35 Burst results for "Methadone"

"methadone" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

02:22 min | 3 months ago

"methadone" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"It's so traumatizing eddie. They did they give her a special pulitzer prize for her. Were amazing but i thought it was really interesting that no not one single police officer testified on behalf on his behalf and i think that that we spoke pretty loudly about his guilt and that nobody everybody who saw that knows that he murdered that man. You know yeah so. Yeah i wanted the max i did but a twenty two and a half years is not little any still facing to federal indictments for george lloyd and for the fourteen year old kid. He had whacked in the head with a fucking flashlight. What a garbage hume. Yeah he really is. And i think that was actually mother. Tried to stand up for a court was so gross. Yeah yeah. I don't He's going to have a hard time. So you know he's been hard times showing his down base in prison in Out in the world if he ever gets out so i'm glad the justice system worked. Yeah i think it did pretty well. I thought that they could have gone for first degree murder. I think that you could have shown intent. Intent doesn't have to be planned and deliberated over hours or days. It can be planned deliberated and a matter of seconds and so. I think that that premeditation can happen. Do you think they were going for what they knew they could get. You'll take it. they get. I think keith ellison didn't make major he. He wanted a case that he could win because if he didn't if they lost that case. I that's how casey anthony got off. Was that it was like that first degree murderer. Whenever i know there's a whole different thing but if they had gone for slightly less they might have been able to convict her now. I won't comedy questions because bill well. It's political comedy. Yeah bill cosby recently. had his conviction overturned. Because of prosecutorial mistake what happened is bill cosby had testified in a civil suit about the matter and been given immunity by bruce castor by the way who was trump's lawyer in the impeachment two point oh and because he was given out immunity he should not have been able to be criminally prosecuted for the same crime. That is true. Okay that is correct. However the feeling that we have and we know that he had asked for light sentence because they said he was sick he was decrepit and couldn't just old and so frail and now he's out and he's going to do a comedy tour. Oh yeah you made this point right about him. And mr top hat. Monopoly guy. Manafort all of a sudden. You're so healthy. Gosh.

george lloyd eddie bill cosby keith ellison casey anthony bruce castor trump Manafort mr
"methadone" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

02:38 min | 3 months ago

"methadone" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"Beans. Check it out again. Proton dot com slash daily beans. You'll be glad you did everybody. Welcome back i'm here with my friend. Good friend she's the host of the podcast called wings with friends. You must check it out. Subscribe writer and comedian. Mary upchurch mary before the break. You were really mad about patriotism. And i'm with you. Because i feel like we need to reclaim what it means to be a patriot. Because you know. There's a difference between being a patriot and being a colt. You know what i mean. Yeah and it's called freedom for a reason for you to mizzou free. And there's a hefty flake and we have the freedom to not go to church. I have the freedom to not like the president and say it out loud or or you know like an what. Don't they understand. Like i love the means. Were like you know. I don't have a giant. Joe biden flag in my yard. Because i'm not a fucking weirdo. I love my favorite is. Don't tread on me flag. that's uterus. Yeah or the one that has like the gay or that one's pretty fun. Don't read to me. that's the snake but it just don't reach me. I want you know the the gay pride wants has. Don't tread on us either. Like i love when l q they arm up and be like fuck it. We're not taking this anymore. Yeah yeah One hundred percent. And i think it's it's very important i mean we're we're at such a crossroads right now with our our democracy we got so close to losing it with that direction and then of course we know we learned recently. That trump was going to you. Know incite the insurrection. Act if against the black lives matter protests for you know and the george floyd protests. What did you think by the way about the the twenty two and a half year. Sentence that sh- dirk show van got for the murder. George floyd i was glad that there was some justice. I wanted to max i wanted. I wanted the macs. But i was glad that there was justice. I still in the in the bottom of my heart feel like you know. This is only because somebody caught it on camera. We wouldn't be doing this. You know but it's something. And i just love how people celebrated and i was really happy for our friends who like even like felt that more deeply and have felt years of oppression and stuff to like. Have a little bit of justice. But you're right. I don't think we would have had it if it weren't for darnell frazier and her brilliant jew state of mind just to stop videotape. That and she's so young. It's so traumatizing eddie. They did they give her a special pulitzer prize for her. Were amazing but i thought it was really interesting that no not one single police officer testified on behalf on his behalf and i think that that we spoke pretty loudly about his guilt and that nobody everybody who saw that knows that he murdered that man. You know.

Mary upchurch mary George floyd Joe biden dirk darnell frazier van eddie
Engineer Your Environment for More Productive Habits by Tyler Tervooren of Riskology

Optimal Living Daily

02:13 min | 5 months ago

Engineer Your Environment for More Productive Habits by Tyler Tervooren of Riskology

"Your environment for more productive habits by tyler to foreign of a scholarship. Darko nineteen seventies. America faced a big problem. The vietnam war was winding down and the troops were coming home addicted to heroin. There was widespread panic and a plan was concocted addicted. Troops would be held until they'd sobered up then send home with methadone. Prescriptions and carefully monitored. For relapses but the plan was never really implemented turns out. It wasn't necessary. The troops came home and for the most part their addictions and reintegrated into society. Less than five percent of them ever relapsed. A simple change of scenery cured their addiction. Decades of follow up research has uncovered. Why the environment you exist in what you're surrounded by has a profound impact on the way you behave different environments encourage different habits. Your habits are a product of your environment. What do you think about when you sit down at your computer to re dream. Oh probably nothing once. You've done something enough times in the same place. Your brain can offload all the work. It takes to remember how to do it. Checking your email seems like the simplest task but it really isn't understand. Why imagine you time traveled here from one hundred years ago. You've never seen a computer. What are all the steps movements and information. You'd have to learn before you can read your email. How long would it take. Just figure out how to turn your computer on yet. here you are. When you sit down at your desk your habit takes over your inside your inbox before you know it. Best the way habits work at the same time. If you're not in front of your computer in your phone is put away. You're probably not thinking about email. You can go all day in fact without a crossing your mind but as soon as you sit down at your computer again boom there. You are reading your email. There's a special connection between the things you do in the places you do. Them does critical to know. If you have a bad habit you wanna break or a productive one. You'd like to start

Darko Tyler Vietnam America
Medina Spirit Treated With Ointment Containing Anti-Inflammatory Drug

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

Medina Spirit Treated With Ointment Containing Anti-Inflammatory Drug

"Like you're an update to the saga of a horse on steroids at the Kentucky Derby Bomb. Bedford is changing his story. The trainer of Medina Spirit now says the horse was treated with an anti fungal ointment, which does contain the steroid Bethune methadone. That's the drug that was detected in the post race drug test. Bamford earlier said he had no idea how the drug might have gotten into the horse's system. Connect be mean. Treat him or that we don't even use that. The ointment is commonly used on some horses, but is a violation in Kentucky if detected on race

Kentucky Derby Bomb Medina Spirit Bedford Bethune Bamford Kentucky
"methadone" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:29 min | 11 months ago

"methadone" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Safety and that of other road users depends on your awareness of what is happening around you. Your ability to control the position and speed of your vehicle relative to everything else that's on the road on a collision or a near miss is often a result of a lapse in driving skill. Advanced driving uses a system of car control. And that's a methadone tickle approach to hazards, which increases your safety by giving you more time to react in complex situations here, Endeth the first lesson. What has this got to do with how you hold the steering wheel? Well, the steering wheel is the thing that you hold onto that controls your vehicle, so to steer correctly results in you being in control of your vehicle at all times, and it starts with holding the steering wheel in the correct position. Now I bet you many of you listening Drive with one hand on the steering wheel. You might have an elbow on the arm rest. You might have your elbow on the top of the window. You might sometimes think it's a great sense of fun to drive without your hands on the steering wheel. If you're honest, straight Freeway, which we don't seem to have on this part of the pond. What we do, actually, but you also probably cross your hands when you make a term. Now, All of these things are common mistakes. I'm not gonna hit you on your knuckles and say You are totally in the wrong These are errors. These are things which don't make great sense. When you hold your steering wheel on the last thing which a lot of guys and girls do is you let the steering wheel spin after you term your vehicle through your hands. This is all wrong. The correct position to hold a steer with I thought I knew how to drive 10 to know. Always hold yours there will the 10 to 2 position as though you're imagining a clock at 10 to 2. Place your hands on the wheel with the palms on the rim. Your thumbs should extend out and be placed on the rim so that your thumbnails are towards you Make sure your family l's nicely manicured, he said. Always hold the wheel likely. Not be ready to tighten your grip, if necessary. Always keep both hands on the steering will at all times while you're driving unless you.

methadone Endeth
Habilitat Creating Community with Jeff Nash

The Addicted Mind Podcast

06:57 min | 1 year ago

Habilitat Creating Community with Jeff Nash

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind podcast today. My guest is jeff. Nash and he is going to talk about habilitated and their model for sustained recovery. Jeff thank you so much for coming. Onto the addicted mind podcast. I am really interested to hear your story but also to hear your model of addiction treatment. Thank you thanks for means a pleasure to be here this morning. All right so tell us a little bit. Where does it all start for you. Oh wow that's a long story like a lot of people. I ended up getting involved with drugs alcohol at a very young age twelve years low and it got really bad really fast. By the time. I was sixteen years old. I was shooting heroin and other substances saw and renew sleep and of course that brought a lot of legal problems and now jail lots of treatment and i was raised in texas dallas texas and i went through fourteen different treatment programs throughout my life and continued really struggle in and out of jail in and out of programs so the age of thirty actually twenty nine years old is when i finally got it together and for me rui. I realized later that i needed. I needed more than just. The normal substance use treatment. I needed a life. Overall are some point hind landed in. Hawaii ended up in trouble ear in jail and eventually ended up in the village. And i kind of took to habilitates philosophy like a duck. They helped me find a passion. Nail figure out who i was and on the final i had a knack for helping other people. They put me through a lot of training. They sent me to school to learn about a substance use treatment and administration and things like that and eventually i became the program. Director for tat. And i did that job for about sixteen years. I was very blessed. I was trained but actually the last person that was trained by the people who founded the program unfortunately our founder any marino us. Since passed away. But i was very blessed to be trained by heaven his wife and then i did the program director of the program for about sixty years and the ultimate two thousand fifteen. I became the executive director. So i've been with a village out now for about twenty four years. I think and different abilities very much. Enjoy what we do and this is so you know. I found my niche. I guess and got a nice life. Now been clean and sober for about twenty four years. That's awesome that's career. Comedy story pretty similar to people's stories right. Tell me a little bit about the fourteen times of trying treatment so here you were addicted pretty early. I guess you know. I think he said thirteen or fourteen years old drugs. By the time. I was sixteen hours using obviously right so using some really hardcore drugs at a very young age very young age of development and you into fourteen different treatment centers. I mean. that's really like someone who is trying to get help ya. Well i think to me jimmy rule honest. I think my family wanted me to get a lot more than i really. Did you know. I had a lot of people i mean i have some childhood traumas that were unresolved goes very angry. Disenfranchised with life you know the family was dysfunctional. Common themes wait was substance abuse on trying and trying really. It was when i got to be a little bit older and how to jail and withdraw in jail and watching life pass me by and to get a little bit more motivated like i need to give together. This is not fine. I was actually of a lengthy prison sentence that i was facing drums now for for drug for drug possession. That's what prompted me to trying. Really dig down deep and try and overcome all these issues until you know certainly wasn't fixed a thirty day curated took me a few years therapy Few years of mentorship but there was a it. Sounds like there was a change in you where you said. Okay i gotta dig deeper here. Something's gotta be different. I can't keep going like this really crazy to say i was on about ninety milligrams of methadone back in the nineties. And i i went to jail overstated. They didn't give me the doses. Methadone so i ended up withdrawing older. Eat from both methadone in heroin on the floor. Wow jail and it was a newsroom experience. I mean it a really miserable experience you know. It was in that fog than i decided. you know. this isn't fun anymore. And you know i mean most of the reason that i was using drugs to escape age of of that i created for myself really but it was a coping skill. Drug use was a coping skill. Not not a very resourceful coping skill but it was yulong and you know the payable. That really made me decide that. I needed to try something else. I was very blessed. Because i i was in jail here in hawaii. And there's a program here old milita which is known as the long hard core long-term aren't or program and the you know. The word on the street was that if you really wanna get your act together. That's the place that you go. And i didn't have anything to lose. That's for sure. So i reached out to them in jail and call them. They came to visit me in jail in a few weeks later. They got me into the program so they are able to to take you in and you really wanted to to get some treatment. It sounds like you were kind of ready at that point. Yeah find the right place in the right place mentally and emotionally that i knew something had to change about jails institutions and death while i was facing all that and it became very apparent to me that the gig was up and it was time to make a change are the only alternative was either gonna die or overdose. Several times nearly died but is facing lindsay incarceration because of by drug use.

Texas Nash Jeff Dallas Hawaii Yulong Jimmy Lindsay
What Science Has Learned About the Coronavirus One Year On

Science Talk

04:58 min | 1 year ago

What Science Has Learned About the Coronavirus One Year On

"It's a really important moment to look back at our very different reality just twelve months ago. In december twenty nineteen the first infections were just emerging inside of china sars. Covy two didn't have a name yet and no one could imagine the global effects that the virus would have on us all but it was also clear that this novel coronavirus lit a fire underneath the seat of science so my question is how far has our scientific understanding about the biology and the behavior of the virus. Come since then yeah. We have learned some really critical things. About how the virus works and also importantly about how our immune system responds to it and how. This virus sars cope chew. Essentially causes our immune system to misfire in cases of severe covid nineteen and miss misfiring really centers on the very early immune responses that. Our body mounts. These are called innate immune responses this innate immunity is a part of our body that really uses sensors that detect pieces of pathogens. Like the co two virus that are not from our own body in once. These factors are sensors detect these viral bits. They sound out an immediate alarm system. That operates through molecules called cytokines and interferons. These are important for activating those later. Immune responses like t cells and antibodies. That we hear about and what we think is that. It's likely that people who sound this innate immune alarm early upon exposure to the virus and induced early in high levels of that interferon alarm system. Go onto pretty rapidly and effectively clear the virus so these might be the individuals with a symptomatic or moderate or mild disease however what scientists have learned. Is that people who go on to develop severe covid. Do so. Probably because in them. The virus causes a misfiring of that. Immune response so like the wrong sets of immune cells may be brought in and they might not deuce that early interferon alarm system. Quick clear strongly in they can't control the viral load. The virus amplifies to really high levels in their body so their body responds to this continued presence of the virus basically by increasing production of factors. That are involved in inflammation. This is an over exuberant inflammation or inflammatory response. And that's what leads to the lung tissue damage which is really a hallmark of code pathology. So what we've discovered. Scientists over the past year is that there are biomarkers. That can give clues about who ultimately goes on to get severe disease. Scientists have also discovered genetic. Differences are mutations that some people have in those innate immune genes that can contribute to poor initial control of the virus. I think that this understanding that there are essentially two phases of covid nineteen disease that initial phase that's dominated by viral amplification in a second phase that in severe cases is dominated by a misfiring of the immune response is really important is important because it ill. At they're two types of therapies. That are probably needed. Depending on the phase of the disease so drugs that charge it the virus directly to stop its replication is would be things like remdesivir that we've heard a lot about in the news or maybe treating with things like recombinant interferon. This is Something that's used to treat other chronic viral infections. Those types of therapies are probably only going to be effective at stopping nets first phase of the disease but are not going to be very effective If they're given during that second phase because it's then it's not the virus but the immune system that's driving illness so conversely drugs that damp a net over exuberant inflammatory response and decks. Methadone is one of those. These might be dangerous. If given during that first phase when you really want a rapid and robust immune response but could be helpful at dampening the damage that's caused by the immune system at later stages one of the key parts of understanding the virus itself. How find it is scientifically really about timing right. Exactly timing is really key to figure out how your body responds very early and later and you know the timing and dose of the virus that you might receive understanding how that timing or the kinetics of infection response are essential and we've made a lot of progress on that over the last year

Mild Disease China Chronic Viral Infections
Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

06:23 min | 1 year ago

Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

"Joining us now. Is laurie garrett. She is a health policy analyst and pulitzer prize winning science writer. Who has been a real voice of reason for us over the course of this crisis laurie. It's really nice to see you. Thank you for being here so you and a lot of other public health experts. They called this back in the summer when the white house decided they were going to take away from. Cdc and have the trump administration. Have hhs collect this data in instead. It really does seem to have been born out in the months since how big a problem is this. How much better off would we be. If we had real data we could count on well. First of all rich we really all agreed to of gratitude to charles pillar who has doggedly covered this story for science magazine for the last three months performed brilliantly and one of them really important things that he has surrey. Thank all of a sudden you are coming on my television for which i apologize talks. And he and he and one of the things that he revealed was that deborah burks was really behind this. She wanted more control of the data she didn't trust. Cdc and claim that the data was sloppy by moving it into hhs they actually then barbed out to private companies. One was a private firm called telegraphing. Biggest client they never had and the other was pailin tier which of course not much later went public on the stock market tear was engaged to sort of massage and analyze the data on the result was of course at the hospitals. Were thoroughly confused. Who are we supposed to send data. To what form are we supposed to fill out. How do we do this. What computers are we supposed to us and for a long time in the summer right after this all started we really had almost no data related to rely upon at all Eventually the federal government started really pushing hospitals around. And said you're gonna lose your medicare contracts. We're gonna take your medicaid and medicare patients and throw them at another hospital if you don't start reporting data to us. Whoa alright swallow hospital start flooding data in. But what's the reliability of the relevance of it. What does it really mean. now. Here's where the the crux of the problem is if your job is to decide how much. Ppe needs to go to arkansas. Or how how much dexsa. Methadone needs to go to south dakota if your job is managing the national stockpile and determining whether or not reading to crisis level of shortages of protective gear for nurses for example. You need to know what's the hospitalization rate. What are the trends. look like. What's the use rate. Well you don't have any such data to rely on right now. It's just a total mess. There's no It's a mess at all levels if the federal numbers don't jive with the state numbers the state the numbers don't jive with the county numbers. The private hospital sector is reporting a different way than the public hospital sector. I mean this is just chaos lawrence this problem or how fixable is. This is a problem. I know that it was a relief to a lot of people to see the list of names who have been advising the incoming president on cova thus far and we've heard sort of reassuring and science based public statements from them during the transition thus far but when they dig in and start to do this work is this a. Is this something that can be is. Is this something that can be undone. Will they have to build this from the ground up. The cdc essentially be put back in charge of this in a way that will just sort of quickly rationalize the state and make it useful again. Will rachel raw. Really anxious to see who biden is going to name as the next. Cdc director and also the next hhs director net will go a long way to helping to answer your question. What we don't really know because the transition team is only just had a few days of access to get inside the cdc. We don't really know what the state of these kinds of programs is now inside in other words. Is it all still in their computers. Are there still personnel. There could reactivate the cdc's tracking system or was it utterly dismantled. And we don't really know the answer to that question right now laura after. Get your reaction to the news tonight. Dr scott atlas has resigned from the white house. I personally was not shy about talking about the fact that i was alarmed to see him in the position that he was in the white house given his stated public views on the virus. What's your reaction to the fact that he's now resigned. It's great. I think that he had a very negative impact on affairs inside the white house. And on our national response and i'm not sure he's going to be welcome back at stanford the stanford faculty have voted to denounce him condoleeza rice his faucet. The hoover institute is indicated some dissatisfaction with his performance. The what's interesting to me is the timing. why now. why did he put out a statement today. Dated for tomorrow and i just wonder if it's in any way connected to the fact that andrews nel who was really the architect of this whole herd immunity approach for sweden Was pushed aside this weekend in sweden. As that country's death toll and case numbers have soared. And there's a strong belief in many sectors of the swedish government that listening to end. Anders was a mistake and also conversely that boris johnson finally rejected of the sort of heard immunity approach that many of his advisor to add been advocating and about three weeks ago started tough lockdowns and since they've been on three weeks of lockdown. They've seen their case load plummet by third

HHS Laurie Garrett Trump Administration CDC Charles Pillar Deborah Burks White House Science Magazine Pulitzer Laurie Surrey Will Rachel Raw Federal Government Cova South Dakota Medicare Dr Scott Atlas Arkansas
Trump mounts bizarre and misleading White House return despite warnings

The Daily 202's Big Idea

03:08 min | 1 year ago

Trump mounts bizarre and misleading White House return despite warnings

"President trump left one of the world's most elite medical centers on Monday evening at Walter Reed. Even as his doctors acknowledged that they were entering uncharted territory and citing privacy laws continued to withhold vital information, the could eliminate the president's prognosis for recovering from covid nineteen. Trump's determination to appear in control in the waning weeks of presidential race in which he is trailing significantly left unclear whether he or his doctors were calling the shots especially because members of his medical team continued to Cherry pick what they're sharing with the American people they say, his oxygen levels are normal and he has no fever, but they refuse to answer questions about results from long scans when his last negative test was or why he's receiving the steroid decks methadone, which is typically reserved for patients with the most severe cases. Several doctors told my colleagues Francis Sellers Lori. Arianna Cha and amy. Goldstein that the president has returned to the White House at a fraught moment in his recovery before he has escaped a period when some patients are known to crash Harlan Krumholz. A cardiologist at Yale says the problem with covid nineteen is that people's conditions deteriorate rapidly even after days of Stability Jonathan Reiner George Washington University cardiologist said that in an emergency, the White House medical unit can do what an emergency room can do in the first fifteen. Minutes someone can be resuscitate and stabilize during a heart attack, for example, and then transferred to a hospital. Still for ongoing treatment, he says, it would be wise for trump to remain hospitalized at a Monday afternoon news conference White House Dr Shawn Conley said the team is cautiously optimistic and hung guard about trump's discharge but he said he's looking to this weekend for assurance that trump has cleared rough waters and he said he won't breathe a sigh of relief until next Monday. Daniel call in infectious diseases expert at the University of Michigan says people of Trump's age and with similar severity of illness to the extent that we know and to the extent that the White House is telling us the truth usually have a pretty slow recovery with weeks and sometimes months of cognitive difficulties shortness of breath in severe fatigue. Like other experts call said, it's highly likely that trump has cova pneumonia. At the briefing Conley selectively invoked health privacy laws known as hippo when questions arose about the president's respiratory system scans or whether he remains infectious. For his part trump minimized the dangers of the virus that has killed more than two, hundred, nine, thousand of our fellow Americans President tweeted quote don't be afraid of covid. Don't let it dominate your life. We have developed under the trump administration some really great drugs and knowledge I feel better than I did twenty years ago. Health officials from current and past administrations agree that the White House medical unit can bulk up on staffing and equipment to ensure that it can care for again at least stabilize a patient who takes a turn for the worse. But a former White House doctor tells us that it's really inefficient and very risky compared to staying Walter Reed.

Donald Trump White House President Trump Walter Reed Dr Shawn Conley Arianna Cha Francis Sellers Yale Harlan Krumholz George Washington University Methadone Goldstein Jonathan Reiner University Of Michigan Fever Cherry Pneumonia
"methadone" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"methadone" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Devon on Washington coming up this morning. So many great gets Trevor. Mad affair lasted 6 35 in Washington football team 75 Joe did Jennifer is here ahead of Supreme Court pushed for any Barrett and in 7 45. Dr Marc Siegel joins us from the Fox News Channel with Mary Walter. Good morning. Happy Mondays Weekends. Kick it off early this morning. Joining us right now, Dr Juggler, Bernice, a critical care and pulmonary medicine doctor. Dr Doug. Good morning. Good morning, Mary. Good morning. Good morning. Thank you for joining us so bright and early, although being a doctor, I guess you're up early every morning. Obviously, since you're critical care, doctor, pulmonary medicine, doctor, you'd have treated a lot of current private spaces. Patients We have spoken to you before. What are your thoughts on way of what you're seeing with the president. And I know you're not his doctor. You haven't obviously examined the patient. But looking at the drugs that we know that he is getting and looking at how he appears in the videos. You he was out yesterday, waving to supporters he was out and about what do you think of the course of his disease. So far, I think he's doing very well with the caveat. I think we need another day or so to before. You have passed final judgment on him. Clearly, it seems since his fever's broken These paths that viral stage the first stage of covert 19, where you have virus replication. Now we just have to hope that the medications and his immune there's medication. Help to keep his immune system from going out of control, which is the hyper inflammatory phase, which unfortunately is what kills most people. Can you give us a sense of what? Each of the drugs that he's taken? Do the ones that we've seen the big ones that the press has been talking about our Regeneron, an experimental treatment? That was the first thing we have heard about Then he's on the decks, a methadone steroid, and then he's on a five day treatment of rendez severe. What are those? Well, it's actually Regeneron is the name of the company. They The medication's experimental, so it's got some weird numeric number that n I h gives out, but basically that's synthetic antibodies. It's the equivalent of convalescent plasma, which we've been talking about, but it's anybody's that essentially coat the virus. And let your body's immune system digest the virus much more efficiently. That still experimental So we have to enter your an experimental protocol for that one. Next would be the random severe, which is an anti viral that when when I was using initially that was actually were part of the research that they have a emergency use authorization from the FDA for that one that also kills directly kills the virus. The decade drawn that he's on that old, she old, inexpensive drug that's been around quite some time that steroid that that is indicated for really moderate to severe patients. You have drops in dropping their oxygen level. When you get that stick, you're much more likely to have this inflammatory response and we get very low doses of it, relatively speaking, and that is essentially an anti inflammatory. He's also one from what I heard Vitamin D, which there's a little bit of data. No one knows exactly what's going on with that, but they feel it may kill the virus. I think another one. They mentioned that that stops the virus from replicating a reproducing vitamin C is an anti inflammatory recorded ah, a free radical scavengers that helps cut down the inflammation. And the last one which glad I brought my FA motivating last week because now he's also on a drug called promoted deed, which isn't an acid. They found that in China, people who are taking that it better. So there doing some studies. The data is somewhat mixed on it. They don't know how it works. They do know it doesn't kill the virus. But he just came out last week that they tested it, you know, and again in the lab in a Petri dish, and it doesn't kill the virus, so then, most likely they feel it has some anti inflammatory effect. Dr. Doug You mentioned the steroid deck. Samantha's own that he's on. I've seen some speculation in the press that this is only first severe cases. So therefore the White House must be lying about his condition. But I heard you use a phrase there, he said from moderate to severe so that suggests that he could very well be exactly as they're portraying him in a moderate case, getting a steroid treatment that right well yeah, well, more importantly, look, the DNA n I H guidelines, which going also coincide with the CDC and the American Infectious Disease Society recommends steroids if your auction level drops below 94% That that moves you also by the declassification from moderate to severe. That's the differentiation now, you know, the doctor's yesterday said his oxygen level drops below 94 for a little bit of time. He's really right on the edge again. Giving that medication is really the Detroit of the physicians. You know, we have guidelines, but it really falls on them. Honestly, from the way they described it. I've been I've been in that situation. I give the people the steroids, the side effect profile for someone again. Knowing what I know of the president's history, you'd be more concerned. If you have someone who has diabetes. Steroids could make the diabetes be very poorly control could run into problems with other diseases also, but in his case from what we know of his medical history The risk..

Mary Walter president diabetes Washington Dr Marc Siegel Dr. Doug You Dr Doug Fox News Devon Trevor Dr Juggler Detroit Supreme Court FDA methadone China Barrett fever
Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

"Could be headed back to the White House as soon as Monday that from the president's medical team who held a briefing today, here's a clip from that Dr Sean Connolly, speaking in front of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Over the course of his illness. The president has experienced two episodes, Transit drops his oxygen saturation, and and there there was was much much more more information information from from today's today's briefing, briefing, particularly particularly compared compared to to yesterday's. yesterday's. Let's Let's welcome welcome NPR NPR science science correspondent correspondent Richard Richard Harris. Harris. Good Good Morning, Morning, Richard Richard and Dr Carlos del Rio, an epidemiologist at Emory University. Hello, do you Are you? Well, Richard, I'm going to start with you. But let's hear first. Ah clip from Dr Brian Garbled E. On the treatments the president has received. We continue to plan to use a five day course of Rome disappear. In response to transient low oxygen levels as Dr Conley has discussed. We did initiate Dexter methadone therapy, and he received his first dose of that yesterday. And our plan is to continue that for the time being All right, Richard, What does that tell you? Well, that tells me that the president was at fifth had very least serious course of disease, and he's getting sort of the top line treatment to address it. The decks the method zone is a steroid. Drug that helps tap down inflammation, which can be a really bad sign in somebody who's immune system may be starting to overreact to the virus. So doctors have come to realize that this is actually capable of saving lives in people. This is the only drug that has actually been demonstrated to do that with Corona virus, and so they've given it to him that will really help stabilize his immune system. That's the hope and of course, the room disappear is a drug that is designed to stop the virus from mass producing itself inside the body. The FDA is authorised its use, but specifically people who are really sick enough that they need help breathing. It has now become evident that the The president's had a couple of episodes where his oxygen levels were dropping. And and at least one instance where they gave him supplemental Oxygen. So s so it looks as though he's you know, getting pretty aggressive treatment for his for his condition, which seems appropriate And surprising to me is how quickly they expect that he may actually be able to go home. Maybe as soon as tomorrow. Well, Dr Del Rio. Let's talk about that. We heard in the clip in the introduction. The doctors they're talking about the president's oxygen levels. As we know with covert 19. It does affect the lungs and oxygen. Saturation is a real big indicator about how well you're doing. So, what did you hear there? Well, you know, I heard several things that hurt that. He he was there when you need to put things together. He's initially diagnosed. He's got mild of these, like, you know, 84% of people of covert have smiled. But they made the decision to give them the one of the two call antibodies Regeneron one and that's currently being studied in people with mild disease. We don't need to be in the article. Then his options saturation crops, and the decision is to transfer into the hospital because once your oxygen saturation cross below 94%, even if it's transitory. You're immediately in the category of no longer mild or moderate, but in the category of being released and its investigations that boat from disappear and Memphis on has proven to be effective. And that's exactly what the president has received was given disappeared. He conceded that the medicine and that's where he currently is right now, Dr Florio. This's important so I'm going to put this to you all along. They had been describing The president's symptoms as mild. You seem to be suggesting that the moment his oxygen levels dropped and he was given supplemental oxygen and then put on these experimental treatments. You could no longer categorize him what he was experiencing as mild symptoms. That is correct. Correct at that point in time, the president no longer having me having mild disease. That's how he's having severe disease, and he's put in a different category. And you know, that explains why Mark Meadows was concerned as express complains why he was actually he told us you know the president. We were very concerned. You know exactly that. I think he's telling you, he was telling the truth. But then I guess the question is your your doctor. Why wouldn't the presidents of the president's doctors have explained it in the same way? I mean, we heard today. Dr Conley say that he wanted to give an upbeat assessment. But that seems at odds with perhaps what the truth may have been. That is correct. I mean, I don't want to to say you know, but I was quite frankly, very disappointed by the press briefing yesterday. I think the press briefing yesterday. What spent he was speaking like a spin doctor. He wasn't speaking like a medical doctor. And you know the job of a loss in medicine when you're doing something like this, especially when somebody who is as important as president is to is to speak the truth and to be transparent, and I think, you know, Unfortunately, we are an administration were transparency and truth has not been at the forefront of this of this response. And we're seeing even in this case when the president of the patient

President Trump Richard Richard Richard Richard Harris Dr Conley NPR Dr Sean Connolly Dr Carlos Del Rio Dr Del Rio Dr Brian Garbled Walter Reed National Military Dr Florio Emory University Methadone White House Memphis FDA Mark Meadows
Steroids Can Be Lifesaving for COVID-19 Patients, Scientists Report

Rick Hamada

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Steroids Can Be Lifesaving for COVID-19 Patients, Scientists Report

"Steroid treatments for severe, too critical Cove in patients. The New York Times reports. The data comes from trials involving hundreds of patients. That evaluated three steroids, hydrocortisone decks, a method zone and methylprednisolone. According to researchers, decks, A methadone provided the most promising results. Ah, 36% drop in deaths over the three trials. The other two were found to reduce deaths as well Boxes. Gurnal Scott of findings and the

Gurnal Scott Methadone The New York Times Methylprednisolone
UK moving forward with megatrial for coronavirus treatments

Science Magazine Podcast

08:19 min | 1 year ago

UK moving forward with megatrial for coronavirus treatments

"A UK mega trial designed. Test Treatments Cove Nineteen Haikai Sarah. We're talking about the UK's It's called the recovery trial and it hasn't differences with other ongoing trials of drugs for Corona virus. What are some of the big differences with recovery? The main difference in some senses said it's a really really big trial they have. More than two thousand patients now. In an outbreak like this if you really want to have really good clear, robust result, one of the most important things to include a lot of people to get a really strong signal of secrecy, that's something that recovery has been able to do, and really no other trial in the world has been able to get those patients numbers. This isn't a UK. And the United Kingdom has a lot of cases for its size. Is that one of the reasons that this trial has been success? Yeah, absolutely I mean if they didn't have that many. Many patients in the first place of today wouldn't be able to enroll that many patients some of the people I've talked to so for instance one of the scientists. He's from Norway. He was saying. The recovery trial is really successful in the sense that one in six patients that goes to UK hospital with Kobe nineteen ends up in the trial. Well, you can kinda wonder why they managed to include that many patients. One reason is that they have the National Health Service all the hospitals took part in that and the top doctors in the. The Nation wrote a letter to all the hospitals and all the staff. Saying you know here are the three trials that we want to prioritize in. Please try to include patients in these trials. If you can, so that's kind of how they they ended up with those huge patient numbers in the first place that allowed them to in a very short time. Get some some answers as a result of having all these patients enrolled and kind of coordination at the national level for recovery. They've seen a lot of results in a short time can. Can you talk about some of the drugs? They've been able to either give a thumbs up to or thumbs down to I one. That was a really big deal. Was the hydroxy chloroquine arm of the study so much has been set written about hydro or Quin, banning a lot of that was based on trials, either with very few patients or trials obsessional, so whether patients were randomized to either get hydroxy chloroquine or a different drug or placebo, but basically looked in retrospect and compared how patients did who got hydroxy in patients who didn't? The recovery trial date has the best data we have for civilian patients being treated with hydroxy chloroquine, and they didn't see a significant difference in how the hydroxy chloroquine group did versus suspended care. Group And they put that out in a press release, and within a few days, a lot of other trials that were ongoing that would clearly not have stronger results were ended. I wouldn't say it's quite the end of that drugstore quance Saga Probably, but certainly mocked the attorney on. And on the other side of the roster here we have a drug that actually help patients that were in the hospital, so that sex method zone. It's a steroid drug that's also been known for a long time quite cheap. It's widely available, so it's really nice drug to be shown to be effective against covid nineteen. There's been a lot of debate from the beginning about how much of the severe illness at the end in patients is really the overreaction of the immune system, and that's of course where the steroid drugs attack the pathogenesis really so they can have damp and. And Immune System, and the hope is that that will mean that that the symptoms of patients will be severe and people are more likely to survive, and then that turned out to be the case I mean they. They found that mortality when one third in patients that received accent medicine. That was really the first big randomized trial in this outbreak that showed a clear difference in mortality, the national. Health Service within hours after the result was announced, changed its standard of care to include some episode. This is pretty surprising. These aren't peer reviewed results. These are press release results. Yes. That's been a huge point of contention. There's just kind of tension inherent in this fast-moving pandemic between you know having really robust results in getting them out there as fast as possible and I talked at length with Martin Landry, one of the principal investigators of the about it his argument. Is You kind of get? The baseline results I. You can look at the data and see okay. There is a difference in mortality and might be some changes in the percentages, but nothing major, but then there's a lot of other data that you want to put in the paper that takes some. Some more work, so his argument was. This is an important resulted to change the outcome of patients right now so let's put it out and then try to get the paper out as soon as possible. After that in the paper ended up coming out I think seven days after the results. Yeah, it's a bit of a wild west. Now place is different. Hospitals have different standards of care like in the US. A lot of hospitals are using convalescent plasma. This is a blood product from a person has recovered from cove nineteen and they're using that to treat patients in the hospital. But convalescent plasma hasn't been subjected to the same level of scrutiny at the same level of evidence has been obtained. You know for that as a deck of Methadone the drug. We just talked about right and I. Mean that's the two points though that I find really interesting and one is. If you're going to give patients these drugs, anyway, you might as well be using that to generate data that then shows whether the drug works said they aren't collecting data on these treatments, so they are collecting data, very. Very. Often right, the problem is I. Mean it does back to what I was saying about randomized patients, you can treat patients with something and then say okay. We're collecting a lot of data and we'LL GONNA look back at how the patients did that. Receive Drug and how patients did that didn't but there's a hierarchy of evidence and really in that hierarchy a randomized trial just because it gets rid of all the bias season, who would receive a drug or not otherwise so everyone? I talked to really agree. Agree that we need in this particular situation that's condemning when you want to see as fast as possible whether a drug has a big effect on the hard outcome like do people die or do they survive what you need, a large randomized trials, and when you ask people why they do, it also goes back to what you were saying. A lot of people said when they tried to convince doctors to take part. The doctor say well, but I have a good feeling I think. I know what works, right. Right maybe I mean doctors sometimes willing to accept a lower standard of evidence to guide their decisions. It then becomes very difficult to get to that higher level of evidence because to do that. You need to accept that half of your patients are not going to receive whatever you believe to be the most useful. That's inherent tension in the whole enduring these kinds of trials when you have some observational data already, but you don't really have the kind of strong data that let's say with confidence. Okay, this worse. I'm here in the US. We have many many cases, but there isn't this sized patient group being randomized. Is that because of what we just talked about, or is it more a lack of coordination? The US has done one big trial though the National Institutes of health the first. Study that was a randomized placebo controlled trial that included a lot of patients. And did give a robust result didn't really see a difference in mortality, but it showed that patients receive from severe. Stay in hospital for a short time period. Why haven't more trials like that I? Think it is a lack of coordination. You can argue that the whole response in the US to this virus has been marked by lack of ordination, and then, of course it does help when you have certain structures in place so again. The National Health Service in the UK with all of these hospitals. Part of this National Health Service. Of course, it makes it a lot easier. You put in place this one structure, one ethical board, and then you kind of do it from there while if you have to piece together coalition. Coalition of different hospitals and different investigators, it becomes a little bit more complicated. I think right, but given the the sheer amount of cases, the US has had i. mean certainly data could have been generated that would have informed both the US and the rest of the world a lot better about what works what doesn't.

United Kingdom United States National Health Service Chloroquine National Institutes Of Health Norway Attorney Kobe Martin Landry Methadone Principal
"methadone" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"methadone" Discussed on KTOK

"It's not just kids. You are our teachers and staff there. You can't run a school without teachers and staff, So you gotta protect everybody. It's going to be a challenge. But the single biggest thing that'll help us out is if we keep the virus in the in the community at a low level. Question. Everyone I know is asking how optimistic are you that there will be drug therapies for covert 19 and a vaccine in the coming months. Yes, we've got two drugs that seemed to work. They're both really for people who are pretty sick Room Death Severe index of methadone. So these are for hospitalized patients who have substantial lung issues and involvement. Already, my optimistic we're gonna get an aural therapy that you can just take when you get sick. I'm not super Look, look, lot of clinical trials going on. I would love to be wrong. But the history of antiviral therapy is not a glorious one. We just have not been able to come up with Orel. Drugs didn't work. Super. Well, vaccines. I am very optimistic. We're gonna have one early 2021. The calendar here Mike is that there are seven plus 1,000,000,000 people in the world and there is going to be a race to vaccinate everybody. We're going to billions of doses, and I'm very worried about supply chains about having of files and syringes and all the stuff. So I suspect spring to summer of 2021 before everybody's going to have to get facts stated in the United States and how effective with a vaccine be expect a vaccine that would work with just about everybody or.

methadone United States Mike
Daily coronavirus cases hit new high as states mandate masks

Squawk Pod

06:43 min | 1 year ago

Daily coronavirus cases hit new high as states mandate masks

"We begin tonight with the dramatic spike in virus cases throughout many states, most notably Texas and Florida both states rolling back reopening. Dr Anthony Fauci sounding new warnings today. Florida California Arizona Texas places like that. There really is a difficult situation. Because as individual states, cities locations are opening up They're really saying a a serious concern of increase in cases, and it isn't just because they're doing more testing, there are more cases. There are more hospitalizations in some of those places and soon you'll be seeing more debts if you. You. Say you're going to go back into lockdown? They'll be an absolute pushback on that. You might have to do it. You never take that off the table, but before you do that. How about doing the things that we said all along? You should do for goodness. Sakes avoid crowds. Wear masks when you see most of the young people. I totally understand. The desire and the urge since you've been locked down so long to go out and just let it let it rip as they say just go out and have a great time. You've got understand that A. we're seeing more and more situations where young otherwise healthy people who get infected. Ill, so you have a responsibility to yourself, but as important is that when you get infected? Even if you don't have any symptoms, you apart of the dynamic process of propagating pandemic. That's killing people. Taxes has become one of the nation's most critical hotspots. There's fear things are so bad. Hospitals are on the verge of being overwhelmed. Dr Salil Bondar is an emergency room doctor at Houston Memorials Herman and is with us live tonight Dr Dari. Give us a sense of what it's like there right now. I mean. It's a very critical time in this city without a doubt. Just just to give you an example, our idea where we're at a prior to June first, we had about one hundred sixty patients across our hospital systems that were in fact with Covid, and now we're at about five hundred patients. Hospital systems that are infected with covid and even yesterday we had six thousand new cases. In Texas a Covid, so there's definitely a high degree of concern amongst everybody here at the hospital in our hospital system and and all throughout the city. What are you seeing in terms of the ages of people being hospitalized, and those being admitted to the ICU, because we're hearing a lot that it is younger people contracting the disease, and those are the new cases, but if so, then then, why are they being hospitalized and wire? They being admitted to the ICU. We did not see those young ages when we went through this here in New York. No that's definitely. That's definitely a paradigm shift that we're seeing a little bit more that we were seeing before. There are larger percentage of younger patients better coming into the hospital competitive before. The good thing is, is that usually? They don't end up staying in the hospital for as long as some of the older patients but that is something new that we are seeing compared to before the slightly larger percentage of patients of the younger population. What's capacity at this point in the hospitals handle the surge. And that's a great question. I think there's been a lot of misinformation about that buys wanted to give you a better understanding of where we're at met. Specifically right now. The Texas Medical Center We have one one thousand, three hundred thirty beds that are available, normally are normal capacities, one, thousand, three, hundred thirty, and yes, those beds are pretty much full at this point in time, however we have prepared for surge capacity as well, and that's about three hundred seventy three additional beds as at search past. If those fill up, there are about five hundred additional beds beyond that potentially. We could utilize as well so right now we have extra bedroom to to care for some of those people using our surge capacity, but if the rates continue as they are right now if the rates continued to the degree that they are right now, two weeks from out, could be very very different story. Tell us about some of the treatments that you are using. Do you have access to disappear? And if so, do you have to ration it? Yes so we're definitely using. For Sure A. Lot of the ICU patients especially there have been some new trials that have come out from the UK about about some steroids as well that can use a text methadone. That we are looking into. In addition, but at the end of the day there's still no vaccine for this, so we still need to do everything that we can toward off people coming into the hospitals, and it's all about all those preventative measures that we've been saying for a long time that that I think Houston really needs to make sure that we follow and do all of those things otherwise two weeks from now. We're GONNA be in a very very difficult situation, even worse than now that we may not be able to come back from Iraq now we can handle it, but we just hope it doesn't get even worse than it is right now. Governor Abbott did roll back some of the reopening plans today including shutting down bars and rafting. Is that enough from your perspective or does he need to close more? I. That was definitely a needed step. without a doubt may end up needing more than that I here in the city of Houston judge. Lena Hidalgo has issued a stay at home advisory for for all residents of Houston and I think at the end of the day we we all know. What to do for this viruses, no mystery as to how to to flatten the carbon, bring down the curve. We know that what works what doesn't. We know that we just need to stay at home and and avoid contact with all those. Extraneous people are going out to different places. We know what to do and I think we may end up needing more than that, but we'll kind of see how it goes. But for right now. That was definitely a needed a good step.

Houston Texas Covid Dr Anthony Fauci Florida Dr Salil Bondar Houston Memorials Herman Lena Hidalgo Dr Dari New York Iraq Texas Medical Center UK Governor Abbott Methadone Arizona California
"methadone" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"methadone" Discussed on WSB-AM

"That's new to me I know it's not new my kids tell me welcome to our world because you know they run the whole game of thrones thing I'm not used to this thing more where you you like the show and it goes away for a year I watched the first season of stranger things I watched all of the episodes in one night Mike eight PM until four in the morning and then it was like a year and I never watched another one I grew up in a time where you had seasons took like maybe the summer off right three months when you came back as a cliff hanger some guide to came back it's hard for me to a year and I love the show called the expanse science fiction great show and I watched it through four seasons it like I call I came home late so I had to go through all seasons that once I got to the end I'm like what is it about a year sometimes I'm I've got expanse withdrawal syndrome but I'm dealing with for the first time and I'm a lot of people do it how do you stay interested I don't even remember what happened a year ago when the thing came back recap episode yes we're if you have any medical cells I'm not on social media Sandra so I'm not I'm I'm trying to fill the gap with any kind of sci fi I can find some much in Stargate universe or something I guess to some twenty ten which is like okay let's know expanse which really is just like it's like methadone I can't get heroin so I guess I'll do the methadone C. speaking of heroin this is my heroine let's do this.

Sandra methadone heroin Mike
Addiction in Isolation

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

06:42 min | 1 year ago

Addiction in Isolation

"After weeks of isolating ourselves to stop the spread of Corona virus. Many of US still haven't been able to settle into a new routine. I know I've had a hard time with it myself. That kind of disruption can take a toll especially for those who are in the process of trying to make a change in their lives like getting sober when I was first getting so far That was instilled in me and the head a regimen at certain meetings that I went to I went Kalma sponsor on a daily basis and once. That routine was set. It really helped it become second nature so that it didn't become a chore. That's Anthony Be. We agreed not to use his last name to protect his privacy. Anthony is an alcoholic who has been in recovery for seven years when he was in the throes of addiction. Most of his substance abuse took place at home alone. I know for me. I didn't need to be in a club or a bar or anything like that. I could just be in my house and stop off at the liquor store and And on the House with so many people isolating during this pandemic on their own. Anthony worries that those who struggle with substance abuse are especially vulnerable. So imagine someone who has just recently gotten sober and has been going to meetings and then all of a sudden now. They're just in the house. The place where everything happened here. Walking around that I'm looking oh That's where I used to put a bottle or oh look at the glasses. Anthony is no longer able to attend his regular alcoholics anonymous meetings in person so he's joined the meetings online over zoom. The interesting part about it for me was Having people check in from Australia the UK. Louisiana North Dakota Virginia. I mean it was all over and so- instantly for me I felt connected like okay. This is how we're GONNA do it. This is what we're GONNA do to get us through. You know this period. But here's the thing. Connecting online may not be enough for everyone doctrine. Nora Volkoff is the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of health. Pretty early on Dr Volkov became concerned. About how this pandemic would affect those struggling with substance abuse. I started to worry it in February but it wasn't really until March that I started to recognize how devastating these could be to individuals that have problems with substance abuse as Cova. Nineteen patients fill hospitals all over the country. Doctor Volkov says it is imperative that healthcare workers prevent this stigma surrounding addiction from influencing how they administer care they are discriminated on the basis that the belief that people do this themselves and therefore you have to own the consequences to your own choices and in fact this is something that patients will tell you that. Have a problem with drugs and why they don't like to go see a doctor or go to the hospital because they are mistreated addictions that one of the most stigmatize. If not the most stigmatized disease. Fortunately she says there have been some changes to the way care is provided for those with substance use disorders down health has exploded and it has been incorporated into everyday practice so rapidly. Dr Volkov adds that treatment for drug addiction however has been especially challenging many of the Methadone clinics are closing their doors. On limiting the number of patients that can go in normally. Methadone can only be prescribed after an in-person evaluation and must be taken in the clinic but now some Methadone clinics are making it easier to get multiple doses of the medication and to be able to take it at home so these changes give us a different perspective of how we may be able to treat people that are addicted to drugs while also forcing us to see the issues that we need to solve address. It's not just illicit substances that pose a threat during this pandemic but legal ones as well because covert nineteen impacts the lungs the food and Drug Administration has advised that those who smoke cigarettes may be at increased risk and have worse outcomes from the virus and while there isn't any data showing how the pandemic has impacted rates of alcohol use disorder. People do appear to be buying a lot of alcohol. According to Nielsen sales of Alcoholic Beverages increased fifty five percent in the last week of March compared to the same time last year. That may be partly as a result of liquor stores being deemed essential businesses in most states and while there has been some criticism of that designation. Dr Volkov points out that having access to alcohol could in some situations be safer for alcoholics. Eve you are addicted to alcohol. And you don't have access to alcohol. And you go to withdraw. That's extremely severe. You can literally die from alcohol withdrawal but Anthony be who's been in recovery for seven years worries about the temptation for people who are still struggling. My first instinct was like damn that sucks. You know. There's definitely some people out there that are suffering and I feel for them when I see Liquor Stores Open. I hope they realize that. That's not an essential but I don't know that that's going to happen. The World Health Organization recently issued a statement saying excessive drinking can weaken the immune system and they recommended limiting access to alcohol during this pandemic. Of course it's one thing to discourage people from excessive substance use during this uncertain time and another to make sure they have the support. They need to do so. Anthony has a simple suggestion for anyone who's currently having a hard time. Pick up the phone. If people are really into the whole technology thing just call people. It makes such a different. And what's what's interesting. Is that if I call someone? It helps them more than it helps me. I'm calling because I want to stay sober. But they'll say thank you for calling me because I was going through X Y and Z. And they might call somebody else. Dealing with addiction is enormously difficult under any circumstance. And we don't want to minimize this at all dealing with it during a pandemic adds a whole new set of challenges

Anthony Doctor Volkov Methadone Kalma National Institute On Drug Abu United States Cova Drug Administration Nielsen World Health Organization Nora Volkoff National Institutes Of Health Director Australia UK Louisiana Virginia North Dakota
Italy: 6 inmates protesting virus restrictions die after breaking into prison infirmary, overdosing on methadone

BBC Newshour

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Italy: 6 inmates protesting virus restrictions die after breaking into prison infirmary, overdosing on methadone

"Prison authorities in Italy say protests a broken nineteen twenty seven jails against restrictions imposed to tackle the corona virus and break the trouble began in Montana in the north after inmates were told visits will being suspended media reported six deaths that around twenty prisoners have escaped from a prison in Fallujah in southern Italy in Milan inmates climbed onto the roof at St Victoria

Italy Montana Fallujah St Victoria Milan
4 years later, New Hampshire's opioid epidemic still rages on

Here & Now

10:28 min | 1 year ago

4 years later, New Hampshire's opioid epidemic still rages on

"We're in New Hampshire for today's presidential primary. At the primary four years ago. We reported here one of the big stories of the decade. No it wasn't how badly Bernie Bernie Sanders. Beat Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump's win. It was the OPIOID Epidemic New Hampshire then second only to West Virginia and overdose deaths life. Life expectancy was down for the first time in seventy five years and this was the first time many in the national media saw this all close. So where are we now while the number of deaths is down but that's attributed to advances in saving people from overdoses. New Hampshire launched a safe fire station program instead of people heading over newborns born they handed in themselves. There's also a two one one emergency line to get help it so-called doorway hospitals those on the frontlines. Say there's still much more that needs to be done John but there's also a story that offers a glimmer of hope for pregnant MOMS battling addiction to tell that story. We had to Rochester New Hampshire capture. How are you good? I'm Kerry Norton. It's nice to meet you. Thank if that's a good word for it. I mean they. Every bit of Space Work Carey is a nurse. She cofounded hope on Haven Hill in this rambling. Eighteen fifty s Greek Revival Country House for moms with substance abuse issues. Trying to stay sober can beautiful. It just looks like an wonderful old country kitchen with a big table for. Everyone wouldn't sit around. We see babies into the living room. So this is our living room The other area is our baby changing changing room in another little space for babies to play with your toys but also social workers therapists. This is a medical treatment facility. Women have to be sober. Some of them are on Methadone. All help each other stay sober by attending support groups cooking meals together. Learning bonding ending skills. Some are about to give birth some already have. How old is this little guy? He just turned eighteen months. Looks like a newborn over here. Yeah we have a little newborn over here upstairs. The bedrooms this old house was once part of the underground railroad today. Shelters eight women at a time and they can bring other children under five as they welcome a new one. So every room has cribs fasten. That's changing tables rocking chairs. Everything a mom we need. Imagine for some of these women. They've never seen anything like this. We're taking care of women who are homeless imminently homeless and a lot of them are generational e so oh I've had more than more than two or three women have said they haven't even had beds in their lives. We have women coming from actual. It's not couch surfing. It's actually they're homeless on you know in a tent or not outside. The women are encouraged to be honest. Honest if they're struggling if they relapse told her ask for help we give women support with so much dignity that even when things are hard and not going well they know they can reach out immediately so many do and you know someone listening might say you know what when somebody is an addict and using heroin. This isn't just about the young women it's about children. What do you say to those people who really don't trust this terrible addiction and worry about the effort put in to who a mother? Reuniting with child or having a child shore so for me it's a chronic healthcare condition that should be treated just like any other healthcare condition that a woman might have throughout her entire life span and we should treat it. It is heartwarming and hopeful. Just like the story of how this all started. I want to talk about the beginnings wings. I understand you came across a young woman who was eight months pregnant. And you were calling around. You couldn't find the resources in I. Did you send out a late night. Email asking asking. Does anyone know Oprah or Ellen DeGeneres. It was a facebook play. Her name was abby and I had just brought her to the one place in New Hampshire that after and we call it five acts of Congress an entire team of people for two weeks worked together into this place. I brought her there and on my way home. My mind is blue and so I put up on facebook facebook. Does anyone know Ellen Oprah or somebody rich because we need to do this in our community. We need to do it now and when I woke up I had a lot of people responding. Including In my co-founder colleen. WHO said I have a house? She doesn't know Oprah Ellen or she wasn't Richard Self but she had a house. That was just the perfect fit for what we needed to do. And we are sitting in that house and this is where. That story gets heartbreaking abby. Young pregnant woman who inspired this project had her baby became sober but experts spurts no the most vulnerable time for mom. Battling addictions is right after giving birth. There's little housing that safe. No treatment no work Abbey became an activist lobbying lobbying lawmakers her sister had died of an overdose but soon abbey did as well the woman behind hope on Haven Hill mobilized they opened a second concentre called it. Abbey's place women from Haven Hill transition there to stay sober find jobs be part of a community. Carrie wells up over the memory when he she has a legacy you know. I always have to remember like not to stop. Because she didn't stop when she rallied was doing great and when she had slips and wasn't doing well she put herself out there. She put herself out there to Eddie. You know legislator any person that would listen to talk to say. This is the problem Tom. This is what's going on. I'm this is how I'm having a really hard time. You know. Women deserve to have this health care treatment and then support and and if for some reason they have a recurrence. They deserve the chance to have this. Chronic illness immediately treated again as needed and they deserve to be MOMS. They deserve to have their children. They love their babies and they are great. MOMS the flip side is I know. She's cheering us on. Because what we get to do. Every day is watch. Women Thrive one of them. Thirty two year old Lauren Phillips who sits with her talkative pink cheeked eighteen month old toddler. Rory she and rory started at hope on Haven Hill will now they live at Abbey's plays Lauren has a job. She's been sober for six months. But it's a rough road. She clings to rory now. But he's been in foster care she. She shares her story to help other young moms. I went into my first inpatient treatments under when I was nineteen years old from that time about fifteen years ago until November two thousand seventeen I was just in and out of treatment centers. I did Three years in prison prison. That's when I got out in November and I got pregnant with this little guy pretty much right away take us back. How did you start? What happened my drug of choice is heroin and cocaine? I grew up in like Upper middle class family. My mother passed away when I was young but my dad was like to say he is an amazing man. Doesn't do it justice. How old were you when you started using heroin? I started using heroin and I was sixteen. How'd did you get an ex boyfriend? At the time it was like Oxycontin and stuff like that by the time that I was educated on it was too late. You know. So how do you get to jail. I ended up stealing from my family stealing from my father's business. I sold drugs and had to sales charges. Once I got into a using. That was just number one. You got pregnant well it would have to be about eighteen when I got out of prison. I was sober sober at that time because I had just gotten out of prison and I- paroled to a sober house for women in Nashua so I was able to stay sober shortly. After after he was born I Relapsed proved to myself the hard way at that point that like my love for him is not as strong as addiction. And like I needed that. This disease is stronger than anything. A call is me to DC Y. F.. And they showed up at my house. I had to get into a program of some sorts and if it was a program that would allow me to take him then. I could take him with me. I ended up by the grace of God at Hope Uneven Hell. I got so much out of this program. And in being a mother to him I realized what was lacking before I guess now. I can say that I wasn't willing to To change everything about my life and Out of fear you know. I had been with his father for a long time. I didn't want to give that up and it led me to a relapse and at that point I felt hopeless at that time but the women that worked here they believed in me at that point and then he ended up going into foster care July. How hard is that? Yeah I needed to get myself better before it could be there for him. I ended up going to a twenty eight day program and you know I. I knew that I wanted him to be happy. And just have a good life and I loved him so much but I think at that point. I still didn't think that I was going to be in that equation. God had other plans for me. Thank God and and stay in touch with Kerry and they were planning on opening Abbey's place and and it has just been amazing and I share my story with anybody who will listen because I know today that it's possible missile. You haven't taken your eyes off him one second. What happens when you look at him? I just GonNa make me cry now. Now I mean he was looking. He's just perfect. I get this feeling looking at him and knowing how perfect he is but I also know that my diseases seizes stronger than that. Like I have to rely on God. I have to rely on the women in the program that have walked this journey before me and that then show

Abbey New Hampshire Haven Hill Heroin Kerry Norton Rory Bernie Bernie Sanders Facebook Ellen Oprah Rochester New Hampshire Hillary Clinton Greek Revival Country House West Virginia John Donald Trump Oprah Ellen Lauren Phillips Carey Methadone I
"methadone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Really sorry that this is they don't it's all good like this this has to be real right like whatever we're doing this is this is what's happening in our life after listening that'll tape with Laura I ask you to do another interview this one starts a very differently the last one Laura's cooking up heroin and I'm having trouble setting up my gear yeah you know what is going yeah yeah yeah your gums sorry your nose run some hot water so you can take the yeah yeah sometimes that does the job for me if it's already in the barrel I just run into the hot water yeah one two three four five I think I might have to do a Hey there yeah all right okay say stuff I'm saying stuff so is looking at all the things I wrote for us all things you needed together all the meetings all the emails and we've just done a ton of stuff and it's kind of like to describe that I have to make us remember and so like today I'm just gonna ask you to help remember some stuff with me and maybe unique and like bring it back in order man okay can you give me an average day like what day would been like before the switch for you so I would be up eight o'clock in the morning I would you know do my thang get up and go to my pharmacy drinks my methadone and then come back but when I woke up I woke up not feeling like I needed to have methadone if I didn't actually drink the drink I wouldn't I wouldn't know I guess what they have dope sickness and yes not at all and I wasn't using heroin daily is aware that means your life like what did you do during the day I came in and volunteered here at that and do it and I was fighting for people's rights that were on drugs I I felt like I'd gotten to where I wanted to be after being a heroin user and Macedon consumer.

Laura methadone heroin
"methadone" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Cost in France about fifty seven dollars add the three predominant pain killers consumed by the winos the ex White House in France are valium like compounds benzodiazepines primo is a blueprint on offering pre no notebook three nor free they made into a bow preening molecule on morphine interesting and methadone yeah old methadone methadone is more addictive than heroin according to people I've interviewed treatment yeah real treatment I love you know the history of of morphine heroin methodology with you in a not show very interesting to me as a former student of pharmacology the country was addicted this country was addicted to the drug of morphine when it was legal talking nineteen hundred error morphine was in in so many different over the counter products elixirs in there since syrups and distillates that they even gave morphine based products the babies were teething so entire generation before World War one was addicted to morphine related products in America this is really nothing new but the addiction to morphine became so great that the US scientific community was asked to come up with a synthetic do you revert to of of morphing that would produce some pain killing properties without being addicted so the scientists produce three six diacetate a morphine which means they added acid peel groups to the morphine molecule and then it was proposed to be much safer than morphine while affording similar if not superior pain relieving qualities so they they released the equivalent of the three sixty I asked the morphing and it was very popular because that product three sixty I asked the morphine is heroin heroine was produced advertorials cure from morphine addiction okay so then the heroin addiction became a bigger problem than the morphine addiction spin the clock foad fifty years that we come to treatment for heroin so the government side just come up with methadone Hey how many times have you seen poor drug addicts well here's the thing take thing sucked and drink the thing take the pick up to take the pill entry now it turns out the junkies will more addicted to methadone which was highly available on the streets because it was such a great height that methadone became a drug of choice for a lot of people addicted to a to a heroin so I don't have an immediate answer to the problem I'll be right back savage the savage nation is sponsored by Swiss America the only company I trust with my financial future call eight hundred two eight nine twenty six forty six or Swiss America dot com.

France White House morphine methadone America heroin Swiss America US
"methadone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Will be held on Thursday expected to be loud Jim o'grady W. NYC news. national attention has been focused on the opioid crisis in rural areas and suburbs but a different sort of crisis is playing out in New York City and it's getting worse W. NYC Cindy Rodriguez reports opioids in the form of pain killers never took off in poor areas of the Bronx that's according to doctor chin not so cutting him from Montefiore Medical Center she's been researching and providing care to marginalized communities there for decades handing him says people of color are less likely to have their pain taken seriously and therefore less likely to be prescribed drugs for it and in a lot of ways it protected communities of color and so it's a little bit of a different epidemic that has been happening because of this history of the disparities in care instead people from East Harlem great toner in the south Bronx are dying from overdosing on cocaine and fentanyl these three neighborhoods have the highest overdose death rates in the city according to the city's health department in East Harlem the overdose death rates rose nearly fifty percent between twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen that city wide the overdose death rate is going down Latino men in these neighborhoods are dying the most doctor shoddy nabi runs a methadone clinics Vermont of your Medical Center she says being homeless unemployed in jail and living in concentrated poverty all contribute to drug problems these are things that hurt our patients at risk for substance use disorders that decrease access to treatment for patients at risk for relapse and overdose and her family destabilizing methadone is the most common form of treatment in the Bronx it must be taken at a clinic while under supervision that Mont of yours Cunningham says middle class communities are more likely to use view print north in a prescription drug you pick up at the pharmacy and take it home there are just fundamentally different ways and. H. these populations have experienced opioids are being prescribed or detection treatment you print north and requires prior authorization from insurance companies Cunningham says many clinics don't want to deal with that which makes the drug harder to get but that could change of governor Andrew Cuomo signs the bill passed by the state legislature the new law would remove prior authorizations for all medications used to treat addiction Cindy Rodriguez W. NYC news..

New York City Cindy Rodriguez Bronx East Harlem Montefiore Medical Center methadone Jim o'grady Cunningham Andrew Cuomo Vermont Mont cocaine fentanyl fifty percent
"methadone" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Name is Logan from Newton Kansas addict in recovery I was hoping that it for four and a half years and most of my life my question is for the generator on the far right have you yourself personally ever taken methadone yeah how can you push a substance that has a chemical dependency with it despite if a person works program that drug will create a chemical dependency I know first hand it was all right so the question is a first of all let me play back up I don't prescribe methadone but I'll I'll answer the question all of these substances that we talk about in here who marijuana cocaine methadone suboxone bike and Percocet all of them carry with them the potential of a physiologic dependence in other words if I take the drug on a regular basis each day and then suddenly stop I'm going to experience withdrawal symptoms if I take each day I will find gradually over the course of the first few weeks that to a if I'm taking the same dose that the effects of the drug gradually diminish to some point where they end up at a baseline so that that's typical remember that what we're doing we is providing the vox owner providing methadone is and I I'm gonna say this is probably your surprise we are replacing one drug with another but remember that what we're doing all of us when you start addictive substance use you are starting it because you are treating an underlying condition the discomfort that you had originally that led you to find these drugs make you feel better because for everybody out there who use terror when got hooked on it there are also some people out there who use heroin and did not get hooked on it what differentiates those people the people who got hooked on it they had addictive disease but they had that before they used the drug so when we're giving suboxone over giving methadone we're giving the drug to treat the underlying disease detective disease and we're doing it with the medication that is less likely to cause harm and is less likely to lead to morbidity and mortality then the drugs that the person had previously chosen to use to treat how they felt thank.

Kansas methadone heroin marijuana cocaine
"methadone" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Push our product. It's one hundred percent safe and pushing it. Did it wasn't unjust. Here's what's available think about prescribing it. It's date the more they prescribe the more the the more perks they got. I don't know how you feel that anything other than being a drug dealer at a higher level it is it's legalized drug dealing and the withdrawal sandwich they last for up to a month. I've been through the methadone clinics. I've been through the spots and clinics. It's all bunch of bush. I mean it. It's legalized alive. You're you're a legalized. Buzz is already is because you can go to work and function because you don't have to go out and hunt for peels and i've never turned to here at one. Thank god i was always afraid of needles and i just i never did that so into oxygen cotton you just quit. They stop prescribing it and you quit cold turkey. No i i went through a series of a month at a time of being sick of an and pardon my vulgarity but <hes> of of using the bathroom on myself vomiting myself film like i've got the flu tom's team i mean there's no you can't get comfortable. Your legs jerk your legs ache and <music>. I'm i'm so thankful that that there's an actual radio station that will actually talk about this because usually it's swept under the rug and people don't care about it. I mean yes. I'll be an addict to the day. I doc regardless of whether i'm using or not. I'm still an addict. That's the mindset is programmed into your body chemistry changes and this is what people don't understand you. You think it's a choice choice. It's not it was a choice for me to take those pills and it was too because reasons exactly. I thought hey this is okay. You know i'm i'm laid up. I'm in a cast from my waist down. I'm the doctor says it's okay those pills once you you were out of the cast yeah i took him up until the day he cut me off and then i went found him on the street right i mean because it was out of that or later earns speak thick and lose my job function in society and are you. Are you on a medical maintenance program. I'm now for like something you brought up. Suboxone and methadone are did the sa- boxin de the it to an extent. The methadone was just legalized. That's all it was and and they can say what they want to but when i tried to leave that methadone that's an clinic. They were like well. No we don't need to win you off. You need to stay here for a couple here. Let's try one milligram going down and at the time i was on one hundred twenty twenty milligrams that stuff it. It took me forever to get out of there. He asked him for you. <hes> ibew gain.

methadone ibew bush tom one hundred percent
"methadone" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"So called methadone mile or about keeping Boston safe he in says police are not out to harass users a lot of these folks I don and now they don't feel that life was worth anything anymore and we have to let them know the life actually is worth something in in when they when they get in recovery when they get sober the things that they lost can come back I mean there's no question about it the city has been criticized for the perceived heavy handedness of police an operation clean sweep commissioner William cross tells WBZ the wheel chairs that officers threw away were in what he called a bio hazardous condition a sheriff in western Massachusetts is defending efforts to manage a spike in opioid related deaths is sending people to jail for a court ordered addiction treatment these are civil not criminal commitments in the program in a special wing of that hand in county jail is roughly about a year old and a county sheriff new coach she says it's been very well received what I was taught by my shoulder continually asked here what can you do to support our community I I didn't have to look any further than to start at the civil commitment treatment center it's been very well plotted by the local people the family members that people were coming through the program but for some reason people out east and people that make decisions wanna way in and say that it should happen there and I just simply say come up and see it in the car drive an hour and a half come see what we're doing because we're doing great work a civil rights group called prisoners legal services disagrees they say the forcing people into correctional facilities for treatment only stigmatizes addiction the group is suing the state to try to end the program researchers in a new report claimed that children are being prescribed an excessive amount of opioids after certain medical procedures more from CVS is of a broader kids are getting too many opioids after tonsillectomy ice a study by the university of Michigan found that between twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen sixty percent of patients under the age of eighteen who underwent the procedure we're prescribe opioid painkillers to take home that's despite guidelines that recommends non opioid alternatives such as ibuprofen the average prescription lasted six to ten days the young people in the study were all covered by private insurance another study finds that those who undergo major operations can suffer in their overall mental health major surgery doubles a person's risk of experiencing a decline in mental skills that's the bottom line to a longitudinal study of more than seven thousand people it found that those who underwent major operations were twice as likely to suffer substantial cognitive decline including in reasoning memory and language skills they've gone may be the result of brain damage from a number of factors related to the surgery including Anastasia mini strokes and inflammation by some estimates one in forty people suffers a significant decline in mental ability after a major operation Jim Chevy CBS news New York firefighter springs into action saving a child locked alone in a hot car Matthew Clinton says he found the four year old child a boy crying hysterically at a shopping center in queens scream and that it was hot and you can see the sweat on the kid's face you know I said listen I'm a fireman and then a caliber with thick Clinton grabbed a hammer shattered the glass grab the boy the boy was taken to the hospital is father was arrested on reckless endangerment this comes after the death of twin one your roles last month in the Bronx after their father left them in a hot car for the day.

Boston methadone twenty seventeen sixty percent four year ten days
"methadone" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The morning wandering around like zombies looking for their methadone fix okay so the quote the question is Tom what we do in Brockton what we do in in the metal nyla box I I I don't know we we we've we've gone through this for the last forty years with the war on drugs all these experts all these Blue Ribbon commissions the only people at ever had an answer for it was the Chinese with the Cultural Revolution okay well that's going to violate our constitution right right right we really I don't I don't I don't know what the answer is I really don't all I know is that you just have to stay away from people like that and if people like that involved with your life you have to cut them loose well although what I that's ready drag you down that's probably good advice Tom Preciado interesting perspective we'll talk soon my friend have a great have a great night Heidi is next in Beverly hello Heidi your first time caller I understand is that true I am well honey I just want to take I know it's a serious subject but at the same time I would like to jump on here and get our studio audience give you run it's always interesting what prom someone to pick up the phone the first time go right ahead I fact that eight you know you're bringing attention to something that's been going on for a long time and I think you hit the nail on the head we guiding you know the methadone alley and this that and the other thing if you have a child or a family member who has died from a heroin overdose did not jazz you know everybody puts their pants on one leg at a time so I feel so sorry for the Kennedy gal that passed away today but we still no one knows formally but this yeah I know I am a true class right is one and then member somebody's half understand good you know they were just as important to their family member as this young lady and it is an epidemic and it is you know when people say methadone alley and this I mean I totally understand and feel sorry for the office said that god attack given the circumstances however I do really feel that it is an epidemic yes his high let me ask if I could okay because we're in agreement on all of this okay it's it's out of control so the question is how do we deal with it here in Boston so Boston doesn't look like San Francisco I don't know if you're aware of what's going on in San Francisco but I am needles everywhere people living on the streets people had a loss in the truck you might hold on now just up and ran definitely hope that we can we can hear me are you able to hear me Heidi I'm trying to say is with you in Los Angeles they they now believe that they're going to have bionic play okay so we're talking serious stuff now I I am sorry for what you and your family have experienced I'm heartbroken I've had friends of mine who have beaten this this this horrific a certain set of strings and my question is I think we warehousing people we used to warehouse them in buildings now we're we're housing them on streets like methadone mile Tom in Brockton engine this is street in Brockton it seems to me that the needs to be some distinctions made here you have some people who maybe do one help let's help those people but when you see five people or six or ten people beaten the crap out of a lot of a motorist that could have been you or me who made that the wrong turn down that street deal I don't think a generous able we can't put them in jail for assault and battery because their attics I think once the behavior gets to that point did that something's got to be done that's what I'm trying to say I think we're looking at people also I totally understand I think however that like this young woman got the bed and she did in fact lose their life by having an overdose she is no different than methadone alley and why they are she aided because they're not getting the help they deserve is what is really no one was depreciating those people what I'm trying to say is I think we are kind of putting them in the shadows we not dealing with them as individuals we're saying okay they're all drug addicts they're all heroin addicts the opioid abusers and it will give him the methadone I think we need to go beyond and we can't get to say look this kid we can save this kid really wants to get off this junk right this guy over here who's away with like presented differently given the fact that possibly this young woman who had you know I you will you know go in there I'm not going there because I got to tell you it's easy to make that point you've made it twice already we get it okay but this is got nothing to do there's all sorts of disparities that list in the that it that exist in the world some people are born into abject poverty some people and and they become billionaires some people are born with a silver spoon in their mouth and they and they they end up in a bad situation I don't want to go there what I want to talk about is how are we treating the people that the people who are living who are existing on methadone miles around this country and you said you lost your son right or correct my nephew nephew okay the question is where do you think your nephew wanted to beat it or do you think your nephew surrendered and said I just want to get high what what what category was he and and I really think it depends on one's mindset I think what was your nephews mindset if you know I mean who is twenty four years old and his age what was on the cotton okay but what was he what was it Caroline was hiding listen to me Heidi I got a question for you if you can answer the question great if you're kind of going to move on what do you think your nephew your twenty four year old nephews mindset was do you think he just gave up and said you know I'm just going to chase this drag until it kills me or do you think that in in a moment of clarity he really wanted to get off that crap what do you think his mindset was I think he may have had the opportunity to get off that but instead of treating him the house down all right so she did you call Heidi I I think you made interesting point to which we had spent as much time talking about the the death of the young woman yes to because we don't know what whether that was a natural cause or whether was caused by some other element presage your call we'll take a break six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine two nine ten thirty is the number and thank you very much for that reminder rob we are behind it's been a busy night here at night side.

Tom Brockton methadone twenty four years twenty four year forty years
"methadone" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And so to have a mayor that appoints all of the heads of all of our agencies, and every member of councils or commissions that advise him you're not gonna have an unbiased neutral party to step in when there is corruption. Or when there is a lack of accountability or transparency, one of the things I found very interesting about your conversation with Alvis Burks was that he said that they found out as the city council they had no right to investigate the mayor when there was some sexual harassment charges levied against him. And that was sort of shocking to me that I thought okay? Then who does hold the mayor accountable. There's no. Holding our mayor accountable in Denver. In fact, our in our charter our city council members have waived their right to review certain contracts, specifically related to even DIA. And so our city council is very weak and has given up any power that they have to the mayor. And when they do have slight bits of power. They don't use it. And that was the harassment thing was a perfect illustration of the the lack of accountability that we have in the city where are you on the safe injection sites being championed by Alvis Brooks? How do you feel about that? That was a really tough one for me because I didn't support it initially. My brother was a user. And the last thing that our family would want would be a safe injection site for him you I wouldn't necessary. Early want to make easier for someone to shoot up. I would want it to be as difficult as possible. But then I met with Lisa Ravel with the harm reduction action center and saw what they were talking about. And what they were considering for the safe injection site. And it looked different than I am magin. I imagine them in an encampment somewhere outside just coming in and out shooting up. It looked more like a methadone clinic which exists. Those those are out there, and is essentially the same thing when you look at the function of it. I I would ask a favor just a tiny favor. If you are elected. Would you commit to go on a non official visit to Vancouver Canada out? And just take a look at their. I think that might change your mind. Absolutely. I have a couple of friends who did just that. And they said no ever again. No, absolutely. And I think that the conversation also chain. Changed when I found out that they don't own their location. And so there would be an expectation that they would need to own their location to even implement. And so I think in Denver a lot of times we put the cart before the horse. Well, and also the legislature doesn't seem to in on this. Right, right. That has been a very fiery subject for people. And I will say that. I don't think anyone when the two or three days that we talked about it on the show. I don't think anyone called in support of it. Because you know, we have a serious problem in Denver, but we don't want to exacerbate it when you when you make something easier, you get more of it. If it was also strange to and felt like a desperate move on from my opponent. Because those are the people he criminalised with the camping ban. And so the the safe injection site coming from him felt disingenuous. Yes. I did it feel like it was really trying to solve a problem a real problem. And when we we passed a tax for caring for Denver that gave him more power to our mayor because our mayor will now appoint the board of this foundation that exists within the city to disperse this new revenue stream, and it talks about this money as if it's going to go directly to the homeless. But there are so many people who are housed that have mental health issues and needs that will probably eat up that revenue stream before it even becomes available to any of our people living on the street..

Denver Alvis Brooks harassment Alvis Burks Lisa Ravel methadone Vancouver official three days
"methadone" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on KOMO

"Treated with methadone and other aids to wean them off. Maybe that's not a panacea. But it's certainly going to give us something to look at it. As maybe one of the tools, we can use going forward from the democratic perspective in terms of our priorities. This is one of if not the top priority democrat. I'd say the issue is important. That's why they form the special subcommittee on behavioral health and long-term care housing homelessness. The intersection of behavioral health, mental mental health and the issues that we're seeing and not only in Seattle ball around the state. Komo's Keith Eldridge reporting a Bill that allows family members to initiate mental health treatment for their teenagers. Even if they don't agree was heard by the state Senate Friday, Peggy d'alene Husan successfully went through a mental health treatment program after she initiated it said the bills a positive step families shift away from punishment to treatment in the first Bill. We heard and the shift from detox to looking at withdrawal and tonight stabilization the Bill also allows teenagers ages thirteen to seventeen to admit themselves into inpatient mental health treatment facilities without the consent of their families. The measure was approved by the house last week. Former first lady Michelle Obama will be at the Tacoma dome. Home Sunday for an evening, promoting her new book. So members of the stage workers union plan to hold a protest March outside the dome, they say they've not received health benefits and have some serious safety concerns about their jobs. The union says they're asking MRs Obama to support them. But haven't heard back. Well, let's take the next fourteen seconds to fantasize about a new life. We're talking lottery. There was no big winner on Wednesday night. So Saturday's drawing is going to be worth at least six hundred and twenty five million dollars. That would be the fourth largest Powerball jackpot ever. No, one has won the grand prize since January. That's Mark Mayfield. Reporting twenty four seven news. The news you want when you want it on KOMO news. I'm Paul Jackson. Now an.

Tacoma dome Michelle Obama KOMO Komo methadone Peggy d'alene Husan Senate Seattle Keith Eldridge Paul Jackson Mark Mayfield twenty five million dollars fourteen seconds
"methadone" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Here's where it gets crazy. Not not even counting the normal people like you, and I like everybody who's ever lived the over one hundred billion normal people. Right, right. We have lost tons and tons and tons of incredibly influential historical figures over the ages, we can divvy it up into a couple of rough categories. Spoiler alert. We do not have the wherewithal to go into every single famous person who has disappeared or been hidden from history. But we can we can touch on some interesting stories that are not Jenga's con we've got stories of misplaced corpses stories of rumored burial sites and these are old old rumors to as we'll find. And then we also have stories of people who were purposely buried in secret. So let's get let's get it started with all Alexander the great. Let's get it. Started in here. Yep. Alexander the. A third of methadone is correcting great different way of saying Macedonia. It became Bago Masset on it was one of the world's this. This gentleman was one of the world's greatest military minds. Will you've probably heard of him just from classes way way back in the day. Maybe you're in one right now listening to this. If so shame on you put your phone away and not to be confused with our amazing cohort, Alex the great and yet correct now, it's great. But in this gentleman Alexander the thirds short life. He established the largest empire. The ancient world had ever seen up to that point. And it lasted that way for a while. It was decreed empire. So weird. Would you read about these people? His is monikers not ironic. He was Alex Zander, the great it was not like a little John name. And I think about congress like this every time I do something really dumb. Like this guy was died in his thirties. Took over most of the known world at the time. And two weeks ago. I fell asleep trying to put on a pair of pants. You know, what I mean, it makes you think it really it really really does. I just recently learned you know, how much I love acronyms goat greatest of all time. Yes. So he could have been alexy's the original goat Alexander. The goat. Does what I'm going to call on this is it this is it. Well, here's the thing Alexander, the great was just a regular old guy doing all this conquering with his giant armies, you know, his numerous giant armies that roamed the planet died feeling like a failure. Yeah. Did name a city after himself. Just goes to show just goes to show, we all have imposter syndrome. I all of us. No matter what you know. No matter how much you achieve how much you conquer never enough unless you get right with yourself and love yourself. And so far everybody has died. No matter what they do. It turns out life as a terminal condition except for that one guy. You remember that's different. Years ago or so you remember talking about space audit at one guy. Can't remember his name? All right. So oh in Henry at a lex. There you go immortality via cancer cells. Okay. So here's here's one of the big things. It's not exactly known or at least is debated. How he died. But it is known when he died. Yeah. Yeah. Three twenty three BC in Pailin. But, but you're raising an interesting point that we we don't know too much about how he died was it malaria was poisoning was West Nile virus there's a somewhat. Idealized romanticized account that says he died of heartbreak. Oh my gosh. That's not a thing. Oh, come on. People have died of heartbreak. It's yeah. They need to suck it up. And you know, start going to the gym. You know, you've got all this advice for these ancient people really do this time in this time in human civilization. Just surviving was like being at the gym all the time. What I'm saying though, like you with everything was getting thrown at you. How you gonna die of a broken heart? That's just sounds like giving up tonight, surprisingly cold. Hey, listen, I've been through the wringer this year last year. Yeah. Okay. I see I see what you come out the other side, though. What are your new me? What's that quote, be kind for everyone is facing?.

Alex Zander Henry Bago Masset methadone Pailin congress lex Macedonia malaria John two weeks
"methadone" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"methadone" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Fifty percent have underlying ADD or ADHD issue and equally that number also are struggling from depression anxiety. And so a lot of times it starts off in a desperate attempt to self medicate. You just want to feel better sometimes an addiction is the product of circumstances. A new study in the journal JAMA internal medicine finds that during the year. Twenty fifteen thirteen percent of people aged sixteen to twenty five got at least one opioid prescription and dentists were the largest single source within a year about six percent of those who got a prescription overall and ten percent of females were hooked Thomas says he sees it a lot in his young adult addiction practice, a teenager goes in for a root canal or tooth extraction. They're giving some opioids for pain relief afterwards. They find it, very helpful. In fact, they find it so helpful that it's relieving mother anxiety symptoms. They probably had. And so they get a few more resources than probably they should have a doctor prescribed opiates for a real pain condition, initially, but tolerance can develop very quickly. So when they finally a cut off by the MD who says no you had plenty of opiates. That's enough. They actually experienced withdrawal physical withdrawal. So they reach for the nearest opiate. They can find and in my town in Portland, Oregon heroin is abundant and everywhere that whole process was initiated in over fifty percent of the cases by doctor prescribed opiates for some people addicted to opioids through a prescription. The solution is yet another prescription methadone or buprenorphine to take the place of heroin or another drug Thomas doesn't like what he calls. This harm reduction approach harm reduction means I'm gonna put you on your opioid prescription rather than heroin. You're gonna come in and take a methadone clinic at the daily dose of methadone for life. And in fact, we're going to increase your dose to such a high level that every opioid receptor in your brain is loaded with opiates, you will get zero benefit euro spec. You go out and shoot up or use. It is no point because all your receptors are flooded. And therefore, we're reducing harm because you won't go out and share needles and have sex and transmit HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. We are reducing harm. It's true. There are less overdoses in those who are faithful to their program. Let me just say this to be putting young people on a life long high-dose opiates type of a lifestyle that is not health. I mean that to me is should be almost criminal despite that Thomas uses buprenorphine in treatment. But in a different way, he doesn't see it as a permanent solution. What I do in my clinic, very gradually reduced the dosed while we're monitoring them and supporting them, and they're getting counseling you doing. All the other things to help them really change their lifestyle. Right addiction is also a lifestyle disorder, and when you can deal with both the physical aspects of using the tool of you. And you're working on lifestyle issues. What are they doing for making a living house? They're living arrangement what's their support system et cetera et cetera. Then you take somebody who is looking fairly hopeless, and certainly feeling hopeless. Indeed it and get them on a path where they're now working. They have a place of residence you're paying their bills. Their driving is quite amazing speed someone's life transforming that way, changing lifestyle is Thomas's preferred way to treat all addictions. He says too often we blame the addict what's really needed is an elimination of all stress points..

Thomas heroin JAMA methadone buprenorphine ADHD depression HIV Oregon Portland Twenty fifteen thirteen percen Fifty percent fifty percent six percent ten percent
Lewis Hamilton - I didn't want Mercedes team orders in Russia

WIP Programming

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Lewis Hamilton - I didn't want Mercedes team orders in Russia

"Methadone inside casts do comply rather than that the Greek. And this is not going to resolve any of the problems. Consultation guy is one thing some people just don't want to make the deal in any case today. You know, I've been speaking to a lot of people since arrived here few days ago. And this is an issue, which of course has been dragging on. You'd have thought people would have made up their minds by now, but it's still a great deal of devils

Methadone
Paul Taylor, giant of modern dance, dead at 88

All Things Considered

00:32 sec | 3 years ago

Paul Taylor, giant of modern dance, dead at 88

"Now to remember one of the most prolific and influential figures in the world of modern dance Paul Taylor the movements he created on stage were inspired, by, everyday, people doing everyday things. And that, includes people, doing nothing. At all. His approach. Turn audiences away at first but he eventually turn them around with dances he created for. The company he founded these were works that were. Eventually adopted by other dance companies around the world Paul Taylor died of renal failure yesterday in Manhattan at the age of eighty eight

Arkansas United States Pennsylvania Dr Sarah Wakeman Secretary Ohio Jennifer Smith Massachusetts General Hospital Heroin NPR Ari Shapiro Elsa Chang Warden Paul Taylor Methadone Jeff Brady Depre Dr Wakeman
It’s Time to Talk About the Opioid Crisis as a Women’s Health Issue

The Takeaway

03:52 min | 3 years ago

It’s Time to Talk About the Opioid Crisis as a Women’s Health Issue

"United States battle with the opioid crisis continues more than one, hundred people still die of an opioid. Overdose every day in this country but new research, and reporting says, there's an important piece of the puzzle that addiction experts and policymakers. Have overlooked gender differences in opioid use, and addiction Aaron shoemaker is a senior enterprise reporter at huffpost. Covering the opioid crisis so more women are being prescribed opioids in a medical setting and that's a little, different than men men are also prescribed opioids in a medical setting but for women it's? Very common for that to be the entry point for addiction and then once they have opioid addiction we don't have very. Good women's specific mechanisms for treating them a lot of our treatment mechanisms have. Been designed for men and men's needs it just out of curiosity was there any demographic breakdown of the types of women that were studied for this report so this was more of. A summation of different pieces, of literature that these To yell researchers had gone through and they. Are both part of a center at Yale that, specifically, looks at disparities and women's health so they. Have over sort of all sorts of different avenues of medicine looked at ways in which women are overlooked but no it wasn't specifically broken. Out by age or race or, different demographics like that so let's talk about how different genders react to pain, and to opioids are there differences in. Our biological makeup in terms of how we men and women react to. This drug so there's some evidence that women are more susceptible, to pain stimuli to begin with but. They're also more likely to have touch points with, the medical system, so because women are involved a lot of times with child care. And child rearing like that's a situation, in which you're having touch points with the medical community and. Every time you have a touch point you're more likely to have medical interventions which can be a good, thing but also means that you are more likely to get prescriptions and in this case? That could be in prescription opioids women are also more likely to be chronic Pain patients than men are so you know. Headaches backaches, things like that which are also conditions that opioids are not particularly effective for. Despite that there's this sort of secondary problem which is that a lot. Of women feel that their pain is not being addressed so not only are we over prescribing women opioids? For conditions that opioids are not really an effective treatment for but on the flip, side that pain is still there these women are not even getting sufficient. They feel medical attention paid to the conditions that they have now what happens to women who are trying to fight an addiction are they treated the same as. Men who were fighting opioid addiction historically the, treatments that we have for addiction have, been more setup for men's needs, women traditionally tend to be at least culturally speaking caregivers in. Our society and so for women childcare is a, huge, huge piece of the puzzle if you have A woman who's trying to seek consistent addiction treatment and maybe that for her means going daily to methadone clinic if. There's not some, sort, of, avenue and support, for her to get care for her kids while she goes every single, day to get that treatment it's, going to be impossible for her to adhere to it what's the impact or what. Could the long term impact be if this, isn't addressed accurately dangerous insufficient treatment of of women when it comes. To opioid addiction I think, insufficient recognition of places in. Which we could stop women from becoming. Addicted in the first place and given that women are fifty. Percent, of the population and that's a large cohort of people that, we are sort of ignoring and under treating areas shoemaker is senior? Enterprise, reporter at huffpost covering the opioid crisis Aaron thank you thank you so much. For having me and check out our series on women's health from earlier..

Aaron Shoemaker Huffpost Reporter Pain United States Headaches Yale Methadone
Owner, prescribers from Tosa pain clinic charged in opioids case

Tolbert and Lund

00:26 sec | 3 years ago

Owner, prescribers from Tosa pain clinic charged in opioids case

"Mayo clinic radio health minute i'm vivian williams more people are dying from accidental prescription opioids then from heroin cocaine combined jacker michael hooton is talking about narcotic pain relievers such as oxycodones hydrocortisone and methadone these pain relievers may help in the short term but mayo researchers found one in four patients prescribed an opioid painkiller for the first time progress to chronic use they also found that people.

Vivian Williams Michael Hooton Methadone Mayo Clinic Radio Heroin Cocaine
Kevin Nugent, Jen and New York discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

All News, Traffic and Weather

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Kevin Nugent, Jen and New York discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

"Of going to different fires in different scenes are full of carcinogens and one of the problems that we became aware of is that a lot of municipalities have all machines that aren't doing the job in cleaning that turnout care effectively or many municipalities can even afford the capital expenditure to buy them any money included an amendment to the state budget wbz news time eight fifty one in new york city thirty say they've arrested a man who was stockpiling guns and fake nypd dear inside his home kevin nugent is now accused of possessing several firearms along with forty methadone till's fake police id's and other imitation police gear that's according to queens district attorney richard brown new jin's mother claims he's a collector not a police impersonator but thirties say new jen's been arrested more than twenty times since one thousand nine hundred ninety seven actor.

Kevin Nugent JEN New York Methadone Richard Brown