much did you learn I or do you know it can be something that you that resonated with you that you learned under coach John Madden John was a good day John did a great job on game day ready at the game and make sure that the game but it was it was was carried out in here Justin said be made in a week converse with us and and he he directed well on the field it was really good and that is a very emotional leader and so you know yeah he had a great career we have great water you know you had a hundred ways to de beers's pretty remarkable when you think about it I learned yeah I learned some of the victims were you were you have coaches about it several and the you learn what you like about it but what you don't like about it and sold the work work does it what I like about him and that's what I took in the culture by one story coaches of what Alexa but coach you know what I didn't like about the coach can you do that with the the game itself what do I like about this offense what about blue district offense and then you take that with you as you grow on expression you stay in the game of love that it and let.

Las Vegas
"miami university miami" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

Let's Talk Dementia

09:00 min | 1 year ago

"miami university miami" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

"Here's your host bestselling author Carol. Welcome to let's. Let's talk dementia. I am Carol. How will your host led the ear? Here this will be my last recording before Thanksgiving holiday. I'm going to take a few days off because a company coming your way my best friends coming in. I'm so looking forward to spending some time with her but I thought it was appropriate that we talk about gratitude and The effects it will have on you on your body on your mind on your body on your spirit on your whole day and you know what affects us affects others. You know you do not live in a bubble so that you only have things happen you that affect only hugh. It's just not true and when you're in a good mood others notice it when you are not so happy Kinda witchy mood and I said that the w Others noticed that I do believe me. That's why my husband had me using. Cbd Oil are still has me using it but anyway that is true for your loved one your or loved one will pick up on your mood believe me. And so if you're having a specifically or tragically bad day don't go visit visit your loved one or maybe if you're having that kind of bad day in your in home caregiver maybe you need someone to come give you a big time relief so you can work through that because it lands on our loved ones in varying negative way you know What happens to US emotionally will affect our day our week our year our lie you can think back on things from a long time ago made you manage just kind of irritates? You doesn't it or you can think back on a wonderful experience your wedding day or the day. Your baby was born the day you on publishers clearinghouse which if that has ever happened to you please make large donation MHM nation to our company. We could certainly use it but you think about those experiences you feel happy and light and that is true even in the face of dementia. What what we know is your loved? One can't remember squat deadly Du Da. But you tell them something good and they're more likely to remember it than the average information like we need to go to the doctor or A little bit. We're going to get a shower. Those things are not gonna remember but really good news they they might remember. It increased chance that they will but bad news. There is a huge increase chance. They're gonNA remember that so we do. Not I don't want to inflict upon our loved ones who've got enough to deal with our issues for the day is a one way we can help with that is trying to exercise. That part of our brain Two employees that activity known as gratitude. Gratitude is it's just amazing. I ran an article. Daily Health Post editorial dated January. Two Thousand Nineteen is said neuroscience reveals gratitude literally. rewires your brain to be happier now told you your brain is very malleable on the neuro. plasticity in your brain meaning that it can change God is very real. NEUROGENESIS happens so we can change our brain and we can change who we are by the things we do the things we attitudes we have in with gratitude so a study was done at the university. We Have California at Davis by Dr Michael McCullough of the University of Miami University Miami and the University of California Davis is Dr Dr Emmons. I'll get it right here if you're lucky so they took subjects and had them To study the practice of gratitude into one third of the study of subjects in the study were asked to keep a journal a for which of things for which they were grateful just to write down each day they were grateful for another third was asked right down the things that just really aren't them daily irritations you know the people. They just won't slap around a little bit and the third group. The last third was asked to write down just daily situations with no emphasis on whether they were good or bad positive or negative just situations you know what happened happened. During the day. The gratitude group after ten weeks study reported feeling more optimistic and positive about their lives than the other group. Oh they did. Honey child was right down the things they were grateful for. I have a physician on the board of directors for our not for profit and he said a study was done that if you write down ten things a day you are thankful for the effect it has on your body. She is better than PROZAC PROZAC. That's chemicals. Oh Yeah we don't know really what all it's doing is maybe not so good for us but tell me one thing just one thing that could be harmful about writing. Ten things should right before or maybe you just want to write three things. You're right we'll start with three. Write that down every day. Other research into the physical effects of gratitude report even more tangible results focusing on the positive and feeling grateful can improve your sleep out Hallelujah. Told you I've been having trouble sleeping for very long. I seem to wake up and it's like Oh let's go back to sleep and I've been used on the Tara breathe oil. It's helping me so much but having that positive attitude can can help improve your sleep. Quality Reduces your feelings of anxiety and depression. Well that all makes sense. If you're anxious in you're depressed you know you may have so much on your. Brian keeps you from sleeping to people. Experience less fatigue and less inflammation. That is the key word in what we talk about. As reducing inflammation in our body inflammation is so bad for your body in every way possible for your brain for your. I'm good Alma. Work GotTa Get rid of inflammation and people are more susceptible when they are not grateful. Oh my goodness that's that's pretty neat. So the reasons why gratitude is so impactful to health and wellbeing is because it begins in the brain. The areas of the brain showed increase increase. Activity led to in conclusion that the motions of gratitude support a positive and supportive attitude toward were others and a feeling of relief from stressors. I spend the morning at nine from nine to ten every morning that I can at our pool which is one of the reasons. I'm so happy to live in his tropical climate where I could do it pretty much year round so I do my exercise. I do my my boobs in the air polluting. Now work my arms and then I work my legs and then I take about ten minutes with some meditative him music going on where I just float around with my eyes closed and I listen. Listen to that wonderful music and I pray in Attila Lord everything. I'm thankful for some days. I don't close my eyes Yaw. Did you know Christians can pray with. Their eyes is open. Who knew that? But I'll keep my eyes open and I'll just absorb the beauty around me. Nature The sky the palm trees the flowers hours observed nature thankful for it. I'm telling you my day is better when I've had time at the pool and I'm convinced it's from moving my body and how good that is for me. I because I take time for that meditation. Gratitude also has a downstream effect on the metabolism stress in a lot of other behaviors. And we know that this act of writing down what you are thankful for can even have a significant effect up to three months after riding riding down that crazy you know that if you are interacting with your loved one with dimension you go. There's no sense in going to sing. Momma she don't remember been there. Fire named You know that attitude you heard from family members probably the ones you wanted to choke 'cause they said such thank but what you gotta realize is A positive visit where you left Mama. Feeling upbeat will lay on her for at least two hours. Afterwards in a very positive upbeat way we see bloodpressure beings Lowered anxiety being decrease. The chances are they want to wander being decreased simply because you had a good visit with them. NEPHEW GONNA I WANNA go visit being a crappy mood. Just stay yourself at home. Because they don't need that we know that for adolescents who show gratitude. They have an inverse correlation relation between bullying and suicide risk. Yeah Yeah that's.

Carol US Cbd Oil Du Da Dr Dr Emmons California Dr Michael McCullough University of Miami University Brian University of California
"miami university miami" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

13:09 min | 1 year ago

"miami university miami" Discussed on From Scratch

"Elie Tahari using Lycra as a breakthrough stretch fabric that they incorporated into the company's Close Andrews considered one of the pioneers ears in the American fashion industry investing in and mentoring other fashion companies such as Alice Anna Libya rag-and-bone among others welcome. Oh come thank you. A lot of other companies to about a pioneer either. Now maybe we could say that about my grandfather. My father which is exactly exactly where I want to start your grandfather's Arthur and he came from Russia and he started the Puritan Dress Company. One thousand nine ten. which basically loss does your whole family's lives into the fashion world? He was known he was a good garment cutter. What exactly is a garment cutter? Mike like my grandfather started in the cutting room. The cutting room is the place where fabrics are laid out and the pattern. Pieces of the dresses are are laid on top and he cut out the patterns. Cut Out the pieces today. It's all done by machinery but back then it was done by hand in the precision of Howard was done the speed in which was done like anything else There are those that are more skilled than others. The company he founded in One Thousand Nine Hundred Ten in Waltham Massachusetts was called the Puritan Dress Company. I kept thinking as I was learning about you that I'd love to see some of his dresses. And you know what goes around comes around and while it might have been out of style for the last hundred years there might be a reemergence of a Puritan dress. I mean there's this Bohemian aesthetic and I'm not very missed out in the style. GIC in that way and so My father never kept any. I never kept her You know I think that Maybe maybe my attitude is more always looking to the future instead of mom instead of dwelling on the past. I don't know whether I ever saw any of the clothes. But he was making and selling retail dresses for two ninety nine three ninety nine. That's two dollars and ninety nine cents three dollars and ninety nine cents. You know a very different time. I'm in a very different Arab but as I look back and see close in the nineteen hundreds and early and mid nineteen hundreds. They're very inspired. So your father. Carl took over the business from Arthur or or work together with his father and and I feel like the company Puritan Curtain Dress Company. which became puritan? Fashions kind of wasn't an innovator. It had mini skirts in the nineteen sixties Even cocktail dresses says before. Then the Gloria Swanson. Can you speak to that like that forward leaning posture you know. My Dad was always sort of very innovative in terms. Of what what he did and how he did it he was fair flamboyant and he was the first one he used to buy designs from the famous French designers and and bring them back and recreate them here on. He did the deal with Gloria Swanson to deal with Chris. Everett to make tennis clothes and ultimately the Ah The big deal did designer jeans with Calvin Klein in In the mid one thousand nine hundred seventy so. My father was always sort of innovating things things and trying to evolve and change the way people People dressed in looked at fashion. That was is about my early life. I remember him doing a deal with the Beatles. And we'd have all these beetle t shirts and beetle hats and everything back in the nineteen sixties and. You mentioned that you know He. It was innovative and evolve constantly evolving. It seems like he was like that in his personal life to. Can you speak to his kind of personality. Side of Work Rousselot Lot flashier than I was fancy cars. Maybe even a little fancy addressed. I'm I'm a little more low key but he just was larger than life life and you know a character that sort of we rarely see today and I think maybe it went with the times and he was incredible person and and a great father to be and such a great friend to so many people in My Dad has passed away thirty five years. Now there would be frequently people come up to me and say I remember Your Dad or your dad did this sir. You know. It's really nice to have that memory in that legacy even though my lost my dad when I was relatively young at twenty I miss him but there was never an empty feeling he just he stayed with me in my life for for all these years and I think part of it is that obviously I followed it. An industry after him I also am very interested in thoroughbred had racing and breeding which was also passionate by DADS. And although I do think I'm I'm quite different than my dad. A lot of my interests in the a lot of my way of thinking so on You know it comes from the same place. There's very little rebellion an on your part. It seems I yeah. I was not a rebellious child at all. I was the youngest of four children. And I guess I was always sort of hanging around my mom and dad and you they'd have to take me on chips and so on. My next sister is three years older than me so I was sort of the baby that was always. Maybe a little special rebellion was not part of anything I thought or whatever. What about your mother? My mother was really fantastic. Antastic woman very different than my dad and sort of way she was. She was pretty private but very eccentric and very creative and now I sort of picked up from my mom this whole love of the garden and landscaping in the outdoors and so on a lot of that is what I love to do at at my home in Southampton New York or some sort of a surreal landscape for that way that I got from my mom but my mom was very stylish. Should you know had a great sense of style both in our homes and in the way she dressed in. You know it's really terrific later. She passed away now three years years ago and you know up until the time she passed away. I used to speak to her three times a week. And what's her name Shirley Rosen in fact all all of the my codes and all you know you now need to have codes on. Everything is my the year my mother was born. Oh so I always can remember now. I know what you're typing on your. ATM IGNORE ATM machine instinctively. You're drinking up the the fashion industry just by being around your father And your grandfather. What are some of your most prominent M- memories of being with him at work you know? Even before I went to work work. I remember running around my my grandfather's trust factory in Waltham and going through the dresses and just experiencing sort of that whole factory part of the business. I remember my dad bringing close home us rummaging through them and I also remember when I was as young. My Dad would always have business people over the house and just sitting there and observing and not really understanding what was going on but just soaking it all in so to speak. So it's true like from an early age And I don't think my dad ever. He never wanted me or ever said anything. Anything about me going into the business to follow him. In fact he said quite the opposite. There were some flirtation with becoming a professional golf player. You dropped out of college judge You went to the University of Miami University Miami and I'm a college in Palm Springs California. I'm basically to play a lot of golf. Where's their a a pivot moment or turning point where you said okay? I'm I'm leaving and joining. The business was actually my hyung-chol who said to me one day. I was playing golf with my uncle and California and that's basically what I was doing was playing golf. I was nineteen years Zoltin. Bongo said to me when he when when are you going to get serious and go to work for your father and stop playing golf every day. That sort of how that happened. My Dad add sort of put together an interesting career for me because I started working in a knitting mill in Long Island and From there I went due to Address factory in New Bedford Massachusetts and sort of got to see the industry from a from an angle. That people wouldn't get the opportunity to see today and and and very rarely Learn sort of the way everything worked from the inside out and You know was able to spend time on the sewing floor with with the pattern makers with With the cutters with the in the warehouse shipping. And and really you. Oh you know understand technically a lot of not only what happens there. But how those people think and how to relate to them and so I spent like a year and a half doing doing that and then I came to New York and and It was at the time that my data done the deal with Calvin Klein came to New York and worked in the showroom. Just says a as a sales assistant really sales person it was one of the most revolutionary things that happened back in the nineteen nine thousand nine hundred seventy s and with the shields commercial and all that kind of thing and so it was just an amazing experience and exposure and WanNa speak more about this jeans. Was the changing agents for the business in a way. Puritan did a licensing deal with Calvin Klein that really caused the the company's profits to escalate. And you speak about that My Dad had a company that in the in the nineteen seventies was doing around three hundred billion dollars in sales and every year would eke out a small profit and was made up of ten different dress. Companies isn't a lot of factories all over the US and lots of employees and so on and you know it was a good living and a good business but it wasn't anything special but in nineteen seventy six. He did this deal with Calvin Klein and I think nineteen seventy seven. We started shipping the first jeans listen within three years. My Dad had closed down every single business. He had went from like four thousand employees to eight hundred. Employees always no more manufacturing facilities or anything and and had a company that was doing the same three hundred billion in sales and making Santosh the prophet he was making the other way and interestingly enough in my my dad said it to that and never registered and recently did is that you know are we said to me you're at the forefront of a whole new revolution in our industry designer labeled apparel before that there the designer identified apparel was not really what was going on in American fashion. Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren. And so on with. We're really the pioneers of designers having their own label and owning their own business. It really wasn't like that before people like my father that controlled rolled business. And so I as I said I never really really never really appreciated a registered with me and maybe I think four or five years ago I said Yeah Now I remember my dad saying that he was right in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. He got what kind of cancer. My Dad had Kidney cancer but he never stopped working till that tell really really the very end And really spent as much time as he could preparing me for something that I mean. Frankly I didn't understand talk but was virtually you know very difficult and impossible situation to prepare before. So you're twenty six. When you took over the company Barry Barry Schwartz and Calvin Klein? They bought your company in. They bought Puritan in a hostile takeover. And you were there for for a few years and then you spend time at incline as the CEO and divorced from them but then in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven Is Sort of like this new era. Where theory was born? Could you tell me about your encounter with Eliot O'Hara who was ultimately sort of tell you a little bit about the the you know even the events that happened before that I'm very open about my career and I don't believe that success is just a straight line line of accomplishments you know my dad passing and having to take over the company and and ultimately Ban Calvin buying the company was..

Calvin Klein Puritan Dress Company golf Arthur Elie Tahari Puritan Curtain Dress Company. Gloria Swanson Kidney cancer Mike Howard Alice Anna Libya Waltham Massachusetts Andrews Ban Calvin Russia Beatles CEO Southampton New York Long Island
"miami university miami" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"miami university miami" Discussed on From Scratch

"In fact, he said quite the opposite thirteen with becoming a professional golf player. You dropped out of college. You went to the university of Miami, university, Miami and. College in Palm Springs, California, basically to play a lot of golf was there a a pivot moment or turning point where you said, okay. I'm I'm leaving an joining the business. There was actually my uncle who said to me one day, I was playing golf with mile California. And that's all basically what I was doing was playing golf. I was nineteen years old and Mongol said to me when he when what are you going to get serious and go to work for you father and stop playing golf every day. That's sort of how that happened. My dad sort of put together an interesting career for me because I started working in a knitting mill in Long Island and from there. I went to address factory in New Bedford Massachusetts, and sort of got to see the industry from a from an angle that people wouldn't get the opportunity to see today, and very rarely and learn sort of the way every. Thing worked from the inside out, and you know, was able to spend time on the sewing floor with Pat with the pattern makers with the with the cutters with the the whereas the shipping, and and really, you know, understand technically a lot of not only what happens there, but how those people think and how to relate to them. So I spent like a year and a half doing that. And then I came to New York, and and it was at the time that my dad done the deal with Calvin Klein came to New York and worked in the show room. Just as a as a sales assistant really sales person. It was one of the most revolutionary things that happened back in the nineteen seventies. And with the brook shields commercial and all that kind of thing. And so is just an amazing experience and exposure, speak more about this jeans was the changing agents for.

golf California university of Miami Miami New Bedford Massachusetts Palm Springs Long Island New York Pat Calvin Klein nineteen years one day mill