17 Burst results for "Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society"

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:30 min | 4 months ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"There's an organization called the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. They've been taking care of cats and need for 25 plus years and I thought it would be nice to showcase the organization. Here's Lauren Glickman executive director Lauren The pandemic has put stress on all of us, including our feline friends, and your organization is here to help we do adoptions. You know, people can surrender their cat to us or bring in a stray or trap of feral and they Can bring it to us, and we will do what is needed for that cat. We also do Spain it or we have a cat Mobile, and this programme covers the North Shore, the South Shore, Central, Mass, Metro West Merrimack River Valley and some of the greater Boston area. Everyone who comes onto the camel will be given exam either spay or neuter Rabies vaccine for cats over 12 Weeks of age and FDR, CP vaccination and a nail trip. We have a calendar on our website, People can just sign up. And then they show up and get their tactics. The other thing that we do is we have a program dedicated to keeping pets at home a lot of times, especially right now where people some people are really facing hardship. They may have a medical bill for a cat and they can't afford it. And we have a program and that the funds Evan flow, But when we have funds were able to support people so they can give their tax that care they need. And keep them rather than surrendering them because they can't afford tooth extraction or something of that nature. We also have the forest program, which is a feline assistance resource is in support program, and basically, it offers subsidize veterinary care for low income cat owners. We really think it's important to keep families together, especially during this time, so.

Merrimack River Feline Rescue Lauren Glickman cat Mobile West Merrimack River Valley FDR North Shore executive director Evan flow Spain Boston
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

01:48 min | 5 months ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The You've tuned into the community cats podcast. Ready. Let's go. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I'm your host Stacey Lebaron I've been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats I. Hope these interviews. We'll help you learn how you turn your passion for cats into action. Today we're speaking with Anna Raines Anna has been involved in animal welfare in its various forms for about ten years she was introduced to human wildlife conflict during a semester abroad in northern Tanzania where she studied conflict on the borders of national parks. When she returned, she began her professional career in animal welfare as a wildlife rehabilitator at large facility outside of Atlanta supervising the rehabilitation and release over two thousand wild animals per year. This is also where she was introduced the concept of complaint mitigation and the importance of spreading the messaging of coexistence after leaving the wild and wonderful world of wildlife rehabilitation, she worked as an animal control officer in Metro Atlanta primarily working in. underserved communities of inner city. ATLANTA. She found herself back on the frontline of mitigating animal related complaints. This is also where she was introduced to the concept of tr and he kept programming. She saw a huge area of need within the community and when the opportunity to manage the best friends community cap program in Cobb county became available she jumped right on it. The C. P.. In cobb county brought the save rate for cats from a sixty two percent save rate to.

Anna Raines Anna Atlanta Cobb county Merrimack River Feline Rescue Stacey Lebaron Tanzania officer
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:55 min | 6 months ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Tompkins are thrilled to announce I. Ever Online Feline Leukemia Educational Day to be held on July eighteenth from ten am to five PM. We will have a wonderful group of speakers schering their expertise around feline leukemia plan. Speakers Include Amy Cole Becker from Best Friends Animal Society Dr Julie Levy from the University of Florida. Brittany Fox over from Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society Danielle Case From Tree House Humane Society Dr. Heather Kennedy from Casey pet project. Project and Monica Freshman from Austin pets alive. Really Hope you'll join us on July. Eighteenth from ten am to five PM to register for just twenty five dollars go to www dot community cats podcast dot com, and Click on our virtual education tab and you'll be able to sign up today. Please join US please learn all that you need to learn about feline leukemia and make those adoptions happen once again, go to www dot community, cats podcasts dot com sign up today. We'll see there. So we were chatting a little bit before we hit the record button for recording the show today and you're a one man show and we talked a bit about fundraising and I've certainly done a lot of fundraising. When I was running the Merrimack River, Feline Rescue Society I would say I spend about eighty percent of my time on fundraising, and then twenty percent of my time on. On operations and stuff, and you and I are very different personalities and I know many people who have our trappers, and or out there and like I said to you earlier I would do everything in my power in order to avoid being out there at one o'clock in the morning and trapping a feral cat, because I tend to like to be asleep by nine thirty and. Grant. Well before going out and trapping cats, and that's the beauty of this business is that we all can work together and find are different roles and being better and stronger or Asians one of the things that you've set up in order to try and help your one man team at this point in time is a patriotic page, and I'm actually only familiar with Patriot pages, because it's used in the podcasting world for monthly sponsorships to help support podcasters, but you're using it for your nonprofits i. think it's a really interesting fundraising idea. You want to share a little bit about for with the page is all about and how you have it set up. When I first started at an have a monthly subscription or donation, things set up. Pretty horrible, but Donations, to be honest with you and I are randomness. Heart I really WANNA do it. I knew my strengths that the Patriots on page helps does is basically a monthly subscription where my page Wednesday they donate an in return. You get just different absent out stickers and Serbs to that degree and then exclusive footage so a Lotta Times some.

leukemia Merrimack River Feline Rescue Feline Rescue Society Merrimack River Best Friends Animal Society Tompkins Amy Cole Becker Dr Julie Levy Monica Freshman Tree House Humane Society Brittany Fox Dr. Heather Kennedy Austin University of Florida
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:51 min | 10 months ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The you tuned in minicabs podcast writing. Let's go welcome to the community cats. Podcast I'm your host Stacey Lebron. I've been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing. People were improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We're speaking with Elaine Spencer and Melanie Gardner. Elaine is a lifelong animal. Welfare advocate and in particular a devoted cat enthusiast for many years career and travel obligations did not allow much time for hands on involvement other than volunteering for a local pet adoption group. However in the last year and a half things have been quite different. In the summer of two thousand eighteen. She became a member of T. town. Pnr An all volunteer nonprofit dedicated to resolving the feline overpopulation crisis in Tulsa Oklahoma. Since then she served on the board of directors and gotten involved just about all aspects of the trap neuter return operations. She is the lead support for the grant writing efforts and she partners with another team member. Melanie Gardner to provide. It support this past. Year has been a whirlwind of activities including grant writing trapping attending conferences presenting classes on cat socialization participating in fundraising events and implementing software applications in our free time. Elaine volunteers for a local rescue in adoption group and is often. Fostering any number of cats and kittens much to the Chagrin of her twelve year. Old Cat. Palley who is also currently leading an effort to getting a ban on declined. Cats passed in the city of Tulsa. Ordinances Melanie is vice. President and a board member for T- town tr whose mission is to resolve the feline overpopulation crisis in Tulsa Oklahoma through spay and neuter of community cats utilizing humane trap neuter return protocols since two thousand and fifteen t town are has fixed three thousand seven hundred fifty five cats with a goal breaking year of one thousand three hundred seventy seven cats in two thousand nineteen thanks to the tireless work of an all volunteer team generous donors and dedicated clinics five years ago. Melanie was inspired by the work of tiny kittens in British Columbia Canada to find out whether tr might be the best way for her to make the greatest personal contribution toward addressing cat overpopulation. The answer was and remains today a resounding yes in addition to a fulltime career as an it analyst and systems engineer. Melanie dedicates her. Free time to all things cats most often helping people who started out as complete strangers evolved into friendships with tr. It is her passionate quest to help cats and the people who help them Melanie's involvement in Tian are compasses..

Melanie Gardner Tulsa Elaine Spencer Merrimack River Feline Rescue Oklahoma Stacey Lebron T. town Elaine T- town Palley analyst British Columbia Canada President Tian systems engineer
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

10:39 min | 10 months ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"To engage communities and get involved in the effort. Puff or pause up for felines is a small but mighty initiative born out of the instagram rescue community. Puff is designed to make connections with rescues across the country and increase rescue accessibility to underserved areas while also making a local impact and encouraging to do the same in their communities. Outside of Puff. Elise works in the mental health field with underprivileged people and is working toward certification as a humane education specialist and spends her nights watching. Hgtv marathons with her husband and her two cats Khloe embel- elise welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. Yeah so before. We JUMP INTO DETAILS ABOUT PUFF. Tell us a bit. How did you become a fan of felines? Well I think that probably plays a pretty common way for most of your guests. You know I grew up having cats in my house and I just fell in love with from the Gecko so as I got older and became more involved with the health of my cats in my home I started getting involved with municipal shelter. I learned how to trap neuter return early stages of this was back in the early. Two thousand love just kind of grew from there. I went to school to be a social worker and through my time working and mental health. I've realized that at underprivileged as the people are that I'm serving so are the homeless animals or the community cats in my local area. So that's kind of where that got started. After I graduated college I had put my community cat. Love not as off to the side but I guess kind of on the back burner a little bit to focus on my career and then I started following kitten lady on Instagram and it just reignited that flame right there. I got involved. I started getting more and more involved in the rescue community on instagram using the hash tags to connect with people who were needing someone come out and traffic or to foster a. Catholic showed up in their yard and really utilizing that platform to connect with people who needed the assistance. That's wonderful I mean we've had a couple of interviews with some organizations that have really taken advantage kitten. Lady obviously is one of them will zweig yard at flatbush. Cats has also really created very huge presence on instagram. You know what is it about instagram? I mean I understand their hold of visual. Everybody can take a million pictures of their cats and post that information up there but why instagram versus some of the other social media platforms. What is it that really you gravitated towards that so instagram seems to be more of an instantaneous Experience to me. So the connections there so far reaching it's a very very global network where the facebooks twitter's they are global but many of the group seemed to be more localized instagram. What I liked about it is that I can connect with somebody who is in California. I can connect with somebody who's an Indonesia or in London in help them connect to other resources. So Puff Cat. Did THAT START ON INSTAGRAM. Or was there something else on instagram. A different logo or name or just your own personal account. I'm trying to figure out how you went from instagram. To puff cat. Was there something specific in there? And I think I may be sharing my age right now on the podcast and the fact that I'm a little bit instagram ignorant. So I apologize. If I'm not understanding everything fully no so I did start originally with just my personal instagram and that was when I follow kitten lady and I started following other fosters and I realized as I was falling more and more that they were kind of taken up a whole fee so I created a separate account. I named it. Khloe and bell. After my cat's just why could have in instagram? We're on looking at the cats and then another one where I'm looking at my friends and then as I started following more so to get more involved. This isn't really my cats instagram anymore. This is for rescue. This is for foster and I renamed it to what it is. Now pitter-patter pause and that's kind of where puff was born. I have two separate instagram accounts. Now I have my pitcher powder pause and I have a cat rescue. We utilize both to to maximize reach. So tell me. What is Puff Cat Rescue? And what you hope that. It will grow into so puff. Cat Rescue is a volunteer foster based rescue. It's a grassroots effort building. It completely from the ground of we are a hundred percent donor-funded no investors new corporate interests and originally the idea was to focus on Massachusetts cats whereas where I'm based out of Massachusetts and we realize as we were growing that the resources are there but they're very hard for people to connect to especially for more rural areas. Underserved areas are having trouble connecting to rescues to help out with the community. Cats and their locales so we were still focusing on that direct care initiative with tr with the fostering but we really want to develop this network an actual network maybe like a social media kind of thing where rescues are members they can go on and any person in the country can go on and see a list of the resources in their area or resources that will come to them and help out even if there's none in their immediate area so how would this be different than some of them are regional programs. Best friends has like best friends network. And there is a Maddie's pet forum out there and then there's facebook pages for the Massachusetts Animal Coalition that you mentioned is this something that's even more grassroots than sort of what those larger organizations might be offering. Yes I would be bringing in mostly. The smaller rescues though is independently. Run one or two person just trying to make a difference really bringing them into it so that they cannot expand their own reach best friends. Aspca those are great organizations. And they're doing wonderful work but we still have a lot of grassroots rescues. That need support that. They're not quite getting so the aim for this is to get them the support that they need so that they can support the people in so when you're saying they're not getting the support is it money. Is it help volunteer help? Is it items stuff? You know food supplies. Do you have a specific list? Or that's to be determined by. The groups is to be determined by the groups. I mean I would think it's all encompassing. There's rescues at have great donors. They have that cash flow coming in but they don't necessarily have the volunteers to support the volume of cats in their area. So head of all encompassing you know it sounds like you did the foster care and rescue. I is that correct. That's correct and we are still doing that. So it sounds like based on that you felt like there was something lacking and that's why you're creating this next level and it's interesting because back in the late nineties for me. When I was answering the phone at the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society all the time with people wanting to surrender their cats or questions about cats etc. Yeah so many people outside of our local area wanted spay neuter assistance for community cats and everybody had to pay one hundred twenty five at that point in time per cat with a private jet to get a colony done and so you know. I knew we couldn't set up another adoption center. You know in all these different communities but I thought well we could certainly do some subsidized free spay neuter for any FERAL CAT. That came in trap needed to be spayed or neutered. So we would start. We started our mash style clinic. So it's basically based on experience you sort of our understanding what might be missing. And what's needed going forward? You know looking at this. Are you creating this network? How is the database being put together or? Is that just a very linear thing will be accessible to everybody. It is going to be designed to be accessible to everybody. The aim is going to be to create a whole new social network where people can get on an engaged maybe like facebook maybe similar to instagram. Where we can make individualize groups prestige lists prostate? We really want people to be able to directly contact each other not just through email or phone calls but instant messaging route chatting so that they can reach as many rescues at the same time as it can trying to streamline all of the connections that we try to make us rescues into one platform. Hi everybody early bird. Tickets are for sale for the two thousand Twenty Online Kitin conference which will be held on June twelfth through Fourteenth Twenty Twenty. It will start on Friday night and then it'll run all day through on Saturday and all day on Sunday speakers that the national kitten coalition have lined up our Chris. Roy Dr Cynthia Delaney. Emily Carl Dr Aaron Doyle Heather Svoboda Michelle Lynch Arden More Carolina key Dr Karen Ver- now Dr Linda Jacobson Kirsten Jenky Dr Mardi greer Miquel Delgado Monica friend. Nicky Harris Simone Kelham Taylor La brea or just a sampling of the folks that are going to be presenting during the weekend. So it's a huge lineup. It's a very exciting weekend. We have go to. Www DOT online kitten conference dot com. Get your tickets today. The early bird price of fifty dollars. This is a weekend not to be missed if you can't be there though it's okay because there will be recordings available. If you do buy your ticket early can get access to those recordings for about sixty days. After we released the recordings don't miss out join us for the online kitten conference. We'll have trivia fun. Lots of excitement online KITTEN CONFERENCE DOT COM. See you then. Technology animal rescue yes. There's an APP for that. Check OUT UBER. Dot Com where you can connect with over twelve hundred organizations and twenty seven thousand volunteers across the country. Do Burt is fully automated. So you can create transport requests for the animals that need a ride across town or across the country. The system automatically notifies the volunteers and manage the sign up process for you DUBAR even has powerful integrations like importing your animal profiles from shelter love and shelter buddy or automatically pushing your transport request to your facebook groups and pages but that's not all do bird has a fundraising module an online store and auction house. Where you can sell your items and even mobile APP on both android and apple for those people on the go check out DUBAR DOT COM to get signed up for free today and start saving more time. Well you save more animals. You're also talking about potentially doing some events. Are you thinking in person or virtual or you haven't thought that far yet or designing them to be more in person because there's going to be some hands on workshops really teaching people how to do? Tnn HOW TO SET UP A trap. How do this how to do that? I do see the potential for a virtual seminars virtual workshops to for sure yeah no. It sounds very exciting. Have you done any educational workshop up to this point in time up to this point we haven't launched any? We have been working on designing a couple of workshops so that when we.

instagram facebook puff Elise Hgtv Fourteenth Twenty Twenty Massachusetts Merrimack River Feline Rescue Indonesia twitter Khloe Emily Carl Dr Aaron Doyle Heat facebooks California Roy Dr Cynthia Delaney Burt Tnn Aspca
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

08:59 min | 11 months ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"We'll see you there and don't forget we'll always have some cat trivia so show up get ready to play see then as an independent feeder you went to rescue con. Was that at all intimidating to you or did it feel like a pretty welcoming environment. Some folks that I have spoken to feel like sometimes when they go to these conventions or conferences. It's a bit overwhelming for a person but I was just curious what your thoughts might be a little overwhelming but it was also heart warming that a lot of people were coming to one location for the one reason and also because I had my neighbor friend with me. It was very nice because it was okay. Whatever I'm feeling I have to put to the side and just kind of focus. What's really on what's most important Animals are GONNA have hopefully a second chance at the home the lead deserved in the first place. The cats that you currently feed many of them have names for you will actually. Yes they do. I have named them so if I'm speaking about them to. Somebody seem my boyfriend. They he knows who I'm talking about and I actually have taken photos with my smartphone and I printed them out and I make collages. Put him up in my home so symbolically. They do have a home because I have their pictures up on my walls and they'll always be with me. Yeah that's a real interesting emotional connection. I find that right now in the animal welfare space. There's a lot of conversation about the human animal. Bond and a lot of programs are in place to help support and encourage that human animal bond. But I don't think that that conversation has gone into the community cat realm where there's really truly a full understanding of the emotion that goes on between a feeder or a caretaker and their colony. And there's just a lot of connection there between the cat and the feeder lutely. I don't necessarily get the sense that there are others that feel that way. Is there something that we can do to help? Convey that to animal welfare world at large like could see from my personal story that my cat tigger has been such a support for me. I don't know what I would do without him because he really excuse me if I get a little emotional but he really his love and his companionship really saved me from going into really abyss of deep dark depression and going out and helping those cats gave me reason to get up and get dressed and go outside and I had to move away from that area. I chose to live where I'm living now just so I can easily go walk across the street. Where he them? I could still walk. They're very easily so I'm living where I am now. Just because so I can get to the cats easily inches that bond. They're always happy to see you. When always on judgmental and the love that they all showed me. How can you not want to repay them by giving them the love and the food that they should have been getting in the first place so I got love for that just because it Kinda save me well and they gave you purpose and having purposes really critically important for all of us and obviously you give them a lot of what they need and so it's a two way street but I think that sometimes we're not thinking about that emotional connection that most feeders do have with their colonies? I certainly know when we were feeding when the volunteers at the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. We're feeding fourteen different colonies covering three hundred cats. You think Oh my goodness that's such a large number of cats but everybody had their picture taken. Everyone had a name. All the volunteers knew the cats and APB's were put out when a cat was missing for a couple of days. It was a big community in a labor of love and the cats got older. Sometimes the questions were really tough about well. Should we bring an older cat in or we let them stay out? And there's a lot of tough questions that go on as a caretaker in the feeder. And you're doing this as a person of one which in some cases might be easier because then you can say oh well. What do I think today Debbie at the Committee level? We were at you know saying. Let's get the committee opinion on how to deal with this cat which could be a heated conversation. But still there's a lot of advocates behind those cats and a lot of emotion. And a lot of bonding I mean it can be years and years and years of commitment. Some of the cats on the waterfront lived to be sixteen years of age. That's a long commitment. That's yes and if that's what I need to do to help them live long healthy life I will. I even have when some of the cats that were in my care when they're no longer around what I do is I paint these rocks with their names on them and I put it out on my patio in my garden. So it's Kinda like oh a memorial for them anytime cats no longer here right gets raw. So it's Kinda way to still honor what they brought joy the brunt of my life you have a very interesting and structured process about sort of how you're handling things and I wonder if it's similar for other feeders that are out there and you know the one thing is it. Sounds like you do know other people that feed the cats. But you're not necessarily a tight community and my sense. Is that some folks that are out there that are feeders. Caretakers are also feeling sort of equally on their own potentially alone and I think that's something that is really unfortunate and I don't want folks to feel that way. I think it's really important for people to feel like they have an opportunity to reach out and to engage and I'm hoping that the community has podcast in some way gives that opportunity. You reached out to me. I think with a random phone call and I think you were kind of surprised when I gave you a call back but you know it's true. I mean we do return our phone calls. I hope and also I think it's important that anybody out there that's feeling alone. Should reach out to somebody so that they can get some support if they needed at any particular time. But you've got a very well thought out system for you know how you're handling the cats that you're caring for. I think I do the best that I can. Sometimes I wish I could do more but I am just doing the best that I can because I really love them that much. And it's all about them you know that's what. I care so much about if that's what God meant for me to do for the rest of my life will then. That's what I have to do. At least I know I'm trying to make impact on the world or at least a tiny corner that a while and today you're sharing your story so that more than just the tiny corner of the world that you live in we'll be able to hear your story and maybe they'll be able to help the cats in their communities so as you say it takes a village in there was one thing you said when we were right before. I hit the record but you know. Make a difference. Be The difference and I don't know if you want to expand on that line any more than that yes I actually maybe a little bit. You just don't want to see these cats though teach people responsibility tell people what they're doing is not right or if you see somebody trying to harmon animal call the authorities shrine to do something that will make them stop but lost so that will keep you safe at the same time. So W if folks are interested in reaching out to you. I'm GonNa make the suggestion that they email me at stacy at community cats PODCAST DOT COM that Stacey S. T. A. C. Y. at community. Cats PODCAST DOT COM. That e mails all over the website and folks can just email me or my phone number is on the site to. They can call me. And if they're interested in getting in contact with you I will put them in contact with you. Since you were not part of an organization nonprofit all that stuff I'll save you from potentially some inappropriate calls of any kind and before we close out. Is there anything else you'd like to share with our listeners? Today would just like to save that. Thank you for anybody. Who's listening to this? Please support the community Podcast you are making a difference just by listening and thank you just for anybody that would potentially reach out in the future. Just always make a difference in their lives. That's great so debbie thank you again for agreeing to be a guest on my show and. I hope we'll have you on in the future in when you have any news to report on your colonies and that kind of stuff for our listeners. I would really hope you. Please consider sharing this podcast with others. I really appreciate you tuning in if you can share it with others encourage others to become subscribers that would be great out also love for folks to put a review up either on Apple. Podcasts or Google. Play you to anywhere where you enjoy your podcast listening. Please feel free to put a review up and we will see you next week. Thank you stacey. Thank you for listening to community cats. Podcast I really appreciate it. If you would go to tunes lever view of the show it will help spread the word help mark community cats..

Bond Stacey S. T. A. C. Y. APB Merrimack River Feline Rescue Google Apple Debbie harmon
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:40 min | 11 months ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Info <Speech_Music_Female> at M. <Speech_Music_Female> R. F. R. <Speech_Music_Female> S. Dot Org <Speech_Female> and our <Speech_Female> shelter staff checks <Speech_Female> that and that sort <Speech_Female> of way to get <Speech_Female> in touch with US and <Speech_Female> We can kind of <Speech_Female> funnel <SpeakerChange> increase <Speech_Female> wherever they need to <Speech_Female> go. That's great. <Speech_Female> Is there anything <Speech_Female> else you'd like to <Speech_Female> share with our listeners? Today <Speech_Female> you know. <Speech_Female> I think the biggest <Speech_Female> thing is <Speech_Female> that I really truly <Speech_Female> believe that <Speech_Female> the future of <Speech_Female> sort of animal welfare <Speech_Female> feeling welfare <Speech_Female> is trying to keep <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> and animals together <Speech_Female> while recognizing <Speech_Female> that. I think <Speech_Female> there's always going <Speech_Female> to be smaller <Speech_Female> place hopefully for sheltering <Speech_Female> but one <Speech_Female> that exists in <Speech_Female> animals always <Speech_Female> need a safe place <Speech_Female> to go. We definitely <Speech_Female> operate <Speech_Female> in our <Speech_Female> shelter whenever <Speech_Female> we can try to keep <Speech_Female> cats and <Speech_Female> people together we <Speech_Female> do. That's a huge <Speech_Female> part of our intake <Speech_Female> program. That's a huge <Speech_Female> part of what <Speech_Female> our option coordinator <Speech_Female> does but <Speech_Female> at the same time <Speech_Female> we recognize <Speech_Female> that there has to <Speech_Female> be a safe place <Speech_Female> for animals to go when <Speech_Female> people just can't keep <Speech_Female> them so our mindset <Speech_Female> has definitely <Speech_Female> changed <Speech_Female> over the years <Speech_Female> and I think <Speech_Female> it's what makes us <Speech_Female> a lot stronger. <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> our staff is <Speech_Female> really all on board <Speech_Female> with trying to do the <Speech_Female> best thing for the animal. <Speech_Female> Whatever that might be <Speech_Female> so I really <Speech_Female> just think that's <Speech_Female> the direction <Speech_Female> that animal welfare is <Speech_Female> heading in general and I think <Speech_Female> that's the direction <Speech_Female> our organization is <Speech_Female> is <SpeakerChange> kind of heading <Speech_Female> towards to <Speech_Female> and I know for <Speech_Female> today's show. We were really <Speech_Female> focusing in on <Speech_Female> the feline leukemia and <Speech_Female> Fars Programs. <Speech_Female> But when you say <Speech_Female> you know whatever that <Speech_Female> cat may need. <Speech_Female> Mr For us <Speech_Female> has a cat mobile <Speech_Female> program <Speech_Female> as well as <Speech_Female> also a spay <Speech_Female> neuter program <Speech_Female> once a month mash <Speech_Female> style teen <Speech_Female> arc clinic <Speech_Female> that is free. <Speech_Female> Feral cats <Speech_Female> so say neuter <Speech_Female> is also a <Speech_Female> huge topic <Speech_Female> within the organization. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Absolutely I <Speech_Female> think <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> we will be <Speech_Female> exploring. Sorta ways <Speech_Female> to be <Speech_Female> proactive and <Speech_Female> spay. Neuter is <Speech_Female> the most proactive <Speech_Female> thing. You can do <Speech_Female> and also helping <Speech_Female> owners day <Speech_Female> on top of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> medical staff <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for their cats. So what I <Speech_Female> mean by that is getting <Speech_Female> regular <Speech_Female> exams and having access <Speech_Female> to that medical <Speech_Female> care so that <Speech_Female> one thousand <Speech_Female> dollar dental doesn't <Speech_Female> have to wait and be <Speech_Female> that substantial <Speech_Female> of a process <Speech_Female> it can be that people <Speech_Female> are getting their animals <Speech_Female> seen sooner <Speech_Female> and so it's less so <Speech_Female> you know preventive <Speech_Female> medicine <Speech_Female> is really important <Speech_Female> and I think that's another <Speech_Female> direction that <Speech_Female> spay neuter our <Speech_Female> organization. <Speech_Female> Everything is going towards <Speech_Female> bread. I <Speech_Female> WanNa thank you so <Speech_Female> much for agreeing to be <Speech_Music_Female> a guest on my show. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to community cats. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Podcast really <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> appreciate it. If you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> would go to I tunes <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> leave a review of the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> show. It will help. Spread <Speech_Music_Female> the word <SpeakerChange> to help. <Speech_Music_Female> Mark Minniti cats. <Music>

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

11:16 min | 11 months ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"New Big adoption center was Wonderful Tree House humane society and they have a cat cafe in their cat cafe. They have feline leukemia. Positive kitties if you could have anything in the world. Would that be something that would interest you absolutely like anything else? It's taking the stigma away from these animals that are labeled with a disease and being able to go into area for the public and see these cats running around playing being normal cats. I think that is an incredible way for people to understand. Feeling the Kimia and to remove that stigma that is attached to them. Sometimes I think the biggest most amazing thing for our volunteers and our staff is that they see the feline leukemia. Kitties happy and healthy an all admit when I first started at the shelter volunteering. I didn't understand fluke. I didn't know feeling a KIA and my husband was mortified to go in our feeling leukemia. Rome because he was afraid. Bring it to our cat and it's just over a short amount of time realizing that okay. The rest of the cats in this building aren't getting it and these cats really happy and healthy and just seeing it with your own eyes is really a truly powerful way to change people's minds. I think a cat cafe is a wonderful way to welcome people in to see the cats and see them thrive. And I think that's fantastic. Let's talk a little bit about the forest program at 'em are and what does it mean to the organization that how does it benefit? The community. Pharmacists are really important program that I help run. It's an amazing way to be able to keep loving owners and their cats together and I really over the years doing this work. I think everybody kind of goes in their field. Whatever it is with certain ideas in certain thoughts and I know I certainly did with feeling the welfare and over the years of really changed my mind and change the way I understand the human animal bond in the way people love their pets and the way their pets are just so much happier with them than going into a shelter or changing their whole life and so the forest program. It's this opportunity for our organization to help keep animals in their home. The point of the program is to help animals in owners when a cat has a disease or injury that would otherwise force and owner to give up the cat get care we can come in and help offer financial assistance so that the cat can stay with their owner and doing the shelter work for several years for so many years. You see the stress and the heartbreak that goes along with surrendering a pet on both sides for the people and for the animal so being able to prevent that he and keep people in their animals together is really really important in today's climate where we see a lot of people not being able to afford their own health care You think about okay. Then how can they possibly afford the health care for their animals? And so really. There is some assistance for people but the assistance for pets is. It's obviously getting better. But it's not guaranteed and it's not there so the farmers program fills a big void in it allows people and animals to stay together. I really feel strongly about it. I really think really positive thing and I always said I think it sort of the trajectory of the future of animal welfare is keeping people and animals together whenever possible. That's great she just sort of thinking about the two topics. We've just covered here feline leukemia as well. As far as I'M GONNA put my executive director hat on and say what? Wait a minute you know. These cats are GONNA cost US money as far as program is going to cost US money. Are these really expensive programs to run so for the feeling the keyboard and care for life program it is an expense but it is an astronomical because like we were talking about before a lot of the time the feline leukemia. Cats are pretty healthy until sort of the feline. Leukemia goes into that terminal stage. So you know. It's really dot a super huge undertaking. The forest is definitely a bigger undertaking. Because these are cases where cats might need dentals that are well into the thousands or they may have been hit by a car in need major orthopedic surgery but until I think as society in general we can come up with a better solution to these huge astronomical. Medical costs when animals are sick or injured. These animals lives matter. They matter to owners and they matter general to our organization so as much as I really think that morale for us is wonderful and major player in in a welfare as the big picture I think one of our major strengths is acknowledging the individual animal the individual cat or kitten and the individual person as well well said well said the other reality. Is that many of those fires? Cats are going to need the assistance anyway if they were being surrendered to the organization. Absolutely we'd be paying for that F. H. O. R. that amputation. Either way so it kind of washes in the end before I go on to. Actually talk about adoptions as shelter director that should be what you spend a lot of your time involved with etc this will be my own version of I Dunno Feline Disease Jeopardy. I'll give you one more one more topic to touch upon and you get to choose so there's F. I. P. Ringworm or Fiv. You can choose one of those topics if you have anything you want to share with our listeners. Do I just choose one of those topics. I could talk all day about all three of those topics. Let's see which one do. I feel strongly about well. I feel with the FIV. So I think I'm going to pick FIV because for a very long time. Mri FOR US has been on the forefront of taking these animals in sheltering them in finding them homes when for a long time especially early on in my career we had so many shelters asking us to take them as transfers. What is special about? Mr Processes that from the very beginning we've kind of said okay. Let's be open minded. Let's think out of the box and so with Fiv we had our FIV positive cats running loose with our regular cats and we adopted them out as regular cats and we talk to people about the FAA. Be Sort of the whole you know. They can be a little bit more prone to the dental disease and their immuno-compromised so having that conversation with adopters but knowing Fiv cats that have lived to twenty. We could send the cats into their homes with the best intentions knowing that. There's a very good chance they were going to be fine and live a long life. What I think is really incredible is that we are not getting those requests for Fiv transfers on any level that we were getting before. And I think again it's a testament to the fact that people see. Fiv cats out with the other cats they see. Fiv cats living long healthy lives. And I think that has changed the hearts and minds of many people many shelters many veterinarians. I think that's really power fall. And so of course we still get. Fiv POSITIVE KITTIES and they're still living out with all our other cats but you know I think it's a great example of sort of the way we have approached cats and kittens that are different and sort of found them outcomes that were really the same as normal cat and then seeing that was successful and worked out well and of course. There's I think there's a published study now about. Fiv Cats cohabitating with non FIV cats and no evidence of transmission. So I think that also helps a lot. You bring up a good point as a shelter director. You're dependent upon a lot of resources and support with regards to protocols cleaning various diseases. What are your resources that you turn to? We are really lucky to work with a couple of really incredible veterinarians who really strive to keep learning. They want to know the next thing. You know the next new research the next interesting thing that comes out and so for us. I think has been a huge resource because these veterans who work with are very very invested. Very very smart and love to learn new things. They're not stuck to some. You know sort of this is the way I learned it in vet school and this is the way it's always going to be. They're hungry for knowledge and they're eager to share that with us and help our cats in that way the UC Davis Corbett School of Veterinary Medicine. They have incredible resources. That kind of how I got kick started in sort of knowing what was going on around me. Were those resources from there but yeah for the most part just kind of on top of the new research coming out you and I share a lot of new findings and research together. But what really is key is her. Veterenarians are super enthusiastic about learning new things. That helps a lot. Let's talk a little. Bit About Adoptions your adoption team you have increased the adoptions quite substantially. I think over the last several years at Mar for us. Would you like to share with us? Any of the sort of special campaigns that you do over the course of the year we sort of chug along as normal but like everywhere else. We get really busy in the spring and in the summer we have had kind of pop up adoption events here there and we have found that fee waived is really the way to go anything sort of less than that is not very effective during the spring and summer months we sort of do those on an ad needed basis if the shelter population just gets higher than we're able to have capacity for but we do have one adoption event scheduled every year. We didn't call you black Friday. We tried it on Saturday this year. But it's the weekend following Thanksgiving and this past adoption event. We sent home thirty three percent of our population which is really good. We really have. Successful adoptions if the funny thing about it was the day before the adoption event we actually did. More adoptions of the day of the event I'm not sure what that was about. But it was just really awesome to see. We got homes for couples special kitties to during that time and that sort of is a big draw for us to do those events. It's an awesome opportunity to find homes for kitties that sort of need a little bit more supporter understanding if folks are interested in finding out more about the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society or if they had any follow up questions. How would they do that? Who We have a really nice website which is M. R. F. R. S. Dot Org the acronym for Our Name and that website is. It's like a treasure trove of resources and information and then we have sort of a general email address it's.

FIV leukemia director US Wonderful Tree House Merrimack River Feline Rescue Leukemia Rome executive director UC Davis Corbett School of Vet FAA F. H. O. M. R. F. R.
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

07:57 min | 11 months ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Her cats into action. Today we're speaking with Britney Fox over Brittany is the shelter director at the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society and overseas the adoption program. She started volunteering. With 'em are for us in two thousand nine became a part-time staff person in two thousand eleven while working in finance. She was hired fulltime as medical coordinator in two thousand twelve and became shelter director in two thousand fifteen. She's also an active foster home and likes to specialize in critical care cases. She loves all animals domestic and wildlife but is particularly passionate about promoting feline welfare. She currently lives in Maine with her husband. Two children dog and five cats Brit. I'd like to welcome you to the show. Thank you so very much for having me. Well this is family. We're having family day at the community. Cats podcasts as many folks. No obviously that I've had a lot of experience with Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. It very much involved in very passionate about the organization and Brit has been awesome to stay involved and working hard and providing great leadership for the Organization for it. I WANNA I ask you before coming to us. What made you a cat lover. Well I did not grow up with cats. Most people find that very interesting but I only had dogs and it was a kitten that my aunt found in a parking lot. He was Kinda scratched up and he looked very sad and she. She rescued him and she brought him to the police station in our town and no one claimed him so my husband then boyfriend at the time he said I'll take him and he had never had a pet before in his whole life. So we got this kitten. Neither of US knew what to do. You know we kind of figured it out as we went along and we completely fell head over heels in love with Rupert. He is no longer with us but he really is my inspiration for finding my passion and my career in my life so I have a lot to thank him for from their Robin. I really learned what wonderful intelligent amazing creatures cats are and We wanted to get more involved. We lived in Amesbury at the time and drove by the shelter and we saw the sign and said you know we really. We really got to check this place out and we applied to volunteer. And the rest is history. I did volunteer at the Bangor. Humane society up in Bangor being when I went to college so he had a little bit of shelter experience and so at the time. Janet who is our volunteer coordinator. She said okay. You have experienced right downstairs and into our room at our quarantine room and I was like okay and I I like a challenge that I really like learning so for me. It was an opportunity to do that for cats who I had just recently discovered I loved so much and fell head over heels for shelter medicine working with cats and just really opened my eyes to a whole new world that I didn't know existed so you know it's sort of the rest is history as they say but cats and feline welfare are something that just so truly important to me. And that's why I'm here. So as you discovered the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. Maybe share with folks a little bit about the organization and the programs and what makes it different from other organizations. That you've been around. Yes so when I started. I didn't have a great idea of on the animal welfare community and what was going on in other shelters but when I started at the MRI for us. I saw the cats that the shelter were taking care of and it really realized that these are animals that needed a lot of help in a lot of care and really had a wonderful chance to find home and the people who cared for them were so dedicated and committed to not only Finding these animals from home but rehabilitating them before they did that and so the more I worked at the time for us the more I realized that we took in animals stat. Maybe other shelters just didn't know a lot about or didn't have resources to care for. I had interactions early on with feline leukemia. Cats Feline Leukemia kittens. There was a Persian. Kitty named mugs. Who was so sick and he had a lot of problems and I just really realized that. There's a lot of animals and a lot of cats out there that need a lot of help. And that's why the morale for us Was Really special to me. Was that they were taking animals from our community other shelters rescue groups animals that without. Mr For us did not have much of a chance. And so that's really what ignited my passion for taking care of cats and kittens. That just really compromised in need a lot of help. But there's a light at the end of the tunnel that these animals can really live and thrive. So it's really amazing to see that journey and get them there and for us is really committed to helping them along that journey and that that is really super important and special to me so one thing that Mri France has done quite a bit over the years. As as you've mentioned the feline leukemia positive cats. What are the greatest challenges when dealing with feline leukemia positive cats and why is it important that we work so hard to try? Get them adopted. You know I kind of look at the challenges on two major fronts. One of them. Is that the cats are immuno-compromised so when they're coming into shelter which for the most healthy and robust of cats can be a really stressful experience. These kitties have compromised immune systems so that creates an even bigger challenge to keeping them healthy and then on the other side of it is adoption recognizing that we are not necessarily a sanctuary that we are in adoption program for these kitties so we need to work with a ball and work with members of the public to make sure people understand the disease and the disease process. Make sure they understand with these kids need but also show them that these cats look healthy and they look happy because they are when they are not showing signs of their disease and they're sort of in that middle point they look like a regular cat and so many people see that so. It's really nice to be able to show them. These animals have such great quality of life. Just like a regular cat and we can get them a home and you know a family and that they have the ability to live out their years whatever they have left happy and healthy just like a normal cat. So that's why it's really important to find these guys. Homes is their quality of life is typically very good. When they're not showing signs of the disease they just look like a regular cat and they deserve our love and our support just like the other kitties that we take in. Is it common? That many people when they adopt feline leukemia positive cats and then the kitty does pass away. They tend to come back to adopt more. Yeah absolutely we have repeat adopters. Feline Leukemia Cats. I usually tell people I see it. Go two ways. I see people that adopt the Feline Leukemia. Kitties and they lose their first one and they kind of say you know. This isn't for me. I'm GONNA come back and get another kitty but want you know a nonfeeling Kimmy Kitty and of course were sensitive to that but more often than that we get people that come back and they say okay now needs a home and those people really inspire me. Every day. We have a couple of people I can think of off hand to really focus on the feeling that Kimia kittens that don't have even as long a life span as the adults and they really are committed to taking these kittens and giving them a family a home for as long as they have and.

Merrimack River Feline Rescue Feline Leukemia Leukemia Kimmy Kitty Bangor director coordinator Maine US Britney Fox volunteer coordinator Amesbury Rupert Kimia Janet Brittany France
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

11:00 min | 1 year ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Dr Kaplan was featured in New York magazine's best vets issue in two thousand and two and again in two thousand and six when city veterinary care was named the best private veterinary practice in New York City. He's the founder of the Toby Project A nonprofit organization dedicated to radically pet overpopulation in New York City. Dr Kaplan I'd like to welcome to the show that you stacey. I'm happy to be here before. We dive in and start talking about your work in New York City and the Turkey project. I'd just like to find out more about how you got interested in helping animals and why you decided to become a veterinarian. Oh you're going all the way back. Let me just say that My family doesn't exactly know where I came from in genetically. Look like them but I'm a lot from them as far back as I can remember. I've always been an animal advocate starting back when I was four gravitated toward them drawn in by them over time. Starting my early adolescence feelings of protecting them and seeing where animals were not being treated kindly. Or being abused. Its aren't a real strong coordinate. So in the natural that it became a vet I tell people my personality and my soul and my career are perfectly aligned. Is there a particular type of animal that you like or all animals animals that are alive and breathing or the one that I liked most and they can be at any species? I'm into advocating. For any animal. In any circumstance I happen to be Medically trained dogs and cats. But I'll do what I can for anything so I will help mice out of glue traps. I will fix pigeons broken wings. I will do whatever I can't help animal that needs help. I basically look at it like this. I've been given a real gift to be able to heal and I feel like Sheila should happen. Whenever healing is called upon. So that's what I do. I really be interested in for discovery. Process that you've gone through becoming a veterinarian for almost last thirty years or so. And how did you become more aware of the pet overpopulation problem? Cat Overpopulation. I mean. Has It always been on your mind as something that you need to do. And get involved with or when you're involved in private practice was more about building your practice and then over time you became more aware about overpopulation issue. In New York. I was just wondering how you learned about all of this. So very little about my practice has to do with business. The reason why I opened my own practice was. I wanted to be autonomous at wanted to be able to do what I wanted to do. I didn't want to have to explain to the owner of the practice that I wanted to help this animal to that animal or person who couldn't afford it or this stray dog or the strike at so that was really the motivation for my own. Practice was just the autonomy but I've always been passionate about saving lives. It's just who I am as a vet and applying that to the innocent voiceless among us. I'm always passionate about but as far as your shelters and spay neuter the biggest killer of dogs and cats in this country. I know this is a cat specific podcast but some of my dog work bleeds into it so like a better word leads so always been aware of shelter overpopulation. The biggest killer of dogs and cats in the country are shelters. I consider that an effective human indifference. And my I have always been open about overpopulation for that reason. But what was the springboard into getting me involved specifically with the Toby Project and targeted spay? Neuter was the adoption of a dog from our city. Shelter here in New York so the dog was in toby while I named him. Toby was a chance meeting along story behind it. Which I think would consume too much time of this podcast. But I think it's an interesting story but he was labelled as aggressive adoptable when he was just terrified and it was a chance meeting between he and I I was the only person on the planet that could save his life. Because I was event you know there were not going to release him because they thought he was a liability in a risk but my veterinary license helped them to loosen up a little bit about that when they saw him with me and I signed all kinds of releases a let them come to me and he turned out to be the most brilliant dog I've ever met. He started his life in terrified way and he told me his whole story on the way home which I'll share with you. But he was almost victim of the system that I've known about an got really personal with me with him. And so that's really what caused me to leap into it? And about that time I was learning about Peter. Marsh with research has proven that untargeted spay. Neuter is the single most effective form of reducing shelter overpopulation. So it's sort of like the timing was all right but my way home at toby. He pulled me to every woman with a stroller wagging his tail and he would look inside the stroller. He was only four months five months of age and he would look inside the stroller. It wouldn't be the child. He was looking for his tail Woodstock Wagon. He would walk away. He was always good with the mother. He was always really happy to see a stroller. So this was about a forty five minute walk home and so we've been counted all kinds of people. It is a very cute dog and so people just naturally wanted to interact with him Any man with dark complexion caused him to recoil add a beard and he would submissively urinate and add a hat. It was barking submissively urinating and recoiling on in his life before he was at the shelter doesn't take a neuroscientist to deduce that in his home life he had a woman and a child that were very good to him and he loved and a man. That wasn't good to him. And that man had a dark complexion of beard and a hat and in a Lo and behold our city shelter. They all wore baseball hats. Many of the employees there were dark complexion so it was his brilliance. That nearly killed him but he felt like he needed to protect himself from somebody. Who looked like this and you know throughout his life. He calmed down with that. He never been anybody. He was always nervous about the beard or the dark complexion the hat but he was perfectly fine and he really was quite the smartest dog I've ever known And most personable and not had him luckily for almost fourteen years. I'd named project after him because he was the example and he was the person dog that put the face on this for me and then so naturally just jumped into it and just following. Peter Marshes work. Now I just joined in doing the thing that would give me the biggest bang for my buck. I you know I started with some clients at mine who are animal advocates. We Fund raised. We got to a point where we can buy a truck and we started. And that's it so most of what I do is i. Sometimes I fill it on the truck but for the most part I fundraise and I advocate and you know we pay. Vats who are specialists in efficient rapids a newer and nurses and supplies etc. And that's us any started. The Toby Project Win in two thousand nine now re probably spayed or neutered about between fifty five and sixty thousand to this point. We have a truck that we serve as the public low income. Neighborhoods we match the highest shelter surrender rates to the lowest income zip codes and that's where we our trucks two days a week. In two days a week we work with Farrell's with a t and are certified rescuers. We had a stationary space for feral cats. From two thousand eleven to two thousand eighteen that was donated to US temporarily. The operative word is temporarily that ended. So we're currently looking for his face again but did not space two days a week. We would spay neuter twenty five cats a day and that was all through other five zero one. Three cat rescue organizations from my experience from running a mobile Spain newer clinic and we just do cats on the cat mobile for the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society that used to run a new do cats and dogs so I know that the booking and the scheduling very different when you're doing two different crowds but also the ferals with the traps in the size of the traps on a mobile vehicles makes it even extra-special fancy dance. We've not been shy about parking. We've had a local fire department. Give us a heated bay. They pull out the truck and let us use the bay and do forty cats. Their cats will recover in the bay Yes we've done a lot of sort of outside of the box to increase the number of feral cats that we can do when physical day. At least our truck isn't structured in a way to really handle those traps Efficiently we pretty much four to six in. That's climbing over quite a few traps in there. So by having an exterior heated space at really helps a lot. This just came up with our manager. A coordinator Lori Berman. Who I hope will interview with you. One day she sent me an email saying we need to get a message out for people on his really cold days about how they keep their cats and dogs warm waiting for our truck and so we're going through different ways of doing that. We settled on blankets and fleeces. I would love to hear more about this. The fire department with their heated bay. This was a town that had asked us to bring our cap mobile in on a regular basis because they realized there was just such a great need and we had these special designated feral cat days then we had regular days where we parked at a bakery which was great because the veteran staff love the bakery nearby so that was for the general public and we also had some grant money to be able to really subsidize the cost of all these programs and stuff but yeah we certainly can talk about greater detail on. Input Laurie in touch with the folks that Ciller working in coordinating those kinds of situations in your experience told me about like New York. I mean I'm quite comfortable with Massachusetts. Me What are your impressions with regards to community cats in New York and the overpopulation situation New York and the boroughs. Are you seeing things changing or do you feel like you're just continually swimming against the tide the latter? It's really hard to determine that I'm sure it has. It has to be changing. It has to be improving but the condition is so overwhelming. That as you know that it's hard to really tell we just go by faith and you know there's research that shows that this works so we're doing this by faith and that reminds me to say one thing. I also WANNA move the project much more specifically to feral cats and one of the reasons for that. We have to do community. We have two dogs and cats that are cared for by people in their communities. Better low income communities. I'm not one hundred percent sure that these people aren't going to pursue a low cost spay neuter somewhere else or whether they're going to would even pay full price somewhere else and they're just looking for a bargain so we rely on the fact that somebody would not want to have their dog or cat spayed or neutered in a truck on the street corner in the Bronx if they could avoid yet. We're in hard times and people are always looking for a bargain and we know there have been instances where people are definitely bargain hunting and they come in with a thousand dollar coat or they'd come driving up in a thirty thousand dollar vehicle so we know they've got some means but the feral cats never have means they are always poor and so I think we'll be target them. Where have to be one hundred percent? Sure we are addressing need..

New York New York City Toby New York magazine Dr Kaplan overpopulation Turkey founder baseball Bronx private practice Sheila US Peter Marshes Massachusetts Spain Peter Marsh Lo Merrimack River Feline Rescue
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"C.'s cat litter. Dr Elsie Cat Litter is known to be the best litter on the market and agrees. Many of you know that hooch was a foster cat of mine that I adopted while at the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. We did use the touch of outdoors litter as we transition transition him from being an indoor outdoor kitty to an indoor only kitty. I'm thrilled. That hooch found his home with me but there were many times when folks would call me saying they're kitty didn't use the LITTERBOX I. It was also thrilled. That Dr Elsie cat attract litter came out as it gave me a resource to share with others that was affordable and in most cases successful in keeping this kitty in their home as a special benefit to community cats podcast listeners. Dr Elsie is offering a rebate up to twenty dollars off your first bag of any doctor elsies litter just visit Dr L. Sees Dot com forward slash community cats podcast to pitcher rebate or. Fill out the online form. Try Dr Elsie today. And you won't regret it. ooh I know that politics at this point in time is really a operational software package for foster care for animals tracking your cats and dogs that are coming in and out in in my Roldan's about the cats but I'm going to hop up on my soapbox of angst. which is I have a very a bad relationship with all the multiple software packages? That are out there that handle your fundraising right if you have a spay neuter clinic or mobile clinic neck which Iran that. He's got another software package for that. Then you have your shelter software package then. You have your volunteer software package that is popular out there too. You so do you have advice for those of us out there like how to manage this software bombardment inefficient ineffective way are are. We still sort of very primitive. It is a tough time in terms of technology in the sense that there is such an abundance of technology that it actually creates a very very overwhelming atmosphere of trying to figure out what you need what you don't need and then if you are able to identify that while our organization desperately needs needs donation management software and we need volunteer software and then we need our shelter software then on top of deciding that you even need these various outwear packages. You'RE GONNA have to go through all the different competitors within each of those spaces and try to understand which ones are going to fit into your systems and processes as well and as well as your budget and and figure out if hopefully any of them will be able to speak to each other now or eventually. It's a very daunting process. And so I think in terms of how politics politics is trying to solve that problem as we talked all these organizations that are using these very separate systems. That's where we see a lot of the human error coming into play because there's absolutely. Yeah no reason that your vet clinic. Software should not be speaking to your animal shelter. Software considering ninety percent of those data points are going to be identical. You're right we're just tracking gang basic information on the animal and as well as their medical records and so politics is trying to create what we're calling these expansion packs that you would kind of purchase as you go and as you grow and so if you're an organization that started as a foster based rescue you might just be using our regular software and then let's say one day you expand into to having a privately held shelter with facility and you open up a spay neuter clinic than you would purchase honor spay neuter software and that would expand your data set of information and features and then. Let's say you're a cat rescue. That's been doing intake an adoption. And now you want to focus in on trap. neuter return focusing on feral and community cats than you would purchase purchase in our trap. NEUTER return expansion pack. And that's the same that we're planning for volunteer and donation management when we talk to organizations that are using a multitude of software packages. We find is that often. These volunteer donation management softwares have every feature under the sun again and are not really really tailored towards animal welfare. So I think that's where politics has an opportunity to come in and say well. We might not offer every feature under the sun as a typical typical volunteer management software or as a typical donation management software. But we're able to do is specialize in the very specific needs of these animal welfare welfare organizations and so if you are looking at separate software packages I would say that you should be reaching out to the support. Teams be suffered companies and really ask them you know our other animal welfare organizations using this and how are they using it. Are they happy using it because you might have talked to one software company. That's like oh well we don't have have anybody in animal welfare. That's using this and that's probably not a software package that you're going to want to go with them if they have no experience in the area because oftentimes these animal welfare groups are having to Jerry rig these platforms to fit their needs. And so they've not ever dealt with that before you don't WanNa be the Guinea pig definitely agreed because it's a huge leap to make this change range so yeah with politics. How do you make money with politics? How do you get paid? Yeah how do I feed my zoo. Basically being that I come from the foster bass background. I have a full understanding that in animal rescue. We are never ever making money off of animals right. We're always putting in more vetting and the cost of at work than we will ever see on an adoption fee. That is true for dogs and not as specially true for cats and so we wanted to make sure that we would be very accessible to organizations of any size no matter the resources and so we charge solely based on the number of adoptions and we charge only one dollar for every successful adoption. And so if you are an organization that's may be doing. Twenty adoptions in December then on January first that we would charge you twenty dollars how this grows to fit both our needs and the organizations that are going to be using politics needs is that you can buy the most limited feature set if if that's all you need but if you are an organization that's looking to grow and expand you can still use politics because you know as we build out the expansion packs we will continue to be a good fit for all of your needs so as I use the example. The floor if you're a cat. Rescue just doing adoptions and intake right now politics is a fantastic fit for you because we're getting off off of spreadsheets and paper and we're making the information centralized and very accessible to the rest of your team and then if you decide to get into trap neuter return you don't have to go back to spreadsheets now or you don't have to go find a separate offer system it will all be in one centralized location meaning that you don't have to worry about making another leap in the future when you do grow zero to that point of your organization now is politics only based on the computer. There's no APP that goes along with it. Is that correct correct. Yep We're solely web base right now so say a foster based organization is doing adoptions at one of the pet food chains that they do adoption day events they would would bring a laptop with them to input out the necessary data do the forms and all that stuff right then and there yet they can bring any device that has wi if I were an ability to access data from their phone or tablet or desktop computer or laptop anything that has access to the Internet they will be able to use. Politics would exxon most of the market based on what I know for folks listening to my show. Many people listen to my show. It's over fifty percent still listen to it either on a laptop or desktop up computer so interesting yes for podcasting Ramat. It shows that are crowd isn't super technologically savvy from that standpoint Ryan. Don't get me wrong everybody over there you guys are all superstars. You're focused on getting the drop drop. said that he the cat kittens the cats adds to the vet and getting everybody where they need to go. And so it's really hard to make time for technology well and that brings me to a good point to and I. I'm sorry to interrupt you but I often. When I talked to these smaller organizations they always tell me A? We're not a good fit for using technology because we're so small or we're not a good fit because you know our processes aren't broken and and I just want to everyone out there that it's not about having a broken process where all here to maximize our life saving potential for the.

Dr Elsie Cat Dr Elsie Merrimack River Feline Rescue hooch C. Iran Dr L. Ryan Guinea Jerry wi
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

10:29 min | 1 year ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"That helps rescues manage their paperwork and gain insights from their data with the push of a button. Politics is expanding into the TR community cat's face in an effort to use technology analogy data and innovation to drive lifesaving efforts for feral cats Liz. I'd like to welcome you to the show a low. Thank you so much for having me on the show. I'm I'm really excited to be here today. So Liz for we take that deep dive into politics we all have to know. How did you get passionate for animals passionate for our cats? Tell us your story that everybody has about all their animals and maybe share with us the animals you currently have if we have time yes absolutely. It's definitely a laundry list of a current zoo that I have but to my story I have always loved animals. The funny thing is I'm actually incredibly allergic to cats and dogs and so growing up I was not allowed to have avenue for a very long time but it started when I when I could pretty much pick up a book and read and go to the library I would rent out books on dogs and cats and knowing that I had to bring them back to the library I would write my own book reports on animals and wanted to soak up as much information as about them as I could since I couldn't really be around them and I just never really lost lost that passion but I got older and so the passion turned into okay. Now everything that I'm learning whether that's in school or at internships or with other jobs that I've had eh adult in the back of my mind. It was always well. How can I take this experience? Or the skills that I'm gathering and apply it to saving more animals and so that's really how so. I arrived at creating politics and getting to work on it. Full time to this day. You're still allergic to cats. Like Cross that bridge. Do you have of any pets at home. I do. I actually have four dogs and three cats. I also have two ferrets. And some salamanders and two horses petting zoo. It was funny when I used to run the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. Im Luckily not allergic to cats. But one of the requirements for being a board member many people jokingly said whereas that you had to be allergic to cats to be on the board of directors because there were so many people who had cat allergies oh Jeez and had overcome that obstacle to have cats in their lives you know and then they were incredibly committed and they somehow made it onto our board of directors so I think at one point our highest rate rate of allergic board members was like eighty percent of our board was technically allergic to cats so I thought that was we always. That was really funny. It just shows you know how many people are out there that would be labeled allergic rush. But anyway I segue here. So let's talk about politic. So how did you first get into the whole realm of software and then how did you get into this whole thought process around actually creating a new software package when there's so many other software packages out there to answer your first question. I mean politics is is definitely a product of this relentless effort to want to find a way to make saving animals my full time job for the rest of my life and and so politics is actually. I would say the fourth company that I have attempted in order to create a business that is really going to be helping animals in every capacity and so oh about four or five years ago I had started my own foster based rescue through that through studying the data of my region. We recognize that cats was really an area that that needed some massive assistance in terms of of life saving and so from that foster based rescue. I'd turn my attention towards innovation and to me that was trying to create a a cat cafe here in Lincoln. Nebraska and Lincoln just wasn't super ready for a cat cafe at the time and so I started to turn my attention towards technology because because I was working at an e commerce website at the time and I was also working on a custom software development shop and so through. Having those two other jobs I started to recognize. Is that while. There's so much that can be done in technology that has yet to be applied to the animal welfare space and if no one's going to recognize it yet and I will be more than happy to take the lead in that capacity and so I started to look at all the things that were being requested of the customs offer shop and also the data that I was studying to improve improve the ECOMMERCE website and thought about how we could combine that into creating fantastic an easy to use software system that could provide a lot of the same insights for animal rescues news and when I went to look at the available software at the time it appeared to me that most of it was directed towards really large humane societies or the really large large private shelters that did have technical teams and they had paid staff and they had other people to take care of the administrative work for them and being that my background. What is more in foster based rescues? I mean I remember running my own rescue. I remember being on the leadership team of a number of rescues in the Midwest and we did not have access to powerful or updated technology and so I saw a really large gap in the software space for Animal Welfare and because foster based has such a special place in my heart because I see the value. You in the work that is done in that area. I wanted to create a system that was more tailored towards the demographic of people who are running the foster based rescues so what were the key metrics metrics are. What were the obstacles that you saw when you look at these other software packages just before we hit the record? I was talking about how you know. They're still so many a small organizations out. There and Trappers Tan are trappers that really still live in the excel spreadsheet world because they just are are afraid of making that leap. You get the sense that it's just so daunting just was there a lot in the shelter. The shelter information was different than the foster care information. And maybe how do those parameters differ from one another. What are the key elements in the foster package in politics? That you have that you know. Are there it but yet the shelter packages may have had a lot of unnecessary stuff. Yeah so that's exactly right so when we went out and decided that we wanted to apply technology. He in some capacity to the foster based space. We went on interviewed a little over four hundred organizations and just asked. Why haven't you switched to a system or if you are using a system and you have already gotten yourself of paper and spreadsheets? What do you like? What do you dislike and continuously? What we're finding is that for the ones that are on spreadsheets? Eighth which was about forty percent of everyone had interviewed We discovered that they had usually already tried to switch into a database at that point in time a lot all of these organizations had been around five to ten years and are really wanting to get off the spreadsheets to create this legacy of their organization that can be passed on to the next team or next generation ration- that's going to be running that rescue on a lot of the rescues. We spoke to had no intent of winding down the organization when they were going to retire from it and so all these people are becoming Ansi NC in wanting to get their records and data and processes into a database that can be easily packaged and passed on to the next group of leaders on what we were finding thing is that when they were trying to get into existing databases that they were incredibly hard to use. It was incredibly hard to move your data into the database and then on the top of that they had to take the time to train all of their team members into using the software. And when you're talking to a demographic or generation of people that generally don't feel less competent on computers we kept hearing the phrase that well we decided not to use the databases because we all felt that we had to have a master's degree in computer science to use it and that was really disheartening. To hear when we're in danger when you know it's twenty nineteen we have access to technology like facebook and Uber and lift all these APPs that work literally at the push of a button. And there's absolutely no reason that animal rescue software cannot come to the table in that capacity as well and so from day one. We wanted to really specialize in thinking talking about who the end user was our software and that tends to be an older generation that is focused on saving cats and so we said well. Let's focus on who's going to a using the software and let's make giant buttons that are easy to use and do the heavy lifting because we didn't want to recreate a spreadsheet that was just online we want on to create something. That's going to actually streamline your workflow that's not going to give you too many data points on the screen that you're not really using and I think that we're in a day and age animal welfare where you know. We don't need every data point under the sun necessarily. We're still trying to understand if it's black dogs or brown dogs that are getting euthanized. More at the shelter alter or is it black cats or only kittens. That are getting euthanize more. And I don't think it's necessary to have data points like does this dog have loppy ears or does it have pointy ears because we're just not there yet in terms of running that detailed reports to understand where the gaps in our life saving is and so we wanted to strip down all the parts the current existing databases that were making incredibly complicated and hard to us. Because it's important to collect even a small amount of accurate data that is going to be useful useful and so we kind of went the opposite direction and stripping down as much as we could to simplify the platform so that it could be accessible to anyone and used by anyone. Whether other that's someone in there who's maybe used a computer twice or a millennial grew up using computers with the software able to calculate things like live release rate the things that we often need for grant applications. Yes exactly right. What's special about politics? We're able to run all the typical reports that you're running now based on your Outcomes and your various intake types and to understand what you're live releases and then what kind of live release that is or what types of non live outcomes you're having as well and and what types of pets those are and where they're coming from so we're able to run all of those types of powerful reports even with the slimmed-down data set because again at the end of the day we're not necessarily running reports orthon floppy eared pets versus non floppy eared pets. Because we know that we're not really at that. Point were not as a nation above that ninety percent save rate to be able to start digging into those really refined data points. Hey Everybody Stacey here with the community cats podcast and I just wanted to let everybody know that early bird. Ticketing ticketing is open for our twenty twenty online cat conference which will be on January..

Animal Welfare Liz Lincoln Merrimack River Feline Rescue Trappers Tan Midwest facebook Stacey Nebraska
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

10:26 min | 1 year ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Here's the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you to community cats podcast listeners Dr L. C.'s is offering a rebate up to twenty eighty dollars off your first bag of any doctor else's litter just visit Dr L. Sees Dot com forward slash community cats podcast to print your rebate or fill out the line form. Try Dr Elsie today and you won't regret it do you have any programs to help with spay neuter for owned cats we don't as a as a county agency but we do work closely with some other area nonprofit groups so we can get the information very close communication with those organizations we also try to have plenty of spots available with those organizations during the month and we have in house say neuter for our animals in our TR's caretakers we can give those spots.

Merrimack River Feline Rescue Dr Elsie Dr L. C. Dr L. twenty eighty dollars
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"You tuned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's go welcome to the community cats podcast. I'm your host Stacey Lebaron. I've been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years as with the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We're speaking with will swaggart will is the founder of flatbush cats a five oh one C. three non profit focused on reducing the outdoor cat population in Central Brooklyn through tr and rescue work he began doing trap neuter return in late two thousand and sixteen gene after moving to the Flatbush neighborhood in Brooklyn and discovering cats everywhere. DNR led to fostering friendly's and before you know it he and his partner were over over their heads with mass trappings and Medical Emergencies will formed a nonprofit to better organize their efforts and begin bringing new volunteers into the fold today. Eh Flat Bush cats teaches tr classes and offer support and tools to newly certified volunteers including Trap Bank community foodbank facebook support group mentoring and rescue adoption support for friendlies they also recently launched their first mobile spay neuter clinic pilot program in partnership with the Toby Project to support low income residents and prevent more cats from being born on the street. Their goal is to help solve the outdoor cat population problem in New York by creating a sustainable model for how hyper local grassroots groups can serve.

Merrimack River Feline Rescue Brooklyn Stacey Lebaron Trap Bank flatbush DNR New York founder partner twenty years
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Takes about six or seven staff to be able to move so far so good with a clean Bill of health. A human's life span raising the pulses of aquarium goers lucky enough to catch a glimpse. If they look just close enough. Aquaria WBZ Boston's NewsRadio. Then from snakes we go to Coyote, use coyotes in New Mexico getting some new protections. Peter King on New Mexico. Lawmakers passed a Bill that would ban contests to see who can shoot and kill the most coyotes. They call it barbaric and ineffective for population control. The state has already banned those kinds of contests on state owned lands. Do Bill goes to the governor for his signature. Florida transportation officials say before manatee county bridge project can begin it will be taking steps to protect the bats that roost under the structure, Rick Hosur. The story crews will be installing one way bat removal tubes onto the longboat pass draw bridge that connects longboat key with Bradenton beach, the escape balance will allow the bats leave, but the wing mammals will not be able to return to the bridge. Head of the summer mating season. The renovation work is set to begin in may and should be finished by year's end. Once the work is completed the bats will be allowed back and from bats, we go to cats in Salem, a missing cat. Found his way home after five years on the run Eleanor report. She says she let her cap Larry out for a walk in August two thousand thirteen after a few weeks of not seeing him. She assumed the worst. But last week reports you get a call from the Merrimack river feline rescue society, it's twenty miles away Salisbury. They had identified Larry through his microchip is now safely back home in Salem with his long lost family. Well, it is back to work for Alex trebek's. He's taping new episodes of jeopardy after his cancer diagnosis CBS's correspondent piper with stores than a week. After revealing. He has stage four pancreatic cancer. Host.

Bill Larry Alex trebek Salem New Mexico manatee county bridge pancreatic cancer Bradenton beach Merrimack river Boston Coyote Peter King Florida Rick Hosur Eleanor CBS Salisbury five years
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"We had like twenty eight volunteers show up for the first training. We ran tiny lion sessions six days a week. And it was really the first large scale in shelter social. Liz ation program. The kittens vary in terms of how old they are. And what kind of backgrounds they came out of and how quickly they turned around. But some of them within two weeks out option floor some of the kids that were a little bit older and a little bit more wild to more time. But it's been one of our most successful programs. We use non force non flooding techniques. Everything is about positive reinforcement and allowing the kittens to choose to have the human interaction. So you're using food and play and those ways of trying to change the behavior of the kittens rather than wrapping them up in the towel. Absolutely. We really want the kittens to seek human interaction versus learning to tolerate it. And there's a really big difference. In terms of how those kittens? Oh, grow up and have future relationships with humans. It is interesting over the years of the many feral cat foster homes that I've worked with with the Merrimack river feline rescue society. Everybody wants to have a different approach. I think everything's becoming a lot more. Play focused a lot more food focused finding the carrots that are going to work to change the behavior of the cats, which I think is great one other idea that was just thrown out a few days ago as the concept of actually having the kittens go into their adoptive home. Find adoptive home that would be like a foster home. But yet the foster home becomes the adoptive home and doing a reduced fee adoption for those kittens and advise them, but then those kittens are going to bond with their family. So it actually takes a step out of the process. So it's an interesting concept. Right. And I think that it's easier to do with the kittens that are more quickly socialized. One of the things that we found in trying to do the shelter work is that having the kittens contained in cages gives you a captive audience. But it also gives the kitten a safe place their cages safe place. So they're allowed to retreat and the time it takes to socialize in the shelter. Versus in foster is. Much shorter. The kittens are getting bitch waited two different people that are coming through of men and women are active in the program children are active in the program..

Merrimack river two weeks six days
"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"merrimack river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"On our community cats podcast Facebook page, and we're actually going to be using those as the basis for today's show along with several other topics. So keep those questions coming folks, we really want to be good resource and giving the information that you were looking for in the meantime, Stacy thanks again for being a guest on your own show. Lisa thanks again for joining me. Happy to do it. I know that on the website. You have a little video that talks about how you got started and rescue. But I wonder if those people who haven't had a chance to watch that yet tell us about how you got started. Sometimes you say it's always starts with one CAD is that I would start it for you. Well, I've always had cats in my life. I grew up with a cat. At a very grumpy always thought to be old cat because she was like seven years old when I was born. So I learned how to deal with. I guess you would say the aggressive grumpy cat from very early age. So I've never been thought of as really a crazy cat loving person. But I've always had a cat in my life. So I guess I have to qualify it. We've always been a single cat household Intel I entered into the realm of rescue, which obviously than the numbers tend to have an exponential changing at that point in time. I got started with the Merrimack river feline rescue society, which has been the first and only group that I've really worked with back in nineteen ninety four it really started with just a knowledge of their first adoption center that they had I had been at the local veterinarians picking up some food for my current cat that I had adopted in college in New York, and I also had found a small kitten in newburyport just walking home from getting ice cream. So I did have a local newburyport cat in my life. Little did. I know that. That she was one of several hundred that we're living in newburyport at that time. And I found a brochure for the group. And I said, well, I could give them a donation. I could give them some food. And so I started out by just giving donation and food then I got on their mailing list..

newburyport Stacy Merrimack river Lisa Intel New York seven years