17 Burst results for "Merriam Webster Dot Com"

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:34 min | 2 weeks ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"I it's merriam webster's word of the day for april seventh. Today's word is brusque spelled b. r. u. s. q. u. e. brusque is an adjective that means markedly short and abrupt. It can also mean blunt in manner or speech often to the point of ungracious harshness. Here's the word used in a sense from the arkansas democrat gazette by dan linebarger. Archaeologists looked down on him because of his working class background and his brusque manner hasn't won him many friends. He doesn't argue with those. He disagrees with he just walks away. We borrowed the word brusque from french in the sixteen. Hundreds the french in turn had borrowed it from italian where it was spelled brusco b. r. u. s. c. o. And meant tart. And the italian term. Came from bruce goose. The medieval latin name for butcher's broom are shrub whose briskly leaf like twigs have long been used for making brooms english-speakers initially used brusque to refer to a tartness in wine but the word soon came to denote a harsh and stiff manner. Which is just what you might expect of a word bristling with associations to stiff scratchy brooms. With your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

peter sokolski april seventh today merriam webster dot com Today english Hundreds italian dan linebarger sixteen arkansas french latin merriam webster
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:38 min | 2 weeks ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"I it's merriam webster's of the day four april fourth. Today's word is hair. Spelled h. a. r. e. hair is a verb that means to go swiftly to tear t. a. r. Here's the word used in a sentence from bucket nut by liza cody. I was just in time to see at feller in motorcycle gear. Pull away from the wire and run down the street. The dogs haired off after him. You're most likely familiar with e sops fable about the speedy herr and the plotting tortoise. The hair may have lost that race due to a technical error stopping to take a nap before reaching the finish line. But the long eared. Mammals overall reputation for swiftness remains intact. It's no surprise. Then that the word hair is used as a verb meaning to move quickly the noun hair which refers in its most specific zoological sense to a member of the genus lay. Poos who's young are usually able to hop few minutes. After birth is a very old word. It first appeared as hara in a latin old english glossary around the year. Seven hundred the verb was in use by the end of the nineteenth century. And have been herring off and herring about ever. Since with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

peter sokolski liza cody four april fourth today Seven hundred Today english merriam webster dot com latin first end of the nineteenth century merriam webster
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

02:08 min | Last month

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam webster's word of the day. Four march twenty fourth. This is an ode to napa cabbage of all the cabbages on all the cabbage farms. Only you have the crisp crunch worthy of our bbc. Go korean dumplings. No other cabbage would do because no other cabbage tastes like you. We love you napa cabbage. Just on tel- green onion napa cabbage. One of many obsessively crafted ingredients. In every hearty. Flavorful caribbean dumpling. Be go go handcrafted. Go baby go. Authentic korean dumplings now in the freezer aisle. Today's word is quash spelled q. u. a. s. h. Quash is a verb means to nullify especially by judicial action. Here's the word used in a sentence from the richmond times dispatch by mark robinson in chesterfield. County a tenant had to request an emergency hearing when the landlord refused to call off a scheduled eviction. After receiving a signed declaration. a judge quashed the eviction. There are to quash verbs in the english language and although their meanings are similar they have entirely different origins. Both essentially mean to get rid of something. You can wash a rumor for example or you can quash a judicial order. The legal term. Quash meaning to nullify comes from the anglo-french words cascais or kosei spelled with a c or a q. U. meaning to annul and is ultimately from the latin word casseus meaning to void the other quash means to suppress english summarily and completely it derives from the middle english word caution meaning to smash and is ultimately from a form of the latin verb aquatic ray meaning to shake with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolowski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

peter sokolowski mark robinson chesterfield Four march twenty fourth today english merriam webster dot com Today One Both caribbean anglo-french korean merriam webster many obsessively crafted ingre
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:58 min | Last month

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam webster's of day four march nineteenth. This is an ode to napa cabbage of all the cabbages on all the cabbage farms. Only you have the crisp crunch worthy of our bbc. Go korean dumplings. No other cabbage would do because no other cabbage tastes like you. We love you napa cabbage. Just on tel- green onion napa cabbage one of many obsessively crafted ingredients. In every hearty. Flavorful korean dumpling. Be go go handcrafted. Go baby go. Authentic korean dumplings now in the freezer aisle. Today's word is prevaricate. Spelled p. r. v. a. r. i c. a. t. e. prevaricate is a verb that means to deviate from the truth to equivocate. Here's the word used in a sentence from the financier by theodore dreicer. It amused him to hear the ethical and emotional platitudes of lawyers. To see how readily they would lie steal. prevaricate misrepresent in almost any cause. And for any purpose prevaricate and sin enemies. Lie and equivocate. All refer to playing fast and loose with the truth. Lie is the bluntest of the three when you accuse someone of lying. You're saying that person was intentionally dishonest. No bones about it. Prevaricate is less accusatory and softens the bluntness of why usually implying that someone is evading the truth rather than purposely making false statements. Equivocate is similar to prevaricate but it generally implies that someone is deliberately using words that have more than one meaning as a way to conceal the truth with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

peter sokolski today three theodore dreicer merriam webster dot com Today four march nineteenth korean more than one meaning crafted ingredients one Merriam webster
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:49 min | Last month

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam webster's day four february twenty seventh. Today's word is spelled t. u. r. b. I d turbine is an adjective that means thick or opaque with or as with roiled sediment. It can also mean heavy with smoke or mist or deficient in clarity or purity. Foul muddy turbot can also mean characterized by or producing obscurity. As of mind or emotions. Here's the word used in a sense. From the naples. Daily news by amy bennett williams muddy nutrient rich lake water can harm the river making it a bid and feeding algae blooms plus. It just looks nasty. The words turbine and turgid t. u. r. g. Id which means swollen or distended or overblown pompous or bombastic are frequently mistaken for one another. And it's no wonder not only do the two words differ by only one letter they are often used in contexts where either word could fit. For example a flooded stream can be simultaneously. Cloudy and swollen and badly written prose might be both unclear and grandiloquent nevertheless the distinction between these two words however fine is an important one for conveying exact shades of meaning. So it's a good idea to keep them straight Like its relative. Turbulent comes ultimately from the latin noun tour bah meaning confusion or crowd with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

peter sokolski today Today four february twenty seventh amy bennett williams merriam webster dot com two words one letter latin Daily news both merriam webster
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:48 min | Last month

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam webster's word of the day. Four february twenty six. Today's word is mcgilla spelled m. e. g. i l. l. a. h. mcgilla is a slang noun that means a long involved story or account or an elaborate complicated production or sequence of events or everything involved in what is under consideration a synonym of ball of wax. He was the word used in a sentence from the new yorker from nineteen sixty five by s. j perelman. Well one fine day last spring. I was laying off for a week at the americana in new york. When solly phones me. A mcgilla about this inspiration that he and some other bookers had that morning in the steam room. Although the word mcgilla is a slang word in english it has perfectly respectable hebrew origins. Mcgilla derives from the dish word. Mega which itself comes from the hebrew word. Meaning scroll or volume and which is likely to be used in reference to the book of esther which is read aloud at puram celebrations. Since then that when mcgilla first appeared in english in the mid twentieth century it referred to a story that was so long and often tedious or complicated that it was reminiscent of the length of one of those scrolls. The hebrew word is serious. But the dish word mega can be somewhat playful and our word mcgilla also has inherited that lightheartedness with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

peter sokolski mcgilla mid twentieth century Four february twenty six today new york new yorker merriam webster dot com hebrew first last spring Today s. j perelman english americana nineteen sixty five one merriam webster a week
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:42 min | 2 months ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"I it's merriam webster. Were of day. Four february nineteenth. Today's word is anodyne spelled a. n. d. y. n. e. anodyne is an adjective that means serving to alleviate pain. It can also mean not likely to offend or arouse tensions innocuous. Here's the word used in a sentence from government. Technology by elizabeth see tippett. Since much of tiktok is wordless. Anodyne tiktok seems the perfect. Corporate antidote to more pointed and politicized commentary on twitter or facebook. The word anodyne came to english via latin. From greek the greek word and no dinos meaning from pain causing no pain harmless or allaying pain. And it's been used as both an adjective and noun meaning something that soothes calms or comforts. Since the sixteenth century. It has sometimes been used of things that dull or lull the senses and render painful experiences less so british statesman. Edmund burke used it this way for example in seventeen ninety when he referred to flattery as an anodyne draft of oblivion that renders won in this particular case. The deposed king. Louis the sixteenth forgetful of the flatterers true feelings nowadays in addition to describing things that dull pain anodyne can also refer to that which cause discomfort in the first place with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

peter sokolski Edmund burke Louis today facebook elizabeth twitter sixteenth century Today Four february nineteenth merriam webster dot com sixteenth english latin greek british both first place seventeen ninety tippett
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:57 min | 2 months ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"I it's merriam webster's word of the day four february seventeenth. Today's word is indissoluble spelled i. n. d. i s. s. o. l. u. b. l. e. Indissoluble is an adjective that means not dishonorable especially incapable of being annulled undone or broken. It's a synonym of the word permanent. Here's the word used in a sentence from the new york times by michael paulson. Pope francis has acknowledged the concerns of divorced catholics. He set in motion a high level debate. About whether and how the church could change its posture toward them without altering a doctrine that declares marriage to be permanent and indissoluble indissoluble and it's antonyms dishonorable meaning capable of being dissolved or disintegrated. Both date there. I print appearances to the sixteenth century. And both our debt to the latin word dissolute lease which means dishonorable capable of being dissolved while the word dissolve in that gloss may call to mind the chemical process by which something mixed with a liquid becomes part of the liquid as when salt or sugar dissolve in water indissoluble primarily relates to other meanings of the word dissolve such as destroy disintegrate terminate and annul. Something indissoluble such as a treaty. A contract or a vow is permanent. The english word dissolve in all its meanings is a cousin to indissoluble and dishonorable disillusioned. Elise derives from the latin word dissolve array from dis plus selvarajah meaning to loosen the source of our word. Dissolve with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word cups..

michael paulson peter sokolski sixteenth century four february seventeenth today Today Pope francis merriam webster dot com english latin new york both Elise catholics webster
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:36 min | 2 months ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam webster's of the day four february eleventh. Today's word it is. Voracious spelled veal. Ac i o u s voracious is an adjective that means having a huge appetite. Ravenous it can also mean excessively eager or insatiable. Here's the word used in a sentence. From the san antonio express news by jeff mcdonald a voracious reader wachner planned on making it through the novel the alchemist by brazilian author paulo. Coelho for the second time that pursue got sidetracked when coach gregg popovich him a stack of books to read including the latest memoir of former president. Barack obama voracious is one of several english words that derive from the latin verb vora which means to eat greedily to devour for aurora is also an ancestor of the word devour and the virus words which describe the diets of very animals. These include carnivorous meaning meat eating herb avarice meaning plant. Eating omnivorous meaning feeding on both animals and plants fruit avarice meaning fruit eating grim onerous meaning feeding on grass and pacifica's meaning fish eating with your word of the day i'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

jeff mcdonald peter sokolski today Barack obama Today merriam webster dot com brazilian paulo. Coelho second time coach gregg popovich four february eleventh merriam webster english both animals one latin san antonio
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:48 min | 2 months ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam webster's of the day for january twenty eighth. Today's word is jeopardy. Spelled j. o. P. a. r. d. y. Jeopardy is a noun that means exposure to or imminence of death loss or injury danger it can also mean in law contexts. The danger that an accused person is subjected to when on trial for a criminal offense. Here's the word used in a sentence from the sacramento bee by crispy chairman and cornerback. Richard sherman's in jeopardy of missing the last two games. With calf stiffness. That has bothered him since september. Geoffrey chaucer employed the word jeopardy in his late fourteenth century masterpiece the canterbury tales. But it's middle. English form can make it hard to spot. It appears in the phrase in jiu party spelled j. up rt. I e with a meaning very much akin to the words meaning in the modern phrase in jeopardy that is endanger the spellings of what we now render only as jeopardy j. e. p. a. r. d. y. Were formerly several. The oxford english dictionary reports that between the late fourteenth mid seventeenth centuries. The word was spelled in a great variety of ways among them. Up rti why o. B. e. r. t. i. e. p. a. r. d. y. and j. o. b. a. r. d. y. With your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending look cups..

Richard sherman peter sokolski january twenty eighth today Today merriam webster dot com september English Geoffrey chaucer late fourteenth mid seventeent late fourteenth century two games english merriam webster canterbury oxford
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's marian what's tres word of the day for january nineteenth. Today's word is conjecture. Spelled c. o. N. e. c. t. u. r. e. conjecture is a verb that means to arrive at or deduce by surmise. Guesswork to guess it can also mean to form a supposition or inference. Here's the word used in a sentence. From the san francisco chronicle by comu- he conjectured that the quick sprouting barley would hold the sands through the winter and spring. This would give time for the lupine to establish itself further stabilizing the dunes. Through the summer and following winter when the noun conjecture entered english in the fourteenth century it referred to the act of interpreting signs or omens especially to make prognostications that sense is now obsolete but by the sixteenth century both the noun and verb conjecture had acquired the meanings of speculation and inference that we use today conjecture derives via middle english and middle french from the latin verb. Coney kerry meaning to throw together a combination of com meaning together and jacker meaning to throw with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

peter sokolski january nineteenth today sixteenth century fourteenth century merriam webster dot com Today tres word both Coney kerry french english latin san francisco
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:49 min | 3 months ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam webster's word of the day for january twelfth. Today's word is pedantic spout p. e. d. a. n. tic. Pedantic is an adjective that means of relating to or being a pendant it can also mean narrowly stockily often ostentatiously learn it or un-imaginative dull. Here's the word used in a sentence from the new york times by kate murphy. The trouble is that listening is a skill few diligently practice even in the best of times family members friends and colleagues may retreat into themselves become easily distracted or maybe get to analytical critical or pedantic in a subconscious attempt to control the conversation when all else is uncontrollable in shakespeare's day. A pendant was a male schoolteacher. The words meaning was close to that of the italian word. Pa- dante from which the english word was adapted. Someone who was pedantic was simply a tutor or teacher. But some instructional pedants of the day must have been pompous and doll because by the early sixteen. Hundreds both pedants and pedantic had gained extended senses referring to anyone who was obnoxiously and tediously devoted to their own academic acumen when describing arguments. Pedantic can be used for instances where one relies too heavily on minor details as a way to show off one's intelligence with your word of the day i'm peter palo scheme visit merriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

january twelfth today peter palo scheme kate murphy Today english merriam webster dot com Hundreds new york merriam webster both pedants italian shakespeare's day early sixteen
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"The Merriam Webster toward the day for May fifteen. Today's word is stymie spelled S. T. Y. M. I. E. Stymie is a verb that means to present an obstacle to stand in the way of. Here's the word used in a sentence from the Ventura County Star by Kathleen Wilson. Ventura County supervisors are reviving and effort to build a bicycle path for commuting and recreation in a railroad corridor that parallels highway one twenty-six a project. That's been stymied in the past. By agricultural interests who say could jeopardize their crops. Golf was being played in Scotland as early as the fifteenth century. But it wasn't until the nineteenth century that the sport really caught on in England and North America it was also in the nineteenth century that the words stymie entered English as a noun referring to a golfing situation in which one player's ball lies between another ball and the whole on the putting green thereby blocking the line of play later stymie came to be used as a verb meaning to bring into the position of or impede by a stymie by the Early Twentieth Century. The verb was being applied in similarly vexing non. Gov contexts with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolow Ski Visit Merriam Webster Dot Com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

Merriam Webster Merriam Webster Dot Com Ventura County Star Ventura County Early Twentieth Century Peter Sokolow England Kathleen Wilson Golf North America S. T. Y. M. Scotland
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Mary what's the day for May Twelfth? Today's word is flotsam. Spelled F. L. O. T. S. A. M. Flotsam is a noun that means floating wreckage of a ship or its cargo broadly floating debris it can also mean a floating population as of emigrants or castaways or miscellaneous or unimportant material. Flotsam can also mean more. Broadly debris or remains. Here's the word used. In a sentence. From the Columbia and Herald by Cheryl Schweitzer. The set is one room. But what a room stuffed with the furniture flotsam and jetsam of a half century. And it's not like the stage crew could go out and rent a lot of nineteen thirty s era furniture so the company has borrowed furniture from local residents for the duration of the play. English-speakers started using the words flotsam Jetsam and Logan L. A. G. A. N. As legal terms in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the earliest evidence of flotsam dates from around the early sixteenth hundreds. The three words were used to establish claims of ownership to the three types of seaborne vessel originated goods. They named Flotsam was anything from a shipwreck. The word comes from the old French for day to float. Jetsam and Logan were items thrown overboard to lighten ship. Lagging was distinguished from jet. Some by having a boy attached so the goods could be found if they sank in the nineteenth century. When and Jetsam took on extended meanings they became synonyms but they are still very often paired with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolow Ski Visit Merriam Webster Dot Com today for definitions word. Play and trending word look ups..

F. L. O. T. S. A. M. Flotsam Jetsam Merriam Webster Dot Com Logan L. A. G. A. N. Peter Sokolow Cheryl Schweitzer Mary Columbia
"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

10:27 min | 1 year ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Support for this podcast. And the following message. Come from behind the Irishman. The official companion podcasts for netflixing new film the Irishman Schmidt Co Star and Comedian Sebastian. MANISCALCO pulls back the curtain on how the film was made with director. Martin Scorsese and co-stars Robert De Niro Al Pacino. We know and Joe Patchy sharing their experiences filming the upcoming crime drama behind. The Irishman is available now on apple podcasts. spotify stitcher or wherever wherever you listen to podcasts with new episode drops every Monday this message comes from. NPR SPONSOR Doctors Without Borders Doctors Without Borders teams confront hard facts in conflict and crisis zones when others look away they step into act in emergencies and their aftermath. They provide essential healthcare run hospitals and clinics perform surgery battle epidemics carry out. Vaccination campaigns and more information on their efforts and campaigns in over seventy countries can be found at doctorswithoutborders Doctors Without Borders Dot. Org Hey al before we get back to the show WanNA remind you one more time of how you can keep this show coming to you every week by by supporting the work of your local. NPR member station to do that. Go to donate to NPR DOT org slash. Sam Or just text the word Sam to to the number four nine six four eight. We'll send you a text message with a link where you can find your local station and make your contribution message and data rates may apply you can visit. NPR DOT org slash s terms for privacy and text message terms. We we are back. You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR. The show where we catch up on the week that was I'm Sam Sanders in studio with two guests Kirk Siegler. NPR national correspondent Senate covering the West and rural issues and layla follow NPR national correspondent covering culture diversity and race. My friends it is time for my who said that really made it to really drag it out I have anxiety about the trivia because last time we failed so miserably twitter stock. Santa got no either either way the paycheck every two weeks tell way can I just carol instead. Oh Fun fact about Kirk and every listeners. Sner should know this Every year around Christmas time Kirk organizers like Carolyn gets a group of folks together and they go door to door snit Christmas thousands yes do logistical and operational issues. This year we make spending it for a year which earns one year I was at Crooks Holiday Party. And he's like all right it's time to go. Caroline and I was not going and I stayed in his house not watch Netflix on his account. They went out to sing anyway. I digress it. y'All know how this game works. I share a quote from the week. You have to guess who said that or get a key word from the story the winner per usual. It's absolutely nothing. Were low budget here at public radio. No buzzers just yell out your answer I quote. Just tell me what we're talking about here. When we saw them today you could see some loose authors in the glue around the hat? It's definitely a concern In the glue around the hat and feathers feathers we're talking about like royalty The royal family. These are the least royal of the Bird Kingdom pigeons. Yes yes Janis Royal Family Mail pigeons. But you don't know why no I have no this story just from your old stomping grounds Las Vegas area. So there's this really crazy story happening out around Las Vegas. Someone is gluing Luoyang tiny multicolored cowboy hats on pigeons has. Oh wait. I did see that I totally forgot. Yes it's bananas and so like there were these videos floating around this week of these pigeons and cowboy hats and the first everyone's like Oh my God it's cute. But then you realize there glued on and that's pretty cruel anyways. That quote comes from a riot hillman. She runs an animal. Rescue Service called lofty and they nurse pigeons and doves back to health and they've been helping Try to figure out what's going on with these pins and the cowboy hat exactly as you keep a pigeon still to carrier pigeons like do they already trained to fly. Get the cowboy hats and you can do that. You know you could theoretically trained carrier pigeon till like fly to the country Western store get a hat fly back. You can't try and we went on its head though true. I don't care how annoying pigeons are you. Don't do that to them. Weird I mean. I hope those pigeons get revenge like they. You better crap all over that house. All right I point goes to Leyla he really competitiveness. All right second quote You can just guess the word that we're we're talking about in this quote I have to say it's surprising to me. It's a word we all know in love so many people were talking about this word hint. It's the word of the year there. Yes Okay Leyla. She came to win. Kirk were you at. I'm sitting right here at home. Not Winning so that quote comes from Peter Sokolski from Merriam Webster Dictionary. He was talking about their announcement this week. That the Merriam mm-hmm Webster Nineteen Word of the year is they They apparently had a three hundred and thirteen percent increase in look ups on Merriam Webster Dot Com this year compared to last year. And we know that they is used increasingly to refer to people who are trans or non binary or gender non conforming and this year has been a big year of acceptance for those in that community. They I'm into it me too. I like to use the word. y'All also not gender-specific very neutral in terms of gender and it's nice and welcoming. I agree all right Last quote this one's Finey This is a fill in the blank. It was a unified command decision to call out a secondary bus to be dispatched to pick up the stranded students and remotely transport to the local. The high school at this time. The incident is being ruled as a prank. As blank was discharged on the bus. What was discharged on this school bus? That made the whole bus to be evacuated thing. Young boys are over. Because we're you know something that young uh-huh teenage boys us a lot to excess and it smells a lot spice breath. Yes axe body spray. There is a teenage nephew. There was on right now. Oh I figured there was a school bus in Paris Florida in which some young kids were trying to pull a prank. They sprayed so much body spray they had to evacuate the bus. A few of the kids had to get treated for a mild respiratory irritation. Everyone was okay but like that's A. Psa of you ever heard one. Oh Yeah Kirk. How old were you when you stop worry next bodies grow? Do I have to answer that. Do you say the past tense. I can say I've never worn axe body. Sarah slather that on and well. It's it's like one of those things it you can't stop and they say on the bottle you can actually spread anywhere so then you spray it everywhere. Okay moving along. Anyway that quote Oh came from the parish fire district in Parrish Florida talking about the school bus in Paris that was fumigated by X.. Bodies Leyla you came into this game very very nervous but I happened to tell you you one thank you yes and you got all three. Can you say she won when technically neither of US really knew do much of the context no no no. I knew that both everyone a and I did. Yeah that's true. I only knew one for real like let's word of the year just like to win new nine sore. All right that concludes who said that my favorite game. Congratulations late. Let you get nothing but bragging rights. Yes yes all right now in the show as we always do each week we ask our listeners to share with us the best thing that happened to them all week we encourage folks to Brag they always do Brent at the tape. Hi Sam this is grace from Meli. The best part about my week was taking my last final for Calculus to neither will have to think about converging are integrating anything at least until early February when I'll be taking in calculus three cheers calculus free holidays. Hello My name is Christina. And I'm calling from Gaithersburg Maryland. This is Megan from Boise. Idaho up this Sarah in Atlanta Georgia. The best thing that happened to me all week was that a new job. The best news I received this week was a job offer Paid it off my car. I graduated from Nursing School. My sister had her first baby. And I'm an anti best. The best part of my week is having my six month. Old Son's fever break I twelve month. Old Daughter slept through the night. Hey Hey Sam. This is Dan in Fayetteville Arkansas. The best part of my week was finally getting home after spending five months and driving. Twelve thousand fifty two miles to visit fifteen the national parks. Your show many great soundtracks with Dr Thanks. Hi Sam this is Laurie from Centralia Washington. The the best part of my week was seeing a short little video of my first great grandbaby and of course. She's the most beautiful granddaughter ever great-granddaughter I'm old anyway. You have a great week salmon everybody there and a great holiday to you. Thanks for the show..

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"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"The Merriam Webster's word of the day for October twenty first. Today's word is comprised made up of as in phrases like a team comprising nine players was correct and that comprise meaning to make up as in phrases like the nine players who comprise the team was not this disputed use is most common in the passive construction to be comprised of has in a team comprised of nine players until relatively recently this less favoured sense appeared mostly in scientific writing but current evidence you'd a massive recreational complex that comprises a concert hall four restaurants two hotels and a theater the word comprise has undergone institute comprise also means to include especially within a particular scope. Here's the word used in a sense. The city developers plans include knows that it is now somewhat more common in general use than the words other meetings with your word of the day I'm Peter Sokolski visit Merriam Webster Dot Com today stanton shift in usage since first appearing in English in the Fifteenth Century for many years Grammarians insisted that the usage of comprise meaning to be Eh definitions wordplay and trending word look ups.

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"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"merriam webster dot com" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"The Merriam Webster's word of the day for October fourth. Today's word is food dark spelled F. U. T. H. A. R. K. Food Dark is a noun that means the runic alphabet any of several alphabets used by the Germanic Manic People's from about the third to thirteenth centuries. Here's the word used in a sentence from the routed handbook of scripts and alphabets. The oldest inscriptions in the food dark were found in Denmark and northern Germany dating from the first century. AD At that time the inventory consisted of twenty twenty four signs later by the eighth century the range used in Denmark was reduced to sixteen the word futher refers to a writing system. Tim used by Germanic peoples and especially by the Scandinavians and Anglo Saxons from about the third to thirteenth centuries. Its origin is unclear but a likely theory is that it was developed by the Goths from the trust can alphabet of northern Italy with perhaps some aspects being influenced by the Latin Latin alphabet of the first and second centuries. The word food dark itself comes from the sounds of the first six letters used in the earliest of the main in runic script varieties. They look like F. U. T. H. A. R. K. while eventually fully displaced by the Latin alphabet. Ah Futher was still used occasionally for charms and memorial inscriptions in Scandinavia into the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries with your word of the day I'm Peter Sokolow Ski Visit Merriam Webster Dot Com today for definitions wordplay and trending word Cups

Merriam Webster Merriam Webster Dot Com Denmark Peter Sokolow Scandinavia Italy F. U. T. H. A. Tim Germany F. U. T. H. A. R. K.