34 Burst results for "Metastasized"

Until Death: Raynella Leath

True Crime Brewery

11:52 min | 7 months ago

Until Death: Raynella Leath

"As a child. Rinella grew up in a small community outside Knoxville Tennessee. Rinella was the second child. She had an older sister named flow. Anna and two younger siblings. Marcus and Robin her parents do e Annie met in college. They married after. Dewey had enlisted in the Army Air Corps. Any Finish College. Do we want a purple heart? And after the war he continued his education. So Anne worked as a schoolteacher and do he worked for the US Department of Energy so he made some good use at his time. Back in college had a masters degree in Chemistry and Physics and he was very invested in a safe storage of nuclear waste. Sounds like a smart guy. Yeah absolutely and Rinella grew up in this ideal environment. It was virtually crime free. And this was a town where she and her siblings could. Just hop on their bikes. Anytime go downtown. See a movie or use the Community Swimming Pool. It was kind of one of those pre planned communities for the nuclear power plant scientists. So the kids didn't even know what their parents position was at the company. But that's pretty much what it all revolved around but they were also religious rain. Ls saying in the choir of the Baptist Church and when she was in elementary school her classes were segregated but her high school actually became the first integrated school in the south in nineteen fifty five so at least in part because of the large population of these government scientists. Rinella schools were quite exceptional. The science were excellent of course and the children began learning a second language by the time they were in the second grade so it really gave her a lot of advantages in life her. She was always at the top of her class and was taking all the advanced courses she could. She's also in the marching band spinner weekends at Football Games drive INS and other activities common in the nineteen fifties. Yes he just watch American graffiti. That was kind of what it was like. Right right yeah. Drinking was less of a problem than in most communities because this county they lived in was completely dry. Yeah that's amazing how to combat alcohol. Well I mean if you really want the alcohol you could drive out of the county and get it sure but it's certainly made it harder on the kids in a lot of their parents didn't even have booze in the house which. I don't know about you but the first blues I had I snuck from my parents. Liquor cabinet will. It's where you get it right exactly and there's not just a dry county but a lot of lot of Baptist people and they don't look at alcohol. Is that interesting anyway now? I think it might be a no no for them completely. It certainly not encouraged note therefore remark so after high school. Rinella went to East Tennessee State University as a nursing student while they're Rinella got good grades in competed in rifle shooting. Yeah funny when you think about Ed. Just the way said that. I'm thinking here's a student right getting the grid. So but yeah. He's a marksman let's Tennessee. It's the south right and. I think there's you know more familiarity with guns in the south or is that just a a cliche. No I think that's probably true. Yeah we'll why she was there. This is when she met her. First husband. William Edward Dos it and he went by Ed but young ad had a very different childhood. He had many losses in his life. And I guess the most dramatic I would say was his mom's death. This happened on Easter morning. Nineteen fifty six when Little Edie was just eight years old and he woke up in the morning to find his mother on the floor beside his bed. Dead of a heart attack and just two months later. His Dad died from cancer. So Eddie was an orphan and he ended up moving in with his aunt. And uncle was kind of tough Lou eight-year-old cured get up in the morning and mom's dead on the floor. Can you imagine it's just? It's horrible so he had a much rougher upbringing then ray Nella dead but he was just a real go-getter and as a child. Everyone said he was exceptionally kind in high school. He played some football but he also worked on the school newspaper and he was a member of several clubs. Once he was in his senior year he was given the award for the Best School Spirit. Then he went to college on a football scholarship and he continued to date his high school sweetheart in his freshman year. Everyone thought these two would get married but then he met right now at college in broke up with the girlfriend not an unusual phenomenon. Guess so ED graduated with a business degree. He and Renault got married when she was a senior in college. Now the story I always liked Nell is mom. She didn't approve of that and she apparently knew how to hold a grudge. But she didn't speak to Ed for the first thirteen years of their marriage. Well that's serious grudge holding right. Guess so you really love my mother-in-law. She doesn't talk to me. But when you look at the big picture it kind of makes you think Did Rain Nella get some of that kind of personality from holding grudges or well at decided? He wanted to be a lawyer and he started taking classes at the University of Tennessee Law School in Nineteen Sixty nine ray. Nella began working as a nurse after she graduated in nineteen seventy two at graduated from law school. He had inherited his family's farm. Both of his parents were deceased so he would call himself a farmer and a country lawyer. But it's funny he always said I'm a farmer I and a lawyer second even though he would really end up being very successful as a lawyer did a good job. He had quite a career absolutely really popular as well. It worked in criminal defending people in need. Yeah he liked to help the poor people. Then in nineteen seventy eight. Renaudot gave birth to their first child. Maggie dice it and they then moved to the family farm. Young family lived in a mobile home on the property. As Ed built a new house they worked hard. He built the house entirely from lumber from his own trees. He had an architect who designed the home and he had a contractor friend who advised him on how to do things but basically he built this place. So that's pretty impressive to me. Sure is in nineteen eighty two. When a district attorney general retired decided to run for that job and the funny thing is once. He entered the election. His mother-in-law had a change of heart. Suddenly Ed was an okay guy. Who's now worthy of my attention right? Which really got crate? But she enjoyed this attention and she would be photographed with him at campaign events as much as possible. But Ed took it in stride you now. That's my mother-in-law. Whatever I'm going to be nice to. Everybody and Rinella was a good wife. She was working really hard to help them with this campaign. So it's not like they were on the outsor- anything. The marriage was really good for a long time. And when Ed Din win this election the family celebrated the local. Sheriff gave Ed a five shot. Pistol telling him now. He needed a gun to protect himself. Because he's putting away bad guys and they might come after him but that wasn't a gun guy then the next year at an Rinella had a son William Edward Dawson Junior. So now the family had big Edie and little Edie Ed had a secretary named K and she was married to a guy named Steve Walker and the two couples K. In Stephen Ed. Ray Noah were friendly and they did some socializing from time to time when K had a son who they named Kevin in nineteen eighty four. She left her position and ED's office and Henry now had a third child whose name Katie born in nineteen eighty five so rinella never visited the walkers but ed ended up spending a lot of time there and you might ask why they spent a Lotta time why. He spent a lot of time there because he was screwing k. Well I'm just thinking you know. Things must have been not perfect with he and Rinella by then if he's out having an affair her maybe he was just bored who knows but K. was very fond of him and that's part of the issue. A lot of people think K. Was really in love with Ed. But he wasn't going to leave rain Allah and we don't know if that's because it wouldn't look good if he was afraid of her. Maybe we don't know. But then in nineteen eighty AK had a second son who she and her husband named Kyle and although her husband Steve Did know about it until years later kyle was actually Ed's biological child the product of this affair kind of love child. We didn't know about birth control too. Well I'm sure there was some knowledge of it but who knows. Maybe she wanted to have a baby kinda nasty to pass it off as her husband. Well I don't know Dick. I almost think it's kind. Maybe you don't agree with me but I almost think it's kind of a kind decision. What good is it going to do their family now? They have two sons. What good is it if she tells her husband? The son is not biologically yours and maybe she didn't even know one hundred percent. That's a possibility but I mean I'm just one of these people. I think sometimes not most the time but sometimes holding back. A harsh truth can be an act of love controversial. But it's how I feel I'm GONNA leave it at that okay now. Nineteen Ninety right now retired from nursing and she concentrated on raising her children and managing the family farm. Dave Leaf was a nice man. Who's a friend of ED? And he had a pool. Nello take your children. Today's house to swim in the summer other than that. There was really no connection between Renault and Dave while they were very different people. I mean she really valued education and Dave was a high school dropout. Who worked as a barber? Not that. There's anything wrong with that but it's a much simpler job than ads. Still Dave was very likeable and well known in the community is a good guy. You know that same year ED started to have stomach pains now. He said in a board meeting for local farmers that he had the meanest away from the world. Who's trying to kill him even though he didn't smile and he said everyone's still took it as a joke. They all understood. That Renault is a real force. Probably wasn't the easiest woman to live with. Now I mean what can you say about right Allah from what we know. She was wearing the pants in her home. No matter who she was married to and you didn't want across her she could hold a grudge dislike her mom. I guess but then tragedy struck in October of nineteen ninety one because that was admitted into the hospital he thought it was just for an appendectomy but during that surgery a Denno carcinoma was found on his appendix and too small intestine so they did some further exploratory surgery and they found that he had cancer. That had metastasized to several organs. It was just all over his abdomen so there was no chance of curing him of that

Stephen Ed Rinella ED Tennessee Ray Nella Dave Leaf Ed Din Chemistry And Physics Renault Knoxville Finish College Baptist Church Us Department Of Energy Anna Dewey Anne Army Air Corps Football
Rush Limbaugh reveals that he has advanced lung cancer

Mark Belling

02:35 min | 10 months ago

Rush Limbaugh reveals that he has advanced lung cancer

"The news that Rush Limbaugh shared in this program I today and I want to comment on that for those of you who did not hear it he did announce ID's Rogan today that he has like cancer any described as advanced he said that he's going to continue to do the show although he's going to be off from time to time for treatment so forth and so on it he wanted to share with the audience because if he didn't he was gone a lot of people would be one always going on indeed want things to leak out so so forth and so on he's sixty nine years old he's no spring chicken anymore addresses been doing the show for a long time better than thirty years obviously starting way back in nineteen eighty nine right around the time eighty eight actually started right around the time I started my show in Milwaukee and he's with a couple of ups and downs and such an institution and such an important part of talk radio and somebody radio stations around the country that it's hard to minimize the impact that he has on things so without regard to how this plays out and how much time it's going to be off the air and how it all works out for him it's a significant story in and of itself does aside problem the personal situation for Russian I don't know anything more than what he said on the program today other than that he said that add if you know anything about like cancer just about everybody does because who doesn't know somebody who's had lung cancer it's just it's a pervasive awful disease that's very common in the United States but unlike a lot of the other cancers one of the reasons why lung cancer just get somebody people is that office it's not discovered until it's very very advanced because unlike some other cancers there's often very few if any symptoms but you have with one cancer in fact rush said that he's not in any pain is that in any anything he had noticed a few weeks ago that even short of breath and he thought well Gee is this my heart is that this is a bad as of the other things we went in for a check up bad they found that there was a problem with the lugs it but they got in there they followed that there's there's cancer dot in there and that's the problem with so many people who end up with lung cancer it's not only a very difficult cancer to deal with that and also was one that was fat but metastasize is throughout your body at do it you know of the cancers the get it's one of the worst ones that have it's usually never caught early because you don't know you

Rush Limbaugh Cancer Milwaukee Lung Cancer United States GEE Rogan
‘Richard Jewell’ and Olivia Wilde’s Offensive Portrayal of the Late Journalist Kathy Scruggs

The Big Picture

10:04 min | 1 year ago

‘Richard Jewell’ and Olivia Wilde’s Offensive Portrayal of the Late Journalist Kathy Scruggs

"Brian on your podcast with David Shoemaker. The press box talked a lot about the controversies around Richard Jewel. Let's unpack some of those quickly before we start getting into the nitty gritty of the film Maybe you can help us understand specifically what role. A person named Kathy scruggs plays in this. Yeah she plays a problematic role. I think we should say she was a big figure. In in the coverage of Richard Jewel. She was a co byline on the very first story in this movie she is kind of a suggestion of a character. More than character. Actor probably The big news of courses that they in the movie they suggest or I guess more than just right she sleeps with an FBI agent. Yes after he gives her a tip yes that they are investigating Richard Jewell. Yes it literally say. She does not literally say I will now sleep with you because you have given me this information But that happens in rapid succession in the span of thirty seconds. It's kind of like the trump Ukraine call. Oh it's a quid. Pro Quo don't have to say it. We know what happened. It was a perfect bout of sex for information as trump might say and Olivia Wilde. And I think you're talking about the delivery. Wild has suggested that she was a relationship with this. FBI This is. This is again some reporting that none of us were aware of before this. That's not what's Woodson the movie the movie is high. Sure Gimme some information and I will do you a favor and then the FBI agent played by. Jon Hamm mm says Oh so we are doing this. which would suggest that they were not doing this before the exchange of information? Yeah Yeah So. This controversy has swallowed the movie up in a lot of ways and I did not think that was going to be the case. And over the course of the run up to the release of the Movie Warner Brothers released a statement sort of defying the Atlanta Journal. Constitution's rebuttal of the movie. They were very proactive. In identifying the fact that this is a movie and there is some fictionalization traumatisation happening here. I wanted to talk to you guys especially about what happens when a movie takes liberties like this is generally speaking. For Art's sake. I think we should always be doing doing this. There's the movie should always be stretching and redefining and re imagining and re contextualising these stories to tell better stories that it's not the job of movies to make good journalists. It's the job of journalists to make good journalists but this seems to be a situation where cleese would obviously the director and and grandfather grandfather of this film. hasn't very specific points of view about authority in the media and there is an expectation that he brought a lot of those ideas. Do Do you think that the movie suffered greatly because of this conversation or or is this just something that we talk about on podcast. Because we're all in the media. Dave Weigel political writer had a great tweet where he said all this controversy convinced fenced liberals that they didn't WanNa see Richard Jewel but the controversy wasn't big enough to convince conservatives that they could own the lips by seeing Richard Jewel. So it Kinda put Richard Jewel in this weird have state I'm with you. I'm all for historical fiction and broad license to do it. The exception I would make is in a case like like this because you could have just picked a random person but you picked a real life reporter who's not famous and you're telling the world the one thing you should know about this woman other than that. She broke the story. Initially but Richard Jewel being under investigation by the FBI. She slept with somebody to get the information. So I think if you're going to do that and then take the additional step as wild suggested that this is based in reality this isn't billy ray writing the screenplay allow. Let's make something up you owe it to show your work in some way whether it's an op-ed whether it's an interview or something because this is beyond this is not famous people. Having a conversation in the White House is a real person sue. This is a a very pernicious and well-established trope in movies about female journalists female journalists in movies are always sleeping with the sources which you know I should just go on record in case you you are not as involved in the media as we are. That's not what happens in real life. We're not all sleep with our sources just so you know. That's not allowed. But when I saw this movie. It was a couple days before the the kerfuffle started and I was so shocked. I thought that either I assumed assumed that. This journalist Kathy scruggs portrayed in the movie was not a real person and then when i Google that it was she was I was like okay. Either there is. She wrote a memoir where she literally said. This happened and I did this. And this is how I got the story in my involvement or else she's dead and friends it's option B because otherwise I was like how do you get away away from this with from a liable perspective. It's so blatant. And so and it stands out and the other thing is just it really it. It undermines the movie. I don't understand why you have to do this. Because this is a movie about how the media was responsible will in in and ruining rituals life which is like. That's fact right that is that definitely happened But to put in this seemingly fictionalized or unsubstantiated and like gross comment on a female journalists in the movie undermines all the legitimate if if tricky cases that Clint Eastwood and movie wants to make about the media's role in American politics in life I completely agree with this man was trapped in his home mm-hmm with his mom for eight days while people everyone in America thought he was a terrorist who had set a bomb and blown up people and it wasn't a case of some of these cases of guilt or innocence. Where it's Oh? He was a little bit involved but he wasn't no he was completely innocent. And Somehow you've done this and taking him him he's no longer the sympathetic figure and the journalists who was part of a team with the JC that made mistakes in covering him. And we're not skeptical enough of the government's evidence evidence and case you've turned them into the into the sympathetic figures. I just don't get it at all. It's a bit of a confounding thing I think a lot of journalists are struggling with the movie for the exact reason you mentioned. Amanda which is that I. I think it's actually quite a strong film in one of Clint's best movies and last fifteen years and it's been completely cast aside and a lot of ways not the Clinton needs another successful movie had plenty in his career but it's a movie that metastasized as a lot of ideas that he's fascinated by kind of like libertarianism in the pursuit sort of like a single man's pursuit of success in the face of a lot of people working against him the Atlanta Journal Constitution response to this though. I think has been a little little bit curious. The long piece that they that they published a sort of profile. Kathy's life I think in some ways was very helpful in terms of saving her reputation specifically early about these kinds of allegations but also revealed a person who obviously had a lot of struggles in her life. Who who did some things that are I think just on the page people will look at me like Oh? Maybe she didn't do that but she was that it's Actually like I thought hyper generated new conversation around her life and around the movie Brian. What did you think about? The idea of trying to memorialize is her in. Defend her in the pages of the paper like that. Well I thought one is I think you just want to give her an identity. You know she is she's been. She's not really much character as I said in this movie. Clint Eastwood doesn't really care about the media in this movie. Other than as there's this noise in this thing that's happening Richard. You didn't care about the way that story got written was very interesting actually is a bunch of editors editors and writers kind of putting that together imperfectly as often. Journalism is so they were trying to give her an identity. I think we've Kinda gone now over the falls where we've corrected is using this horrible. Oh stereotype that got into this movie and now we're kind of excusing. What the paper did and all the media did and saying? Oh Her story. I saw held up. No they didn't one guy was innocent and two there were actual mistakes in the peace even in the first piece in the paper together which so. It's totally understandable. Hannibal that the paper wants to do this. But to me at some point it becomes okay. You're giving us one identity. You're telling us the real story behind your life and then there's this conversation about what the media did to Richard Jewell. which is it's actually kind of separate one thing? That's a little lost in the conversation around this. I want to get your perspective on an Amanda is when you're making something let's say you're making a podcast or you're working on a story story or you're making media company every day you're collaborating people. And you're interrogating all of the choices they're making on a regular basis. You have questions about things. The Livia Wild Defense of the character is one of those things where you think that at some point you might ask a question. You might not just presume and I guess that's questioning maybe the integrity of what Olivia while saying the defensive. Her character but movies take a long time even even one day Clinton movies take a long time to make. There's a long time in the making so how. How did how was not not everyone on the same page with this? What am I going to say? Movies do take a long time to make but relatively this was like a very quick movie At least in the filming like this was filmed over the summer of two thousand nineteen and it's December and now we're watching it so that's pretty wild and and it does really seem like Olivia Wilde. Got wanted to takes and it's like go okay. This is the performance going with which is it's it's a caricature I think. It's pretty generous and cruel version of a reporter which is fascinating because Libya while the daughter of journalists so i. I wouldn't say that this is a portrayal of empathy eighty and understanding at least from what I've seen Granted you only get to take her to but she the material is not there on also. Her interpretation of the material is pretty pretty intense but it definitely seems like it wasn't examined at the time and it certainly seems like no one anticipated this and no one got on the same page about their talking points because Libya has been all over the map. And I'm you know what I'm not sympathetic. With the fact that she's answering search for somme choices. I like this movie directed by Clint Eastwood. It's written by Billy Ray. But also she knows what she's doing. She read the

Richard Jewel Clint Eastwood FBI Kathy Scruggs Olivia Wilde Atlanta Journal Brian Billy Ray Reporter Amanda Clinton Jon Hamm David Shoemaker Libya Wild Dave Weigel Google Woodson Ukraine Richard Jewell.
Uganda's Solution For Treating Extreme Pain

Short Wave

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Uganda's Solution For Treating Extreme Pain

"In the US. Drugmakers have flooded the country with these powerful. We're foles sophisticated opioids that are at the center of the OPIOID epidemic. That's the US opioid crisis. Right but in Uganda and in fact in a lot of African countries for years they've been dealing with their own opioid crisis. which is the opposite issue patients? There don't have enough access to major painkillers. Why is is a combination of governments not spending on it not making it a priority which when it comes to an internationally controlled narcotic substance? There's a lot of red tape. So there's not many options beyond simple painkillers. Like ibuprofen seat him in offend a lot of tylenol. That's not usually enough for people in extreme pain like from cancer. It's GonNa feel so so horrible you just sometimes it's kind of been just end up paying undue like please get me through these. Please get me through this. Justin Anga has breast cancer. Hurt then metastasized. I met her at Hospice Center in Kampala. A tumor had reached her spinal cord just thirty years old but she's lost so much weight. She looks like she could be twelve. That's that's rough. Yeah really awful pain. But then a nurse gave Justina dose of Uganda's Goto solution drinkable liquid. Morphine she says the pain was gone in a matter of hours. A wind and the tone may good city game and I just drifted We do morning from Lake. Wow extra slipped to morning okay. So liquid morphine. That's I mean that's an opioid that can be addictive right. Yes but in Uganda. Health officials say they've figured out a system for how to use it effectively cheaply and safely safely to treat pain. So today on shortwave. Managing Pain in Uganda. We hear about this simple solution that they've come up with drinkable liquid morphine. It's been life changing for patients in terrible pain and not just in Uganda. It's a model that a lot of countries throughout Africa are looking to as a way to bring pain relief.

Uganda Morphine Pain Painkillers United States Justin Anga Kampala Ibuprofen Hospice Center Africa Justina Lake Thirty Years
Episode 11 Laying Out For CRISPR

You Did What Now?

09:14 min | 1 year ago

Episode 11 Laying Out For CRISPR

"Well and Michael Are you a person who always on sunscreen when you go outside no no no I got I don't get it I you know this summer I got out within in a while now that are a little older I feel like between becoming an adult did you know working nine to five with the sun's out of them young kids but now nowadays if you know we got it we went to the pool we do all that stuff I- I tand pretty well so I'm not going to be outside for twenty minutes I don't worry about it I did get one sunburn this year so maybe I should have done it more yeah well people used to go to the beach and just cover themselves in baby oil so they could be getting good hand but I feel like those days are mostly gone more likely at the beach juicy people ladies in huge hats China protect themselves from the sun from all the damage that it causes but I don't know think about what would you do Oh my goal if you if you were had some sort of issue where every time you went in the sun you would take the risks up developing cancer I mean isn't that what we're replying with sun damage this bill basically that a any any real sun exposure gives you cancer I mean that's that's you got burned that summer did you kanter no but did I raise my chance of getting cancer you're talking about like I would have burst into like cancerous immediately it's GonNa be rain down on me it's GonNa be the big chip on my in my arm is going to pop up cancer all of a sudden because I walked out in the sun for five minutes yeah yeah I mean you you go outside you get a Thun Bern and within a few days you develop them and malignant melanoma developing on your skin the I I would start sleeping during the day working tonight yeah that's exactly what this man in California has done. He suffers from an extremely rare disease he's where he has extreme sunlight sensitivity so that anytime he goes out in the sun he he developed mold on his body that can eventually become cancerous and so yes he definitely has had a job where he works at night and he is now petitioning in offering his ready to be Chris Byrd the name of science oh he's he's doing what now exactly so he's offering himself up to be Chris Byrd by way we so this isn't this isn't a seventy he's not going out in Suntan in you know baby oil and going out in the sun and getting crisper that that's not what you're talking about no no he is an in he he experiences malignant melanoma basically every time he goes out in the nine anytime he had some exposure so what client what classifies it as malignant. I'm not I mean I have all sorts of freckly type moles that you certainly not malignant but what makes them what makes them malignant versus just hey this is something that happens to my skin in the sun right so if you're the malignant melanoma then the problem is that it can eventually miss metastasized and spread to the rest of the body and so every day he basically has to look at his entire body and check himself l. for mold that could develop because of any sort of UV exposure and as soon as he notices them to go and get them removed now okay so you've been dealing with it since he was nine years old and he started developing all of these moles off his body and when he came of age of nineteen he eventually got graveyard shift as a waiter denny's just so that you wouldn't have to expose themselves to any any sunlight is this has he got cancer no he hasn't I don't think so but he feels like at some point at he's getting older I think I think he's thirty now in key fields like it's getting worse and worse than he feels like eventually he's going to miss something and that he will get cancer yes so he has in genetic disease it's something that he inherited it inherited it is not really a name for this disease it's so rare and there's no no cure for eight besides just avoiding the sun at all costs and so so he has started petitioning scientists to ask him to see if they they can Christopher his buddy if they can care it retroactively remove via yes but that's not really how it works right I mean he is however millions of cells with carry this thing so how can you give them all that now that's a really great question because that is not how Chris Bury were crisper is an amazing technology it can be a US to alter it can be used to take out small amounts of of DNA sequences to basically turn off a gene which we talked a few weeks ago about the scientists in Russia who is trying to crisper the the babies who are likely to be born death right and so in McKay The scientist is actually just deleting the this sequence that has the mutation so that the gene that causes that the problem is is basically turned off which by the way I update you days ago that that scientists is going ahead with the plan he's actually started editing the genes in human eggs yeah sure let's let's be exciting yeah so he doesn't necessarily have approval to you start to to start the experiment to actually implant thanks but he's going ahead and editing them in just in case he does get all right and this is what was basically the same thing as he needs to have a willing he's going to have to have a willing participant though in this case I guess it'll be a parental we'll participant the volunteer child and here's this guy this guy wants to be like hey let's let's push this forward throughout all this approval just hey come on come do what you want to me I'll be getting big well the guy in Russia here already has parental approval you're talking about the the guy that wants that his moles that Christopher guy that that's what worries about getting Chris Byrd he wants to be Chris Byrd because he's worried about getting Chris Byrd in exactly to get two crispy in the sun so he's going to get Chris Byrd well yes so the guy in California he read in two thousand seventeen about the bio hacker designer he failed in genetic engineering kit and is that the guy that just like just randomly starts putting stuff in his arm because when he was at a biotechnology conference and just injected a crisper cocktail in to his body supposedly it was a muscle boosting crisper cocktail Yep not quite sure how that works or if it's legit but it's definitely something that that he was interested in display hang so yeah so the California he saw that that happened he said Hey I wanna be Chris Byrd so he started he took it upon himself to try and find a gene and that could save him and he found a gene that he would like to have Chris Byrd into his body right so so the house aside where he founded Jean that he doesn't have or well gee what does he turn on two hundred one off I I don't this is getting media leaves a bit gene his diseases he's missing gene or what they don't know exactly what conduct his his I guess his acidic genetic mutation he doesn't know exactly which mutation he has I'm sure some scientists could eventually find that out but I guess the route that he's going to do if he found a gene in the water bear the okay a bear correct have you ever seen these little little tiny indestructible things yeah yes so he found something and and one of those eight legged water-bearers that it's a gene that protects them from the damaging effects of radiation which is one of the reasons why they have such a long little life fan so he is trying to find someone who will basically crisper that gene into his body okay good plan right war yeah the show this is great I love this plan this is a great plan is well thought out for sure he hasn't although he has all the information and he knows what the Da- I I mean I I get I get the desire and shore you WanNa be the Guinea pig but this just seemed like snake oil on this thing wearing red shirts and he had he makes great he's always got these redshirts is regulated color red well that guy that guy's really good at basketball uh-huh maybe I'll be really good at basketball and that's what the skills like

Chris Byrd Cancer California Thun Bern Michael Kanter Twenty Minutes Five Minutes Nine Years
18 Years After 9/11, Is Peace Approaching?

World News Analysis

13:35 min | 1 year ago

18 Years After 9/11, Is Peace Approaching?

"Listening to the panel discussion of wrote today. I'M GONNA in Beijing eighteen years after nine. Eleven attacks is peace approaching refusing to hand over Osama bin Laden al Qaeda who was quickly identified as a man responsible the US invaded Afghanistan marking the start of Afghanistan war against the Taliban eighteen years of war and talks president trump declared a recently the peace talk was the a wisdom holly. Ali Ben were dead after the Council Secreta meeting with a group in the United States to continue our panel discussion. We have Zun can research fellow with coaching while university and Joe Hi Research Fellow at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and Max Abrahams in the United States Assistant Professor of political legal science at northeastern university so max first of all what do you make of the very idea of inviting the Taliban to Washington for the first time especially at a time time closed due commemoration of nine eleven attack. I'm very surprised from I think that that at the invitation that should never have actually really hard to believe that trump invited the how to all right around the anniversary of nine eleven. I mean trump used to criticize Obama for negotiating with the Taliban remotely never mind from nine eleven never buy we. Are you know with the idea that I would lead to keep with the Taliban. The negotiations previously were over and so I. I don't grudge The recinding Oh that invitation he almost didn't make expense. I mean the story was at the invitation was presented because an American was killed in the violence well. That's it's really not very surprising at all to call them remains very violent group and if anything seems escalated to violence during these you so called negotiation that Ted I don't WanNa leave you were with the impression that some Hawk on. I'm actually not in favor of the United States withdrawing from but I don't believe you that negotiation are a requirement to do what the United States should do in Afghanistan. It's simple we appeal to the VM Dope in France I don't think that the United States should lecture the Taliban on how it needs to you know with the Afghan government or how needs to reduce militancy locally or how it needs to respect human rights the Taliban isn't going to do any of these things you need to do. Simply state is its power and we we don't want to be in your country and you don't Wanna in your country and so we are going to withdraw however if circuit it is another nine eleven attack if the if the NPS is used again as a launchpad for Bass casualty the terrorist attack against the United States then the American public phobe strongly in favor of returning Tennessee on essentially giving you the ice discretely so it's really up to you the Tobin he want to remain a local group because if you start acting like a transnational terrorist group and if you don't police the area if you allow your country to be used by groups like the al-Qaeda Akagi network two large international well then we may come back in the gloves come off and so I do not believe that negotiations with the Taliban or advisable and I don't think that they're a requirement for us to get out of that John would trump hope to accomplish with a meeting with with the Taliban in the United States in the first place. I want to go back into history just a little bit in two thousand nine. When Obama first entered into office he started the so-called search Afghanistan adding more than thirty thousand troops in Afghanistan. Try to stabilize the country and try to protect the communities immunities on the ground so that's the Karzai government can stand on its food now. Ten years later is not successful in in terms of protecting and also continue to help the current. Afghan government to sustain yourself and on the other side. I Taliban expanding territory and now occupy more than two thirds of the country particularly in the rural area so I think it's not that at the US wanted to do this or that is that they cannot achieve the original goal of eradicating terrorism and also establishing a government pretty much finished the task of nation-building so at this point they were forced to negotiate with the Taliban if they want to withdraw troops according to some time lie and there's a very strong support in the United States for us to withdraw from that country because some people think staying that catch far too long and they are now in less risk from terrorism from that country so trump is actually representing a lot of people. The majority of Americans will to withdraw from that country is just way too through what approach that you can withdraw with confidence that Taliban will no longer support terrorism continue to be a launchpad for terrorism but negotiations didn't go well because again trump trump just won't theatrics. He wanted to have a big deal to show to American. People that he got things done however when you go to the real real problem and trying to solve that problem there are a lot of mistrust between the Taliban the US government so on the one hand Taliban don't think that the US will completely withdraw from Afghanistan and on the other side of the US still wanted to stay there and monitor situation people in the trump administration creation particularly recent fired national security advisor Baltim- probably still want to maintain a number of military force and the basis in Afghanistan still operating so when you still have this mistrust. It's very difficult to get the grand deal Dan overnight. That's why inviting Taliban into the United States probably for a signing ceremony is a very bad idea from the very beginning now it fells part so zone withdraw from Tom. Ghanistan Dow was the key two thousand sixteen trump campaign promise so hall political of Trump's a decision of on Afghanistan immediately twenty twenty onto your reelection pressure. I mean I agree I agree with what the judges said that it it a lot of the negotiation a lot of this this process was about the trump campaign achieving this big promise on their mandate and with the twenty twenty election coming up a grand and victory in Afghanistan would have meant this big deal that was signed between the Taliban and the US government but you know let's again go back in history in two thousand and eleven and twelve there was a big call by the Obama Administration for the Karzai government assigned the BSE and within the Afghan government there were two different parties one that wanted the US troops to leave withdrawal instant withdrawal so that the Taliban would come to the negotiation table and which turned out to be the assure of any government. They were not in favor of immediate withdrawal. Now we see that for the US list for the American people withdrawal from Afghanistan is important. It's a war that has cost almost nine hundred and eighty billion. US dollars over the years. It's been eighteen eighteen years and we don't know what what what the war is for Osama bin. Laden was found killed in two thousand eleven he initially not handing over was the reason to going to have gone is Stan then the question of nation building the trump administration has clearly said that we're not here to build anything and of course as was mentioned by I earlier panelists the gone Taliban have two thirds more more of the Afghan territory under them than before so clearly it seems to be at that the presence in Afghanistan isn't achieving anything concrete but it's not about the presence in Afghanistan of the war in Afghanistan. It is about what are the consequences quences off an exit that is premature and the consequences can be dire. we know what happened in the nineteen ninety s Pakistan Afghanistan the region at on as a whole suffered because of an abrupt ending to aboard that wasn't well planned and right now of course for from the American perspective if nine eleven and God forbid is to happen again then we can go back and treat them the way isis has been treated but that is not the real question you have China you have Pakistan. You'll save India the government government which has been supported by the Americans to abandon them of ruthlessly can have consequences fall was and what happened was nine eleven post nineteen eighty s war in Afghanistan and I think the these are important questions for us to address. The Quadrilateral Coordination Group was one initiative right now. How only last weekend Beijing Islamabad and representatives from a Samba and Kabul were together and these are small efforts to new negotiate and to understand what the government is willing to accept so a withdrawal is important? How long it's going to take is one question but but what the consequences of a withdrawal that only looks at American interests are is an important one to to address Max anything to add. We've seen wiz North Korea. That's trump cam blown up a process and then try and restarted a couple weeks later a will that be the case with Afghanistan as well well. I think that the biggest problem with put the US can sell an in Afghanistan is that fails to to limit what our objectives are in that country of course the reason why they are is because of nine eleven when we went there to kill the perpetrators and of course bin Laden and actually to a large extent people forget that been Nishel school. was what successful well not entirely but certainly partially takes us. We killed off a large portion. the computer chip that of course we didn't get all of them. We didn't even get bin Laden. 'til your later the threat when metastasized but other media respond. I would do that. You know maybe apiece score or V clock but the the problem is then you had mission creek and we added on all sorts of theory objected so you know making peace now in the country more broad try to hammer out negotiations between the Taliban and the Afghan uncover concerns about human rights stuff. He's all important goals as in in terms of normative attractive they're very important no doubt but the US military doesn't have the capacity to ameliorate I these other goal and so the United States particularly the military needs to understand mimic caisson nations of US power around the world. I I think from the very start or goals in Afghanistan should have been limited took counterterrorism in very soon after arriving theon team and so we continue to have you know these goals also which are unrealistic and so I think that we need to keep counter terrorism at the forefront of our objective and we should have left very soon after arriving upon accomplishing our objective our counterterrorism effective to the extent that we were able to joey in August talking about the limitation of the US force in August trump said he's

Taliban Afghanistan United States Osama Bin Laden Al Qaeda Donald Trump Afghan Government Government Karzai Government Barack Obama Beijing United States Assistant Profes Metastasized Chinese Academy Of Social Scie Ali Ben Washington Max Abrahams Council Secreta Joe Hi Research Fellow ZUN
U.S. Plans to Open Direct Talks with Houthis in Yemen

WSJ What's News

03:08 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Plans to Open Direct Talks with Houthis in Yemen

"A wall street journal exclusive. We report that the u._s. Is planning to open direct talks with hutu forces in yemen in an attempt to end the country's four year war joining me now from washington with more details is wall street. Journal national security reporter warren strobel warren. This is a conflict between iran backed who the rebels on the one side and a saudi arabian coalition backed by the u._s. on the other that began as a civil war in yemen before years ago. Yes the current violence began as a civil war between the hutus and the internationally recognized government of yemen but it quickly metastasized ostracized into sort of a larger regional conflict with the saudis and the united arab emirates coming in on this basically against the who these was some backing from the united estates in on on the other side iran came in with what officials charges financial aid training and weapons for the huskies so it's sort of become a microcosm because of the larger regional conflict in the gulf and the u._s. Backing of the saudi coalition that you mentioned has drawn bipartisan opposition here in congress it it has indeed it's actually one of the very few issues that you can find people on both the democratic and republican side the island congress <hes> agreeing on they feel that the u._s. is supplied weapons to the saudis in particular and the saudis have used them in a non responsible way causing literally thousands of civilian casualties. There was a move to cut off support for the saudis <hes> cut cut off arms transfers basically and that was passed but vetoed by president trump over time the u._s. Actually has sort of slowly reduced its support for the saudi led coalition that is doing these airstrikes <hes> stopped <hes> late last year stopped refueling planes but still provides intelligence and some other support and as you mentioned this the effort to open direct talks with who these comes as there are heightened tensions between the u._s. and iran and the surrounding region as well so what is prompting plans to open a direct dialogue now yeah i think there are concerns that <hes> yemen which although it's become part of this larger conflict is is obviously is it's one of the worst humanitarian it is the worst humanitarian crisis in the world according to the u._n. And there's concern that if you get further dragged into the into the sort of regional conflict making making the war there the conflict they're harder to solve so that that is certainly one issue that that people are looking at. I think the other issue is that from sources tell tell us this effort to open a channel with who these by the u._s. sort of a recognition or acknowledgment that there's no military solution to the conflict the saudi emirati intervention engine there has has not worked. There's not a winnable way winnable war here for the saudis and it's time to try a different tack warren as you just said the war in yemen has devastated the country the u._n. Saying the yemen is home to the world's worst humanitarian crisis and that's just one of the considerable challenges ahead here. Yes s. u. Of you have widespread cholera epidemic in yemen you have millions of people who <hes> have been forced from their homes millions who are at risk for starvation and <hes> the u._n.

Yemen Saudi Arabian Coalition Warren Strobel Warren Iran Wall Street Journal United Arab Emirates Cholera Washington Reporter Metastasized President Trump Four Year
Twenty Eight Percent, Billion Dollar And Eight Billion Dollar discussed on Public Affairs Programming

Public Affairs Programming

06:22 min | 1 year ago

Twenty Eight Percent, Billion Dollar And Eight Billion Dollar discussed on Public Affairs Programming

"I came to Congress I decided to make tobacco my issue we had some successes in order in nineteen eighty seven in my third term in the house second term on the Appropriations Committee I successfully passed appropriations amendment banning smoking on eighty percent of airline flights in the United States it was a minor it was a major miracle no one expected this young congressman from Illinois with the opposition of both Republican and democratic leadership to pass this measure on the floor what they fail to understand is the house of representatives is the largest free could flyer club in America and they were sick and tired of secondhand smoke on airplanes and voted with me the bill was signed into law by president Ronald Reagan despite big tobacco fighting all the way they called my band quote an intrusion on individual rights you may hear echoes of that in this room today it was just the first step I didn't realize that eliminating this inconvenience was a tipping point but it was it turned out that a lot of people thought well of secondhand smoke is dangerous on a plane what is the dangers in a movie theater in a restaurant in a bowling alley we also went on directly after big tobacco's efforts to adopt children which is why we made cigarettes more expensive with taxes that is the single greatest deterrent to children turning to cigarettes we dump Joe camel and the Marlboro man as part of a national lawsuit with prohibited kid friendly flavors and cigarettes like strawberry and grape and since these historic changes the percentage of youth smokers declined from twenty eight percent twenty eight percent in the year two thousand to less than eight percent today however anyone who believes that the multi billion dollar tobacco industry would go quietly ignore the power of their greed and that's why we're here today losing their precious market share big tobacco put their researchers and markers to work first they needed a new product the didn't Kerry the moral taint of cancer causing tobacco even better if it looked like USB flash drive could easily slip into a kids laptop they needed a campaign that included an unproven positive health claim such as Jules current make the switch slogans they relied on a multi billion dollar twelve point eight billion dollar investment from an old standby L. trivia formally known as Philip Morris they needed a special strategy focused on kids because they knew the children for a variety of reasons the most absurd susceptible new users of products it worked with cigarettes it was going to work again with jewel invading how did they lower the kids I've got a bag full of all of the different flavors I will go through a mall but the include fruit medley gummy bear whipped cream unicorn razzle berry and cotton candy I go tell me that's all about adult switching from cigarettes to vaping finally and this is critical they needed the food and drug administration to look the other way as their massive empire mushroomed and metastasized unfortunately the FTA FTA is been happy to service that accomplish delaying commonsense regulation of the E. cigarette industry by years refusing to move remove illegal products on the market and standing silent in the face of these false health claims by jewel I made it clear to the acting FDA commissioner doctor Sharpless and commissioner got leave before him the FDA's helpless spectator ship has to come to an end whether by law regulation court order or discovering the political will to get off the sidelines so what's been the result of big tobacco and big vapes efforts combined with the FDA's abject failure to regulate the industry despite their authority twenty seventeen twenty eighteen the number of American teenagers using any tobacco product increased by nearly forty percent this was the largest single year increasing use tobacco use ever that's right all of our significant harder and gain she reduced youth use of tobacco products are being re first because of the cigarettes like tool and the accompanying kid friendly flavors and all of the full page jul adds the crying children you know we see them you seem in the hill roll call political Washington post New York times Wall Street journal this isn't a new tactic that's exactly what big tobacco to when we said lay off the kids they bought full page ads in the Wall Street journal saying we don't want kids to smoke cigarettes how many kids do you think it up in the morning to read the Wall Street journal exactly none this is just a PR campaign now by jewel once by big tobacco to try to say that they have a business model that really isn't directly kids the facts tells of the words to combat today's vaping epidemic hi there is bipartisan bicameral legislation to crack down on kid friendly E. cigarette flavors I'm joined by senator Lisa Murkowski Republican of Alaska representatives to get some rest our safe kids would give the cigarette companies one year to prove their products meet three criteria first companies would have to prove that their products actually help adults cigarette smokers to quit second they have to prove their products don't harm the people using them third E. cigarette companies would have to prove their products do not cause children to start using nicotine if the federal tobacco twenty one bill moves this year I think it might listen it's imperative that the legislation includes strong provisions crackdown on kid friendly E. cigarette flavors that are affecting our kids the someone who lost his father is a kid to smoke related lung cancer I hope that these cigarettes would prove to be a smoking cessation device for adults to date there is no proof instead these devices and

Twenty Eight Percent Billion Dollar Eight Billion Dollar Eighty Percent Eight Percent Forty Percent One Year
'Toy Story 4' is a Masterpiece. Is It in Pixar's Top 5?

The Big Picture

10:49 min | 1 year ago

'Toy Story 4' is a Masterpiece. Is It in Pixar's Top 5?

"You. I'm Shawn fantasy editor in chief of the ringer. And this is the big Pixar podcast. They conversation show about Toy Story, four and all sorts of childish things. I'm joined today by apparent at the ringer rob heart villa. Hello rub. Hello. How's it going? It's going very well. And I appreciate you being here. You know, some of my frequent co host on the show among them, amended Dobbins, and Chris Ryan are, just straight up assholes about animated movies, and I noticed that I need to have people on to talk about important animated films. And I think even before you were a parent, you would have been a thoughtful and sophisticated guest for this episode, but you are a father and so you are happenings moves to Pixar in, in deep way in recent years. Is that fair to say that's very fair to say very complicated relationship with these movies at this point? But yes, yes, so we'll talk about that a bit on this show. I think we'll start the show though by talking about the new Pixar movie, which is, of course, Toy Story four, I think, when Pixar I started about twenty or so years ago, I never would have guessed that. That there would have been a fourth installment of any of these movies, in fact when they started. They seemed like a new version of a kind of storytelling that didn't necessitate sequels if you look on the ring dot com right now you can read a really interesting column by miles Surrey about the state of Pixar and their decision to make a series of sequels over the last ten years, and what that means for their, their brand, and what it means for their business and what it means for their creativity. And in some ways, I think it's been really threatened over the last few years, you know, we were just talking before we started recording about the infamous cars, three, which I would say is not one of the more legendary. In the Pixar verse. But Toy Story four, I thought was quite wonderful. And I thought it hearkens back to what makes a lot of these films. Great and also push them forward a little bit, rob. How did you receive toys story for what did you make in the movie, I saw last night with my sons who are eight and five and sort of Iraq is sort of preview screening. And I my kids laughed more laughed, louder just more obnoxiously than at any movie. I think that I've ever taken them to know. So I by by that measure, I mean it was a huge success. And I thought it was wonderful, and I thought it push things forward, but also sort of hold back on that sort of classic Pixar idea that like the kids are delighted, and the parents are total emotional wrecks. You know what I'm saying? Like I it's sort of an impressive mass magic trick that these movies can do. And I think especially of inside out, you know, which was, my, I think I've written about this on the side a couple times now. But like my son walk. Out of inside out. He was five at the time and he thought anger was funny, and I was just crying mess, you know, because I just watched I just watch goofball island, which is like the visual manifestation of like a joyful kid becoming a sullen teenager, like depicted, on, like a giant theater screen, and it was just the most crushing experience like the way those movies these movies are designed to work on those two levels, and they sort of drive, the parents to the toy store, but also to therapy, like, I, I feel like this one was sort of uncomplicated, Katie just funny and delightful and I had it seriousness and had like themes that parents, especially it would pick up on. But like it wasn't working that dichotomy where it was sort of, like designed to upset me personally, you know what I'm saying? Like I feel like they can play with that a little bit. But they don't have to hammer at it all the time in every movie that they put out, you know, I could just enjoy my kids, enjoying this one, a lot more than I feel like the last. Several Pixar movies. Yeah. I agree with that. I do think though, there is this entire school of almost academic sought around Pixar movies. And if you want to, if you want to experience Toy Story four as an exegesis on creationism and identity and a cartesian analysis of society, you probably could do that. I absolutely. Yeah. And I think that is that, that whole divide is fascinating to me the way that you've underlying basically the pure kid enjoyment of something, and the way that adults are entertained, and even moved by some of their films. I feel like can you give me a little bit of a sense of as a parent? What it's like to see a lot of movies like this, not just Pixar movies, but animated movies or what's on TV or what streaming for your kids and what the balance is between this is secretly for parents. And this is actually just dumb entertainment for kids, so that they don't like break things in the kitchen. Yeah. I mean, I feel like I've seen every type of movie along that spectrum, you know, and I haven't hated any. Movie that I think I've taken my kids to even like down to, like rock dog or whatever, you know, like I it's the LEGO movies are trying to be adult and trying to be knowing and it feels like they are specifically pitched for the adults in a way that, like a lot of the jokes are going right over the kids heads, like I don't dislike those movies, but I think that the LEGO movies are a little too cute about that. You know, I've seen plenty of things like, you know, the emoji movie or the trolls movie or whatever. Which are, you know, have theoretically adult jokes, but aren't trying to work that duality certainly the way that Pixar movies. Are you think about four key who like the new protagonist are like the new cool character here in Toy Story, four four key spends the movie like having an identity crisis like ease? He's a new toy but he thinks he's trash. And like he wants to be trash like he's literally, a spark with pipe cleaner arms, and he spends the whole first thirty minutes of the movie is going trash trash. And like I think that's really profound. And my son just really loves the way that four key keep saying, trash trash, like he did it. My son did it all the way home whole drive home like. And it's that's a cool. Little thing, that's you know, the different levels, and you can appreciate it on without it having to be this comedy versus tragedy divide. You know, it's sort of typifies, you know, again, like inside out, or even like the last toys story movie, Toy Story, three ends, of course, with, like, the scene, where they're all heading down into the incinerator, and they all sort of somberly, join hands and they're sort of resigned to the fact that they're all gonna die like all these little toys, and it's you know, I'm sort of a crying rack, and like my sons are sort of mildly disturbed, but they figure everything is going to be okay. And it is, but, like there's a moment of like pure pesos on that level in this movie, and I was, frankly, kind of relieves like the idea that I have to walk into every Pixar movie like braced dad, this huge sort of existential breakdown, you know, as my kids, just enjoy themselves like at felt like we pulled back on that. A little bit. And I was grateful for that. I agree with you. It's it did feel bit like an episodic adventure, which wasn't a bad Yang. I think sometimes you can get a movie like that, where the stakes have been lowered from the previous film, and you're like, well nigh. You're just wasting my time. But inevitably when it's a movie about anthropomorphized toys, somehow, it's nice to just have something that is a little bit more fun. I mean you mentioned Toy Story three which, you know, sort of ends with that transition from Andy to Bonnie, and then inevitably Bonnie becomes the, the young child, who is the owner of all these toys. And so were reintroduced to a world that features some of Bonnie's toys, and then the toys from the classical Toy Story story, and then four he comes along on the first day school. I, I did feel in that sort of first day of school moment that I was getting some of those inside out vibes that you're talking about where it's sort of, like they have managed to metastasized the most vulnerable feeling that you can have in your life. That that's scary trust. They of school where like I don't know anybody and everybody hates me. And I'm afraid and I miss everything. Is comfortable around me and they zero in on it, and they show it to you through the eyes of a little kid. And you immediately feel a recognition. That is a storytelling power. That is often overstated about Pixar allow me to overstate at wants more like it's amazing how they manage to locate and isolate those feelings and show them to you on screen, and make you relate to them like I am consistently blown away by that. There's another one at the end, when there's the kid lost at the fair, you know, she's just sort of there's a little girl, and she's crammed between, you know, to food carts or whatever, and she's crying and like, yeah, it's the exact same feeling and I yeah, there's a conversation also I think it's between Woody and four key. And like I think what he says, like, you know, these kids like you watch them grow up and become a person. And then they leave, you know, they'll do things you'll never see like the whole point of these movies is that the toys realized that one day, they'll be abandoned. You know, one day, they'll fall out a favor and one day, the kids will run off without them and won't need them anymore. That's, that's not even subtexts. Like that's just that's exa-. Exactly how parents feel watching these movies, you know, I think that's always there. And it is really striking. You know, I mean, this is possibly the best movie I've ever seen with the numeral four in it. You know what I'm saying? As you as you said, like I understand sort of the dismay, or at least a concern that Pixar has become by and large, like a sequel factory, you know, but I I I didn't dislike incredible to at all. But like I felt like certainly this was a better sequel than any of the other sequels that we've had this year. Obviously, you've been talking about how terrible and how sort of lifeless, they are like this is just a one eighty from that. Yeah. They staved it off. It's, it's a pretty impressive single-handed job in a in a friend summer from hell for this movie to come along and, and gay ever. So briefly, I think I think pause things one thing, that's notable too, is, you know, we're talking about the human emotion that they're able to imbue into these films and into these characters in the movies directed by Josh Cooley, who is. Essentially a first time Pixar director, though. He's worked for the company for a while and the screenplay has two people credited, but the story has two four six eight people credited and it's a complicated list of people. I'm going to read it to you really quickly story by John Lasseter Rashida Jones will McCormack Josh Cooley. Valerie LaPointe, Martin Hines, Stephanie, fulsome, and Andrew Stanton. Now, the last two people are the official authors of the screenplay famously when this movie came together, Rashida Jones and will McCormack her writing partner were brought on board to write it, and they eventually left the project because they felt like they were not as open minded about new voices, particularly a woman of color talking about the way to tell these stories for Pixar Pixar, very famously has had some fraught history with, with John Lasseter, one of its co founders chief imagine ear for a number of years due to sexual misconduct allegations. And the company has I, I would say affectively weathered the. Storm, whatever that can mean an has moved on from Lassiter, who I believe is most recently appointed to a position on inside of sky dance, and they're animated division of paramount, but it's so strange to have an event like that happening

Pixar Editor In Chief Surrey Dobbins Iraq John Lasseter Rashida Jones Katie Josh Cooley John Lasseter Chris Ryan Lassiter Affectively Andrew Stanton Bonnie Rashida Jones Director Valerie Lapointe Official Partner Andy
"metastasized" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"metastasized" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Good for you. While you're still our world explore when anything happens around this planet, we want you to jump on it and the so much going on these days right now, the you get the feeling Robert things are under control or out of control worldwide. Well, we had eight years under President Obama in which we took sort of conciliatory steps towards some of the players in the Middle East. So, you know, we deals with Iran to sort of tone things down and we had Arab spring, and then we had a series of semi democratic. Leaderships in the Middle East Mediterranean area. So we had a bunch of crises that they didn't pop or explode. And when President Trump came into office, we then reversed course, now in any any political situation when you reverse course, sort of period of nothing happening, and all of a sudden things started to speed up and this summer what we're going to see is the Neta fact of reversing our foreign policy, and we're already seeing military offenses and places like Libya and Yemen, another countries and also Afghantistan, so this is going to be very busy with violence. I think so too. And we, of course, seen so much of it over the last couple of months that doesn't seem to go away wanted to ask you a question about ISIS because the president did say that ISIS had been defeated. But today video pops up of a guy that everybody thought was dead Baghdadi who heads up ISIS. I mean where is this guy? Well, okay. So ISIS ISIS is metastasized. And you know, that means when you have a medical condition that you think you have control, and you, you know, ply some kind of medication or chemotherapies it accidentally spread the disease gets worse Hoti. So what most people don't realize is that ever since Baghdadi made that famous speech in the eight hundred year old mosque in Mosul. There have been a hundred and forty three attacks over thirty countries. And what that means is we've been focused on Syria because that was sort of a geographical battle to get rid of ISIS, but we haven't been paying attention to the spread or the franchising of ISIS from everywhere to the Philippines to sort of call them copycat or inspired attacks in places like France. And even America who's financing these people were they getting their weapons. So it started in Iraq. Remember, we had a huge reconstruction budget. A friend of mine was doing secret mission over there, and they were dropping bombs on banks. And I said, oh, he's getting rid of the ISIS. Money's reconstruction money. And the reality is that we pumped billions of dollars into Iraq, which was in shaved off in used by ISIS or in people in the end bar problems to fund is once ISIS gets its tentacles into a town or region that begin taxation so everybody has to pay a certain percentage of taxes from their businesses their income like a mob shakedown exactly then there's funding. So when I was in Libya watching our forces kill ISIS each business had a logo spray painted on it to show that it was paying taxes to ISIS. And of course, they didn't. They dragged him out in chapter heads offered something terrible to them. So it's self-funding insurgency group, and it can go anywhere. There's any kind of infection any small dispute that one group might have another. Other. They literally send trainers. Propagandists. 'financiers and trainers to within sort of ninety days have them up and running his ISIS and they're up at running into doing. It the roll over the place, aren't they? Well, the goal now is not so much to have real estate. So college was supposed to be, you know, huge spread of geographical control. They know that's not gonna work. So what they're doing? Now is they're saying, for example, three Lanka, you know, who the heck would predict ISIS attack in Sri Lanka. So they provide the expertise they provide the explosives training. And then when they say you're linked to ISIS you get global publicity for this violent event. So it's it's a it's a it's the Colonel Sanders of terrorism, you know, it has much more impact now anywhere in the world. You think the burning of Notre Dame cathedral had anything to do with terrorism? Or do you think it was indeed restoration problems that happen? Well, so I believe that they're done a study. And they said it was caused by fire. But before that there had been multiple attacks on churches in they're actually been. That's right. I sys inspired plot to light a fire. Now that tells you all you need. To know about terrorism because the symbolism of terrorism is more frightening than the actual act of terrorism. So all ISIS would have to do is claim that event, and then you have to spend millions of dollars in publicity trying to compete with that. And this is the danger of asymmetrical warfare throw some countries your way Roberts, and tell us your views on how we're handling things with them. Let's start of course with with Russia. The, you know, the attack on the president and the talk of Russian collusion apparently hasn't filtered out at all and Philip petered away actually in this particular case what's going on with Russia. What did they what did they what do you think? They actually did. Well, Russia's a very tiny country, and it has much more impact than than the economics military. What really happened is that during the lead up to the transition of power between President Obama and. President Trump a number of people were performing diplomacy essentially trying to unwind Obama's sanctions on Putin. And Putin supports Olea guards. You know, the wealthy who who also support him. And this is a very comfortable relationship for a guy that's been running that country since nineteen ninety nine. And so the idea was let's be friendly with Russia, and let's try to get them away from supporting Ron, and this is an agenda that they have. So the collusion was was almost farcical. You know, it was like dancing at the high school prom where people were putting out feelers and people were trying to chase those down. But there never was any Clinton dirt never was any real collusion. But the Mueller report was triggered by sense of espionage that there must be some Russian and going on. And there was some meat or some fire was smoke. I didn't help the President Trump can get. Romancing with Vladimir Putin and asking him to hack look for emails and things like that. But at the end of the day was an investigation Miller did a good job. He found many other things he has fourteen other cases that has to be resolved, but Trump fields vindicated. But it should be a warning to us that Russia is actively involved in influencing elections. What about our relationship with Iran? Why can't we get a better relationship with them? Are they that bad? No. But, you know, this starts in nineteen seventy nine, you know, two things started nineteen seventy nine which was the Soviets invading Afghanistan when we began to create essentially jihadis funding extremists. And also when you had the revolution in Iran in which they threw out the man that we had installed shop. So we have a long history of antagonist with the current mullah's because of obviously the embassy kidnapping and a history of supporting terrorist groups and violent acts against the US. It's changed dramatically in the last few years because if you look at a map, and you look at where Saudi Arabia is oil is it's right on the coast across Meron and the biggest threat to Saudi Arabia would be the complete elimination of their dictatorship by Ron by taking over their oil. So we have a thing called Neo cons. You know, these are people that believe in the sort of Choi of of Israel. Real Arab nations and sort of fundamental union between Christians and Jews and Muslims. And we have created this new axis of I don't know what the call it. But we are working actively with Saudi Arabia in the UAE to support Israel's goals which essentially to push back on round because that's Israel's biggest fear now has around declared war on us. Have we come to blows with Iran? Yes. We've pushed our luck. And they've pushed their luck. And we're literally bookending them in Iraq and Afghanistan, so they feel threatened and that is going to be a flashpoint so ever since sure isn't sixteen they have been working with a number of groups to come up with some kind of false flag operation, which I would be in Lebanon or Syria. It would be started by somebody or Runyan's attacking some western elements, and then Israel would begin than we would time in. And then that that's our war. Most arrangements. I am told love the western way of living. Do you agree with that? Yeah. Because that's where culture comes from. But don't forget there at the crossroads right? They're literally in the middle of Asia and the west, and they are more than able to appreciate not only their own culture. But obviously, you know, things that come from Asian the thing that comes from America right now, they live in a repressive somewhat restrictive environment. 'cause we keep turning the screws on them, and the Mola's want to have sort of this throwback environment in which yes, you can be educated, and you shouldn't get married, but you can't sort of be your own person. So anybody that travels to Iran, we'll tell you that they had a great time. And the people are wonderful and isn't sad that they are so poor that they're so repressed if the mullah's disappear Iran would just be a modern Middle Eastern nation. Yeah. No. I think you're absolutely right. Robert stay with us. We're gonna take a quick break. We'll come back and talk about China, North Korea and some other hot points all around this planet, Robert young. Pelton with us on coast to coast AM next hour will flip the switch and take phone calls for him. Those of you who are into worldly events while you'll be able to chat with him about some of those. We will be back in a moment..

ISIS Iran President Trump president Russia Iraq President Obama Middle East Baghdadi Vladimir Putin Robert Libya Israel America Middle East Mediterranean Syria Saudi Arabia Afghanistan Ron Colonel Sanders
Keeping Money Secrets From Each Other: Financial Infidelity On The Rise

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Keeping Money Secrets From Each Other: Financial Infidelity On The Rise

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from CFA society. Washington DC does your wealth manager measure up a CFA charter holder. Does they have the investment expertise to unlock opportunities? Other advisers might not see learn more at the right question dot org high. So there's marital infidelity what about financial infidelity? This is when people hide their accounts their debts or their spending habits from their spouses or partners. Studies estimate up to forty percent of American adults admit to some form of this and therapists and financial advisers say it can really undermine relationships because of all the lies NPR's. Yuki Noguchi reports on one couple's journey from deception to disclosure and Blaine Ed fifteen years ago at a party, he hosted in Houston at twenty three combs already had his financial act together. He owned a house all ready, and he had a job any managed his budget lane was three years older and saddled with dental school. That she found his financial security super sexy. Gosh, this I've hit the jackpot. This is amazing. They married and settled in Charlotte, North Carolina. They had some different views about money. We'll never really had the idea that people would manage keep their money in separate accounts or hidden from each other. Joining counts was the way that my parents manage the household finances that was real skittish about that. I guess because my parents went through a a not very pretty divorced, but these differences they negotiated. Eventually they got around to saying, okay, let's do this. So like all of our counts were mutual and shared that sharing. Extended to an combs is dental practice. Ed comb stayed home with their boys while his wife supported them later, he returned to school to become a therapist, but his counseling practice was slow to take off. I had a period of struggle how to deal with my own insecurities, and what it meant for me to be provider or not being a provider, and I borrowed more money and wasn't talking to my wife about it. Ironically, his practice focused on financial therapy counselling for couples fighting about money. Meanwhile, combs himself secretly borrowed thousands of dollars on a credit card over the following year that debt metastasized to over twenty thousand dollars he told himself he'd repay it as he won more clients, a just need more time. But every month, the debts grew his wife, she didn't notice, but I'll be honest. I was probably more oblivious than I'd like to admit that. I was guilt. Consumed ad combs. He thought about it hourly even talking about this with you now like I have my own sense of shame. That's coming over me. 'cause man I really do that he agreed to tell his story because he thinks it might help others in the same boat. The few academic studies on the subject say between a quarter to about forty percent of American adults deceive their partners financially. Ted Rosman is an industry analyst for credit cards dot com. It does seem that financial infidelity. Is on the rise. His firms recent survey found millennials twice as likely to hide money or accounts from partners than other generations and digital life makes doing so easier. You can sign up for the account. You can get the statements. You can do your spending all without anything showing up in the mail. Ed combs kept his secret under wraps for a year. The debt grew even to him. It made no sense his job after all involved helping couples navigate financial conflict his wife called him, Mr. financially responsible. It is ironic. He says the strain isolated and depressed him for the most part people thought successful, his smart. He's capable internally. I just nothing else field further from the truth. Ultimately, the truth did come out one night after their three sons went to bed. He told her and combs recalls. The initial shock span of a couple of minutes. Really what what just got swept out from underneath me. Then she got angry everything. Me wanted to just yell and like punch pillow. And I think when he's been so we got share everything we got to do this for your business, and my business together all the time when that happened. The trust part was the hardest thing to get back getting it back required couples counseling. Apologies transparency time even forgiveness. She admits she resented repaying his debts like I don't wanna do that. I feel like you should bail yourself out for what you because it's been over two years since he came clean. Ed comb says he's learned to empathize with those like himself who break their own moral code and people like his wife who were hard to forgive and are people generally speaking able to move through that. You heard me take a deep breath because it's easy to talk about on the phone interview. And it's harder work to do week in week out to those still hiding in the shadows. Both he and his wife say come forward. The sooner the better, you can Gucci NPR news.

Ed Combs Yuki Noguchi Blaine Ed Ted Rosman Ed Comb NPR Cfa Society Washington Gucci Npr CFA Charlotte North Carolina Analyst Houston Forty Percent Twenty Thousand Dollars Fifteen Years Three Years Two Years
FDA finds breast implants cause rare form of cancer

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

03:14 min | 1 year ago

FDA finds breast implants cause rare form of cancer

"FDA meeting for the second day to address the populace possible risk of breast implants. The agency reported last fall that four hundred fifty seven cases of cancer detected and women with breast implants, some women with textured implants or developing a type of cancer called lymphoma. CBS's Anna Werner has more. Sandra, raw, she's a grandmother who'd had breast implants for more than two decades with no issues until April of twenty seventeen my left breast began to. Swell. And there was a hardness in what her doctor at. I thought was a common infection turned out to be cancer. I was in shock, really. I couldn't I couldn't believe it. It's called breast implant associated anaplastic large cell foam. A rare cancer the FDA says can develop following breast implants most women who get that cancer. Like rush have what are called textured breast implants. These shaped implants have a rougher surface. That's designed to limit the movement of implant. But may also initiate the cancer breast surgeon, Elizabeth Potter is Russia's doctor is one of the theories that this just kind of irritates and inflames the surrounding tissues just one of the theories because of the surface. That's right reports to the FDA show of four hundred fifty seven cancer cases, at least three hundred ten occurred with textured implants, most women are cured. After doctors, take the implants. Out. But in Sandra Russia's case after her implants were removed and she'd had breast reconstruction. She developed an odd pain in her jaw. So doctors did another test. It showed that it had metastasized all through my body. I can't imagine what that feeling is. Like, I was complete utter shock as incomplete. Utter shock. She wasn't the only one when I got the pathology report. I was astonished I I actually thought it was incorrect really, I read it and reread at the cancer had moved beyond the area the implant into her tissues and bones. And this was not something that you expected to see I've never heard of that. And did not expect. It was not taught that that could happen. Not only was Russia's cancer not easily curable it could kill her. Potter says it took five rounds of chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant to put her into remission. We have seen something. New and breast implant associated cancer. And I just want us to pay attention to that. It was just an awful experience really the country's three largest breast implant manufacturers told us textured implants have been extensively tested for safety and comply with FDA monitoring. And that patient safety is their top priority. Mentor says the cancer risk is rare with its implants. But that's not good enough for Dr Potter. She won't use them anymore. I won't place them. Actually my practice. We often say at this doesn't pass the sister test doesn't pass the sister test. I e let's give it to your sister. You're not going to give it to your

FDA Elizabeth Potter Sandra Russia Russia Lymphoma Anna Werner CBS Sandra Two Decades
Apple to pull some iPhones in Germany as Qualcomm extends global wins

Techmeme Ride Home

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Apple to pull some iPhones in Germany as Qualcomm extends global wins

"The legal tussle between apple and Qualcomm has metastasized a court in Germany has granted an injunction to Qualcomm banning apple from selling some iphone models in Germany that use chips from Intel and parts from a supplier named Corvo apple said that it plans to appeal. This ruling, of course, but that during the appeals process, it would stop selling iphone seven I phone eight models at Apple's fifteen retail stores in Germany, all I phone models remain available through carriers and third party resellers throughout Germany to reiterate, apple and Qualcomm have been fighting a major

Apple Qualcomm Germany Corvo Intel
"metastasized" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on Think Again

"Emerges initially out of just kind of lonely man on the internet trying to connect and trying to reverse engineer how how to get dates, but then more sin metastasized is in very surprising ways. Yes. I mean, I don't catch the way that it metastasized into a kind of deranged wing of the alright, right? Like a decade later. But like, I I look at what it is. Right. And it's like, yes, we're going to take a kind of data driven approach we're gonna approach human interactions the way. We do video games. And we're going to discover the algorithms that underlie sort of human, motivation, behavior and psychology. Yeah. And and sort of we're going to use a kind of Milan, Chicago, very clever and medically is very intelligent Milan. Just sort of evolutionary psychology and the various ideas about how human behavior that are floating around in the author of the culture of that time, right and fairly described as a misogynistic sure movement. I mean, just kind of women want a strong evolutionary won a strong alpha male. Come and tell them what to do want. They want a male of higher status Rame selves. Right. And I mean that that this characterizes the the beginnings of this pick, right? And so it was all about like demonstrating your higher value and doing that through the nag and nag for the audience is like, basically sort of a disk dislike underhanded. Yeah. It's an a backhanded compliment. That's actually a bit of a dish purposes to lower the self esteem of the prisoners speaking with. The woman. And of course, it makes them come to regard you as in relative terms to have higher status than themselves. And you know, this kind of this kind of entered. I think this is the thing that enter the culture at large as you know, if you read stunned doll reading, the red in the back whack like, you know, he had an understanding of the heck, right? And they sort of like reverse engineered and created in their own kind of like nerd ish autistic way, and what is interesting is a group of computer, scientists and engineers who sort of like approached the human human social interaction as a kind of big data problem. They kinda sorta solve it. It kind of kinda sorta works. I is just a hack, right? Yeah. You have the mentality. I'm playing a game in my social relations. You know, you sort of like inoculate yourself against the fear of rejection because people who play games are used to to losing. Right. And then and then you get better and you develop your skill. So it takes this kind of like very masculine kinda Like like. skill building. Like nerd ish. Like sort of Aspar burger, Ian approach to and whether or not there's a way that you can sort of because we all have this idea that like human relations are about spontaneity and about like real connection and emotions and is there a way to like hack that. And so they figured out a way that sort of like got them. What begins as kind of like contrived and sort of like based upon bits and routines. A person starts to sense the like the flow of human interaction and like human like real connection can emerge from that. But because it's occurring within this context of like you and your broS playing a game where you're all keeping score. Like, that's that becomes this kind of like homo heraldic competition. Women are only counters. You know in the game like t-, then takes over and I'm going to have real human contact emerges like real connection emerges. Then it introduces a kind of cognitive dissonance that might send you spinning off run the game. And of course, that typically happens most people who play, but there's this notion in the game of one Itis, right, which is like, you know, the the air of thinking that any particular person or any real connection is meaningful. And that's why of course, it is like openly at explicitly. But also the deeply sociopathic. It's crazy. It was it was a kind of. I'm not saying it was inevitable. But like it was an emergence of the internet of its time. And it was an emergence of the kind of sexual dynamics of its time which have since like iterative, and and degraded and generated into a kind of like warfare between the genders, and the the metoo movement is a kind of registration of a general culture wide rejection of those kinds of..

Milan metastasized engineer Ian Chicago
"metastasized" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"Cancer metastasized to lymph nodes under herreid arm and also thermometers scans found other traces of cancer in her body once again fouled that there were sweet SP. Spots on her right lung as well said look now is that the cancer had had left the priming side priming humor in a right? Breast had moved to live knows at Linda's normally Lippo's carry Lebed's fluid, which is very clear so on scan. They look like hollow little bulls balloons, and instead hers rule filled up with swollen with increased blood supply all these signs of Hanser. And if he was panicked. She also went on a gene chest and emailed me. And said Dawson, I've had a gene test, and it showed that I've eight defective genes all of which dispose rest cancer. So now, she has belief that she also has the suspicion of breast cancer that she decided to not rush into conventional therapy. In fact, you didn't even get a biopsy. She declined the biopsy and monitor progress only using scans getting to is. A well-developed nowadays she began to do everything she possibly could to affect her energy. She worked entirely a level of energy. She she gung should've Chiyo intensive for two weeks. She had medicine treatments and she had acupressure treatments using EFT or tapping therapy, cheated demo- treatments with healers. She cleaned up. Her diet, see governor of all the stress in her life, and by this much the diagnosis by may her lip knows would clear by April when they gave her another scan that whole timbers mass trunk to about from five centimeters to about one point four centimeters Trump by more than half and by June all of her markers came back cancer-free. So she worked entirely the energy level and it had. Profound effect on the matter of her body. So you can't see those fields. Not like she was looking at something. And watching change that nonetheless, even though these feels are invisible they can have dramatic bags on our health and our wellbeing and the results that you show in your book in the subjects that you talk about. I mean, it's things like a aids cancer, very serious conditions that that are getting reversed and removed, and you know, one thing we talk about so much at live happy's things like mindfulness and compassion gratitude and how they can help you live a richer life and have better wellbeing, but you really dig into it and explain how our thoughts affect us physically. So how will practicing things like mindfulness or gratitude effect as in our physical space? It will affect us dramatically and it shows up in terms of disease by penalty and lone Javed. He wants study. I quote in the book, for example in mind about away much better. I cover about four hundred studies but a body with dry science. These are really living stab -als of how he can shift all those those things, but in one just one of those studies at showed that Optimus live on average eight years longer than has MS Scola. So think about that just to change a mindset change of attitude living.

Linda Cancer Lippo Hanser Dawson MS Scola Optimus Lebed Chiyo gung five centimeters four centimeters eight years two weeks
Breast Cancer, Michelle Polanski and Coney Island discussed on Hugh Hewitt

Hugh Hewitt

01:33 min | 2 years ago

Breast Cancer, Michelle Polanski and Coney Island discussed on Hugh Hewitt

"Around the country. It's a cold windy day here on the Coney Island. Boardwalk in Brooklyn, where organizers say thirty five thousand people showed up for this breast cancer, walk to raise funds and awareness. Michelle Polanski says she's been walking for ten years after being diagnosed with stage one breast cancer rust, my mother metastasized breast cancer. And we're here to fight today. I'm here with by wonderful friend, who's also a survivor. We're just the feeling

Breast Cancer Michelle Polanski Coney Island Brooklyn Ten Years
AstraZeneca buoyed as Imfinzi cuts lung cancer deaths by a third

Michael Savage

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

AstraZeneca buoyed as Imfinzi cuts lung cancer deaths by a third

"As a possible breakthrough in the treatment of one cancer encouraging data for lung cancer patients whose disease hasn't yet spread this. After a study by drug maker AstraZeneca which shows its infancy reduce the risk of death by almost one third compared with chemotherapy alone and that immunotherapy which uses the patient's own natural defenses to fight diseases can be affective before cancers metastasized to other organs. The information delivered at the world conference on lung cancer in Toronto also published by the New England Journal of medicine. The drug was approved this week in Europe and got US regulatory approval back in

Astrazeneca New England Journal Of Medicin United States Toronto Europe
CEO Of CBS Les Moonves Accused Of Sexual Misconduct By Six More Women

Maxwell

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

CEO Of CBS Les Moonves Accused Of Sexual Misconduct By Six More Women

"People reports say CBS CEO les Moonves says will resign as sexual misconduct allegations against him double to twelve CBS's. Jim taylor. More women are lining up to accuse the CEO of CBS of sexual harassment. CBS does say it's taking the new charges. Very seriously. Six additional women raising the salt claims against CBS chief executive Leslie Moonves report in the New Yorker where six women already made similar claims against him move as told the New Yorker he had consensual relationships with three of the women CBS has been investigating the allegations. But CBS's Joel slush your says, the new accusations, raise even more questions. What is the culture that has been allowed to metastasized for so long that allowed this to occur? And how are we going to address it? I think that's what shareholders wanna know what employees want to know. And that's what the public wants to now CBS.

CBS President Trump United States Mike Pence Cynthia Nixon CEO New York Times Republican National Committee Les Moonves Bob Woodward Long Island North Korea Serena Williams Vice President Mayor De Blasio New York Giants
Six more women accuse CBS CEO Leslie Moonves of sexual assault or harassment

Clark Howard

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Six more women accuse CBS CEO Leslie Moonves of sexual assault or harassment

"Moonves says will resign as sexual misconduct allegations against him double to twelve CBS's. Jim taylor. More women are lining up to accuse the CEO of CBS of sexual harassment. CBS does say it's taking the new charges. Very seriously. Six additional women raising the salt claims against CBS chief executive Leslie Moonves report in the New Yorker where six women already made similar claims against him move as hold the New Yorker he had consensual relationships with three of the women CBS has been investigating the allegations. But CBS Jill Schlesinger says the do accusations raise even more question. What is the culture that has been allowed to metastasized for so long that allowed this to occur? And how are we going to address it? I think that's what shareholders wanna know what employees want to know. And that's what the public wants to

CBS Les Moonves Jim Taylor Pam Coulter Jill Schlesinger North County CEO Harassment Chief Executive
"metastasized" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

09:19 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Is Bloomberg Thanks let's get back to our top story President Trump's top national security it is said to have. Worn turkeys and Basseterre to Washington Use has nothing to negotiate until a detained American passer is free that adds fuel to the fire with Turkey's financial meltdown deepening here's how, one of our guest described the situation early on bloomber whatever. Way we look at it now Tokyo's fried roasted stuff there in huge huge difficulty. Because. There's no easy path in front of them. They're going to have. To raise rates at some point is absolutely going to collapse Metastasized into a financial crisis if they do raise rates they. Have an economic crisis and that's also going to put downward pressure on the currency Let's get some additional inside with our. Emerging markets liter leader 'Boudzhi she joins us around the Dubai set Donna. We had some commentary from an executive board member of the Bundesbank. Verbally he saying what the Turkish government needs to do as initiate bold, action and that's pretty much. Consensus for the most part of this market you look at the lira it stabilizes stabilized for quite? A while now but the, next eighteen hours what comes, next in this process from from the feedback you've been getting Bloomberg reported yesterday that apparently the economies are. Is going to be on a call with investors on August sixteenth. Now this is an important development because even though he's been speaking publicly, the assumption is that he's. Going to give investors some sort of reason to calm down now he As I said he has in fact spoken before but what people wanna see our specifics people want to know what the plan is they don't, want to hear big words about how the economy is gonna grow and how they're going to fight this economic war against. Turkey, they want to know exactly what Turkey is going to do in, order to maintain independence with the central Bank and in order to win back investor confidence. I suppose Last. Night I? Mean they've taken shock tactics new Hyde another five percent on rates. Nothing yet of, that magnitude from Turkey one talk, about contagion this is in the library. For our viewers FX ball is at the. Highest is when he's seventeen this is the correlation between the lira and the rest of the markets my question to you is this I. Know that you probably have a bit of a laugh with me is the Turkey crisis getting old is this one at moment spike and it's going, to, dissipate aggressively You know I think I think. A lot of people were worried that maybe, the might be some contagion across emerging markets, but as the crisis in Turkey unfold more and more people are starting to realize, that this is really a Turkey problem the issues and, Turkey, aren't really prevalent across emerging markets and as as we have seen with. Argentina central. Banks across, emerging markets are in, fact willing, to act in order to, ensure that investors do have confidence in. Their ability to not. Just deal with immediate problems but also to. Stay ahead of the curve and that's the point us. If we had we had Oppenheimer away into this as well and they. Would agree with you that this is a crisis that's specific to Turkey and there's not necessarily that risk of a wider contagion Dan in? Terms of resilience who is better off than others at the moment Well I mean it's much easier Kosei who is not better off I mean what you're really, what you're really looking for is runaway inflation and whether or not the central banks are willing to deal with them for. Instance the two highest inflation's that we have in emerging. Markets are in Turkey and Argentina of the, to Argentina has been willing to act quickly Turkey however investors aren't sure how they're going to deal with that and just bear in mind even though I mean well, Turkey's inflation is near sixteen percent the emerging. Market averages about two point eight percent so, you know what we're what we're looking at, here is you know you've got some very interesting real rates across emerging markets but, not in those areas where inflation is high Donna thank, you, so much for being with us a myself this morning that is done About two g. or measuring markets, team leader resident in to buy one invest Bloomberg, spoke. To you this morning says that there's even bigger threats to the. Markets been tacky As things stand I don't think Turkey they have the potential At the. Moment I think I can titrate impacts at its every. Limited I'm concerned about other things going on in the world Donald. Trump does next with. Respect to the parish Let's bring in Andrew Jackson. Head of Asia ex Japan equities and fund manager Janice. Henderson investors he joins us from saying the poor Great to have. You with us this morning Andrew so what? About gas a little bit early say Turkey, is fried it is roasted it, is stuffed, how. Contained is the Turkey in the oven Good morning to you Look I think broadly in agreement with Donna's comments that we're not really seeing a contagion broader markets in terms of the economic fundamentals of what we are. Seeing contagion to send and that's why we've seen a flight. To US dollar asset so we've seen some short-term selling off in emerging markets where there could be some contagion Knows you're not markets. Where they have large current account deficits and large levels of the US dollar. Borrowings the good news for me is an x Japan investors we don't have the same issues within Asia. We do have, some economies like Indonesia, we've seen the currency under pressure this year is a. Result, because their current account deficit has been widening and I think that has breach two percent also in the most recent data so I believe that Turkey's relatively contained we're not. Gonna see a huge impact to the fundamentals wean Asia but. Of course in the short term the markets are more worried about sentiment rather than fundamentals When you look at the trade. Relationship Andrew talking about one percent of exports Turkey and China so that puts it all a little bit. Into perspective Turkey, in broader Asia still, though let's assume that this scenario deteriorates and Turkey and Scares quite a few investors around the world. How do you play anxiety and ripple effect through the m from Asia equities, perspective, there, has to be a way to capitalize on this Sure Clearly within is your extra. Parent you could decide to allocate an active. Managers we're looking to outperform l. benchmark attention is going to focus on those economies that have much stronger fiscal positions that we're going to talk about the Chinese economy. Later clearly the issues in in, China more, inward looking and more domestic focused on on de. Leveraging if you look at their current account position and the fiscal, position generally they look very. Attractive, similarly markets like Thailand within a southeast Asia. Context they accounted account position and surplus looks very. Attractive so there's definitely opportunities for stock pickers in this environment because you're seeing broad-based sell-off eight equities and all of the companies are going to suffer as a. Result Yep. And that's what we need to identify where. Those opportunities the valuation metrics some would say reaching appetizing levels Andrew Jilin eastern with us we've got more to get through breaking news from Drake and scull at us. Of this is one of those, companies we've, been tracking in terms of the challenges that they. Have had over the past three to four months this is how, the number stock up in. The, second quarter that will be a loss of. One hundred and eighty one point one million dirhams. Revenues three hundred fifty but they are naming use of as the new c. e. o. so, there is change here out the top four Drake and scull Yousef Yeah. This, has been one of. The troubled troubled companies on the index but again one of the key segments in a wider Dubai property developers story you look at what's happening with the stock it's tremendous pressure on fears of an inclusion and the second. Front of this was of course the ongoing investigation around the previous management they named their four CEO in three years. So this is the fifth CEO, that they have, so we'll wait and see if we get any more clarity as to how they're going to turn around this company more clear direction Madison Yep as you say. There's a long line discussion over that the. Former manager and a lot more to get. Through I still had more confusion by Tesla's privatization plan private equity firm reportedly denies beat. Involved contrary to Elon Musk's latest tweet but. Up next the latest data China rather disappoints across. The board we're going to dig a little bit deeper into what's going on in the world's second largest economy that's next this is, Bloomberg Are you in In a challenging. And.

Turkey Asia Bloomberg Donna China Dubai US Trump Metastasized Andrew Argentina Tokyo Japan Elon Musk southeast Asia Turkish government
"metastasized" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

12:06 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Now I have a great affinity A great affinity for products like SuperBeets. And also certain medical advances That use products that use advances to create a healthy body Now what am I talking about Well. I'll tell you over the weekend I learned about some incredible. Advances, we've made in fighting cancer And particularly renal cancer are e. NFL cancer And, I know our food pharmaceutical companies come under. Vicious attack that they're, making too much money it's the same media the same politicians, who destroy everything wanted destroy them drug companies Many. Of you feel that, are drugs are too expensive but let me tell, you something The vast majority of research that's done by, these companies winds up with nothing But when they come up. With something it is a big deal for the quality of life and longevity And they've done this, when it comes to renal cancer that metastasized is in somebody's body And they have developed an infusion And, I think you've. Seen these commercials they're very quick they're not very detailed on TV that shows a healthy human, cell devouring killing a cancer cell And. They've come up with this infusion there was just approved by the FDA not too long ago Of two drugs Because the, cancer cell tricks. They healthy cell I'm doing this, as a pedestrian but I'm just making a point The, cancer cell tricks they healthy cells And, how does it do it it tricks the healthy cells, by presenting itself as, a healthy cell Presenting itself, as a healthy cell so your immune system and the healthy cells do? Not attack, the cancer cell and he keeps spreading growing and killing So they had to figure out How to expose the. Cancer cell to the healthy cell so the healthy cells would see it. As a danger and attack it That's what they've invented In addition they've invented Another drug That jacks up. Your system That strengthens your immune system particularly when your elderly and your immune system isn't. What it used to be it's more and more difficult to fight, various illnesses and so forth And so they've created Suchitra and now they combine these drugs In an infusion that goes directly into your system To kill. These, cancer cells that have metastasized in the body again a certain type of cancer But it is the cutting edge it's brand, new it's now on the market it's something they've. Been developing for years and years and, years and, it's cost them an enormous amount of money and now they will be. Saving, lives improving lives lengthening lives It, really works It really works So I'm probably one of the lone voices in defending. Our pharmaceutical companies And I would ask Bernie Sanders Where do these drugs come from Scandinavia. No they don't come from Scandinavia They, come from large pharmaceutical companies Not a socialist paradise All they know how to do is, redistribute regulate and tax In this country we invent we create We save lives That's what. These companies do. They save lives This is. A miracle drug And there. Will be more many more As they Develop a better and better understanding of the human body The the, good aspects work, in the hell the other ones work it's absolutely incredible It gives a. Lot of people a. Lot of hope This was not available a short time ago Seven or eight years ago they would have hit you with chemo and radiation rack your body and maybe would help a little bit maybe wouldn't they just weren't sure And so before we destroy another magnificent private sector institution let's think about it okay That's think. About Let us go, to Wes, Pawtucket Rhode Island the. Great WPRO go Yes good evening Mark I, Colonel west a couple of times Raisman and as, a navy veteran I did forgive him, for being, in the army but But The last time I saw him I was working on a cruise campaign here, co-chair and I presented him with a Markham bumper sticker that said cruise, west He'd, already moved, to Texas yes. So and I think if he chooses to run. In Texas he will win thank you for your. Call west Dan New York New York the great WABC how, are, you Gating Mark your your apps longtime listener and really really enjoy your show you're absolutely right on about the pharmaceutical industry they do tremendous amount of. Work there's a tremendous investment in these trucks and I think, a lot of people forget what's return back to the economy in people who are able to work people able to go. Back, into the workforce, and? Of. Course. This huge effect that it. Has. Patient's, lives but we're really walking through new era right now, where these immune. Drugs are really going to cure a, lot of, patients you're, you're an oncologist. Correct yes yes This is a. Brand new I mean I'm not. Overstating that my doctor no you're not, you're not in fact not only for kidney cancer bladder cancer for a number of other cancers when these drugs were they worked dramatically well they don't work everybody. And I don't want to give people false hope works about, really in about one in four patients but what it does it's well this latest combination works in about eighty five percent. Of, the cases they, believe? Yep, Yep The interesting, thing is is that this combination of the I sick you're talking about you're just turn. It, down That is the, one I'm talking about yeah Europe just started die for it just shows you the differences in the systems. And There was a lot of. Disappointment in the oncology community did not get accepted And they even, have some some really unbelievable pills that. People take, if the infusion, isn't they've. They don't react well to, the infusion I mean oral pills again nothing's perfect, they have some side effects but who would have thought that ten years ago Well. It just shows you what, team vestment and research does and what the head force and it's an enormous expense people just, need to understand in most of the. Time they, come up empty, I look. At look at the amount, of investment in research they're doing now in Alzheimer's Absolutely and and for the most part but not not. Exclusively they're coming up empty empty but they're making progress a little bit here. And there I study a lot of this just because that's. What I do and yeah A lot. Of it's learning how to use, the drugs had elite use them properly, if you look back, into the nineteen sixties, about some. Of the drugs we use them we really. Didn't. Know the right dosage in the, right schedules and as, as the research developed we, were able to cure for example to stick. Your cancer and nobody gets very very rare very rarely people die from cancer. These days I, won't pronounce this well, it's one of the, misspelled an. IV o. l. u. m. a.. B. Nevada And it's combined with IP l. I m. u. m. a. b. Why don't they make the name so complicated but anyway they combine these, two and, the FDA approved using it as. A first line drug you know you step to try other things we were two months ago They moved it through quickly You know they they had, a number of patients well over thousand patients and. Had had a significant effect so There's opportunities out there my. Friend Absolutely And without these, companies I don't know where we would be And you know people acute. Ho you just like corporate has nothing. To do with that, it has nothing to do with it Compassionate if you're humane, you've got you've got it embraced capitalism he got embraced. The market system private property it works All right doctor thank, you for. Your call And. Some of these doctors let me tell you I. Don't know, how. They show up every day Cancer doctors Every day My stepdaughter's going to medical school Her first year she's absolutely brilliant These kids. Work so hard And for years And it's so competitive And then after four or, five years of that Then they are at the lower rung of the ladder when they work. In these various hospitals and assignments and so forth And, then after several years of that there. At the very lowest rung of the ladder when they when they join an officer open their own office and so forth so He put, in an enormous amount of time and. Expense To, become doctors I know we're supposed to hate doctors to I know we're supposed to hate everyone who's. Successful anything that works in the name of big government And egalitarianism I rejected all we'll be right back Mm-hmm Mark, Larson. And Tony Ramirez of singing, hills memorial. Park Joni we've been saying for years singing hills memorial park. Is not, what, you think of in a cemetery you know it's, it's a beautiful place like going to a park and you can only know that if you go out and take a free, tour great time of the year to do that but also explore. Some, of..

cancer renal cancer FDA SuperBeets Texas NFL metastasized Tony Ramirez Bernie Sanders Suchitra WABC Europe Mark I Scandinavia chemo Wes
"metastasized" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

11:40 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on KTRH

"Now I have a great affinity A great affinity For products like SuperBeets and also, certain medical advances That use products they use advances to create a healthy body I want my talking about Well I'll. Tell you over the weekend I. Learned about some incredible advances. We've made in fighting cancer And particularly renal cancer r.. E. n. e. l. cancer And I know our food pharmaceutical companies. Come under vicious attack, that they're making too much money it's the same media the, same politicians who destroy everything wanted destroy them drug companies And I know many. Of you feel that, are drugs are too expensive but let me tell, you something The vast majority of research that's done by, these companies winds up with nothing But when they come. Up with something it is a big deal for quality of life and longevity And they've done this, when it comes to renal cancer that metastasized in somebody's body And, they have developed an infusion And, I think you've. Seen these commercials they're very quick they're not very detailed on TV that shows a healthy human, cell devouring killing a cancer cell And. They've come up with this infusion there was just approved by the FDA not too long ago Of two drugs Because the cancer cell. Tricks they healthy so I'm doing this, as a pedestrian but I'm just making a point The, cancer cell tricks they healthy cells And, how does it do it it tricks the healthy cells. By presenting itself has. A healthy cell Presenting itself as healthy so so your immune system and the healthy cells do? Not attack, the cancer cell and it keeps spreading growing and killing So they had to figure out How to expose the. Cancer cell to the healthy cells so the healthy cells would see it. As a danger and attack it That's what they've invented In addition they've invented Another drug That Jack's up. Your system That strengthens your immune system particularly when your elderly and your immune system isn't. What it used to be it's more and more difficult to fight various illnesses and so forth And. So they've created such a trap and now they've combine these drugs In an infusion that goes directly into your system To. Kill, these cancer cells had metastasized in the body again a certain type of cancer But it is. The, cutting edge it's brand new It's now. On the market It's something they have been developing for, years and years and years and it's cost them. An enormous amount of money and now, they will, be saving. Lives improving lives lengthening lives It, really works It really works So I'm probably one of the lone voices in defending. Our pharmaceutical companies And I would ask Bernie Sanders Where do these drugs come from Scandanavia no They don't come from Scandinavia They. Come from large pharmaceutical companies Not a socialist paradise All they know how to do is, redistribute regulate and tax In this country we invent we create We save lives That's what. These companies do. They save lives This is. A miracle drug And there. Will be more many more As they Develop a better and better understanding of the human body The the. Good aspects work, in the how the other ones work it's absolutely incredible It gives a lotta people. Out of hope This was not available a short time ago Seven or eight years ago they would have hit you with chemo and radiation rack your body. And maybe it. Would help a little bit maybe it wouldn't they just weren't sure And so before we destroy another magnificent private. Sector institution let's. Think about it okay Let's think. About Let us go, to Wes, Pawtucket Rhode Island the great WPRO Vigo Good evening Mark I met, Colonel west a couple of times man and as, a navy veteran I did forgive him, for being, in the army but The last time I saw, him I was. Working on cruise campaign here co-chair and I presented him with, the Markham. Bumper sticker that said cruise west Yes, so and, I think, if he chooses. To run in? Texas he will win thank you for your. Call west Dan New York New York the great WABC how, are, you Dating Mark, your your apps longtime listener and really really enjoy your show you're absolutely right on about the pharmaceutical industry they. Do tremendous amount of work there's. A tremendous investment in these trucks and I think a lotta, people forget what's returned back to the economy in people who are able to work people go back into the workforce and. Of, course this huge, effect? That, it, has, patient's. Lives, but we're really walking to new era right now where, these immune drugs. Are really going to cure a lot, of patients, you're you're, an unconscious correct. Yes yes yes This is a brand new, I mean I'm not overstating it at my doctor no you're not you're not in fact not only for kidney cancer for. Bladder, cancer for a, number? Of, other, cancers When these drugs work they worked dramatically well they don't work everybody and I don't want. To. Give people false hope it, works about really about one in four patients but what it, does it's at while this. Latest combination works in about. Eighty five, percent of the cases they believe Yep. And, the interesting. Thing is. Is that, this combination of so I think you're talking about you're just turned it down That is the, one I'm talking about yeah Yeah you're just trying to die for it just shows you the differences in the systems. And There was a lot of disappointment. In the college community that did not get accepted And, they even have some some really unbelievable. Pills that, people take if, the infusion. Isn't they don't react well, to the infusion I mean oral pills again nothing's, perfect they have some side effects but who would have thought that ten years ago Well. It just shows you what's, investment in research does and what's ahead for us and it's an. Enormous expense people just, need to understand in most of the. Time they, come up empty, I look. At look at the amount, of investment in research they're doing now in Alzheimer's Absolutely and for, the most part but not. Not exclusively they're coming up empty empty but they're making progress a little bit. Here and there I study a lot of this just because. That's what I do and Yeah A lot of it's learning how to use the drugs had, league use them. Properly if you look back into the nineteen sixties about some of the drugs we, use then we really didn't know the right dosage in the right. Schedules and as as the research, developed we were able to cure for, example to stick your, cancer and nobody gets, very very rare were very rarely do people die from cancer these. Days I won't, pronounce this well it's, one of the misspelled an IV o. l. u. m.. A. b. And it's combined with IP l. i. m. u. m. a. b. Why don't they make the name so complicated but anyway they combine these, two and, the FDA approved using it as a first line drug, you know used to have to try things for two months ago They moved to through quickly and They, had a number of patients well over thousand patients. And had had a significant effect so There's opportunities out there my. Friend Absolutely And without these, companies I don't know where we would be And you know people accused. Ho you just like corporate has nothing. To do with that, it has nothing to do with it If you're compassionate, if you're humane, you've got a you've got to embrace capitalism got embraced. The market system private property it works All right doctor thank, you for. Your call And. Some of these doctors let me tell you I. Don't know, how. They show up every day Cancer doctors Every day My stepdaughter's coming to medical school her. First year she's absolutely brilliant These kids. Work so hard And for years And it's so competitive And then after four or, five years of that Then. They are at the lower rung of the ladder When they, work in these various hospitals and assignments and so forth And then after several years of that there at the very lowest rung of the ladder when they. When they join an officer open their own office and so forth so He put, in an enormous amount of time and. Expense To, become doctors I know we're supposed to hate doctors to I know we're supposed to hate everyone who's. Successful anything that works in the name of big government And egalitarianism I rejected all we'll be right back.

cancer kidney cancer FDA SuperBeets E. n. e. Texas Bernie Sanders WABC Jack chemo co-chair Pawtucket Rhode Island Scandinavia officer Mark I Wes Markham
"metastasized" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

11:41 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on WJR 760

"Yeah I have a great affinity A great affinity for products like beets. And also certain medical advances That use products that, use advances, to create a healthy body Now what am I talking about Well. I'll tell you over the weekend I learned about some incredible. Advances, we've made in fighting cancer And particularly renal cancer r.. E. n. a. l. cancer And I know our food pharmaceutical companies. Come under vicious attack, that they're making too much money it's the same media the, same politicians who destroy everything wanted destroy them drug companies And I know many. Of you feel that, are drugs are too expensive but let me tell, you something The vast majority of research that's done by, these companies winds up with nothing But when they come up. With something it is a big deal for the quality of life and longevity And they've done this, when it comes to renal cancer that metastasized is in somebody's body And they have developed an infusion And I think you've. Seen these commercials are very quick they're not very detailed on TV that shows a healthy. Human cell devouring killing he cancer so And. They've come up with this infusion there was just approved by the FDA not too long. Ago Of two drugs Because the, cancer cell tricks. The healthy cells I'm doing this, as a pedestrian but I'm just making a point The, cancer cell tricks they healthy cells And, how does it do it it tricks the healthy cells, by presenting itself as, a healthy cell Presenting itself as a healthy so so your immune system and the healthy cells do? Not attack, the cancer cell and it keeps spreading growing and killing So they had to figure out How to expose the. Cancer cell to the healthy cells so the healthy cells would see it. As a danger and attack it That's what they've invented In addition they've invented Another drug That Jack's up your. Immune system That strengthens your Munich system particularly when you're elderly and your moon system. Isn't what it used to be it's more and more difficult to fight various illnesses and so forth And. So they've created such a drought and now they've combine these drugs In an infusion, that goes directly into your system To kill. These, cancer cells that have metastasized in the body again a certain type of cancer But it is the cutting edge it's brand, new it's now on the market it's something they've. Been developing for years and years and, years and, it's cost them an enormous amount of money and now they will be. Saving, lives improving lives lengthening lives It, really works It really works So I'm probably one of the lone voices in defending. Our pharmaceutical companies And I would ask Bernie Sanders Where do these drugs come from Scandanavia no They don't come from Scandinavia They. Come from large pharmaceutical companies Not a socialist paradise All they know how to do is, redistribute regulate and tax In this country we invent we create We save lives That's what. These companies do. They save lives This is. A miracle drug And there. Will be more many more As they Develop a better and better understanding of the human body Now the the, good aspects work, in the hell the other ones work it's absolutely incredible It gives. A lot of people. Out of hope This was not available a short time ago Fach seven or eight years ago they would hit you with chemo and radiation rock your body and maybe would help a little bit maybe wouldn't they just weren't sure And so before we destroy another magnificent private sector institution let's think about it okay Let's think about. It Let us, go to, Wes Pawtucket Rhode Island the great WPRO Vigo Yes good evening Mark I, Colonel west a couple of times Raisman and as, a navy veteran I did forgive him, for being, in the army but The last, time, that. I. Saw him, I. Was working on a cruise campaign here approach hair and I presented him, with a Mark of bumper sticker that said cruise, west I think, he'd already moved. To Texas yes so and I think if he chooses. To run in Texas he will win thank you for, your call west Dan New York New York the great WABC how, are, you Good evening Mark your your apps longtime listener and really really enjoy your show you're absolutely right on about the pharmaceutical industry they do tremendous. Amount of work there's a tremendous matter investment in these trucks and, I think a lot of people forget what's returned back to the economy in people who are able to work people even. Go, back into the workforce and, of? Course, this, huge. Effect that it has the patient's lives. But, we're really walk into new era right now where these immune, drugs are really. Going to cure a lot of patients, you're you're, a non, college est correct. Yes yes yes This is a. Brand new I mean I'm not. Overstating it at my doctor no you're not. You're not in fact not only for kidney cancer for bladder cancer for a number of other cancers when these drugs work they worked dramatically well they don't. Work in everybody and I don't want to give people false hope, it works about really about one in four patients but what it does it's at while this latest combination works in about. Eighty, five percent of the cases, they? Believe, yeah, yeah The, interesting thing is is that this combination it's the white think you're talking about you're just turned. It, down That is the. One I'm talking about yeah Europe to start to die for it. Just shows you the differences in the systems and there was a lot of disappointment in the. Oncology can use it did not get. Accepted And they even, have some some really unbelievable pills that people take, if the infusion isn't they don't react well to the infusion I mean oral pills. Again nothing's perfect they have some side effects but who would have thought that ten years ago Well it just shows you, what seems vestment and research does and what's ahead force and it's. An enormous expense people, just need to understand most of the. Time they, come up empty, I look. At look at the amount, of investment in research they're doing now in Alzheimer's Absolutely and for the most part but not. Not exclusively they're coming up empty empty but they're making progress a little. Bit here in ice study a lot of this just because. That's what I do and Yeah A lot of it's learning how to use the. Drugs how do we use them? Properly if you look back into the nineteen sixties about some of the, drugs we use, them we really didn't know the right dosage in the right schedules and ask the research. Developed we were able to, cure for, example to stick your cancer and nobody, very very rare for very rarely people die from cancer these. Days I won't, pronounce this, well it's one of them is spelled, n. i. v. o. l. u. m. a. b.. The volume And it's combined with IP l. i. m. m. a. b. Now why did they make the name so complicated but anyway they combine these two, and the, FDA approved using it as a first line drug you know, used to have to try other things for two months ago They moved to through quickly You know they they had, a number of patients well over thousand patients and. Had had a significant effect. So there's, opportunities out there my friend Absolutely and without these companies. I don't know where we. Would be And you know people. Accused ho you just like corporate has. Nothing. To do with that, it has nothing to do with it If you're compassionate, if you're humane, you've got gotta you've got it embraced capitalism got embraced. The market system private property it works All right doctor thank, you for. Your call And. Some of these doctors let me tell you I. Don't know, how. They show up every day Cancer doctors Every day My stepdaughter's going to medical school Her first year she's absolutely brilliant These kids. Work so hard And for years And it's so competitive And then after four or, five years of that Than. They are at the lower rung of the ladder When they work in these various hospitals and assignments and so forth And then after several years of that at the very, lowest rung of the ladder when they. When they join an officer opened their own office and so forth so He put, in an enormous amount of time and. Expense To, become doctors I know we're supposed to hate doctors to I know we're supposed to hate everyone who's. Successful anything that works in the name of big government And egalitarianism I rejected all we'll be right back.

cancer kidney cancer FDA bladder cancer Texas E. n. a. metastasized Wes Pawtucket Rhode Island Mark I Bernie Sanders Europe WABC Jack officer chemo Munich Scandinavia
"metastasized" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

07:46 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Now I have a great affinity A great affinity for products like SuperBeets. And also certain medical advances That use products that use advances to create a healthy body Now what am I talking about Well. I'll tell you over the weekend I learned about some incredible. Advances, we've made in fighting cancer And particularly renal cancer r.. E. n. a. l. cancer And I know our food pharmaceutical companies. Come under vicious attack, that they're making too much money it's the same media the, same politicians who destroy everything wanted destroy them drug companies And I know many. Of you feel that, are drugs are too expensive but let me tell, you something The vast majority of research that's done by, these companies winds up with nothing But when they come. Up with something it is a big deal for quality of life and longevity And they've done this, when it comes to renal cancer that metastasized in somebody's body And, they have developed an infusion And, I think you've. Seen these commercials they're very quick they're not very detailed on TV that shows a healthy human, cell devouring killing a cancer cell And. They've come up with this infusion that was just approved by the FDA not too long ago Of two drugs Because the cancer cell. Tricks they healthy so I'm doing this, as a pedestrian but I'm just making a point The, cancer cell tricks they healthy cells And, how does it do it it tricks the healthy cells, by presenting itself as, a healthy cell Presenting itself as a healthy so so your immune system and the healthy cells do? Not attack, the cancer cell and it keeps spreading growing and killing So they had figure out How to expose the cancer. Cell to the healthy cell so the healthy cells would see it as. A danger and attack it That's what they've invented In addition they've invented Another drug That jacks up your. Immune system That strengthens your immune system particularly when your elderly and your immune system. Isn't what it used to be it's more and more difficult to. Fight various illnesses and so forth And. So they've created such a drought and now they've combine these drugs In an infusion, that goes directly into your system To. Kill, these cancer cells had metastasized in the body again a certain type of cancer But it is. The, cutting edge it's brand new It's now. On the market It's something they've been developing for, years and years and years and it's cost them. An enormous amount of money and now, they will, be saving. Lives improving lives lengthening lives It, really works It really works So I'm probably one of the lone voices in defending. Our pharmaceutical companies And I would ask Bernie Sanders Where do these drugs come from Scandinavia no They don't come, from. Scandinavia They. Come from large pharmaceutical companies Not a socialist paradise All they know how to do is, redistribute regulate and tax In this country we invent we create We save lives That's what. These companies do. They save lives This is. A miracle drug And there. Will be more many more As they Develop a better and better understanding of the human body The. The good aspects, work and how the other ones work it's absolutely incredible Gives a lot of people. Out of hope This was not available a short time ago Seven or eight years ago they would have hit you with chemo and radiation rack your body and maybe would help a little bit maybe wouldn't they just weren't sure And so before we destroy another magnificent private sector institution let's think about it okay Let's think about. It Let us, go to, Wes Pawtucket Rhode Island the great WPRO Vigo Yes good evening Mark I met Colonel west a, couple, of times man and as, a navy veteran I did forgive him for being. In the, army but Go last time I saw, him I was, working on. A cruise campaign here Rhode Island I was co chair and I presented him with, a Markham, bumper sticker that said cruise west Already, moved to, Texas yes so. And I think? If he chooses to run in Texas he, will win. Thank you for your, call west Dan New York New York the great WABC how, are, you Good evening Mark your your apps longtime listener and really really enjoy your show you're absolutely right on about the pharmaceutical industry they do tremendous amount of work. Is a tremendous investment in these trucks and I think a lot of, people forget what's returned back to the economy in people who are able to work people able to go back into the workforce. And, of course this, huge? Effect, that. It. Has on the patient's. Lives. But, we're really walking into a new era right now where, these immune drugs. Are really going to cure a lot, of patients, you're you're, an oncologist correct. Yes yes yes This is, a brand, new I mean I'm. Not overstating it at doctor no you're not. You're not in fact not only for kidney cancer for bladder cancer for. A number of other cancers when these drugs work they worked dramatically well they don't work in everybody and I don't want to give people false hope works about. Really about one in four patients but what it does it's at while, this latest combination works in about eighty five percent of the cases they believe Yup Yup the interesting thing is is that this. Combination,.

cancer kidney cancer Texas bladder cancer Scandinavia SuperBeets FDA Wes Pawtucket Rhode Island E. n. a. Bernie Sanders WABC chemo Colonel west Dan New York New York Mark I
"metastasized" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

11:41 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Yeah I have a great. Affinity A great affinity For products like SuperBeets and also certain medical advances that use products that use advances to create, a healthy body Now what am I talking about Well. I'll tell you over the weekend I learned about some incredible. Advances, we've made in fighting cancer And particularly renal cancer r.. E. n. a. l. cancer And I know our food pharmaceutical companies come. Under a vicious attack, that they're making too much money it's the same media the, same politicians who destroy everything wanna destroy them drug companies And I know many. Of you feel that, are drugs are too expensive but let me tell, you something The vast majority of research that's done by, these companies winds up with nothing But when they come. Up with something it is a big deal for quality of life and longevity And they've done this, when it comes to renal cancer that metastasized and somebody's body And they have developed an infusion And I think you've. Seen these commercials are very quick they're not very detailed on TV that shows a healthy human, cell devouring killing a cancer cell And. They've come up with this infusion that was just approved by the FDA not too long ago Of two drugs Because the cancer cell. Tricks a healthy so I'm doing this, as a pedestrian but I'm just making a point The, cancer cell tricks they healthy cells And, how does it do it it tricks the healthy cells, by presenting itself as, a healthy cell Presenting itself as a healthy so your immune system and the healthy cells do? Not attack, the cancer cell and it keeps spreading growing and killing So they head of figure out How to expose the. Cancer cell to the healthy self so the healthy cells would see it. As a danger and attack it That's what they've invented In addition they've invented Another drug That jacks up your. Immune system That strengthens your immune system particularly when your elderly and your immune system. Isn't what it used to be it's more and more difficult To fight. Various illnesses and so forth And so they've created such a track and now they've combine these drugs Infusion that goes directly into your system To kill these cancer. Cells, that have metastasized in the body again a certain type of cancer But it is the cutting edge it's brand new, it's now on the market it's something they have. Been developing for years and years and, years and, it's cost them an enormous amount of money and now they will be. Saving, lives improving lives lengthening lives It, really works It really works So I'm probably one of the lone voices in defending. Our pharmaceutical companies And I would ask Bernie Sanders Where do these drug come from Scandinavia no They don't come, from. Scandinavia They. Come from large pharmaceutical companies Not a socialist paradise All they know how to do is, redistribute regulate and tax In this country we invent we create We save lives That's what. These companies do. They save lives This is. A miracle drug And there. Will be more many more As they Develop a better and better understanding of the human body The. The good aspects, work and how the other ones work it's absolutely incredible Gives a lot of people a. Lot of hope This was not available. A short time ago Seven or eight years ago they, would have hit you with chemo radiation rack your body and maybe? Would help a little bit maybe wouldn't they They just weren't sure And so before we destroy another, magnificent private sector institution. Let's. Think about it okay Let's think about. It Let us, go to, Wes Pawtucket Rhode. Island. The. Great WPRO, Vigo. Yes good evening Mark I Colonel west a couple of times Raisman and, as a navy veteran I did forgive him for. Being in the army but The, last time I. Saw. Him. I was working. On the cruise campaign here or would I co-chair and I presented him, with a mock a bumper sticker that said cruise, west He'd already. Moved to Texas yes so and I think if he chooses to run in Texas he will, win thank you for? Your call west Dan New York New York the great WABC how, are, you Eighty Mark your your apps longtime listener and really really enjoy your show you're absolutely right on about the pharmaceutical industry they do. Tremendous amount of work is a tremendous investment lease trucks and, I think a lotta people forget what's returning back to the economy in people who are able to work people even. Go, back into the, workforce? And, of, course, this huge effect that it. Has, patient's, lives but we're really walking into era right now where, these immune drugs. Are really going to cure a lot, of patients, you're you're, an unconscious correct. Yes yes yes This is a brand new. I mean I'm not overstating at my doctor now you're not you're. Not not only for kidney cancer for bladder cancer for a number of other chances when these drugs work they worked dramatically well they don't work in. Everybody and I don't want to give people false hope works, about really in about one in four patients but what it does its apps well this latest combination works in about. Eighty, five percent of, the? Cases, they, believe The interesting thing is is. That, this combination of so I think you're talking about you're just turned it down That is the, one I'm talking about yeah Europe to start a die for it just shows you the differences in the systems. And There was a lot of disappointment in. The oncology can use it did not get accepted And they even have some some really. Unbelievable pills, that people take, the infusion. Isn't if they don't react, well to the infusion I mean oral pills again, nothing's perfect they have some side effects but who would have thought that ten years ago Well. It just shows you what, team vestment and research does and what's ahead force and it's an enormous expense people just need to understand in most of the. Time they, come up empty, I look. At look at the amount, of investment in research they're doing now and Alzheimer's Absolutely and for the most part but not. Not exclusively they're coming up empty empty but they're making progress a little bit. Here and there I study a lot of this just because. That's what I do and Yeah A lot of it's learning how to use the drugs had elite use them. Properly if you look back into the nineteen sixties about some of the drugs we use that we really didn't know the right dosage in the right schedules and ask the research, developed we were able to, cure for, example to stick your, cancer and nobody gets, very very. Rare very rarely people die from cancer these. Days I, won't pronounce this well, it's one of them, is spelled. An IV o. l. u. m.. A. b. And it's combined with IP I l I m u m a b Why don't. They make the name so complicated but anyway They combine? These two And the FDA approved using it as, a first, line drug you know you step to try other things. For two months ago They moved it through quickly and They, had a number of patients well over thousand patients. And had had a significant effect so There's opportunities out there my. Friend Absolutely And without these, companies I don't know where we would be And you know people acute. Ho you just fight corporate has nothing. To do with that, it has nothing to do with it Compassionate if you're, humane you've gotta. You've gotta embraced capitalism he got embrace. The market system private property it works All right doctor thank, you for. Your call And. Some of these doctors let me tell you I. Don't know, how. They show up every day Cancer doctors Every day My stepdaughter's going to medical school Her first year she's absolutely brilliant These kids. Work so hard And for years And it's so competitive And then after four or, five years of that Then. They are at the lower rung of the ladder When they, work in these various hospitals and assignments and so forth And then after several years of that at the very, lowest rung of the ladder when they. When they join an officer opened their own office and so forth so He, put an enormous amount of time and. Expense To become, doctors I know we're supposed to hate doctors to I know we're supposed to hate everyone who's successful. Anything that works in the name of big government And egalitarianism I rejected all we'll be right back.

cancer kidney cancer FDA SuperBeets bladder cancer Texas E. n. a. Scandinavia Bernie Sanders WABC Europe Alzheimer Rhode chemo Wes Pawtucket co-chair
"metastasized" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"It starts to sleep metastasized deliver it to the intestines joe's heart based tumors are often it's a bad tumor to half anyway this is interesting they treated the researchers treated the terrier the dog with a fda approved medication that is used for breast cancer in women and the results is dog is it's several months and the dog is still alive and do not doing well so they're now think about using this medication for a real studies in the veterinary schools because it's proved already for people if they could show that not only is ineffective but safe for goes as well that might be a great great new medication to treat really a serious rather deadly condition called dimaggio sarcoma nothing a story that was on prosthetic devices and now you've heard of three d printers right so there are now of applications and wet lot of ways to make these devices and three d printers are i mean amazing so it takes a long time to make it i mean the process itself but instead of just having ink on a page it actually looks at an object in three dimension and it will recreate it using some sort of i know whether it's a vinyl plastic would but it actually could make really strong devices and they're now starting to make prosthetic devices and so far they've used them for dogs camels drafts gazelles goats and actually even for a five ton five ton bull elephant thirty year old bull elephant get a prosthetic device so you just imagine how strong it is that they could support the weight of a five so that's pretty good lately before typically we just didn't have really great prostheses for dogs and again three legged dog to them it's nothing us it bothers us but the dogs get along great but there's a way to do it make it comfortable not your take the skin not have the dog oh nuts have wearing it i think that's great rhode island rhode island great state of rhode island passed the bill this is really good it's not the first state to do it we talked about this several weeks ago one of the other states did this so basically their aim is to strengthen the criminal penalties for repeated animal cruelty and neglect they also restricting pet shop sales dogs and cats the only way pet shops who sell dogs and cats if they dogs and cats at they're selling came from risk groups or shelters no more no more puppymills that's great not only that they're also now are not allowing any sales at all of puppies or kittens in public places like like recreational parks parking lots flea markets etc so they are really cracking down on these were quality puppy male dogs and cats and the best really i say this time look i i used to help a pet shop i used to treat their animals you know my thought was at the time and i still would because of the politics the animals shouldn't suffer so until i would say this to you know some of these groups that were anti i was treating these animals as you guys you duke it out it out however you want do court do whatever you have to do i agree if you can close them down that's great but meanwhile we have twenty puppies and kittens in here that need help and i took an oath and i'm gonna album but if we can do what we have to do to stop the sales and the best way to stop these poor readers is have nobody by the pets anymore so once more states like rhode island jump on that bandwagon and start restricting the sales then this is how you hit a dollars and if they can't sell them there's stop reading so another interesting story it was an article from research at again stuff like this doesn't surprise me at all it shouldn't surprise you at all and that is that veterans with post traumatic stress disorder ptsd had or have service dogs basically run lower cortisol levels they are much less stressed then veterans with ptsd that do not have service dogs or there are waiting for their service they've already filled out the applications now they're just waiting for the right match they run higher levels that tells you lot really does there's there's so much about just the affected dogs have an hour stress levels and of course we know that veterans with ptsd have very high stress levels and so even the difference is so noticeable and i.

joe five ton thirty year
"metastasized" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of his life in nineteenth century farmhouse in rural new hampshire and lived by his own account much longer than he or anyone else expected about thirty years ago hall lost half his colon cancer and began working on a memoir called life work midway through writing that memoir his cancer reappeared and metastasized to his liver his memoir ended just as his chemotherapy was about to begin and doctors gave him a one in three chance of living more than five years that was twenty five years ago in one thousand nine hundred three in life work donald hall wrote about how important work on the family farm was to his parents and grandparents and how important his own work as a poet was to him i see no reason to spend your life writing poems hall road in one essay unless your goal is to write great poems the harvard graduate also wrote in his memoir about how close he was to his wife of then twenty two years jane kenyon they met while he was teaching and she was a student at the university of michigan and she became a highly regarded poet in her own right terry gross interviewed them both in nineteen ninetythree and began by asking donald hall to read from his memoir life work if all goes well as it were i will might inches recovered the morning globe the coffee work on poems and work on pros walking the dog logo with jane and the continual or recurrent dread exacerbated every three months by checking my ca the black cell multiplies it's a common condition for millions of people old ones dropping off a new ones entering the mode the cancer glove the death watch heaven knows and moments of anxiety magic thinking knows no left or hindrance they are reading everything i write on this yellow pad i'll take it i'll take it the nature of this book alters shall i change the title from life work to work and death box office he said sneering oh let me return to my seem i've worked all his preoperation week but not on life word i'm sorry has helped an absorbing this is incomplete this morning as i write this medical report for life work i find that work remains la matter not only in defiance of death but in plain sight of it it absorbs me to write these pages it absorbs me more nearly than anything else has done for the past week or ten days writing about cancer allows me to transcend my cancer either syntax or rhetoric of dread and suffering if work is no antidote to death nor denial of death is a powerful stimulus to work get done what you can donald hall thank you for reading that let me just paraphrase something that you wrote in at the end of the reading that you gave at the beginning of of our talk you you were saying that you were thinking that your death could be the worst thing that ever happened to your wife jane lemme introduce your wife jane kenyon the wonderful poet who is with us as well and jane can i ask you what your reaction was when you read that passage well i had to agree with it it really is the worst thing that could happen to me we're extremely close both as as human beings and as writers we share so many of the same joys and and difficulties were extremely close we live and work in in the same building twenty four hours a day and we're very much in each other's pockets so it really would be devastating for me to lose my pal i like to ask you to read a poem in this is a poem about your husband after surgery and the poem is called chrysanthemums right this this one is about the first round we had before he had metastases to the liver so chrysanthemums the doctor averted his eyes while the diagnosis felon us as though the picture of the girl hiding from her dog had suddenly fallen off the wall we were speechless all the way home the light seems strange a weekend of fear and purging determined to work he packed his dictaphone a stack of letters and a roll of stamps at last the day of scalpels so blood and gauze arrived is closed i lay on his tightly made bed waiting from the hallway i heard an old man who's nurse was helping him to walk that howard johnson's it's nothing but the same thing over and over again that's right it's nothing special late in the.

new hampshire twenty five years twenty four hours twenty two years thirty years three months five years ten days
"metastasized" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Grads case the cancer went from her i and then metastasized into her liver there is no known cure for this at this particular point in time one of the patients said the other thing is kind of touchy that people think of what happened to you as a disfiguring injury obviously because of the removal of one particular i but it does seem that thirty six people have responded so far saying they too attended auburn university and habit diagnosed with ocular melanoma blows the six and one million people right out of low water arend said officials said that they are hopeful research and awareness will advance the prevention and treatment of this cancer the alabama department of health believes it would be premature to determine that a cancer cluster exists in that particular area but it does seem that not only is that in in the detected in auburn alabama but specifically related to the university more research is being done as right around thirty six thirty seven thirty eight people have come forward in the last few weeks owner of has anything to do with different chemicals are different agents used in agriculture 'cause auburn's a big that's actually a good point and north carolina that era north carolina is an agricultural society that's actually a very good point so people not wearing proper safety goggles on the work in the labs or whatever and then of course you know you've got airborne because if you've never been to the campus of auburn university it's everywhere you know you've got the veterinary labs the the fishery schools the animal husbandry centers.

auburn university ocular melanoma arend alabama auburn north carolina alabama department of health
"metastasized" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Random selection on multiple choice answers that takes an almost still because you know the they should never trigger the arbitration clause they should never gotten into this litigation and they need to get the hell out because this could clearly metastasized from a civil to a criminal matter it so they're literally doing right now everything that is wrong now what's going to happen from this point on is that that denial of his knowledge is going to get michael cohen into what is already serious trouble with the the new york bar but for trump they now have to deal with the fact that a lawyer gave one hundred thirty thousand dollars to a porn star without ever speaking with him or having an agreement that he get the money back that sounds a lot like a contribution and the justice department has already said that that can be a criminal matter if bob mueller pulls the president as he can to question him about it you now have an existential threat for his administration well let me just stay on that jonathan this question just just just to stay with that for a second if the president's look at this i wanted to the president look at these two possible threats right if you were doing a really cold i'd analysis you say okay i got i got two possibilities here one is i'm going to get drawn into campaign finance case it's an epi see thing it's criminal but it ends up focused on michael cohen that's one side as i understand it the other side is we end up in the civil litigation where i might get deposed and i've got problems not just on this nda and related to the stormy daniels story but there are other nda's out there there's a whole morass there something is donny suggested that we don't know exactly what it is but trump is clearly clearly a giving indications as afraid of whatever it is that dwells in that area is there not a way in which it could be the rational path to say you know what these are too bad pass we've made a bunch of mistakes here but let's just play the criminal piece here let's play that out and let it be a campaign finance argument and make the focus on cohen in order to keep the president out of being deposed in the civil litigation.

michael cohen justice department bob mueller president new york jonathan daniels donny one hundred thirty thousand do
"metastasized" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The day but not every country will be subjected to the tariffs i'm jimmy floyd this is all things considered on wnyc some republican lawmakers are alarmed by president trump's decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports varies a lot of concern that this could surely metastasized andrew a larger trade war coming up we consider whether congress is likely to challenge the president plus a round table at the white house to discuss violent video games and how they relate to school shootings also transgender teachers around the country getting more organiz what that means and how there organizing after news headlines live from npr news in washington on lakshmi sang despite opposition from members of congress and us allies president trump is formally imposing tariffs on imported steel and aluminum he has just signed two proclamations and pierce hammer keith reports the order applies to every country except canada and mexico for now the tariffs will take effect in about two weeks ten percent on aluminum imports 25 percent on steel president trump spoke from the white house with hard had holding metal behind him the american steel aluminum industry has been ravaged by aggressor foreign trade practices it's really an assault on our country although trump initially wanted the tariffs to apply to imports from all countries at least initially canada and max sokoto won't be affected in addition other countries can seek exclusions based on their security relationship with the us critics and there are many of them from us allies abroad to republicans in congress argued these tariffs could start a trade war temer keith npr news legislation the bars anyone under the age of twenty one for buying a firearm in florida and imposes a threeday waiting period on all gun purchases on governor rick scott staff ask the legislation also calls for the arming of some teachers something scott had said he does not support this comes just over three weeks since the mass shooting at a parkland high school it has been a tough go for a lotta northeasterners digging out or in the case of this female motorists being pushed out after their second winter storm in less than a week car is stranded in the snows a familiar seen in maine and other states have received upwards of two feet of snow when it comes to shoveling sidewalks rhode island resident justin tours is doing some heavy lifting definitely brick your burt especially when it all stopped renew noodles known everything was radio every that story is on w l.

mexico rhode island rick scott keith npr wnyc maine parkland high school florida assault jimmy floyd canada us washington white house president congress trump ten percent three weeks 25 percent
Global stocks sag as key Trump adviser quits, stoking trade war fears

Glenn Beck

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Global stocks sag as key Trump adviser quits, stoking trade war fears

"Two peace that's triple eight two two seven three two two three this is far sixty two years ago san francisco san jose oakland a cumulus station on amazon's alexa over in the case of all skill market's reaction adult film star sues i'm barbara kusak global stocks in the dollar slumped after a key advocate for free trade in the white house reside the departure of white house economic advisor gary cohn is fanned fears that president trump will go ahead and impose tariffs on imported steel and aluminum and risk a trade war the senate majority leader mitch mcconnell expressed his concerns saying members in his own party are worried it may backfire varies a lot of concern among republican senators that this could metastasized and through a larger trade war and many of our members are discussing with the administration just how broad house sweeping this might be that earlier at a white house news conference trump said trade wars aren't so bad adult film actress stormy daniels aka stephanie clifford is suing president trump and wants a california judge to invalidate a nondisclosure agreements she signed days before the 2016 presidential election we save for the first time in public court records that stormy daniels who was also named in the suit by her legal names stephanie clifford did have an intimate relationship with donald trump during the summer of two thousand six and well into two thousand seven the lawsuit says the pornstar an adult film director wanted to go public with her story of the affair with mr trump and her desire to go public came to the attention of mr trump and his campaign president trump says he's not worried about russia meddling in the twenty eighteen midterm elections during a joint news conference with the prime minister of sweden trump said will counter act whatever they do but he didn't see how with a five percent pay raise in hand the nine day west virginia public school teachers strike is over and schools will reopen on wednesday i'm barbara kusak does your.

San Francisco San West Virginia Sweden Russia California Mitch Mcconnell Senate President Trump Advisor White House Amazon Barbara Kusak Prime Minister Director Donald Trump Daniels Stephanie Clifford
"metastasized" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The tariffs are driving them crazy all republican civil war there is a lot of concern among republican senators that this could for metastasized and through a larger trade war i trust you know that voice that mitch mcconnell the senate majority leader in he is very concerned about and not only is there republicans civil war 2018 over this issue of this issue of terror terriers embarrassed terriers and barracks everywhere anyway that's the issue on the republican side we have democratic civil war 2018 as well there's a banking bill going through i don't know if you're aware of this senator elizabeth warren not happy about this there is an effort to make very significant changes again to the doddfrank financial reform bill and depending upon who you listen to it of a war 2018 as well there's a banking bill going through i don't know if you're aware of this senator elizabeth warren not happy about this there is an effort to make very significant changes again to the doddfrank financial reform bill and depending upon who you listen to it it's either a catastrophe or not such a bad thing and so in the next hour instead of senior legal analyst time formerly let's take a look at the banking bill the banking billets got substantial democratic support in the us senate which means it will break a filibuster right this thing can pass yes it can please remember the filibuster exists dilemma senate for legislation and they've already done their deal with reconciliation so that's all nordli get sixty votes you need bipartisan support there is bipartisan support to weekin we can is one way of phrasing it the next many months you and i just need to know that any peace of legislation going through the senate is going to need sixty votes because as an automatic filibuster now on everything that the banking bill is definitely sparking so we live in a time of great change we live in a time of very very phrasing it change is another way and and we have carpet competing definitions as to what this bill does so we'll do the banking bill in an hour but there is nothing is because he says every full thing and i'm just done chasing the guy we did this has been my balls even the beginning i don't know chase what he says i watch what he does and.

elizabeth warren us senate metastasized mitch mcconnell senator analyst
"metastasized" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on WCTC

"Of the whole exercise that you can somehow not citing sources not credibly citing sources but just gossip you pick up in between things from people who might or might not have been present in the room report that the president is repeating stories now with greater frequency and as i ask david bazi are the principles in the room with a stop watch that they are actually timing oh here we go here comes that two for 401 k story again always mentioning alania again i mean it strategist it's a bazaar kind of a rain to hold up or barometer someone's mental fitness i don't understand that and as you said outcomes let's focus on outcomes if he's doing something horrible on the national scene if he's destroying the economy and he's blowing up politics and can't get a tax plan through while all right net debt benkin go make your argument but none of that is happening in fact the inverse is occurring the inverse and there's a string need to share with you this from the ap china's government promised friday to deal seriously with violators of un sanctions on north korea after a south korean newspaper said chineseowned ships registered abroad regularly delivered oil beijing has no information about the operations of ships registered and an eight they say south korean officials have seized two ships on suspicion of violating un sanctions imposed to discourage the north koreans from pursuing nuclear and missile technology so china saying they will deal seriously with them in accordance with laws and regulations so this is a big turnaround china was paying no attention to the united states nobody cared what obama or george bush said the north korean situation was allowed to intensify and metastasized the nuclear ambitions year after year after year after year trump calls out little kim called them out column crazy little dictator over there and said look i got a big button here mind works now people in the media were rending their garments and screaming in the streets all of this is terrible the diplomatic niceties are prone to the side what has become of us what's become others these were getting attention we've we've arrested the attention of the world and north korea knows you mean business because of that threat you won't have to news a new because of the.

president david bazi china north korea beijing united states obama kim chineseowned george bush north korean 401 k
"metastasized" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"metastasized" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Is the punch took sunday morning to those remember watergate the seminal moment may have been win white house counsel john dean said he told president nixon there was a cancer on the presidency disappears to be the week with a russia's story has metastasized the gap between the original story donald trump jr told and what we have learned to be the truth grows by the day in with each day new piece of evidence the white house is forced to revise and extend its remarks in one week we move from the white house and trump jr denying ever having met with russians through a series of concessions any volving explanations offered only after reporters had uncovered new facts to where we are now the trump jr jared kushner paul manafort russian lawyer a lobbyist suspected of having ties to russian intelligence and interpreter and maybe others mad at trump tower during the campaign to discuss dirt on hillary clinton is they're more was it collusion aiding and abetting treason as i'm democrats charge simple opposition research is president trump is claim was it even illegal to be sure there are many unanswered questions but here's what we know right now to trump the team was open to getting information from russians and willing to covered as far as my son is concerned my son is a wonderful young man over the course of seven days a head snapping series of statements shor number one there were no contacts with russia and the putin regime during the campaign that's absurd it does though base through it i have nothing to do with russia to the best of my knowledge no person that i deal with test saturday the.

john dean russia donald trump jr white house trump tower hillary clinton democrats trump president nixon abetting president putin seven days one week