32 Burst results for "Messina"

"messina" Discussed on Seeking Wisdom

Seeking Wisdom

04:45 min | 8 months ago

"messina" Discussed on Seeking Wisdom

"What they mean and then once i understood it from an cognitive icies and all these kind of things like once i understood that those elements in other words the people element you know the storytelling why people make decisions the way they do how they build then i finally could understand to some level marketing. And it's funny. I all i talk about now. This most people think that i'm a marketer. You know what i'm hearing a new two things that is so fast one. I'm now connecting you to some of the other entrepreneurs that i'm talking to and i'm realizing there's something about you guys that so special that i don't have the same sauce you deconstruct things to learn them. And that's at engineering. Maybe anew and there's a side note tangent but that's the other thing i was gonna say was it's the brand love peace and the building brands and the way you learned it the other thing. If you had your unlock on sorta copywriting human decision making mine was we went it coke and we studied how people fall in love so actually got love experts and pepper schwarzer name on today show every year. Thanks valentine's day. But she's really an expert on how people fall in love and what is so interesting is we were able to connect how people fall in love with how people fall in love with brands and the similarities are amazing. Would be the same right. Because we're just unions so that's right and we're looking for consistency right and then we can break the tie you screw up reduce sensitivity as i love you but only as i love you. Can you make you know. Are you good looking in the beginning matters. What are your values. It's all the same and it's so amazing and she was this unlocked for those of us that we're working on this project like. Oh my gosh if you just keep that in mind and because we all have had relationships whatever with your you know it's like you can't say you love me if you don't actually call me..

two things today day valentine
"messina" Discussed on Seeking Wisdom

Seeking Wisdom

03:57 min | 8 months ago

"messina" Discussed on Seeking Wisdom

"Are all hundred percent whereas all the ones that are in the top ninety seven percent awareness brands but a brand lake coke is got really almost high virtual brand love if you would and some of these have really high product love and there's a big difference that we could probably talk about but they become well known in our lives. Did you find that. I love the way that you learned at coke and i think that's the way i've learned of just like you're getting your in the deep end of the pool. You're forced to learn like you survive driving. It's not always. It's not comfortable right because you're always on the flying. Did you see a lot of people not make it through that process. Because i asked because they think a lot of times now when i'm talking people younger in their career. They seem to want these. They want the growth but they don't want the discomfort. That's a really good way putting. I think i mean you're an entrepreneur. So you're in another class of people who are can handle the discomfort but i do like white space and so i kind of said you know i found value to create. I didn't always follow the job description and on entrepreneurs you didn't even have a job description so you take the structure out altogether. I'm giving a little bit destruction. We like okay. So you sort of want me to hear How do i add value. Whereas they're white space and in their some discomfort in that it's actually also freeing because no one's done that before and i've liked being you know perceived over many of the jobs are coke for the first time. Somebody had those jobs and appreciated that. Because i think i can only count on my hand wandered to my ten jobs and coke was less than ten jobs. Jobs a coke that someone had a for me and it's very very freeing to do that and not have to walk in someone shoes but actually kind of create the new shoes if you would but there is a discomfort you have to thrive in and it makes objectives hard..

hundred percent ninety seven percent ten jobs less than ten jobs first time of people
"messina" Discussed on Seeking Wisdom

Seeking Wisdom

04:27 min | 8 months ago

"messina" Discussed on Seeking Wisdom

"We are back on seeking wisdom. And i have a special special gas. I'm a little shy today. Because i'm in awe of this gas. Her name is rebecca messina. Thank you rebecca for joining us. Thank you for having me. I get your autograph no way. I'm going to give the audience your background because it's so extensive embarrassing so i'm going to embarrass you. Embarrassed embarrassed all right. So rebecca is a global citizen. She's working for continental speaks four languages. I can barely speak english. So we're gonna have to dig into that and she uber's first ever chief marketing officer and we're gonna die into that but before joining uber she was global. Cmo of being son. tory. I hope i said that right. You'd nice and they own lots of things if you like to drink jim. Beam maker's mark and other brands are. We can dive into that. And then she spent a long time in coca-cola which i'm fascinated back and she's back in atlanta right now so we're going to dive into that and what she's up to now as a senior adviser mckenzie she's super fancy the fancier before we started this episode rebecca. I were talking about doffs buffalo chicken and sneaking into canada. That's right all that's true. So did you grow up. I grew up in the bronx as we know as many now i grew up in a very small town called batavia new york. It's about thirty.

rebecca atlanta rebecca messina canada batavia today first english mckenzie uber new york tory -cola about thirty coca bronx
JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

Can We Talk?

02:49 min | 8 months ago

JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

"Ovid is a dancer and choreographer from aden yemen. She moved to israel as a girl in nineteen forty nine and became a founding member of the inbal dance. Company marguerite recorded her oral history for the gemina oral history project. In two thousand eleven gimenez stands for jews indigenous to the middle east and north africa region that jewish communities thrive in for over two thousand years until the twentieth century. When a million mizraki sephardi jews fled and were forced out of the land of their ancestors. The san francisco based gemina is working to preserve that rich heritage and history producer. Asala sunny poor recently sat down with sarah levin gimenez executive director to talk about some of the stories in the archive as well as their own family histories. A saw worked with sarah on the archives many years ago sayre you and i worked really closely together while i was in college My very first internship ever was with jim messina and working on this oral history project. I like to think that it's what really launched my love of storytelling. I wanted to start by asking you. Why do you think it's important to preserve these stories as told in the words of those who lived it. So i am so happy to be doing this with you a saul. I think that judaism as grounded and stories like that is the legacy of our people. That's the foundation of haha. That's the foundation of what it means to be jewish as passing on stories Were the combination of thousands of years of stories and in regards to gimenez oral history project We collected stories of communities of people who who hadn't been given a platform to share. They hadn't been given a microphone. They hadn't been given an opportunity to talk about what happened to them when they lived and fled countries throughout the middle east. North africa and their stories are an incredibly critical part of contemporary jewish history. And where we are. Today with establishment of the state of israel nineteen forty eight posts showa post arab nationalism and uprisings in the middle east and north africa there was a major disruption of over two thousand years of continuous jewish life in the middle east north africa. Kinda came to an end and that is a huge part of the jewish story. And we have this very unique opportunity to collect the stories from the people who lived through this historical moment in time and it was an honor to collect these stories and hopefully add them to the record of jewish

Gimenez Aden Yemen Gemina Sarah Levin Gimenez Ovid Middle East North Africa Marguerite Foundation Of Haha Jim Messina Sayre Israel San Francisco Sarah Middle East North Africa
Countries eager to reopen countries as pandemic recedes

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

Countries eager to reopen countries as pandemic recedes

"Countries reliant on tourism a racing to re open borders and revive economies decimated by the pandemic the rollout to vaccines against Kobe nineteen is giving government officials in many countries new confidence to welcome visitors but time is critical Virginia Messina interim leader of the world travel and tourism council says summer is a strong season for most markets particularly Europe and the U. K. she really hopes to see restrictions ease soon I'm Charles delivers my

World Travel And Tourism Counc Messina Virginia U. Europe Charles
"messina" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

01:38 min | 9 months ago

"messina" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Do any.

Here's The Truth About Soy

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

02:14 min | 9 months ago

Here's The Truth About Soy

"Messina. Phd is here with me today. Welcome to the show dr messina. Thank you for inviting me. It's a real pleasure to have you here and this is a topic that comes up quite a bit whether we're doing the live. Qna's with viewers or. We're just taking questions in our mailbag. Everybody always wants to know about soy. There's so much debate surrounding soy. That has been so pervasive for so many years. Why do you think it is that. Soy is such a hot topic. Well there are lots of reasons and you're corrected his a hot topic and it's a controversial one in many respects one. Reason is that there are about two thousand scientific articles published each year on swipe foods so you think over the past twenty or thirty years. There's about fifty thousand articles. And if you cherry pick the data you're able to make a convincing argument for just about anything you want to say. But what's important is to look at the taliban of the evidence and to really focus on the human research the clinical study is the observational studies. And when you look at the human research is pretty clear. That's so i can make an important contribution to a healthy diet. And why is it that that animal based research doesn't necessarily always translate to human results. When you can make an argument that were so closely linked to other primates. Well i think it's pretty clear about first of all. Most of the research has been conducted in rodents and for all sorts of reasons. They're not a good model in general but especially because or especially in the case of soy because soy foods contain a rather interesting compound called eissa flav owns is aflame. Owns at come for why so much. Research has been conducted on soy and it turns out that the animals metabolize eissa flavors very differently from humans. Now animal studies are a part of the scientific literature but fortunately in the case of soy. They're literally hundreds of clinical studies that have evaluated not only benefits but also safety and also hundreds of observational studies. That have looked at those end points so we really have a wealth of information upon which we can make conclusions about the health effects of soy based on the human research.

Dr Messina Messina Taliban
Moderna announces COVID-19 vaccine trials for children

The Paul W. Smith Show

00:57 sec | 11 months ago

Moderna announces COVID-19 vaccine trials for children

"Vaccines, this time with Children covert vaccine maker Moderna is working on trials to test efficacy on kids. Evan Excell bank reports The drug company is now enrolling 6700 additional kids age six months to 12 years. To ensure the vaccine is safe for them to the key, says Johns Hopkins Pediatric infectious disease Doctor Allison Messina are one making sure they're still undeveloped Body's absorbed the drugs the way adults do, and to pinpointing the right dosage amount for smaller bodies with the fewest side effects. They go to younger and younger kids. What they do is they start with the best tolerated dose and in that adult group And then they'll kind of see if they do better at lower doses. Doctor Messina says it's still critical to inoculate Children because they can still spread it. In an interview

Evan Excell Allison Messina Moderna Johns Hopkins Messina
"messina" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"All right to Tom in Messina Park, New York apartment, Just plain Messina, New York. Go ahead, Tom. Hey, How are you? Well, thank you. I think it has a lot to do with the parents at home. There are enforcement her kids are teaching in that school is important. And where I come from the community here. It's a very poor community. It's the most forced me in upstate New York. And in funny it's just not available for sure. So we're just sure all way around it. Don't matter. Yes, some families can afford it or not. We just don't have Infrastructure where I am without you know it. Zorn Lee good to have the proper facilities. But there is no reason why you cannot get Decent of a decent education out of a school that may not be the richest school may not have the the best labs or the fanciest fieldhouse are like but again. I'm curious as to just what all you find deficient in terms of funding in your school system there that there would would prevent someone from learning. I'm in favor of of improving situations like that. But I don't know that this automatically closes the door to learning Tom. Is closes the door to a family that just can't afford the want to send their kids somewheres else. Or we did. We didn't mention the fact that often there are scholarships in the like available. I mean, well, where I am, And you know we're right on a communion border. We're in a Community that we'd have to travel three hours for a private school. All right. What do you say to a Tom Andrew? I think Tom brings up a really good point. And then in some rural areas, there are fewer options than there are in larger metropolitan areas. And that's just a reality. Um, I would say that I believe he was in New York. He's in upstate New York. Near the Canadian border. Yes. New York is one of the states. It doesn't have an online public school, which is something that would be beneficial open enrollment programs, allowing students to go toe, other traditional public schools and public charter schools, magnet schools, Those could be options. But I say all of that to acknowledge There should be choices there, maybe choices but also to say that if there are challenges in that school district, and there are deficiencies, and there is a funding disparity that absolutely should be addressed. I'm not on here being an apologist for poorly funded. Schools by any stretch there, enough more to come back in a moment. I worry about lots of things, my finances, my cran kids. If you're 65 or older,.

Tom Andrew New York Messina Park Zorn Lee
"messina" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"And so I'm doing afternoons and Jim Messina and Randy Meisner, who was the first bass player for the Eagles and sang with her later. Take it to the limit came into my studio one afternoon, right before that weekend. We were doing the fireworks. And acoustically performed. Take it to the limit. And your mama don't dance, And that's one of those things. Obviously, I have no record of whatsoever. I wish I've got it burned in my memory. I'll never forget it because it was so cool. I'm sitting here going This is actually happening right in front of me. 5 Ft. For me. Randy Meisner and Jim Messina are singing your mama Don't dance and take it to the limit in my studio. That was so cool. It was so cool and not a blank tape to be found. I know the feeling. I'm sure it was on a cassette air check, but God knows what happened to that. Fair enough. Oh, that's awesome. I got goose bumps. So what do you What are you listening to us on this morning, So this is cool. It's a Philco 41-2 21. And that means it's a 1941 Philco table model That happens to be the mini Me version of Jerry Jeff Walker Still co consul. Oh, it is an adorable little tiny version of the same radio much smaller speaker and Which that speaker is so small. Nobody can rebuild it. So when right now listening to you with three different speakers, each one using a different part make this sound, but it's working. So I'm reaching out the different folks trying to find the diarrhea. Replacement from a radio that is otherwise trashed, or I'll come up with a more modern equivalent. Although it pains me deeply to do so. It will still be a beautiful set Beautiful Cabinet, and I have a picture of Steve Uh, probably five or sitting on top of my Crosley prostitute 12, which is basically a radio the size of my fist on top of the radio the size of my truck. Um, if I can swing it at one of picture of this one on top of yours, because it's the same thing, All right, all right. Excellent. Well, listen, it's great to talk to you, as always, my friend and Any idea if you're going to be coming back into town before Christmas? What do you think the matter of fact, Next week is my last week for this year of working the day job, So I'm throwing a lot of stuff together and people who have possibly given up on me completely. We'll be hearing from me. And so please, folks be sitting down on the phone rings because you might fall out of your chair. Old old radio Ricky claws coming to town today. Alright, man, Thank.

Randy Meisner Eagles Jim Messina Philco Jerry Jeff Walker diarrhea Ricky claws Steve Uh
The Voicemail That Gets a 70% Callback Rate

Daily Sales Tips

04:05 min | 1 year ago

The Voicemail That Gets a 70% Callback Rate

"Most salespeople. Hate leaving voicemails. Now he asked him why most them say well because they don't call me back and reality is you're right. You're absolutely right. If you have the wrong voicemail. So the next few minutes. I'm a teacher my voicemail scripting that gets me over seventy percent callback where the have taught to literally thousands of reps over the last decade. You step by step exactly what to say how to say it. So as you'll listen to this only to really listen to the tone. And the words i say and also explain the why. It's so effective now. First off most within leaving voicemail at south something like this hey scott. It's marcus shannon with abc company. Hey i'm giving you a call. Because i wanted to show. His great solution has xyz benefit one time and calendar. Here's my number blah blah blah. Now you might get some calls back off that but it's usually pretty religious very very small percent. they'll call back instead. You want to shift it to this. Hey scott it's marcus. I'm calling in reference to abc company. Please going back on my cell five or one to two one nine nine nine nine again. Five four one two one nine nine nine. Thank you boom. that's it notice there. The tone it's firm. it's not enthusiastic. It does not sound like a sales person. So that by itself is a pattern interrupt. They're like ooh what's this all about. The second pieces knows how limited information you gave. I didn't say it's marcus chin. Said it's marcus when he say it's marcus or it's your name the first name the psychology behind is they recognized as a. How should i know this person So they're going through their heads into the voice mail now he's to peak some curiosity and then the piece is north. Korea didn't instead named company. You're working with us. Dropped a reference in our reference should be an existing company. You do business with so now. They're like oh what's this all about. So now what's happening is you provide a limited information. You're told is firm. You don't like a salesperson and now ukraine fomo in their in their mind fear messina. They're not sure why you left voicemail and as a results that will lead to a higher likely to them listening to it and call you back now. Have you also noticed as well. It's very short. Voicemail maybe fifteen twenty seconds long so easy and fast for them to listen to and be able to decide what to do next. And here's what's really powerful. Let's say for example. Yuli voicemail on a monday and you wait two days and you decide to call them again. Wednesday and you'll leaders zack. Say message again verbatim with nothing changing. Think about if you're on the receiving received to the same voicemail of someone standing firm and preliminary information in which their tone is creating. Its firmin's now your chance of them call you back increases. And what's amazing is when you do as consistently with every single voice you will see. You will get more calls. Because they're not sure why or call and when they're calling you they're guard is down and they're more open to the conversation okay and there are thrown off. That's very powerful state to have your project and when they're calling you and i promise you do consistently for every single call the exactly verbatim how i said the tone. You will get more called the ever gone before and i have had reps who say. I'm not sure i was going to work for me. But then they commit to for a full week. Every single the voicemail. They saw got more calls back than error. Of course more practice with tonality in the firmness you will see. Your converses will also skyrocket as a result.

Marcus Shannon Abc Company Marcus Hey Scott Marcus Chin Yuli Voicemail ABC Scott Firmin Korea Ukraine Zack
"messina" Discussed on RPM45

RPM45

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on RPM45

"To chill and find out who I was the picture that I get from when you talk about when you first auditioned him was he was very raw had no experience just seemed like a nice guy. How did he grow and change through that. Any was in the beginning very very eager to make his music and he was he was he was really a great partner. He worked hard. He just was one of these guys who was really really eager to express himself and to be creative. We want even more sophisticated as a vocalist. I think he was needing to be challenged more page him over the past ten years. You know, he definitely got to the point where as a vocalist phenomenal vocalist. That's his thing. His vocal is his instrument. He was frustrated with where I 1000 To go and obviously where he was seeing things going if you listen to the last album native son, his songs were extremely packed with instrumentation and vocals and stuff and I just have a name or philosophy about how music feels good to me. They're not that it's right. Not that it's wrong but I like cutting things all at one time. All of the logs have seen his stuff was cut off it all had the live performance feeling that we could then capture and take under the road but the same musicians and audiences with while get a chance to hear the music that they love away. It was created in from home with created it Kenny at the point where he'd like to overdub a lot when we got into the ladder album. The music was starting to get crammed over a range. So I think I'm beginning to sound overproduced which is my style becoming more and more his style and because I was a producer I was resisting some of the stuff and I think that was creating anxiety for him. I know it was awful. And I could see it one of the reasons why it was I thought it was time to go as he went on in life. I didn't spend a lot of time with him, but he seemed to change at least what I was hearing back from other people before he was a little more kind and easy-going and playful and as his voice became more sophisticated. So did he think his personality needed some more sophisticated and as he made more money, you know, he started to acquire desires for things that were expensive sort of out of the normal price range for most people and I felt myself moving in that direction one point in time and that's what I said. You know what I got to get back to my roots who I am and where I came from. That's why today I live in the country. I've got a dog I got four cats three jackasses bunch of chickens and a horse and I'm doing my own maintenance and fixing my fences and I'm cussing out every time I have to go out and do something I'd rather but it's what keeps me. Balance keeps me rooted keeps me in touch with my neighbors. It makes me appreciate what a plumber does what a carpenter does, you know, I do much of that stuff myself until I get to the point where it's over my head off. I called Pro and to do it, you know my fix most of my electrical until it gets to the panel. And then that's what I call the electrician but I think it's important most of my friends that I enjoy spending time with them pretty grounded and rooted in what they do. Their families are important to them, you know, their lifestyle is not about living with the Nouveau riche or going to the most expensive restaurants or Thursday at the most expensive hotels. It's about just living life and being part of the herd. I don't think any lives that way anymore. I don't really know that much about him any more so I I can't really tell you how much he's changed other than from when we stop spending time together. He definitely has went in a different direction both musically and lifestyle whether it's been good for him. I don't know how you left win at the end of 1976. And then you kind of chilled out for you said a few years. Yeah. I came back and started recording again in 1976 with the release of the album called Oasis. There's a song on your second album. I'm a big fan of is called loving you every minute. I thought that was a great song. We are going to put putting it back into the set here. I'm working on getting a keyboard player to cut start coming out and fact, I was just thinking of that but that that dude my head all morning. So so tell me and you're still playing obviously right now, we're all sucked but you've scheduled some things for what twenty Twenty-One or something like that in terms of performance package right. Now. We do have some dates on the books beginning in January 27th, sixth, I think but you know again, it depends on it depends on whether we can get this virus under control off. All of a sudden it's just all cost right up again. I mean, we'll listen. Thank you. You've been very generous with your time. And I really enjoyed talking with you and I've learned a lot from talking you so I appreciate it. Well, thank you very much. Thanks to Jim Messina and thank you for listening to rpm45 will be back again with another hit artists from the 60s 70s or 80s next week..

Kenny partner Jim Messina producer
"messina" Discussed on RPM45

RPM45

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on RPM45

"On getting a couple albums made a year with Kenny. And so I said, you know, I'll consider obtaining if she's willing then that's fine. But the important thing that you know, I need to say is that I came back here to be a poor choice not to be an artist again and advise long as I'm producing the records and that's understood and I'm happy to do that. I had that conversation with a client but she was an agreement. I had a conversation with Kenny, which he said hey things are wage. You know, let's keep it the way it is. So that was pretty much the birth of a Blog is Messina subsequent to the release of the first album, which was called sitting in with the idea of being that you were sitting in right now with the idea what I was just sitting in as big as hard as the mid with sit my ass out later, but it didn't turn out the alphabet the album. It was actually a Duo and a very successful one, but it was also time for me to McKinney went into this thing thinking he was doing a solo record as a solo artist and really didn't plan on doing a duet. Neither. Did I but it became clear after four or five years that he was beginning to suck kro, and and wanting another Direction the working with other people which means time, you know, it's time to do that. So this was kind of a mutual thing, you know, sometimes when we we hear about wage is breaking up you think of its acrimonious and all that stuff doesn't sound like I felt at this time. In fact, I'm the one who brought it up and I just didn't want to see this thing end with us getting into a huge. Dumb argument over something and I was tired. I was having a difficult time digesting food for had allergies all the time and under a lot of stress. So I just think that it was time took me take a break. I took three years to.

Kenny McKinney Messina
"messina" Discussed on RPM45

RPM45

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on RPM45

"In your career home? I was pretty between the Springfield and all the you know, all of the chaos and Poco and the frustrations. I just thought you know what maybe this band stuff is not something for me in the summer of nineteen seventy. I had made an appointment with Clive Davis to talk to him about the possibility of coming to work for them as independent producer. And at that time I explained to climate really tired of being on the road and I was just newly married. I lived three blocks from CBS and just felt I got the time to stay home and do some production work. So, you know, I chatted he's like one that you get this album done with poco wage. One More album to do get it finished, you know, get yourself replaced it'll even an amicable way so everybody's okay and we'll talk about so, you know when finished the record and the age factor is Paul cotton to replace me and I said listen to make this easier for everybody. Let's bring him out on the road and I'll teach him the parts. So he and I share a room and I taught him the parts but I was pledged so that he would be familiar with with it and on October 31st 1970 at the Fillmore. He took over my position as guitarist and nineteen seventy one thousand producing for CPS. Don Ellis had started working at CBS as a artist development for Clive Davis. Antonio's had approached me in the summer of nineteen seventy with the idea of what I'd be willing to listen to the brother of his friend and logins. It was a singer-songwriter consider maybe producing a so get a call from logins and he said listen, I understand we might be able to get together and I pray hear some of my music and I said, yeah, that'd be great. I said, can you bring some tapes home and we can sit and listen to him so he showed up for dinner my house. So he walks in and you know look at him and it has this really tall guy with a part in his hair and his jeans fit him like he had a load in a unique idea where them today a little too low and and a beer and I thought oh my God, this is not what I had in mind so he came in and we were chatting and they seem to be very person said, so can we listen to some mutations? Well, I don't have any taste I says well, did you bring your guitar? And he said I don't really own one. So at that moment, I kind of felt like I don't know that I really suck. Beer but I am in my house. Yeah, right. I went over to the closet and pulled out a a nylon guitar that I had in there that I spend time working on. I said tell you what here you go. I got a machine set up right here Thursday to my sits in Stereo sit in the middle. There's a guitar, press that button when you're ready to record then show me what you got. Well, what have you been doing? I mean before this. I mean, how did they find him if you if you didn't need a guitar and and I mean he didn't have tape. Well, what was he doing before he met with you? What he had been doing was working for a as a staff song. I understand, you know what they needed a demo or a song or song written for Elton John or whatever because he has this incredible epicotyl. He could twist his voice to sound like whoever we wanted to sound off on Russell or you know, Elton John he could do it. So he proceeded to record Danny's Song how to cook order a couple of other things and so we had dinner and chatted at night and he left and wage. Ask my wife I asked her. What did she think any cuz she goes well, he's he's interesting I said, yeah I said but you know, what? What am I going to do with him? And most of these songs are folks shows that the quote wait times over he had a wonderful voice and could do the Blue Eyed Soul could do the country could you know really had a grasp of music cuz he was a real music lover and appreciate her home and was was was willing to step out of this thing too, which was important. So the more I began to work with him. I had some songs that I would working on after Poco and we had house at Pooh Corner and we had a Nissan which I felt if he was given the right material in the right opportunities, we could make a great album. So I cut a demo on the whole record. And once I had it the arrangements the way I walk I took and cut it up and sync with it. Like I would be releasing the record and I turned out into Clive Davis climb up the material used to but there's one problem. He said it sounds like you're playing on this thing on the line is dead. William and I just have to understand that case number never had a banner employed abandoned and he need needed to erection. He needed musicians that would listen to what was going on in my life. I think the only way to have done that was to get in and be a part of this given what I just said, you know, he needs some help on this first or what I'd like to suggest is that I sit in with him on this album wage and go out with him in the first tour so that we can get things organized and get an agent to get his manager get everything set up and try to make the state special as possible Clapton like the idea that first page cuz he said, you know, I've had too many bands that we've done an album and the bands break up because they lose somebody and I said, well, I understand that I said, but it's much different than and I said, I'm not going anywhere. I'm organizing this so that it will be as successful as it can and I said there's been.

Clive Davis CBS Elton John Springfield CPS Don Ellis producer Paul Antonio Pooh Corner Clapton William Danny Russell Nissan
"messina" Discussed on RPM45

RPM45

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on RPM45

"A deal and it was right there and then subsequent to that is when the Davidson have been working with the sungai engineering to the Buffalo Springfield. So you might want to consider working with him. So they put me on the date. That's what I started working with about those Springfield my engineered their second album. And then on the second album or third album, I should say they were starting to make it off their bass their got busted. They needed to hire a bass player. And at the time they didn't even know that I was in position. I got this opportunity. I thought that maybe I could raise my hand application for the Springfield is our bass player too. So when it came time to audition, I would have plugged in my base. We lived to got about ten bars twelve hours into the first song even looked at them. Like wow, you know these parks and I thought to myself of course, I do been working with you for a year and half any anybody with half a wit would have been booted. I think I think so brain dead. So they hire me because I knew all the tunes and I was there and it seemed like a good deal for everybody. So then I became their bass player and engineer and in somewhere in that period of time. I got a call from Ahmad erdogan said he wanted to ask me if I would consider producing the Buffalo Springfield and I said well why me and he goes well they seem to trust you and they they need a producer and they can't seem to find anybody and I'm very comfortable working with you if I took the job. So you're a member of the van and you're producing at the same time, right and that's on the third album. And that was the third off the album needed to be done. You know Neil was off doing what he was doing to even you know, I would work the sessions for him to get him recorded in the same thing for Richie except with Richie was a whole lot more Hands-On to get his music recorded captured and edited into that album. My focus was on producing an album getting it done and delivering it as I said, I would change. , turning in Atlantic Records, that was my job and problem is called last time around which is very descriptive in this case. Yep. Yep. Yep. That was the last album they made and then move onto..

Buffalo Springfield Davidson Springfield Ahmad erdogan Neil sungai engineering Richie Atlantic Records engineer producer
"messina" Discussed on RPM45

RPM45

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on RPM45

"And it's all Technical and data and numbers and everything fits together in a formula. I was cursed with having a little of both so often times it's almost feels like I have a schizophrenic brain where it doesn't know whether to be creative or intellectual or vital actual or creative and sometimes it gets stuck in the middle, but still obviously you've both is not that you're lacking anything. You got both sides. Well, I got both sides but it would be nice if I had one whole it says a 2/2 pack of always feeling a little half empty with some vital you were producer and 17s unbelievable to me and.

producer
"messina" Discussed on RPM45

RPM45

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on RPM45

"Hey, this is Marcus off and this is rpm45. Jim Messina has done at all when it comes to making music. He's been a recording engineer record producer singer songwriter and guitarist. He was a member of Buffalo Springfield the pioneering country rock band Poco and the hit-making duo Loggins and Messina on this week's rpm45. We talked about all of it all through high school. I had a band would be paid 6200 bucks and then divide that up between the five of us in a gasoline was a quarter a gallon cigarettes for $0.25 30 sets of those days. So you get a sense of a price as was you know, my first car was 75 bucks off. So, you know, if you could earn, you know fifty bucks on the weekend. Well, it does pretty good stuff pretty good stuff for being in high school for sure. I mean you on a weekend you can turn it up money to buy used car off. Did you get four seventy-five bucks? I'm just curious. I got a 1948 Chevrolet two-door sedan that had been painted Frost white, all spray cans and I actually bought the car from Jim Webb the songwriters father Bob Webb and Jim Webb and I went to high school together. He was a grade ahead of me and years later. Not only did he sell me my birth car. But he also he was a precursor. So he married me and my first wife and Jim Webb married my wife's sister. So you played throughout High School you made some pretty good bucks doing it and not what cannot eleventh grade honors about 15-16 the guy by the name of Larry Goldberg with audio Fidelity wanted me to make an album and I made this album. It was supposed to be what I would call to let me double meaning that's just the music would be on there. But by the time it was finished they had other ideas. They wanted to call it Jim Messina and his gestures and the album was called garage doors, and they had put all this friggin tractor Noises Off. Beginning and ending of the songs was just was rumor going away, but they friggin do that. So by sixteen I had an album out and then by Seventeen, I I had been discovered by a guy named the new Clinton Edwards who was a DJ working at a Cy radio come to see me and asked me if I would be willing to work as a producer for him company had called Ibis records an independent label. In fact, I don't really know what that means when you want me to do and he said I just want you to listen to the music and make sure that the musicians are playing it the way you want them to play it and then we'll open put you together in a studio with an engineer wage see how they come out and you're how old is this time? Seventeen years old. Wow, your album that you recorded was that with the same guys? You were playing all along with you mean in high school? Yeah back up until the end of high school. I had the same guys after that. I took the drummer with me to La as a we lived together to try to see if we can you know, Make it has musicians but he later had to spell out cuz he you know, he needed to earn money and he wasn't getting any work, but I continued on and produce records for this guy until until the company you shut down. So that's where I got started in micro with the engineer. We became friends and he said Hey, listen, why don't we team up and maybe produce some records together? So we we did she tried to get Talent which we did and then we produced another act and then after that it was it was getting tough to just make a living like was having a hard time. I was having a hard time. I just needed to get some work. So he started training me to do engineering work. I began getting my skills as an editor learning how to operate machines helping with maintenance alignments and then he got me a job working at Bob Ross music working as an engineer and eventually just learned by experience how to operate the studio and then might got a job working in building a studio for a dog. Folks you literally wired it up. Yes, Mike and I did wired it up from the mic and put panels into the console into the preamps lineups. Now the faders out the patchbay into the time machines and through the speakers. It was quite an exciting thing to learn how to do.

Jim Messina High School Jim Webb engineer Bob Webb Buffalo Springfield producer Marcus Larry Goldberg Clinton Edwards Loggins Bob Ross Mike La editor
"messina" Discussed on Kinda Cute Podcast

Kinda Cute Podcast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on Kinda Cute Podcast

"This episode has been a little sexy cuz this one's this upcoming articles a little sexy to gets a little naughty x-rated if you will. Wow, so, it's Hollywood's best Chris. It's simply doesn't get better than Christmas Cena bison jitu Singh Kurtz. Now I had to talk about this article because a while back we talked about Christmas, you know being the best Chris I believe is another sanjita article so clearly she feels strongly about this. We talked about that in episode Twenty Eight to be exact if you'd like to go back and give it a listen for a little context home. So soon Gina is just that lucky bitch that I admire so much I love her writing and she gets to interview every celeb Crush of mine and recently she got to zoom with Chris Messina now, he's Conveniently the battle of the Chris's is ongoing, you know, the Bland white bread. Chris's and there was recently another Twitter discussion that cropped out a about which is the best which is the worst. And as you said happens with this Chris Evans one and Chris Pratt wasp, but the sad part of all this is that Chris Messina is never even included on these Chris lists. So I very much appreciate this article and sanchita alerted me that Chris told Forbes in 2017 that he simply loves working with the women and I mean honestly shouldn't everyone loved walking with women. We are delightful there should be more women bosses more women CEOs, that's a story for another day. But I know you guys agree and he says I'm talking about the roles. He's played he says in addition to the sweetness of the nice guys that made him famous. He's got a lot of quote Anarchy and anger in him. He just needs a place to put it off. But then that is negated by this next part, which is a fun fact. I never knew maybe you guys did it said he only ever wanted to be two things and actor or a dancer he competed for Mr. Dancer the United States and its hero is still Mikhail Baryshnikov, the legendary Russian American ballet dancer. It was kind of like Billy Elliot meets The Karate Kid people didn't quite understand it. He says if a past life, he'll still take a ballet class now and then and when he sees a dance show on T. He'll stop to watch it. I love watching dancers. He says with a smile you can tell so much about a person by the way, they move it's such a vulnerable mode of expression. Let's break that down a little bit. Have you guys heard of Mister Dance of the United States? Is that like an old-timey thing or am I just behind the times in the dance world? And then Monday? He says that he loves watching dancers, which I agree with. I mean there is something hypnotizing about watching the dancers. I am still very deep into Dancing with the Stars. Don't worry guys. Just because I don't necessarily need talk about every week. I am still very much invested sky this week was dressed up as Doja cat and she looked so gorgeous. I just I just love her and I know I've said this on here before but I met Mikhail Baryshnikov sudden once because he was best friends with one of my friends in college and I really like to just keep that fun fact in my pocket because that is the closest I will ever get to a Sex in the City Star because he.

Chris Chris Messina Mikhail Baryshnikov Chris I Chris Pratt Chris Evans Singh Kurtz United States Hollywood Billy Elliot Twitter Mister Dance Karate Gina Doja Forbes Stars
Robust Fit to Nature

Data Skeptic

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Robust Fit to Nature

"I enjoy bringing neurologists on the show from time to time as I'm going to do today. In invariably I work in some sort of question about how different the brain is from the machine approach to intelligence. How apples to oranges? These things are in many ways that's fair, and we may eventually develop Agi in some exotic way that bear similar resemblance to our existence, just a computational process that exhibits this property called consciousness who knows but as often as I say it's apples to oranges. It's I. Don't know honey crisp to gala or Fujita red. Delicious Carl Sagan said about Apple Pie the point being that. If you frame it this way, the brain is a highly over parameter. Is the machine yet? It's still learns pretty well. We also have artificial machines that are highly over parameter. That's a complication for us there, so maybe just maybe there's a roadmap somewhere in here and things like evolution in urology can point the way forward. Along. This week on the show. I'm talking to reassign one of the authors on the paper, robust fit to nature, an evolutionary perspective on biological and artificial neural networks. Can't. My name is Alexa. I'm Apple Festival. Neil scientists. According to Department at Princeton, university, or can you tell us a little bit about your specific interest? Within neuroscience, we study out the human brain function in the real world, severely using naturalistic setups and care a lot about our people communicate the thought people, non woods and neuroscience and fields. I may be more familiar with like computer, science and machine learning. Certainly, there's some overlap and collaboration, but we're not known for collaboration per. Se yet I know for meeting some of your papers in particular the. The robust fit to nature paper. We're going to discuss. You have a strong fluency in these tools, so I want to ask you. At what point did you become interested in machine learning so relatively recently, I was saying the last five to ten years. What is unique about my? We understand other brain is operating in life, not realistic setups, so we really don't usually use a lot of the control experiment that are used in cognitive sokaia Daniel signs so most of the modeling and competition. Competition Walk in our food was not given to us because it was never applied to listrik setups excitedly sounded like a black tool in in Messina attention to have modest that sort of cognitive problems. For example you have minded cocoon is faces as good as humans. Instead they ask why these like new models are coming out of fill in computer science. Oh, by companies start to slow cognitive problems in life and second to ask out of this mother's relevant to kneel. Scientists are quality. There's. There's a lot of I. Suppose perspectives on this. Certainly the way of human learns in the way machines currently learned I guess some similarities, but they're quite different. Are we even in a place where we can have strong discussions about this, or is there something exotic Lee apples to oranges about the way machines in the human brain work? It's a good question I think. If you ask most of the people in my field, they will say well, not so, what actually really relevant to in? Kings? It was so different and if you look at the Tilles, that people use now to think about the way and psychology and cognitive functions it will also look very different. But the more we looked into this modernist related, actually that they might be to the same family of models as human brain and amusing details, family of models to say that the obviously a lot of differences between biological networks in official neural networks, but we now think that they might belong to the same family of and broadly speaking. What is that family? Can we characterize it in some mathematical way? We. Can I take what unique about? It down models. What is the time to act down model? The title understand and let me explain if you think about go back to the example of faces face net is a model tied to give the proper name, the Labor of the name of the face. We Batticaloa image. If you think about language modern, it's modern to predict the next world in sentence or complete a sentence if you think about driving a car. To drive, so if you think I'm GonNa, sit downing. It's what I to act in performance. Pacific function and they don't think down what a tight to understand the world. To Act in the world, and we stopped to think that the brain also have is like when without desire to act now brain designed to acting six and not designed to understand the situation, and this is very different perspective. Perspective of must people in our field I think actually the to understand other lengths factor so I will give you an example Devesh simple example in I. think it will help us to think let's say I. Five Thousand Points that will simple from Pablo, if a student of mine will come we ten thousand parameters to predict it's like. Like ten thousand nine points or not scientist. He didn't gain any understanding, Abud, on the next track so I really unappreciated if he understood that Pablo can be monitored by CLAMATO.

Pablo Carl Sagan Fujita Alexa Apple Festival Apple Batticaloa Neil Princeton SE Messina Tilles Scientist Daniel Abud LEE Official
Former Congresswoman Katie Hill Does a Postmortem on a Lost Congressional Seat

Hysteria

09:05 min | 1 year ago

Former Congresswoman Katie Hill Does a Postmortem on a Lost Congressional Seat

"When the news is bad? I know that it is tempting for me to tune out but I also know that sometimes examining bad news and figuring out how to learn from it is a good thing so with that semester. Monaco and I are starting this week. Show with the conversation with former California Representative Katie Hill. Katie resigned from her seat last October and in a special election last week a Republican one bomber. So where do we go from here? Let's ask Katie are welcome Katie Hill. Welcome back to hysteria. We're so happy to have you back. Glad to be back. Thank you first of all. How are you doing man That's like a loaded question. I feel like I'm you know I'm I'm okay. The results the election were pretty horrible. You know in a way it was of what we were expecting. But you obviously didn't ever want and at you know it's just like one thing on top another in life in in figuring a way to get up in Russia yourself off in new forward was I was again when I was a kid. Reverses a still own a horse and the biggest thing that you were taught was being you fall off you get back up and get right back on and that's just kind of against what length is so drilling down into that trauma? A little bit last week was was the special election in California's twenty fifth for everyone listening. What happens and were you surprised when you say what happened do you mean why did we lose or yeah yeah why Jillette. Why did why did why did she was. Yeah well I think the biggest chapter honestly is just people in a special election. Democrats don't show up and you've got the rented. Republican base. That was particularly riled up because of my scandal and excited the opportunity to take a seat back. I mean that was that was literally what they were plotting. They were trying to you. Know to find something they. They found something. They exploited it. They got me to resign and this officers their opportunity to take back. The seat they felt was stolen from them in the first place remember. It hadn't been held by a Republican ever in its current form and they really did not think that it's possible for someone like me. Let alone any Democrats there So I think that they really rallied around this opportunity and from what we know they actually did some very despite the fact that you hear them complain all the time about ballot harvesting. They had some very organized efforts around ballot sting and Them for figuring it out. Because like you know that's to me it's about helping people be a but the churches were really mobilized in getting people to providing drop off centers. And saying that they're gonNA mail to use of swing by the church in you know do it in your car or whatever and we just didn't have something like baton. I think you can also partly attributed to the fact that Democrats were pretty disenchanted by things right. Like you're GONNA be really really frustrated works so barred and felt like you were. Finally I heard over a felt like you were finally represented and have all go away. So quickly is is really disenchanting. Should okay so there was a special election in California's twenty fifth special action in Wisconsin. Seventh both know that these are anecdotal elections in every district is different but you can still kind of extrapolate things on a maybe on a larger scale from this like. Do you think that Democrats should see what happened in your former seat special election as a wakeup call I do. I think that it shows that you remember mine was one of the Houghton quote safest swing seats right. Hillary Clinton when by seven. I want by nine. This isn't one of the seats that should have at risk. So what it means is that you know. Depending on what things are looking like November especially depending on the energy that's coming from rate than district's length. The ones that we flicked that were that were ones that that trump won by sixteen points are really really wants. We need to watch out for so we should give up or stop paying attention to the house just because the Senate is looking like it's within reach or obviously presidency so that to me. The biggest of all first and foremost the second is that as we are adapting to this Nalen strategy. How we doing that right? Field is what has been our strongest most important. Get out the vote effort right and that's modified I don't take. You should give up on it all together. I think they're Balkans Altogether they have they have a different base of people who they can go soo and again reliably that will reliably answer their phones that they can you get to things like drop off ballots churches. But we're GONNA have to modify field programs to to frankly make sure people know how vote by mail. When they have many many of them have never done it before especially in these lower turnout areas of to begin with which are usually the most. Democrats held Katie. Beyond even just in. How do we re engage the Democrats that helped you win by nine points when now they're also facing the pandemic childcare challenges on employment and things that are just like so catastrophic question? I think I am hopeful that the loss actually was a wakeup call for a lot of people might have thought like while the seat will be fine. Now they're like okay. I have really have to bow part of I mean honestly. I think that the the district itself is democratic leaning enough now that if we get to turn out that you know is usually expected in November election. I think she will win. And we saw we saw it happened with the ossoff special in Lucy. Macbeth one in general. I think we're GONNA see that in this case but it still. You know it's something that can't be taken for granted in terms of the support that I had the volunteers mobilized rabbit. I think that's that's going to be the same thing right is how do you figure out ways of ways of getting involved? That may not mean. Move leaving your house And how do we get people excited about it? Especially when the Senate is in play in California and the The obviously dilatory votes are going to be there for Joe Biden. No matter what so. I think I think it has to be like maybe you know maybe the Gee let's get so excited about meeting the seat back because like that. That as it's more like Oh you fuckers. Hello and stand up and what's ours okay. You said the word motherfuckers. Let's expand on that a little bit because we we chatted briefly about this About this race and how it personal it was to you and how personal it was considering the person who ended up winning the seat. Can you talk a little bit about the people who helped promote Christy Smith opponent short so the first person the first slew of images that came out was through the publicly came out was through red? Sti His enemies are images of You. That were released without your consent without taking taken without your consent. Got It and the only person that could have done. That was my accent. Spin obvious denied it. And so it's a it. So that started at Red State. The person who published those who who was the investigative reporter has been a longtime Republican operatives in the region who writes I guess on side. Honestly don't really know what I know that writing as is not a full-time thing for her and she had worked for one of my previous owners. She worked for Steve Night in the past and the day after the day. After I resigned she endorsement ARSIA There were a number of other people who were involved and again. This is information as circling through like facebook groups and drew a the random people that are on the ground in. It's not it's not like a niffer court case starting to like that bitch so many of the people who were supporting my sem from the beginning. We're the ones that need new. Had the photos and some of that is actually on logs. There's still posted out there. A Joe Messina. And things like that so I think For me that that was the biggest thing right like it was misleading. That my favorite before all of this came

Katie Hill California Senate Monaco Facebook Joe Messina Hillary Clinton Russia Representative Houghton Christy Smith Wisconsin Steve Night Joe Biden Macbeth Investigative Reporter
"messina" Discussed on Cap It!@Lindenwood

Cap It!@Lindenwood

12:30 min | 1 year ago

"messina" Discussed on Cap It!@Lindenwood

"Hey how is everybody? Hi Dr Elder how you Doctor Levin how are you? You wouldn't really good we are. We are virtual again today. I she will reality -ality it's really good. I mean it's you know it's it's a just offers another whole. Ho venue you know another whole approach to this which is really really allow defying that yes. I couldn't agree more. Yeah so we have. We have guessed even even though a virtual we have some guests today right yes and we are so grateful for our guests and are very important gas so important especially during this time are wonderful librarians from the Lark. We Have Megan Pfeiffer Davis who is in charge of outreach e learning and Nancy Messina's our director of Reference Services. So welcome. Both of you thank you so much for being here. Thank you for having us. Yeah in your so kind today. Because I'm we're GonNa talk about something that today that can be can be role challenge. I think for some of our students and I think it can take a lot longer than What students make it might take? And that is what's going to be the topic right right. Definitely scary topic. Finding I think is one of the scariest things for me just to start off. What do I do so once once I know the topic? It's so easy to research it but Knowing the topic is the hard part. So that's what we're here to help a little bit with you so you just take it away and give you know. Give our listeners. Some some great tips on what they can do to fully develop their topic using your resources which are vast. That's that's the lucky part of Berlin with students is how many resources are available that they may not even know exists I let Megan start. Okay wonderful this something. I always tell students that is super important coming whether it's Undergrad master. Add level is picking something that's of interest because when you pick a topic that you don't like you don't want to write about it you don't WanNa Research. It is not going to interest you while you're reading so that's always like the number one. I went for my season psychology. And so when I was in my Undergrad I realized I really love rain. And drizzle sounds bad I really like greenies and so there's this disease that is from hitting your head will times multiple concussions. We've seen it in the NFL in its chronic medical up the idea. That's what I wanted to research when I went into Grad School while I'm so the other thing that get super important is getting a connection with other experts in the field so you can develop that topics so once. I knew I was super interested in that younger. Kids are getting concussions. We have brains of students that have died or pass before they're eighteen and they're having that same neurodegeneration that we're seeing an older adults so that may be context or should be relooked at a younger level so that was something. I knew I wanted to do so. I didn't know what to do with that. Right big what do I do so when I got my visor I was able to sit with them and talk through everything that was already out there. He knows the literature. He knows where the holes are he was able to say. Do you like this. We want to go this route. I know this person over at the University of Arkansas connected with them and you can help vote topic so really working with your connections to develop a topic as good as well I Know Nancy had a student in the school of ANC because that's one of her groups on that was doing the same topics and he was asking for research help and she connected him with me and so then him. Ira able to kind of develop this ISA's in a different way. You interested in Developing his topic more towards the broadcasting in the the being aware of what's hostilities can happen or the long term effects with a professional and collegiate athletes so working with your experts. So whether that's your professor An advisor at Your School of. It's your principle. If it's a librarian they will be able to say that you think about this route. Can you go this way? Hey there's this whole here. Let's do that and then also reading the literature so looking into the literature and saying you know what that limitation bothers me. I WANNA research that further or you know they. They did this but I would have done it with a different tests or different measure and taking it back to fix that whole artistic set issue that House Nancy because we have the same thing so an instant well and one of the things looking at the literature. Sometimes it's really important to look at what dissertations are what these are out there. Like what has been done or what has been recently done Or what has been done? Maybe been the last thirty years but maybe needs an update So to look at some of the resources we have so we have P Q DT dissertations and theses. As one of the things that you can look at All Linden would dissertations or put into the open area But then we also have pro dissertations and theses which is You can get kind of a snippet of those so Some of them. We don't have full text but you can get an idea so those are two different resources that you can look at to see what has been done To See if you know. Are you on the right track Has this already been totally developed? And you're not going to have a voice in it So I think that's something really important when developing your topic is sometimes you have to look out there to see if you can if your voice can add to the scholarly communication the big pool of all of these things. So definitely as you're developing your ideas and thinking finding those holes is really important to looking at the resources that are out there The one thing I wanted to say is that For any of you. That are working on their working on your dissertation or thesis. Wile working a job. Think about how this kit. How your topic of my impact? Your job So by sister-in-law. Just got her. Add and she did a topic that she could study in her classroom so something that she had a she was very passionate about and she could look at her classroom setting. She could find other colleagues that she could study uses study pool. And you go through the hull. Irb process. Don't get yourself in trouble there. All those don't get yourself in trouble but But I think that the really important thing too is to think about. Why are you? Why do you want to get this doctorate? How how could this impact your job so I think that's really important to topic finding I what I just love what you just said. Why do I want this degree? I think that's really that's A. That's a big at the big component to all of this. Because I think he can really shape your topic And I love your other idea of you know finding finding the whole what I'm saying what what doesn't exist and that can only be found by reading reading reading. You know yes such such wonderful advice from both of you and Megan. I really love you talk about speaking to experts and I think you know as we've you know sort of adapted to this a virtual meeting plan you know I think it's a great opportunity to reach out to maybe experts in the field. But maybe we wouldn't normally reach out to you know so as you're researching There might be an expert out there. Maybe at someone. Who's written a dissertation? You know as you talked about. Nancy you know. Hey here's an opportunity reach out to Who's written a dissertation that you really That speaks to the topic that you're interested in you know. Hey maybe do zoom call or even an email And I mean I think we probably should can do that before previously this for the crisis but I decided right. Temporal maybe a little bit more eager to to reach out in in sort of this virtual This virtual environment. But I think that's great and The a inmate in looking at those recommendations for future research in those dissertations is that place for your dissertation in an at exactly where you're working. Is there a a a place where your dissertation can fit all wonderful ideas of it? Well and I would agree with you on and don't feel like you can't reach that no one that you can't reach out in this environment or even before this environment Because one of the things that I find with students that I've worked with is that they. They're they're willing to ask me but I'll say. Hey so you found US great research but they. They know the person they want. I said have you. Have you tried to reach out to that professor or that author And say no or even a museum. I mean a school district. I mean all of those I will do it for them because I feel like sometimes people are afraid but it is such a great resource to just reach out and I will say most of the time someone emails me back when I reach out. Sometimes I check that they do Or how fast how fast they will respond to you know. I'll send it to some museum that I know almost nothing about And they will come back within. It'll say oh in four to six weeks we'll get back with you and within a couple of days. I have answer and I just think that's so important so don't be afraid to reach out Sometimes are there like right now with finals and all that maybe not the best time to reach out it might take locker but no it still an option that you should keep on the table absolutely you know even this is just a just a fun story to Kinda like tag onto what you just said. Is that what are the? What am I students that I that I was able to share she? Her her idea came from the book that we were actually using in the course and I did say well you should just find out the contact email hem and see see what he thinks that he ended up actually being on her committee which was really awesome right And so you just never know when it's GonNa land up right right. Yeah I love that idea you know look for people who could service as experts on your committee and possibly even a you might find incident or someone that could help you create the instruments use for your study so which could of course work with the help with reliability and validity for your study so even.

Nancy Messina Megan Pfeiffer Davis professor WanNa Research neurodegeneration Dr Elder director of Reference Services All Linden Grad School Berlin ANC Doctor Levin NFL Ira Wile University of Arkansas Irb advisor
Connecting in isolation: Indigenous people create, find and share community online

Unreserved

05:53 min | 2 years ago

Connecting in isolation: Indigenous people create, find and share community online

"Are you missing being able to talk to your co workers face to face longing for the days when meetings didn't use zoom Google hangouts or other technology my next guest is embracing her virtual work meetings? Scour Nadi in her team meet in the virtual world second life for work the Mohawk artist is the CO founder and CO Director of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace or ABC Tech. She's joining us for Montreal. Did tell us how it works. Hello Greg so describe your virtual indigenous world. What does it look like about? First of all it's called Atlantic Island And when you arrive with you're wearing your avatar in Atlantic island. The first thing you see is the celestial tree. Most of the things you'll see on optic. Ireland are parts of sets that I made with my wonderful team for Messina's that I've made in Michigan Amazon movies shot in a virtual environment. Like a video game. So you have this beautiful celestial tree which from my movie about the creation of the donor schone creation story But surrounding it now are some benches that you can sit on to so that you can enjoy the tree or chat with your chat with your fellow. Avatar It's in a kind of a plaza and all around in our different places you can go and look at. There's a museum of the future I call it. There is the wonderful campfire with the adirondack chairs. Around the MUSKOKA chairs around it. There's also another little corner that has a traditional pre contact longhouse side by side with a long house of the future and three sisters garden growing out in front. Well that's a sounds lovely and we're going to be posting a few pictures on our website at CBC dot ca slash unreserved. So people can see what it looks like for themselves. So whose idea was it to have a meeting in the comfy chairs around a big fire. Actually I can't remember exactly which member of our team suggested it. It was my dream. Come true though I have been I've been hanging out in this virtual world for quite a while and I've always seen as a space that could be used as a community space especially far. You know our communities who are spread out like as indigenous people were spread out across vast territory noticing North America. I could see this as being a place where we could come together and meet in an embodied way if we couldn't fly somewhere you know and talk about our issues or just visit. You know awesome so now. That more and more offices are moving to online meetings. What do you think the benefits are of this? Virtual option that you've created you know. Zoom is fine. And that's great but you know you. Do you really have to show all your workmates? Your apartment on your possible messy bedroom. You know you can set yourself up in a shared space and you can also put on. You Know Your Best. Avatar in your hair will be all done near makeup. His all done. You can be sitting in your underwear but you know wearing we're close. There's an added extra bonus for me. I believe in why you know one of the reasons I like to hand in a virtual world like this is because there's like a fantasy element I mean in this. I've built this world with again with the help of my amazing team. I've built this space. That's like it's an indigenous space. Where else do you get to hang out around the celestial tree? Yeah I think it's so it's it's just beautiful for me thing to be able to share with other people with the People. I'm working with and you know we're not We're not a business so to be in a space that allows us to continue dreaming and imagining is very beneficial. Less sounds amazing. I for one would make myself twenty pounds lighter and my brain's be perfect every time. Yup You can do. That isn't that it is so. Is this virtual space open to visitors? As a matter of fact it is However you might show up there Zana and you might like not know quite what to do since you're a new job in our language so you might kind of walk around and you might find it you might. If you're lucky you know how to walk around but you know you might not quite know how to interact with things or you might feel kind of lonely talk about social isolation if you show up there for PM and no one's even there. I'm then happened a lot. So what we decided to do is to set up. Activating active island. Which is the weekly time slot that we make sure we're in world so one at least one of our team is in world at that time and they're there to visit with you or show you around or tell you all your avatars. Here's actually on backwards. Let me help you you know. And and that's turned out to be a nice way for people to get into seeing the space but You know I think again imagining what the space could be and conversations have happened as well so I invite you to come on Friday afternoon. Two thirty you know we have a web page. Www DOT AB tech ab T. E. C. Dot land and that. Be that webpage. You can figure out how to visit US awesome while I will be sure to To get my best avatar outfit on and come visit Awesome thank you so much for your time. Today you're very welcome

Atlantic Island Google Co Founder Montreal United States Greg North America Abc Tech T. E. C. Dot CBC Co Director Of Aboriginal Terr Michigan Muskoka Social Isolation Ireland Zana Messina Amazon
Changing the Healthcare Space with Voice Technology with Dan Messina Co-Founder & EVP of HandsFree Health

Inside VOICE

02:50 min | 2 years ago

Changing the Healthcare Space with Voice Technology with Dan Messina Co-Founder & EVP of HandsFree Health

"Now Dan. You've been in healthcare for over thirty five years. You've been the CEO of Magellan. House the CFO AETNA HOUSE. And you served as a partner of health advocate which showed for nearly ten one hundred times. Excuse me of the outside capital invested. And I'm curious. Why did you begin a journey into healthcare so many years ago and then why in the last few years did you decide that the next right move was to found lead a voice based healthcare company? A great question. I mean I think that I wish I had some really glorious story to tell you but the fact that matter results in the right place at the right time I had been with AETNA and Cigna in the late eighties early nineties and during that timeframe there was a big transition from multi line insurance coverage to healthcare and healthcare began to grow rapidly and I was right in the middle of that so gaming opportunity to be part of the process of transitioning CIGNA and Aetna from their multi line offerings to just healthcare and you know put me in a healthcare world. Which was you know? Maybe a lot of sense balance sheet perspective but I don't think necessarily it was beneficial for the end users perspective and all these companies grew rapidly and You know worked for them but I think the members found themselves facing a lot of difficulties in trying to figure out the healthcare process. That's what led to help advocate about twenty years ago me and others from the large health plan companies realize that the to get through the healthcare process was nothing easy and we thought whom better to help them figure out their way through the maze that people to help contribute to the maze and so we started health advocate opposite. Frankly couldn't believe how successful that company became basis form. It was simply a company that was providing any response and you healthcare question. Any individual may have nobody that twenty year span at grew from two forty four million members with over a thousand employees and yes we were able to sell it for about one hundred times. The invested capital was which was obviously very impressive. That then let me two hands. Free health with my colonel the other CO founder of the company hands. Free Health is really in some respects like health advocate where it's responsive to questions that people may have but it does in a voice recognition fashion voice responses service. We think that voice response is a direction that the whole country's going and healthcare is kind of catching up but getting there right now and of course. Healthcare has unique difficulties voice response because of the terminology and being able to convert that terminology voice. You Know Bill Gates. I think twenty years ago the healthcare the content is key and I agree with that and and Between the content and the voice. There's no simple task and I think that's one reason. Healthcare is behind. But if you look at all the stats. Everyone's growing dramatically voice annoys people are increasing utilization voice so it makes sense to have health be part of the growth model and that's where hands free health does come into

Aetna Cfo Aetna House Cigna Magellan CEO DAN Bill Gates Partner Co Founder
Tips To Prepare For The Coronavirus

Short Wave

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Tips To Prepare For The Coronavirus

"Are we got some really great questions from listeners? And I want to start with this one from Mattie Park in Ventura California okay. I'm just wondering how many people who get the corona virus actually die. How dangerous is it? Really? How much more likely is it to lead to death than the regular flu? You know. I'm afraid we might be whipping up some hysteria about this disease. Well I would say that. The good news is that so far. Most of the illnesses have been mild in China. Eighty percent of the cases have been classified as mild. This needs symptoms such as you know a dry cough may be a low grade fever something similar to a cold or perhaps the flu now. The death rate is estimated to be about two percent and this is really important to point out. It means that ninety eight percent of people who get this. Don't die from the virus right. Mattie asks how this compares to flu well the answer is that flu has a mortality rate of about point one percent or about one thousand. But here's something to keep in mind. Also that I think is really important. This two percent estimate is really provisional. It could be off. I mean early in an outbreak the sickest people are identified and there may be people with more mild cases have not been accounted for so that could throw off the calculation and it's possible that the death rate is even lower mean here in the. Us There are only a small number of cases but so far there have been no deaths and the people who do die in China tend to be older. The average age is in the seventies and the thought really is the people who are already in poor health due to medical conditions or habits such as smoking. The day are most vulnerable are their symptoms. That people should be on the lookout for and how are people who are sick actually treated sure well? Early symptoms include fever dry cough. Some people experience fatigue headaches less frequently. There's diarrhea the treatment is typically what healthcare professionals would call supportive care and that really just means giving medicines to keep a fever down making sure the person stays hydrated so plenty of fluids now shortness of breath can develop and that would be assigned. You need medical attention in a clinical setting. They can use a breathing machine to assist with breathing now. There was something that a bunch of people wrote in saying that they were confused about and that was something that Nancy Messina of the. Cdc said yesterday Yes we are asking the American public to work with us to prepare it in the expectation that this could be bad okay. One listener heard that in wrote to us. What does that mean exactly? It's completely unhelpful. Bottom line is what do we do in a practical sense? I completely get that. I think big picture here. There is no cause for panic right now but now is the time to prepare as we just heard the. Cdc says it's a longer question if if it's now when now we won't see outbreaks everywhere all at once in this country it could be cluster in a small town or maybe in the middle of an urban area. We don't know but think about this the way you think about preparing for snow storm or a Hurricane. It may not come. It may not happen but if it does you'd be smart to prepare. You may want to have some extra food in your cupboards have basic medications such as Aspirin Ibuprofen on hand. I spoke to Rebecca cats. She's director of the Center for Global Health Science and security at Georgetown University in this situation. If you have widespread virus in your community you may not want to go to a public drugstore. You may want to figure out ways you can distance yourself from other people. You also may want to think about what you do if your kids schools are closed. What is your daycare backup? Plan talk to your employers about working from home. Think through the details of that. It's really just about good

FLU Dry Cough Director CDC China Mattie Park Fever Ventura California Mattie Hurricane Nancy Messina Rebecca Aspirin Georgetown University Ibuprofen Center For Global Health Scien
Algorithmic Injustices: Towards a Relational Ethics with Abeba Birhane

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:46 min | 2 years ago

Algorithmic Injustices: Towards a Relational Ethics with Abeba Birhane

"Welcome to the Tuomo. Ai podcasts thank you so much for having me Sam. I'm really excited about this conversation. We had an opportunity to meet in person After a long while interacting on twitter at the most recent NRA conference in particular the black workshop. Where you not only presented your paper. Algorithm ick injustices toward a relational ethics Best Paper there and so. I'm looking forward to digging into that and some other topics but before we do that I would love to hear you kind of share a little bit about your background and I will mention for folks that are hearing the sirens in the background. While I mentioned that you are from University College Dublin. You happen to be in New York now at the ES Conference in association with AAA I and As folks might know it's hard to avoid sirens and construction in New York City so Just consider that background are mood mood. Ambience background sounds. Cosso your yes. How did you get started working in a ethics so my background is a cognitive science and particularly a part of cognitive science cord embodied cognitive science? Which is which has ruled. Seen A in cybernetics in thinking. The idea is to focus on on the on the social on the cultural on the historic In kind of view cooperation in continuity with the warrant with with historical background in that in as opposed to you know your your traditional approach to cognitive which just rates combination as something located in the brain or something formality. Something that can be computed so yet. So that's my background. Even during my master's I lean towards the AI. Ice I'd of Koebnick science the more I dave into it the more I much more attracted to the to the site to injustices to the social issues. And so the more deputy goes on the more. I find myself in the that they takes site. Was there a particular point that you realize that you're really excited about the ethics part in particular or did it just evolve for you? I think it just evolved. So when I started out at the end of my master's in at the start of the day my idea is that you know we have this new relatively new school at thing way of thinking which is imported Kokusai which I quite like very much because eighteen sizes you know ambiguous eighties in Messina and contingencies. As opposed to you know drawing create Clean Boundaries and so the idea is yes. I liked the idea of redefining competition. As something relational something inherently social and some think that is continually impacted in influenced by as our people ended the technologies. We use so the technology aspects. The technology end was my so initially. The idea is yes. Technology is constitutes aspect of aspect of article. You'll help the famous nineteen ninety eight thesis spy and Clark in the John Muir steak standard mind where they claimed in. The iphone is an extension of your mind so you can think of it that way and I was kind of advancing the same line of coats but the more identity into it the more I so yes ditch technology with its you know computing such as face recognition systems on the streets or your phone wherever yes it does. Impact in the does continually shape in reshape. Our mission in what it means to exist in the warrant. But what became more and more clear to me is that not everybody's impacted equally a the more privileged. You are the the more in control of at you are as to what can influence you end what you can avoid. So that's where I become more and more involved with the attic solve computation and its impact on cognition. The notion of privilege is something that flows throughout the work that you've presented at blackened. Ai Our make injustices paper and this idea. This construct of relational ethics what is relational ethics. And what are you getting at with it? Yeah so relational ethics is actually not a new thing. A A lot of people have terrorized about it and I have written about it but the the way I'm approaching it the way I'm using it is. It's I guess he kind of springs from at this restauration that for many folks who talk about ethics or or fairness or justice most of it comes down to constructing these needs formulation of fairness or at mathematical calculation of who should be included and Who SHOULD BE EXCLUDED? What kind of do we need that sort of stuff? So for me relational ethics is kind of. Let's let's leave that for a little bit late. Zoom out and see the bigger picture and instead of using technology to solve the problem stats emerged from Technology Self. So which which means censoring technology late instead center the people that are people `specially people that are disproportionately impacted by the limitations or the problems that arise with the development and implementation of Technology. So at there is a robust Research in economic fairness or go to speak injustice and the the pattern. Is that the more you are at the at the bottom of the intersection level. That missed further away from you are from you. Know your stereotypical White Sis. Gender made the more the bigger the negative impacts are on you ways there it's a classification or categorization or whether it's being scaled in scored for by hiring algorithms or looking for housing or anything like that at that the Maury move away from that stereotypical category status score the more. The HABE that they embarked his own use. So the idea of relational ethics is kind of to to to take from that perspective to to take that as a starting point so these are the groups are these are the individuals that are an much more likely to be acted so in order to put them at at advantage or in order to protect their welfare. What do we need to do? So the it's died is to start from there and then ask for wishing instead of saying here we have this technology or we have these Saito Algorithms constellations. How do we apply them? Or how do we then use them to to you? Know for Beta or a fair outcome and sometimes the answer you arrive at. Is that a particular technology. Shouldn't exist in a given form. Yeah right exactly exactly. So I think one of the downsides of an obsessively working on and some matrices or some equations on fairness is that you forgot. Forget to ask in the first place do we. Should we even do this in the first place and I think some people have articulated this really? Well you can think of this. In terms of that you know face recognition systems that are becoming very normalized in common spatial in the states. Do you feed at your face. Recognition Algorithms with diverse data in order. So that it recognizes everybody equally or do you stop and think do we actually need face recognition systems in the first place.

AI Twitter Tuomo NRA University College Dublin Koebnick Science New York City Saito Algorithms New York Messina John Muir White Sis AAA Clark
Brown Sugar: A Tribute to Hip-Hop

This Movie Changed Me

03:49 min | 2 years ago

Brown Sugar: A Tribute to Hip-Hop

"I saw brown sugar. I was completely taken over by the music of course it's the first thing you notice about the movie the wonderful wonderful tribute to hip hop and owed love letter however you want to call it hip hop that permeates every scene in movie this because eight chess turn but the thing that carried me through watching it over and over and over again was the relationship between Sydney played by Sonali Johnathan and trae played by Taye Diggs. Their relationship is as equals not something I grew up watching calms. It's not something that I saw men and and women respecting each other to other as if they both believed each other to be intelligent equal human beings and their relationship gave me hope for what love could be wasted US whereas Philip Too potlucking at the block party you remember. I beat machine boy. You thought You d nice not our eight. Oh eight this simplicity provides a fine line between eloquence. That's implying. This has a dope. Line was my first published article. I can't wait for you to come out when you left I went out to. La Times every Wednesday a Yo com go to the park and read. It made me feel closeted love brown sugar. We begin the movie with Sydney entry as kids first learning and falling in love with hip hop and this love of hip hop is what connects them throughout their life. Sydney becomes a writer and editor of powerhouse hip. Hop Magazine Andrey gets into the recording recording industry. He's the man behind the artists and he gets into this field because of his love of hip hop but both Sydney Andrey are struggling to reconcile this. It's ideallic love that they have of hip hop with the reality. Did you sign a new act without consulting drake. I saw and I had to sign the man Never Messina. Shit like that a black and white rapid duah. I know they go here Kamal Man. You know that's just a gimmick these guys they have like no skills just straight it up. Why now I saw last night a real MC. This cat deserves a shot. He came with the real original real real hip hop given them. I'm trying to sell records to people will actually buy them so I need a boob. Who's going to be able to give me that M. T. V. rotation baby now been akin ran and ten the heat of future Babe Eminem. He paved the way they gonNA be like Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder Paul McCartney and and Michael Michael Jackson. Are you serious. Yes you really want me to do this. If you want to work for a millennium records that's what we do here. We make hits as we see hip hop grow and change we also see Sydney Andrey grow and change and it was this intertwining of love and hip hop that really spoke to poet Nick George in fact when lead producer. Maya emailed him to talk about brown sugar trigger he had this to say when I first saw brown sugar. Both love and hip hop. were new things to me. I thought I understood both I also thought their utility in my life was simple and yet through this movie. It became apparent that both are unpredictable. One of the major themes is evolution and allowing a thing to grow beyond what we thought we knew you about it.

Sydney Andrey Sydney Line Taye Diggs Kamal Man Stevie Wonder Paul Mccartney Michael Michael Jackson Sonali Johnathan Philip Nick George Never Messina Trae Writer And Editor Maya M. T. Producer
Gulf Of Mexico And Florida discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

00:12 sec | 3 years ago

Gulf Of Mexico And Florida discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"Man almost lose his arm to flesh eating bacteria after a fishing trip. Florida went fishing in the Gulf of Mexico and pricked himself with a fishhook. And then you got a flesh-eating

Gulf Of Mexico Florida
"messina" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"messina" Discussed on The Takeaway

"This is politics. Amy Walter on the takeaway. There is this great quote in the old days saying, I'm not a member of any organized party democrat, and we pride ourselves on being the big tent, but turns out either being a big part, right? Because there's people in the tend to say things, you don't agree with. That's Jim Messina and the former White House deputy chief of staff and campaign manager to President Barack Obama and that tension Jim is referring to there. It's been front and center for Democrats all week after freshman democratic congresswoman Ilan, Omar said this. In this country that says in his Kate equal to push allegiance afford country. I want. Why is it? Okay. Me. The talk of the influence of the ouray of fossil. Fuel industries are big farm and not talk about our full Oppy that is influencing house. Omar is referring to Israel there. And her comments were interpreted by many as antisemitic. These days Jim Messina is mostly working on international campaigns. But he sees a parallel between what's happening in the United States Congress, and what's happening in the labor party in the UK where Jeremy Corbyn. The labour leader has refused to condemn vitriolic antisemitic remarks, and there's a big war going on in his own party about this. And so these are going to happen. I think the Democrats have to do is remember that we are the big tent and picking a fight with ethnic groups, any ethnic groups is not the right thing to do. And when people do that in our party or out of our party, we should call it what it is which is wrong and ridiculous. Of course, not everybody sees it that way the minute two women arrive in congress. They're going to get attacked his antisemitic. If they're critical of Israel, which they are many Democrats are also frustrated that instead of spending this. This week promoting their signature anti-corruption voting rights, Bill HR one. They've spent it debating anti-semitism within their own ranks, others are frustrated by what they think is a news media obsessed with finding and exploiting any divisions within their caucus to drive clicks, an eyeballs the day new mall to the saga came on Thursday afternoon resolution that condemned hate against many groups, including Jews and Muslims was brought to the floor stand as a very strong supporter of Israel hatred for the children of Israel is a very special kind of agent. That should never be watered down words matter for generations. They have had dangerous consequences for me for my family, and for my people every democrat, and all but twenty three Republicans voted in support of it. Helping us understand how we got to this point. And where it goes from here is the New York Times show. Cheryl, gay Stolberg in twenty twelve Ilhan Omar who was not yet a congresswoman issued a tweet in which she said Israel had hypnotized the world with its evil doings by the time..

Israel Ilhan Omar Jim Messina Congress congresswoman Ilan Kate Amy Walter Fuel industries deputy chief of staff President Barack Obama New York Times Jeremy Corbyn White House Cheryl Bill HR United States UK
"messina" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"messina" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"You can preorder my book the MVP sheen coming out late this spring, though. Reserve your copy right now, thanks to Bill Higgins, or his editing assistance. And we will be back to talk to you very soon. After the last song, I'll leave you with a parting word for my mother on the topic of Yankees newly admitted to the hall of fame. Ben you up to Messina. Right. Remember that sandiego? It was like the weekend before it was like before nine eleven remember any of that time. He was one strike away from a perfect game. He's like the intellectual right member of Mensa. I'm surprised he got in though, aren't you? He was good. But not great. Right. He was great. Oh, he was that Rivera was unanimous. Yes. Is that a yes? Would you voted for? You mean because of the way he lost the series that time never seem to have much confidence in him. I dare grudge. Well, would you voted for? Yes. You would've voted for him. Right. Yeah. And did he deserve animus, if you're clearly great enough to get in you might as well, be unanimous? And do you you know, I had wanted to go find his restaurant and Yonkers or wherever it was and see them. I remember every time he came in. You would go Mariano here. He comes again. Well, I had a reason deny because he lost one time. He lost a very important time. I don't mind if he was a hundred times, but there is a terrible Ross. Right. I mean, it had an effect Neela to make one mistake. I allow when mistake just not big mistakes. A come on anyhow, I got I gotta run.

Rivera Mariano Yankees Bill Higgins MVP sandiego Neela Messina Yonkers Ross
"messina" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"messina" Discussed on KTRH

"Out divine completely. So at this point. It's like I'm expecting and hoping to get a lot of grapes this year. But I was looking for some guidance on on pruning is I don't know how to prune grapes or what to do with them. You have a suggestion there. Take a trip up to Messina off. Where he could trip up to Messina Hof. And they're doing it right now January through the first February's their time to pruned grapevines. And if you've got one of the kinds that they grow. Then you can learn from them visually about where to prune and exactly how to train it. But usually January February is the time we prune dormant grapevines here in Texas. So the house and the training, you know, it's we really need to learn from the experts they've been growing for over four years that same kind of great bind up in the brazos valley. Okay. And you're going to have to forgive me. I'm having a hard time understanding where you've never heard of Messina Hof. No, okay. Right. This almost spell it for you. Emmy SSI, Anna. Okay, Messina and then the second word Hof H O F one of the largest, Texas wine producers. In all the state of Texas. They're like number one two or three and they have a place in Bryan Ryanair easy to get to. Okay. You go up to ninety highway six exit old reliance road and follow the signs to the winery. And basically if I go you go up there and take the tour and. If you can get one of the the tour guides who've been doing it for more than a couple of years that they all take you out to the vineyard, and they show you their pruning perfect makes sense. Absolutely me trying to tell you something that you could visually. Go see doesn't make sense by do know that January February because I know they're pruning right now up at Messina Hof. A.

Messina Hof Messina Texas Bryan Ryanair brazos valley Emmy SSI Anna four years
Bill Snyder, Holly Rowe and Brett Farve discussed on College Football Live

College Football Live

00:17 sec | 3 years ago

Bill Snyder, Holly Rowe and Brett Farve discussed on College Football Live

"Slide efforts here. That was Marie is that's all that. Oh, oh, yeah. Holly sold out. Maria. Maria was weeks. All's that was. Holly winds job Ali. Yeah. Ruffling. Gentlemen, effort,

Bill Snyder Holly Rowe Brett Farve Clemson Maria Taylor Browns Brett Farr Saint David Pollack Clemson Camp Bill Schneider Debo Sweeney Marie Levi Messina Espn Baker Mayfield Mark Joey ALI
Colombia set for combative runoff with divisions over peace

Morning Edition

00:22 sec | 3 years ago

Colombia set for combative runoff with divisions over peace

"Old civil war divides we mentioned this because columbia just recently ended a fifty year old guerrilla war and its first presidential election since the peace accord replays some of their old divides two candidates made a run off one of them a former leftist guerrilla the other a right wing candidate who does not like the peace deal at all john otis is in bogota covering the election for npr news either job hey it's good to be here steve so the right wing candidate who i guess got the most votes right yvonne duquet a largely unknown until recently associated with this president it was really tough on the rebels and then you have this former leftist guerrilla who's he and this is gustavo petro he was in fact part of the m nineteen guerrilla group which disbanded almost thirty years ago in the past colombians would reject leftist politicians like petro because they figured they were still closet guerrillas but now that the major colombian rebel group farc has disarmed under the peace treaty it's opened up a lot more political space for leftist like petro petro has promised to govern on behalf of the poor but his critics are now trying to paint him as a dangerous radical loop plans to adopt some of the same policies that have led to food shortages and hyper inflation in socialist venezuela right next door so things really are getting quite polarized here between the right and the left ahead of the second round election well are things so polarized this peace deal which is not very old could come apart that is a possibility steve petro strongly supports this peace treaty but duke as a big showing on sunday reflects a growing frustration among colombians for the peace accord it ended a war that killed two hundred twenty thousand people and vastly reduced violence but dookie claims it's too lenient on former fighters for example those accused of war crimes are going to be able to avoid prison under the packs of duke as promised to rewrite this treaty others think he might end up focusing on economic issues but either way he easily won the most votes sunday in polls place him as the favourite going into the runoff on june seventeenth thanks very much that's reporter john otis in bogota like many american manufacturing towns messina new york hemorrhage jobs in the past decade gm and reynolds metal closed aluminum company out coa downsized but now messina is banking on a new opportunity to boost its economy crypto

Colombia Gustavo Petro