25 Burst results for "Mercatus Center"

"mercatus center" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on WDRC

"For through that, without really talking about it. The only come to we have only come to learn about the Negative effects of them in very recent years, so these institutions they are set up under the guise of cultural exchange, for example, or the teaching of Chinese language. Which are in fact innocent activities. Right, So we actually find that good, But underneath they are trying to pressure hold. Universities will not talk about Xinjiang genocide a week of genocide or Probably the market the movement in Hong Kong that would be very concerned. Well, and in fact, they love the fact that we've got a culture war going on right now. While China presents a very unified front, there's no culture war going on inside of China right now, is there There's not really a cultural war. But in fact, it's very interesting. You brought it up because in China, there is a different kind of, uh, I would say social discontent in the sense that economic development in the past 20 years I've created a lot of income inequality. And so younger folks now, for example, they are not really able to afford expanded housing and urban area and so some people yeah, hunger, especially younger people in China. They even go so far as to, for example, learning about mouses Maoism again and saying that we should probably struggle against capitalism. There's different kind of struggle or different kind of oppression in China along economic lines more than you know, race or gender in the United States, But the logic I think it's similar. And I think it's damaging whether for the U. S. Or China about any society to to counter oppression with a different kind of oppression, which I think would be damaging to our society for the long term. I'm talking to Dr Wei Fung Jiang, who is a senior research fellow at George Mason University at the Mercatus Center. Don Caroline should comment on this because it just seems very strange to me that you've got Nike. You've got some of the other major companies that I mentioned. These are companies that literally will say we won't have our employees traveled to certain states in America. Because they don't have the right bathroom rules that accommodate transgender or because we don't like their history or changes in their voting laws that displaced the baseball All Star game That's going to happen in about a week or so, and they're all politically correct at home. But then, with the Olympics, they say, Oh, we're completely fine was supporting in some cases, America hating American athletes going to compete in a Chinese Olympics that gives that country a great amount of stature. Probably not as much money as the Olympics usually brings in because no no in person people in the stands, but But they'll they'll have their they'll have their own athletes that they sponsor go to a Chinese Olympics in a country where you've got two million weaker is locked up in prison camps, in some cases being used as slave labor to make American products and that's okay. But they don't want to travel to a state that has the wrong transgender bathroom rules. Can you help me sort that one out? I.

United States Hong Kong Nike Olympics America Don Caroline two million George Mason University Wei Fung Jiang U. S. Chinese Mercatus Center American Xinjiang week years China past 20 a week All Star
U.S. gains 916,000 new jobs in March

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:53 min | 1 year ago

U.S. gains 916,000 new jobs in March

"Hundred sixteen thousand new jobs in this economy in march restaurants and hotels education construction manufacturing. Honestly i could just go on naming industries. They have all added jobs. We're down to an unemployment rate of six percent even and that is with a whole bunch of people getting back into the labor force so marketplace's mitchell hartman gets us going with the goods of this very good jobs. Report positive comments were a dime. A dozen as i did. My economist calls today starting with nicole. Golden at the atlantic council definitely signs of a boom. Very happy to see it. What's michael farren at the mercatus center pumped up. Is the trajectory. Two hundred and thirty. Three thousand jobs added in january than four hundred sixty eight thousand in february and doubling again to more than nine hundred thousand in march. You think marches number is high april. And may's numbers are going to be positively eye-popping as larger and larger proportions of the population are vaccinated and more of the economy reopens the breadth of job growth. Is what impressed kurt. Long at the national association of federally insured credit unions not just hard hit bars and restaurants but retail transportation. The building trades finance. A lot of businesses are looking ahead to really strong consumer demand and they don't want to be caught flat-footed without the necessary employees. Getting everyone back to work especially unemployed. Parents will require more rebound in services for those workers says nicole golden at the atlantic council. We need childcare to come back because it employs a lot of women and in particular minority women and because the burden of care and school closures have pushed so many millions of women out of the labor force. Childcare jobs are still fifteen percent below pre pandemic

Mitchell Hartman Michael Farren Atlantic Council Mercatus Center National Association Of Federa Nicole Kurt Nicole Golden
Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

"Lead. Today comes to us. Courtesy of the ever given that is a thirteen hundred foot. Long two hundred foot wide containership. One of the biggest of its kind. That is as of this moment. Most embarrassingly stuck jamming up the suez canal. Nobody going north not going south one of the key routes of global trade basically closed we have gotten christine. Mcdaniel on zoomed. Help us understand how this might play out. She's a senior research. Fellow at the mercatus center at george mason university. Thanks so much for coming on. Thank you nice to be here. So i have to tell you the first thing i thought when i saw pictures of this ship turned sideways in the canal. Other than how the heck did that happen was wow. The global supply chain is really really fragile. If this can block a major artery yes. It is fragile. There's lots of moving parts but remember the global shipping industry logistics. They are used to supply shocks demand. Shocks weather related war-related. So you know it's nothing they haven't dealt with before fair enough but if you are a a tanker company looking at this traffic jam in the suez canal. How long are you gonna wait and let your extremely valuable ships. Sit there in the backlog before you go around down the south of africa and angola the long way round right. Well economists especially trade. Economists have spent some time trying to calculate how much time cost and international trade The couple economists demanded that each additional delay of shipping is equivalent to about a half a percent to two percents patera And then of course. This is cascading. Because it's not just the stuff on that particular ship That's that's delayed by that. it's everything else. That's getting delayed because of

Suez Canal Mercatus Center Mcdaniel George Mason University Christine Angola Africa
"mercatus center" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on KOMO

"Blank today on the Dan Patrick Show this question Are you involved in personnel decisions? Have you been involved in personnel decisions? Not not as much. I don't You know, I think that you know what do you want to be involved for us? I think it helps. I think it helps it to be involved. More Ross Wilson not happy with the number of sacks and hard knocks he took in 2020. Former Kansas City and San Diego head football coach Marty Schottenheimer has died. 8 77 from Alzheimer's. He won more than 200 games with four different teams into his son, Brian was Seattle's offensive play caller Sports A 10 and 40. After the hour Bill Swartz come on news and the Coma news time now for 11 health leaders north of the border are predicting a possible second pandemic, causing lockdowns and stalled economies to linger even longer comes Brian Calvert explains why some are starting to panic. The words came from the mouth of Dr Eileen developed health officer in Toronto. We are in a position of great uncertainty with respect. Two variants. What we know. Is alarming to clarify her concern isn't over the covert strange doctors have been treating the last several months. Her concern are the variance in Britain and South Africa as well as Brazil that have made it to this continent. We are in a transition from one pandemic. To another a transition. To a new pandemic. The currently known variants are said to be treated with current vaccines bought these new strains from these three countries appear to be more contagious. They spread easier and faster with the possibility of spreading faster than current vaccination efforts can actually keep up with British Columbia Health officer, Dr Bonnie Henry agrees. Sadly, yes, it does change the game in some ways, if it starts to take off and become dominant in the community, who says she's focused on travel restrictions as a way to keep more new strains out of her province tends to be a younger population. So these are people who have traveled or have been in contact with Who have traveled for the most part, travel restrictions have been imposed on those coming into the U. S. For the same reason, which is why many health experts aren't is worried about the new variants. As long as we can pick up the pace with vaccinations. Some are comparing it to a foot race, saying we win if vaccination rates can outrun the variance. If not, there's a possibility of a second pandemic. Andrew Pollard, chief investigator of the Oxford Vaccine trial, told the BBC. He's confident the current vaccines can make a difference. With these variants. It might not prevent covert altogether, but it would prevent the most serious symptoms, he's quoted as saying. As long as we have enough immunity to prevent severe disease, hospitalizations and death And we're going to be fine in the future in the pandemic. Brian Calvert camo news camo news time for 13, Or maybe see news TECH trends. A new report evaluates whether your state is ready for the drone. Revolution delivery drones have said to take this guy's in a big way in the coming years. Red score up senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center says it means local and state governments need to get plans in place because there are privacy issues. There are trust past issues are nuisance issues, and it would behoove all of us for states to start thinking about these things before. Is thrust upon them. The center of the new report looks at what states are the most ready for commercial drone businesses to start operating score up, says they did this by looking at laws around airspace over 20 states. Loud airspace, leasing, sometimes over state highway,.

Brian Calvert Marty Schottenheimer Andrew Pollard Mercatus Center officer Dr Bonnie Henry Dan Patrick Ross Wilson Alzheimer Bill Swartz Dr Eileen British Columbia Health senior research fellow Brian Toronto Seattle head football coach Coma San Diego
"mercatus center" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on KOMO

"And Park around state route 5 to 7 North bound four or five of the slow between Talbot in Northeast 44th. Our next Cuomo traffic up 7 34 report This time is sponsored by the extra Jin temporal scanner. Everyone's temperatures very throughout the day. So it's important to screen for fever in the morning and in the evening fever is a sign of covert 19. So stay safe with the ex surgeon temporal scanner. Now from the diversified crawl Space Weather Center, the forecast and it could get interesting or the next few days. Partly sunny today dry and the high temperature about 40. We may see some more sunshine by this afternoon. Frosty weather overnight, though tomorrow still partly sunny, but some spots could start seeing a few snowflakes like on the Olympic Peninsula. Tomorrow night breezy a chance of snow lows in the mid twenties, and then we start seeing a chance of snow it for some respect. Thursday, Friday and even Saturday Mostly cloudy and 33 downtown Comeau News wants to know. Did you hear now? Kierra has the question in our Daily news trivia contest. Well, a recent survey reveals that one in five of us carry this in our glove box and I'll give you a hint. This item is normally found in your bathroom. What is it? Well, if you're the first caller with the correct answer, you score a digital download of Peter Jackson's middle Earth saga. You get the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings. All six films here the numbers to call 206421 Coma. Our toll free 877397 KOMO the winning answer at 7 40 from ABC News TECH TRENDS, A new report evaluates whether your state is ready for the drone Revolution. Delivery drones have said to take this guy's in a big way in the coming years. Bread score up senior research fellow with the Mercatus Center says it means local and state governments need to get plans in place because there are privacy issues..

Space Weather Center Mercatus Center fever Cuomo Comeau News Olympic Peninsula senior research fellow KOMO Jin Peter Jackson Daily news ABC Kierra
"mercatus center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Busy today. Getting ready for the incoming administration were various and sundry Senate committees holding confirmation hearings for some of President elect Biden's nominees among them, Janet Yellen. Pick for Treasury secretary As you might expect a lot of talk from the Senate Finance Committee about how much the government ought to be spending to repair this economy and a lot of answers from Yellen. Like this one. To avoid doing what we need to do now to address endemic and the economic damage that it's causing would likely leave us in a worse place, fiscally and with respect to long are our debt situation. Been taking the steps that are necessary and doing that through deficit, finance deficit finance debt and how much of a big deal it ought be right now is our story today marketplaces Nancy Marshall Ganz or has it The thinking of Janet Yellen and many other economists goes like this. We need to borrow and spend whatever it takes to get the economy back on its feet now, former Fed economist Claudius Psalm says. Think of the economy like a house with a leaky roof. If you don't fix it now, you'll have a big, expensive mess to clean up later when it rains. That all cost so much more than if you just fix the roof in the very beginning. When you saw that we had a problem. Some says if the government doesn't pour enough money into say, keeping business is going so they don't have to lay off employees. The economy won't fully recover. Besides, says Doug Elmendorf, dean of the Harvard Kennedy School and former director of the Congressional Budget Office, If you invest in the economy now you can help it not just recover. You could make it stronger. If we use government borrowing to build infrastructure conduct research. Then the debt will leave our Children grandchildren better off. Because of the value of those investments At today's hearing, Janet Yellen said. We do need to be responsible about the growing federal debt. But David Beckworth, senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, says investing now means the debt will be less of a burden so the more people are working, the more Taxable income. There is the more revenue the federal government gets in the easier it is to pay off the debt going forward. Beckwith says. The national debt could even double without causing big problems that would trip up.

Janet Yellen Senate Finance Committee Senate Nancy Marshall Ganz Doug Elmendorf Claudius Psalm Biden David Beckworth Harvard Kennedy School George Mason University Mercatus Center President Beckwith senior research fellow director of the Congressional
"mercatus center" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Would you get a covert shot for 1500 bucks? You know for 1500 bucks right about now. I'd do anything we discuss tomorrow morning. 5. 30 wls am 8 90. Welcome back to season. The mention Paris for joining someone is done. Boudreau, senior fellow the Mercatus Center just really beautiful obituary about the life and legacy of the late Walter Williams down thanks much for joining the show. My pleasure. So how did you get to know Walter Williams? Oh, my gosh. Well, he was my colleague. I started teaching at George Mason in 1985 is my first job, and Walt was on the faculty then, but I knew of him before I became aware of him. When I was an undergraduate back in the late 19 seventies, I would see him. On every single one of Phil Donahue show, and I would read some things he had in the newspapers. So I was impressed with him long before I met him and one of the things that was really pleasant. In meeting Walter was learning that the private person is exactly what you'd expect from his public persona. He was a man of principle. He was a man of deep learning, and he was a very caring individual. Who was also incredibly courageous when done and talking about sort of life and legacy of Walter Williams, obviously having been a proponent of his work, and we had him on the program. Ah, couple of times it is it is pretty incredible than intellect is greatest has was not widely known by the American public outside of conservative circles. We see people who are absolute frauds and Inteligencia being touted. Like the next great thing I mean, from candy comes to mind just not to name any names, but that's the name I gave out. And meanwhile, Walter wouldn't specially was an expert in this field who actually had studied in depth. The economics of racial inequality in the United States has given short shrift by the media. Yeah, well, that's because what he found did not sit the media's narrative of identity, politics and depression. What he found was that free competitive markets under the rule of law that is color blind works best and works best not just for people who are already wealthy or people who are And racial majorities but works best, especially for the poor and minorities. But of course, the progressive left. They have to have it the other way around. They have to have victims. They have to have people to two for whom they conserve the saviors. And Walter was basically saying, Look, wait. I don't want my people. I don't want black people to be treated like that. But of course, that's it runs against the prevailing narrative. And so Walter was largely ignored. Sadly, as you point out, it is incredible How pervasive that narrative is. There's an article in The New York Times and probably go through the next half hour here on the show. Which they're a couple sociologist talking about why racial progress stalled out in 1970. They go through a litany of reasons, and not once does it occur to them that perhaps government policy directed unequal outcome, rather than equal opportunity might be the reason for that stowing out. It's appalling isn't I mean this'll at least ought to be considered among the possible explanations. But it's not in my view, and I were in this largely from Walter and also Thomas Soul and a handful of other people. Charles Murray in his 94 book Losing Ground. The welfare state has been a terrible enemy. To the very people it's designed to help. It's been a great friend to do gooders and the people who are seeking government power. It hasn't been very good for the blacks. It has not been very good for minorities. It's bit's held them back at Walter argue that with with solid theory, he argued it with data and again as you rightly lament, he was largely ignored. So for folks want to get familiar with Walter Williams work and ah, lot of the ways that that he sort of appeared in public where temporary media right making it appear on shows like this one is a gastric would appear for Rush Limbaugh and the post for him. That sort of stuff sort of exist in time. It's not really archive. What's the best way to get familiar with Walter's work? Walter for I think 40 years more than 40 years, wrote a weekly column and he was very proud. He never missed a week. In fact, the last one came out on the day he died on December 2nd. He wrote a weekly column that was syndicated by creators and these are available free online. You can just Google Walter E. Williams creators and you'll go to the link and it has all of his columns and you can click on anyone. And read them. Many of these columns have been collected in in in book form, the Hoover Institution has has.

Walter Walter E. Williams Walter Williams Walt Paris Phil Donahue Hoover Institution United States Google Mercatus Center Boudreau senior fellow Rush Limbaugh Inteligencia George Mason Charles Murray The New York Times Thomas Soul
"mercatus center" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Let's start when talking about Social Security, your piece that you wrote for the Mercatus Center. You said in that piece that sustainable solvency will include a blend of eligibility age changes. Revenue increases. And moderation of benefit growth rates. All of those are politically difficulty and social Security often is the third rail of politics so Any thoughts on how a proposed solution to the Social Security dilemma can get the type of supporting Congress. It would need to actually be enacted. Well, that's a great question, and actually, it comes very close to my motivation for writing the study to begin with. Because I think the typical assumption is that Attaining solvency is all bad news, right? We have we have benefit promises that well exceed the amounts that incoming payroll taxes will be able to fund and the process of aligning our benefit promises and are incoming Tax assessments is an is an unpleasant exercise. Right? And people think of it in terms of taking things away from people. And of course, politicians don't like to do that. What I've tried to do with my study is to explain that there is actually an upside here, that a lot of the things that we can do to make the system or equitable, more efficient. Better targeted on people who need it and giving fewer windfalls. Two people who don't need it actually will wind up not only strengthening system finances and slowing the growth of costs, but actually enable the system to work better for the people who participate in it. One of the points that you make is that in many instances, social Security redistribute income from folks who have less income to folks who have more. Can you drill down a little bit on what you just said? How is it that Social Security does that? And what would the policy solution? Be think The short answer is it's complicated and there is a lot of different examples and fixes that that should be made. But I think the first thing to understand is that Social Security is at best. It's a zero sum game, right. It's not Savings program. It's not a program that's building capital. It's not a program that is increasing. Our national stock of resource is to finance retirement income. All it does is move money around. Transfers income from some people to other people, which means that no one can actually gain money net from the system unless somebody else loses that much money or more. And so when we look at the system we have to think about is it moving money around in ways that make sense in which serve the program's sort of social insurance purposes Now, as some examples of how it does this regressive weighs. One classic example is the so called non working spouse benefit, which is a very regressive benefit it it basically gives people On working spouses. Ah benefit, which is equal to 50% of the benefit of the households Primary wage earner on on practice. What that means is that if you are a Single mother working every day for minimum wage for an entire career and contributing payroll. Taxes your entire life. You're actually going to earn less of the benefit through that process than if you stay at home with a nonworking spouse and Mary, a very high income earner. And don't pay any payroll taxes and examples like that redirect resources away from people who need it more and give windfalls to people who need it less and there's there's a number of examples like that throughout the system. This is coupled with the problem as you pointed out that the cost of Social Security are growing much faster than what the earnings of workers who are paying into the system are growing. So what can be done to address that problem so that we don't continue to take more money out as an actuarial percentage than what we put in? I would say that there's a couple of things. One is that there is a method of indexing benefits now that actually causes are outlays to grow faster than workers earning. It's basically in next to growth and something called the national Average wage index. Which tends to grow substantially faster than price inflation. So as we're all living longer and benefits are automatically index to grow each year at this particular rate. What happens is that It imposes a much higher tax burden and cost burden on worker's earnings Over time. We don't have toe cut benefits per se, but we could choose a different method of indexing the growth of benefits going forward. So that the costs don't continue to outpace worker's earnings by so much. That's one thing that comes to mind. There are other things that come to mind if we had more time. Why don't we talk a little bit more about that? Then another related to one of the points that we were just talking about about how the system Rather crudely and inaccurately from tries to provide higher returns to people in the lower income end. Now one of the approximations that has made in the benefit formula. Is that it actually doesn't operate as a function of what your wage earnings are every year. The basic idea behind the benefit formula is that if you are There's a connection between the taxes you pay in the benefit. You get out, so it keeps track of your taxable earnings over your lifetime and bases your benefit on that. However, what it does is it basically creates an average figure for each person. It actually doesn't use your actual annual earnings each year to determine The benefits that you have accrued now that all sounds very technical, but the bottom line is that the system can't tell the difference between a lower income person earning A $40,000 a year for 30 years of earnings from higher income person who's earning $80,000 a year for 15 years worth of earnings. In other words, the system doesn't really differentiate between someone who's actually of low income. Versus someone who simply doesn't work that many years. And if you actually go through the data and look at the people who are getting rid of the highest windfall returns from the system and who are deemed by the system to be very low income workers. Very high percentage of them are actually people who have income from other sources, either because they are immigrants who got a lot of their income when working abroad before coming into the post security system or because they're people who are married to a higher wage earner or something like that. Only a small minority of the people getting those windfall returns. Actually households of need. So if we were to redesign the benefit formula, so people actually accrued benefits with each year of their taxable earnings rather than this crude, averaging Would be able to target benefits. Ah, lot more effectively. We are talking with Charles Blake House who is a senior research strategist with the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He has produced a policy paper, strengthening Social Security and analytical framework. Tell us a little bit about Mercatus. And where can folks go if they would like to read your research and learn more about this topic? Well, Mercatus is an academic research center.

Mercatus Center Mercatus Congress Charles Blake House Mary George Mason University
International students may need to leave US if their universities transition to online-only learning

Lars Larson

05:33 min | 2 years ago

International students may need to leave US if their universities transition to online-only learning

"And it's universities, especially the public universities have, I think kind of a strange relationship of the rest of the world are universities air sought out by international students from around the world who want to come here to the United States? And they want to study? We understand that we understand those universities love those international students to because they tend to pay the greatest amount of tuition. This is even if they're a taxpayer funded taxpayer owned. University. But now that many of those universities are in a position where they're having to do online education of the students, is there any good reason for the student? I have to live in the United States and be granted a visa to do that? Dan Griswald joins me now who's the Mercatus Center's director of trade and immigration, Dan? Welcome back to the program. So the president has issued. Sorry about that. Go ahead. I'm glad to be with you was. I'm glad to have you with me. So this directive from the Trump administration that would take away international college student visas. If they're coursework is entirely online. Anything unreasonable about that? I think it is unreasonable and it's unnecessary one. It's very short notice. You know, just a few weeks before the fall semester starts. If they are going online for all classes, maybe not necessarily do that all semester. There are still reasons to want to stay on campus. You can meet with other students. You Khun do extracurricular things. They have labs and things like that. So It's just totally on unnecessary large and it's going to hurt the U. S economy In the short run. As you mentioned, it's going to deprive us of billions of dollars of tuition payments, potentially It's going to hurt us in the larger run by discouraging these students from coming here, and many of them go on to feel important jobs here found important companies and boost our economy. Okay, I'm a little bit of two minds about this. So, Dan, I'll admit to being a bit ambivalent about this because on one hand, I hear, but these students come here and many times they stay here, inform companies here and they start businesses and they employ people. Those are all good things. I'd like to see American citizen students do that. And there are times when I look at Universities, even in my own neck of the woods, and I think they're pursuing the international students more than they're pursuing the students in the in their own state. In other words, the state that owns the operation owns the The University provides taxpayer funding for it so that it benefits foreign students and if they end up going home, and I'm thinking, in particular about China or China says sends its students here. They learn a lot of things, and then they go home. Or they perhaps worked for a a big tech company here and then take all that that that knowledge and information and capability back to their home country and they compete against the United States. Well, I think that can happen. But there's no trade off us. Students and foreign students can prosper together. And in fact, US students are better off if we have foreign students here and then work beside them and start those companies and create those patents, But you know most of the, but let's look at doctoral students in the stem subjects, right science technology engineering. Mathematics, 72% of them. The doctoral students will stay here for 10 years or more. That percentage is even higher among Indian and Chinese students, so some of the Chinese students to go back Most of them stay here and you mentioned cos you know, cos like zoom Tesla's space six Instagram. Those were all founded by foreigners who came here as student and stayed here and found that those companies Which were a great benefit to consumers, and also have created a lot of wealth and jobs for Americans. We're going to have less of that activity because of this action by the administration. If those universities were forced had on ly or primarily depend on domestic students, students who are you know the sons and daughters of American citizens or American Green card holders. Would that necessarily mean that those companies would not be created by those students instead of instead of foreign students? Well, US entrepreneurs do found those companies. But no, I think we have fewer of those companies founded. You know, we favor native born students right? They get the in state tuition. They have plenty of opportunities to go to college. No American student is being crowded out by, for instance, In fact, the fact that the foreign students pay full freight. On their tuition means that the colleges can offer lower tuition native born American students and helping them get an education and have better paying jobs for their careers. Okay, because I don't want to sound jingoistic. But I'm also aware I've seen universities and say, We've had to put a cap on this before China virus, But we've had to put a cap on the number of students and I say, Well, hold on. You're still taking lots of international students. And they say, Well, that's because we're getting 30 or $40,000 a year from them. We're only getting 10,000 year from the students in ST And again, they seem to be more interested in those $30,000 payments than they do, making more room for American students. I think that could be true at some schools. Most universities are seeing declining in moments, or at least they're having to hunt harder and harder for this. There's plenty of opportunities for Americans. American students and the foreign students actually create more opportunities because they helped keep the tuition down so it could be more affordable for American students.

United States Dan Griswald China Donald Trump Mercatus Center Khun President Trump Director The University
"mercatus center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Who are not showing symptoms the World Health Organization now since it's rare for someone who's a symptomatic to infect others chief medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta says that might make a difference it gives context raises a better sense of who to focus on to make sure the people who the bright people getting isolated and the right contacts are also getting quarantined I'm John Lawrence another finding from the medical community according to a study of six countries published in the scientific journal nature shut downs probably prevented about sixty two million confirmed code nineteen cases including nearly four point eight million in the United States so we will turn to of that particular problem but it's certainly not gone away and in some respects that may never go away it may be with us annually just like the flu is but looking at another aspect of that tonight we turn to Bruce Yandle contributor to the Washington examiner's beltway confidential blog a distinguished adjunct fellow with the Mercatus center at George Mason University that's located in Fairfax Virginia just outside the nation's capital he's also dean emeritus of the Clemson University College of business and behavioral science which is all of the way of saying that Bruce Yandle knows about the economy thank you for joining us tonight delighted to be with you Jim let's start off with the how the economy is doing I suppose all right off the top we should point out that like so many aspects of the pandemic cases the Taliban use on the like the economy I suppose is not one big national picture but a host of little pictures it is in the region wide.

World Health Organization Dr Sanjay Gupta John Lawrence United States flu Mercatus center George Mason University Fairfax Virginia Bruce Yandle Jim Washington Clemson University College of Taliban
Covid-19 Spreads: Is a global economic downturn on the cards?

John Batchelor

08:23 min | 2 years ago

Covid-19 Spreads: Is a global economic downturn on the cards?

"Show covert nineteen the corona virus beginning in China but now we see the news stories the satellite nation of South Korea it's watching turmoil in its production lines the non satellite nation Iran is cut out from the world community and world manufacturing so we're going to set that aside and go to northern Italy where there is a super spreader we're told and there are Italian town shutting down particularly Italian towns near the best mills the Italian mills now I'm describing economics but I'm doing it anecdotally so I welcome Christine McDaniel a senior research fellow at the Mercatus center who is approaching covered nineteen from the point of view of world economics Christina very good evening to you mention in your remarks we don't have a great deal of data but what we have is there any indication of an analogy to the corona virus have we seen the world deal with at this scale of threat before and do we know what it means for the economy when and if it recovers good evening to you good evening thank you so much that to be here on this fascinating it's not grim topic well the condiments you know we look at our historic events and course there's the mayors and the sars outbreaks although this one is a somewhat different in the sense that the incubation period as the actual duration is not yet known at first it was reported to be two weeks but then just today we're hearing out of China out that there was an extra long coated nineteen incubation dad a whole family of six tested positive for the virus falling and your bonds long cord G. so if we were still very unclear on the parameters and until we get a better sense of the incubation and the and the spread then you know until that happens it's still gonna be very difficult to to what we know what the reach could be all that said today China is much more integrated into the world economy than it was during the sars outbreak and US production can be shut down if China shuts down so so well we haven't reached a health epidemic yet like Diane Swonk said you know it is very possible that there will be an economic camp that make even without health condemning it even if it's just so what if you're driven but again we just don't have the data to know for sure we have a report from South Korea that Honda I will suspend production in South Korea because of the covet nineteen actually because they can't get parts from China but that leads to shin bone the bone we also have a similar indications from Sam song and we can expect that care will also struggle is it does this tell us that it's a profound damage to the world economy as my thinking as bad as an amateur Christine is that whoever wants to buy an automobile has the money in his pocket and when that automobile is available the purchase will happen so whether it happens in the first quarter of the second quarter the third quarter it's still part of growth is that it is that it is that it is the wrong way to approach this or is is that too positive well it's it's probably right you're talking about pent up demand you know things like for you know a large consumer goods if I want a new car or a new washing machine you know whether I go out today tomorrow or next month I'm going to go out and buy one so there are certain purchases that will happen even if they are delayed and their other purchase at your purchases and and trip trips that just won't happen because they didn't happen last week you know for example a conference that you don't you might wish they were supposed to go to that you didn't go to are you what are you did you go out to dinner you didn't have to go to work another event so there are some things that those sales are just gone and they're gone forever so it it depends on the type of sale that we're talking all right let me give an example I was scheduled to be in it was Pakistan within these next days for an international conference of financial conference called by the president very important to the development of Central Asia which you know is undergoing a re awakening right now renaissance it's been delayed till fall now yes that's a delay but it's not a cancellation and yes there will be a negative effect on the hotel years and the drivers and the airlines in and out of those Pakistan is that profound the travel agency is what I'm chiefly of focusing on but also the business travel agency which is a which pays top dollar well remember travel and tourism accounts for about ten percent of global economic activity so if that ten percent slows down for the next quarter or two then that's going to show up in the in the GDP numbers it will eventually bounce back but you know in the near term it you know it probably is going to look to bleed out through the through lower GDP a lower GDP in the first and second quarter but we look at GDP globally is this just a job for the IMF Christine Shawcroft well you know it it just goes to Millis is is not really going to help here if our people are just staying home right there in the we heard the CDC and HHS today and they said that the other course they're balancing against you now it depending on how things go in the eyes of would be a very aggressive on one hand they want an aggressive containment strategy on the other hand they want minimal impact to communities and so they were talking about you know encouraging people to stay home okay we'll find staying home then your physical stimulus is not necessarily going to help you know it might help some particularly I financially failing firms but in terms of the core they're the real reason for the economic slowdown the two center bucket tied to the virus back to school season which is not necessarily going to help so you have to remit long term economic growth is driven by mainly two things number one population number two productivity growth and so don't the long term is what you need to ask yourself how is this going to affect populations how was it going to affect productivity growth productivity growth you know that's our ability to make more eager to do more with less and in the long run I don't see how this would affect predicted to gross and last we have to make some structural changes to how we do business and that yeah it is no cost and slow things down but I think we're far from getting to that discussion yet Christine you read your colleagues and there do they love to kind of this love modeling is their modeling to describe something at this scale is there a book about this or are they writing the book now there are lots of models of modeling a chance going on right now and you're right we we we economists love models and up we use models to you know basically hold everything constant and just change one thing to get a better sense of how one thing can affect everything else we can model anything right and we have a global economic models country by country even the sub national level regional level models sector by sector so we can and we're very good at at modeling the economic effects of a chair or tax but the problem with this is we don't really know what the the the shock to the model is is it a supply side shock is the demand side Sharkey is a little bit little bit of both so and so economists get a better sense of how the virus is going to translate into affecting costs is supply and demand it's it's really hard to to use models to get some type of precision on the economic

China South Korea Iran
"mercatus center" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:25 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on WGN Radio

"In, for another addition of the opening bell, and another business day getting underway. We've got lots of ground to cover this morning. Of course. It's thought leader Thursday here on the program. A regular weekly conversation with our thought leaders about issues, relating to the economy and banking and finances. Greg works hook is here, this morning, senior vice president and regional manager of the Chicago market for commercial real estate at associated Bank. We're gonna be talking about the hot commercial real estate market in Chicago in the Chicago area. Greg join us momentarily here this morning. Of course, we're also following the latest developments from the interest rate meaning. From the Federal Reserve which wrapped up yesterday a little bit later on in the program. Veroni their regime will be with us this morning senior research fellow at the Mercatus center to talk about the Fed's announcement on interest rates holding steady with interest rates for now. We'll talk to you about what monetary policy says about the economy currently at about five thirty eight also, we'll keep you posted on the latest news, weather, sports, and traffic as we move through the hour. So stay with us here on the opening bell. Let's begin on the WGN associated vague market desk. The opening bell rings on Wall Street this morning after stocks closed up following hints from the Federal Reserve that an interest rate cut could becoming in the near future. The fed kept interest rates unchanged yesterday, but in a statement following the monthly meeting it said that will act as appropriate to sustain the economy at the closing bell yesterday. The Dow was up thirty nine points. The NASDAQ gained about thirty three the. P was up about nine points in this morning futures pointing toward opening gains. Dow futures are up to one hundred and twenty seven points. Nearly three quarters of a percent. Nasdaq futures up almost one hundred points this morning. Nearly a percent and a quarter as in p futures are up nearly three-quarters nearly twenty six points as we look around the globe this morning. Markets in Asia generally higher as well. The Shanghai of nearly two and three quarters this morning to in third actually up about sixty nine points in Hong Kong market's up by nearly a percent and a quarter in Japan by nearly a half a percent. The Nikkei ending the day up about one hundred twenty eight points in your markets are also generally in the green in London. Germany, and France of more than half a percent and oil is trading at fifty five twenty five barrel in New York up about a dollar forty nine couple of stories as we begin this morning heard there in the opening montage solely sullen burger the miracle on the Hudson pilot saying that the deadly crashes. Boeing's troubled seven thirty seven max jets should never of happened. He was testifying house hearing yesterday, sullen Berger says the crashes are evidence that the current system of aircraft design and certification has failed the Boeing aircrafts are blamed for crashes in Indonesia and the Opie that killed three hundred and forty six people planes have been grounded since March, investigators are focused on an anti stall system. Solan Berger, says Air Line Pilots need better training on high-tech aviation systems. He argued that the industry and regulators must be more proactive, the higher the unemployment rate. The more women are sexually harassed in the workplace. That's one of the findings of a new study by researchers at Farley Dickinson university in New Jersey. If found that a spike in the unemployment rate in one month, usually followed by an increase in the number of reports of restaurant the following month. The researchers say it appears men are more likely to harass women at the workplace, if they feel their economic position in society is threatened. The study also show. That even though harassment complaints have fallen over the past twenty years, African American women's still experience a higher risk of harassment. Let's begin this morning with thought leader Thursday. Greg Warsak is in the chair, this morning, senior vice president and Rachel regional manager for the Chicago market for commercial real estate at associated vein. Greg morning. Welcome back to the opening bell. Great to be here. Steve want to begin with a little bit of breaking news. We won't go into a lot of detail on it. But I know we've talked about this before. So I just had to bring this up. We work has hit one million square feet in Chicago. They're the biggest tenant now in the city of Chicago. They are now the largest tenant over a million square feet, not surprising. You know, there's a bit of a, a space grab going on with, with the co work companies here in Chicago. And, and we work is obviously the front runner and is now up to a million square feet available space. They just at least another ninety thousand square feet in the west loop who are the players here. Would it be knighted? And is in there, probably, and who else are some of the big ten it's you know, there's industrious there's, we work, there's frankly, there's more. I just saw a recent study from one of the real estate companies and it was far more than I expected. It was forty or fifty companies, many that you've never heard of. I'm not sure how they're all gonna fit in the space. I guess, is there's going to have to be some consolidation at some point, right? Well, he kind of goes to the main conversation, we want to have today, and that is a things are going really well, on the commercial real estate market, aren't they rather? It's rental or buying. It seems really strong. Yeah. All indicators right now, or that things are continuing to clip along, really, well, if lending, you know, loan, demand is any indicator. I would tell you that we're on track to have a record year. And a lot of that is just strung real estate market and all asset classes, what would a record year look like on paper. Whoa today year to date? Our commercial real estate lending group is a head of two thousand fifteen in two thousand sixteen new loan. Origination, paste, and those were record years. Those were great years for all banks. And it was a really strong commercial real estate market, and those years. So we're outpacing those years right now. Did I read somewhere that we're preaching pre recession levels that were almost back to those level? Yes. Some of the values are finally getting back to the Pru recession levels where things were a bit frothy. I think there's more underlying value. Now that to support you know, higher rental rates, you know, better product, but yeah, it's, it's still. We're seeing across all asset classes too, which is interesting. And, and even in retail. I saw report to that when you compare it to some of the other big cities, and I think they threw in San Francisco in Los Angeles, and New York Chicago came out in a pretty decent way because of it's easier to build here. It's system. You know, one there's still more available land. I think you know, some of the coastal towns of just run out. It's, it's now a tear down environment and it's just prohibitively expensive for land for labor for construction costs. So Chicago is starting to look more attractive. And we're starting to see more developers and investors come in from the coast, what what's being developed? Do we have a sense of what kind of businesses are going to take some of these spaces or is it just all over the board all across the board? It's all across the board. I mean, we're seeing strengthen you know, for us it's continues to be apartments industrial and retail the there's you know, there's a lot of disruption retail, but that creates new opportunities. And so we're seeing a lot of new interesting. Deals and, and of course, office, there's a lot of activity in the office space right now as we sit and have our conversation here, we can look out onto the city and I see a couple cranes. The one that I think we all watch your most regularly is the Tribune tower building, that's being redeveloped redeveloped to really pricey condos. That's the trend is it, it's, you know, adaptive reuse and those are interesting deals. I mean, that's a architecturally significant building. And it's great to see that the developers going to preserve in an highlight all those need aspects of that historic building, how will interest rates the play on interest rates impact all of this going forward, as we discuss this, the end of the Federal Reserve's, wrapping up its meeting, and this week, they discussed, perhaps cutting interest rates at the next meeting. What are we going to see if that's the case? I think this is all been surprising developments, quite honestly, I think when we were all sitting there at the beginning of the year, the expectation was that there is going to be two to three rate increases and you know to be at this point in the year to be talking about now. No rate increases. And in fact, you know, if if this tariff talk continues and. You know, rates could actually go down. I don't think anybody expected this. I don't I'm not sure anybody had predicted and what it's doing, I think, is. You know, it's, it's certainly not slowing down the commercial real estate environment, because one of the biggest issues that people are thinking about was, you know, when or the rate's gonna take off both short and long-term. And now we're seeing really a softening in, in both short and long term rates. So I think that's gonna, you know, push this out even into two thousand twenty in terms of the market still being favorable for development and, and all real estate activity. Greg hang on. We're going to continue our conversation this morning. With Gregg Warsak of associated Bank our commercial real estate conversations going to continue, but we need to take a quick break here at five eighteen on the opening bell to update traffic.

Chicago Federal Reserve Greg Greg morning associated Bank senior vice president regional manager Asia WGN senior research fellow Solan Berger harassment New Jersey
Are higher minimum wages hurting teens looking for summer jobs?

Radio Night Live with Kevin McCullough

01:10 min | 3 years ago

Are higher minimum wages hurting teens looking for summer jobs?

"Study from the Mercatus center says the main reason teens are having a difficult time finding jobs is due to some states. Raising the minimum wage USA radio networks, Tim Burke has more now as a minimum wage hikes continue to occur. Employers are looking for applicants who have more experience rather than at sixteen year old who's hoping to land, his or her first job, Larry wing. It is a pit bull of personal development. He joins Fox News and says, it's rather unfortunate. This is the road employers are having to go down because teens are able to learn so much from that first job. It is a tough situation. But the nice thing is, is that you learn what you have the job you learn a little respect for having a job. I believe. And I think one of the opportunities here is for kids to learn what it takes to get a job, then what it takes to keep that job. What it takes to keep your boss happy, how to serve customers. All of those things make you a better human being. And I think that's the real value here. Plus, the feeling that you have internally for your self esteem, that you're not going to be judged based on how many likes you get on your cell phone on your social media pages. But you're going to be judged based on how hard you work get rewarded for that work in the freedom that comes from spending that money, you earn for

Tim Burke Mercatus Center USA Fox News Larry Wing Sixteen Year
"mercatus center" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

11:29 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on KTOK

"Ago. President Trump said efforts to negotiate a new U S China trade agreement were going well, but the talks have bogged down, and the president is threatening new action against Chinese imports here to sort through all of this is Dan Griswold. Who is a senior research fellow at the Mercatus center at George Mason University. Dan, welcome back to American radio journal. Dan, before we get into where things stand, these U S, China trade talks to begin with why are we engaged in talks with China, what have some of the problems been in? What are they discussing some of our complaints against trying to go back a long way that they don't sufficiently protect intellectual property in China that Chinese agents, including the government are actually. Stealing intellectual property, cyber theft around the world that they have restrictions on foreign investment in China that requires US companies engaged in joint ventures to, to share their technology. And then the fear is often the case that technology gets used by the Chinese company. There's also fear that China is buying up a US technology companies, and then sending the technology back to try and there. There's truth to all of this, what the Trump administration has done is ramped up the pressure on China and the temperature on this by a number of degrees. We've been engaged in these talks. And in the background of the talks starting last summer. The US started to impose duties on imports from China, and this was under a section of US trade law called section three. Oh, one which involves bringing cases against countries that are trading unfairly or discriminating against the United States with the potential to us tariffs. The talks as the president himself said up until fairly recently, he said they were going, very, very well, high level meetings, apparently, there was progress on, on these issues, I out lined, but for reasons that are still unclear the US trade team led by a US trade Representative Bob lighthizer has said the Chinese were walking back some of their commitments. And so the president as he often does tweet it out, his views on Sunday, saying, we were going to start reimposing higher duties on the literally hundreds of billions of dollars of imports from China and that's where we stand right now as we look at these import duties and tariffs that have been put on in the past, what, what is the recent history been? There have been relatively low have they've been bouncing around, if you look back over the last three or four years, what is the trend line been before President Trump? They were pretty limited. President obama. Put some tariffs on tires imported tires from China. And those had mixed effects that we ended up importing tires from other places or didn't really save any jobs. But Americans paid more for, for their tires, just kind of aimed at specific products from China, we use the anti-dumping log recipe against imports from China, but no president in the history of our trading with China for the last forty years has imposed these kind of blanket tariffs. So to give you an idea of the magnitude we import about five hundred billion dollars worth of goods from China each year. The president started this action with tariffs on fifty billion dollars worth of Chinese goods. And I think those terrorists word about twenty five percent. Then the Chinese retaliate it, which often happens against US exports. That's where the tariffs against US soybean exports came in and other US exports. Then President Trump up the ante even more by putting first ten percent tariffs on. Another two hundred billion dollars worth of imports from China and then threatening to go up to twenty five percent. And that's what he's gonna do this Friday, if there isn't new developments he's going to ramp those tariffs up to twenty five percent on the next two hundred billion dollars. So basically, we've got we're about to have twenty five percent tariffs on half of our imports from China. The economic effect woman, it the economists are unanimous on this. The cost is paid overwhelmingly by the American people. We pay higher prices for consumer goods from China. US companies pay higher prices on parts and other components of from China. This reduces real wages raises costs for American producers, and then of course, you have the retaliation, which is cost US exporters tens of billions of dollars of sales. So there's been a lot of pain in China and the United States so far no gain if we look back over the. Last few months. Dan, we have had just assume NAMI of good economic news. We have unemployment low inflation's under control interest rates are fairly stable, the economy by all measures is just chugging along, so yeah, why do this? Now, I guess you go back to the old saying if it ain't broke, don't fix. It doesn't this sort of knock us off the positive track that we've been on. Yeah. And that, that's a good way to put it. Why, why would the president do this? When the economy is, is doing so well, one argument he has as well. We can afford to do it, right. The economy's doing. Well, we can we can give up some growth of a little bit of growth for greater gain in the future. I think that's a risky calculation. The economy is growing despite the tariffs, not be because of them, they're having a detrimental effect on the farm sector bankruptcies in the midwest are reaching record. Highs and tariffs are part of the story. These retaliatory. Tariffs and loss markets abroad, US, manufacturing firms that depend that we have the steel tariffs, of course adding to the pain in the manufacturing sector. It's an interesting thing, would you don't want to read too much into month by month figures. But the last couple of months, manufacturing jobs, have actually decreased while overall jobs have grown manufacturing jobs, have decreased, and that may be an indication that the pain from the tariffs are starting to spread in the manufacturing sector. So there's no good time to put these sorts of tariffs on, but this isn't helping the economy it's, it's growing because of tax reform, because of deregulation because of growth picking up abroad. This is working against the president's goals of invigorating the economy. So what are the options instead of putting on tariffs? The president wants to put pressure on the Chinese to adhere to the agreements. They've already made tried to bring this trade agreement to a favourable conclusion. What else could he do? There is a better. Way than these blanket tariffs that are leaving a lot of collateral damage. The president has some important tools one we can bring cases in the WTO. We have successfully brought more than twenty cases against China in the WTO, and they've moved in a market reform direction in virtually every case, we should be working with our allies, rather than tagging ising over stealing autos to bring more cases against China. We can bring specific legal action against the bad actors in China and our department of Justice has done this as well. We could file cases indictments against specific companies, you're seeing some of the action against y'all way the Chinese technology company and other individuals. That's the right way. Go at it punishes, the specific actors rather than innocent consumers here in the United States, we also have an agency in the federal government called us syphilis the committee on foreign investment in the United States. If the Chinese are vying, US. Company, and if that raises national security questions, the silliest can step in and and bar, the transactions, and we have used that in the past. There's lots of things we can do and have done to address the specific problems. We have been talking with Dan Griswold, who is a senior research, fellow at the Mercatus center at George Mason, University, and, Dan, where we have you on we'd like you to tell us a little bit about the Mercatus center also where folks can go to read more keta center is a nonprofit research center connected with George Mason University. We produce studies and other products looking at public policy issues from a free market perspective, people can find our work on a trade and immigration and other topics at Mercatus dot org. Then Griswold of the Mercatus center, Dan. Thank you again for being here. Thank you, Scott, Parkinson at the club for growth keeping an eye on Capitol Hill for us. Got good to have you here. Thanks for. For having me Lohman. There's been some action relative to the Export Import Bank this past week and Scott before we get too much into the details of what congress did tell us a little bit about the Export Import Bank. Why is it something we should care about the Export Import Bank is a federal agency that exports credit on behalf of the federal government? It does loan financing for corporations large businesses folks, that are looking to have effectively preferential financing in their loans so that they can have lower risk, while they're dealing with certain exports to other nations, and the United States Senate this week took some action that impacts the Export Import Bank. So tell us what happened there. Well, they're probably tocine was champagne and whatever else you wanna drink here in the swamp the Export Import Bank for the past days. Had operated without majority of its seats on the board of directors filled so that prevented them from doing any loan financing in excess of ten million dollars. What that meant was major corporations like Boeing and general electic and Caterpillar were unable to seek financing through the Export Import Bank and it proved the point that the club for growth is making back in two thousand fourteen and twenty fifteen the last time, the Bank was up for reauthorization that, really there's no necessity to put risk on the backs of taxpayers for these loan financing deals, there is certainly a private market available to major corporations like Boeing and GE and Caterpillar. And so it was really unnecessary for the Export Import Bank to ever have the ability to do these loans and excess of ten million dollars. We believe that it's corporate welfare strongly, and actually your Senator there in Pennsylvania. Pat Toomey has led the. The charge against reauthorization of the Export Import Bank. And specifically he's held up these nominations for the board of directors the expert Import Bank. Unfortunately, this week, Mitch McConnell and the United States Senate, but those nominations forward, and they passed with roughly seventy two to seventy nine votes. They were three different roll-call votes. The club for growth, keep voting against all three your Senator, Pat Toomey, obviously, deserves a lot of credit for holding those up over the past thousand days. Do you look at a corporation like Boeing Boeing has had a ton of financing options throughout its history, as a major corporation, and what they do is when they when.

China US president Export Import Bank Dan Griswold Trump Mercatus center U S China George Mason University Import Bank federal government senior research fellow Pat Toomey theft Boeing Boeing American radio journal United States Senate
"mercatus center" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Of the IRS demanding those tax returns, this is different from the request made on the basis of that old nineteen twenty four law that happened a couple of months ago, the bottom line this fight is going to court where the power of the congress to hold the executive accountable under its oversight powers that will be tested by conservative supreme court. ABC senior national correspondent, Terry Moran trade talks with Chinese negotiators ended without a deal. Friday. The twenty five percent tariffs instituted on Chinese imports are still in place Christine McDaniel, the senior research fellow at the Mercatus center at George Mason University says the recipients the American businesses absorb those costs and pass them onto consumers through increase. Prices people may think that a terrif- is sort of poking in Florida, and the I it's really not it's really shooting yourself in the foot. President Trump tweeted that the two sides had candid and constructive conversations. There may be a significant chemical spill in the Houston ship channel near bayport, Texas. The coast guard says a seven hundred and fifty five foot tanker with a tug pushing barges collided Friday afternoon. Those barges loaded with the gasoline blend stock reforming port of Houston. Fire department spokeswoman Lisa Ashley tells ABC news. Understanding that the reform eight is a category. One flammable product, and is toxic to quite light is no really reports of injuries. But it appears one of the barges is leaking reforming. The Cuban government says it will begin rationing chicken eggs rice, being soap and other basic products in the face of a grave economic crisis. Ecommerce minister blames the hardening of US trade embargo. This is ABC news. Have you ever thought about saying goodbye to your job just walking into your boss and saying I quit, and how would you.

ABC Houston Terry Moran US supreme court senior research fellow President Trump Christine McDaniel IRS Mercatus center George Mason University congress Florida bayport executive Lisa Ashley
"mercatus center" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Of the IRS demanding those tax returns, this is different from the requests made on the basis of that old nineteen twenty four law that happened a couple of months ago, the bottom line this fight is going to court where the power of the congress to hold the executive accountable under its oversight powers that will be tested by conservative supreme court. ABC senior national correspondent, Terry Moran trade talks with Chinese negotiators ended without a deal. Friday. The twenty five percent tariffs instituted on Chinese imports are still in place Christine McDaniel, the senior research fellow at the Mercatus center at George Mason University says the recipients the American businesses absorb those costs and pass them onto consumers through increase. Prices people may think that a terrif- is sort of poking foreigner. And the I it's really not it's really shooting yourself in the foot rather Trump tweeted that the two sides had candid and constructive conversations. There may be a significant chemical spill in the Houston ship channel near bayport, Texas. The coast guard says a seven hundred and fifty five foot tanker with a tug pushing barges collided Friday afternoon. Those barges loaded with the gasoline blend stock reforming port of Houston. Fire department spokeswoman Lisa Ashley tells ABC news. Is a category. One flammable out product, and is toxic to quantify light is no reports of injuries. But it appears one of the barges is leaking reforming. The Cuban government says it will begin rationing chicken eggs rice, being soap and other basic products in the face of grave economic crisis. Ecommerce minister blames the hardening of US trade embargo. This is ABC news. And..

ABC Houston Terry Moran US supreme court senior research fellow Christine McDaniel IRS Mercatus center George Mason University congress Trump bayport executive Lisa Ashley Cuban government
"mercatus center" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Six years of President Trump's tax returns. Giving Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin an IRA Commissioner Charles ready. A deadline of next Friday to deliver them his new tactic in the battle over Trump tax returns, and the chairman of the House Ways and means committee. A democrat is issuing a subpoena to the Treasury Secretary and the Commissioner of the IRS demanding those tax returns, this is different from the request made on the basis of that old nineteen twenty four law that happened a couple of months ago, the bottom line this fight is going to court where the power of the congress to hold the executive accountable under its oversight powers that will be tested by a conservative supreme court. ABC senior national correspondent, Terry Moran trade talks with Chinese negotiators ended without a deal. Friday. The twenty five percent tariffs instituted on Chinese imports are still in place Christine McDaniel is senior research fellow at the Mercatus center at George Mason University says the recipients the American businesses absorb those costs and pass them onto consumers through increase prices. People may often think that a. Tariff is sort of poking in Florida, and the I it's really not. It's really shooting yourself in the foot. President Trump tweeted that the two sides had candid and constructive conversations. There may be a significant chemical spill in the Houston ship channel near bayport, Texas. The coast guard says a seven hundred and fifty five foot tanker with a tug pushing barges collided Friday afternoon. Those barges loaded with the gasoline blend stock reforming port of Houston. Fire department spokeswoman Lisa Ashley tells ABC news ninety standing that the reform eight is a category. One flammable product, and is toxic to Quantico light is no early reports of injuries. But it appears one of the barges is leaking reforming. The Cuban government says it will begin rationing, chicken eggs rice beans, soap and other basic products in the face of a grave economic crisis. Ecommerce minister blames the hardening of US trade embargo. This is ABC news new.

President Trump ABC Christine McDaniel Houston President Commissioner Charles US Terry Moran Commissioner Steve Mnuchin senior research fellow George Mason University Mercatus center Cuban government IRS Florida
"mercatus center" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Deal was reached by the end of talks today with trade talks had been going well by all accounts until last weekend went according to the US China made new demands the US is not prepared to meet I talked with ABC news. Correspondent Andy Field. Conditions. Are the president hasn't said, but I not unusual to see that happen surly not unusual for the president to do this himself. We've seen this countless times during his presidency where we thought there was a deal between the president and Democrats on various things from immigration to taxes to spending to healthcare. Then suddenly it all gets blown up at the last minute because well, it's the president who throws in last minute demands. So he's no stranger to seeing this here. He just doesn't like it. When it happens to him. There is a bit of a loophole in the increase in tariffs. It only plies to goods that have not yet left China, which gives the two sides an extra couple of days to make a deal that undoes the tariff hike if that doesn't happen. Oh, China says it has no choice, but to retaliate against the US other nations, including the u k are urging China and the US the two largest economies in the world to come to an agreement noting that a trade war between them would. In fact, have global implications. The association of global automakers warns the Trump administration's decision. To increase tariffs on Chinese imports will hurt the exports of American made vehicles. The association represents the US operations of international automakers including Toyota, Hyundai Nissan and Subaru. The group says new vehicle exports to China fell from two hundred sixty two thousand five hundred twenty seventeen to just one hundred sixty four thousand in two thousand eighteen in large part because of a twenty five percent retaliatory tariff China imposed on US vehicles from July to December of two thousand eighteen China's the second largest vehicle export market for the US. Meantime, Christine McDaniel as senior research fellow at the Mercatus center at George Mason University says some of the people cheering loudest for the president's tough talk on trade, the ones who will end up paying for it. If a deal isn't reach the people who are getting hurt would be speaking up more. And while they are speaking about the cost they still support the president's approach in a way, it's a real waste of a tax cut US trade. Representative say the talks will continue but aren't saying when it is six twenty now at news ninety three point one KFC keg, traffic.

US president China Andy Field ABC KFC Trump administration Representative Christine McDaniel George Mason University Subaru Mercatus center Nissan Toyota senior research fellow Hyundai twenty five percent
The Exim Bank Could Gain Strength This Week

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:42 min | 3 years ago

The Exim Bank Could Gain Strength This Week

"American trade policy. There is news of the US export economy. The Export Import Bank which helps finance the sale of made in America products. Overseas hasn't been at full strength since two thousand fourteen but as marketplace's Tracey Samuelson reports that might change this week for. Two years. The EximBank has been the subject of debate. Is it a valuable tool to help us companies sell abroad, or does it mainly benefit big multinationals that don't really need it support? The White House is in the valuable tool camp says Gary Heff Bauer with the Peterson institute. Who is quite focused on increasing US exports and historically the EximBank has fostered. US exports. Bet since the Bank can't prove financing over ten million dollars. It's just doing a lot less than it used to. Bankers operating a level. It hasn't seen maybe forty or fifty years. Fred Hochberg is a former president and chairman of Export Import Bank in two thousand sixteen and twenty seventeen he was its sole board member he says during the Obama years the Bank financed roughly fifteen to twenty billion a year last year about three and a half billion dollars in Financing's. The Bank may soon be back to full muster. Thanks in part to recently changed rules in how the Senate confirms presidential nominees, but the banks near-disappearance has given its critics new ammunition. Very Nikkei J at George Mason's Mercatus center says despite its reduced capacity. We've found is basically the impact on export was absolutely. They was non as we expected an issue that sir to come up when the banks chartered needs to be renewed. Again, this fall.

"mercatus center" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

05:43 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on 710 WOR

"So it's you know, you got all these little peachy p. And then they're cheating, the old people medication, isn't that? Great. And otherwise, you're not allowed that drugs are on a formularies can't get this particular. You cannot get it even in brain on the formularies, and the pharmacist told me that they'll they won't let you have. It doesn't take change dancer doctor to change it because they're all paid for for the private pay. Bye. Bye. It. You know, I I'm magin everybody in the country being treated and forget about that he rate, and you know, hearing aids cost four thousand dollars. I mean for real prescription Kyrie people gonna get little earbud allowed. What lights will be like original booking at this one study as from the Mercatus center and their libertarian free market think tank. They're not partisan. They put the price tag for Sanders Medicare for all thirty two point six trillion dollars. That's what the tea over ten years. We and I think our caller from from the last break explain to us. I mean, this is one hundred thousand dollars. You got a family of four five you're gonna be paying people don't have this money. It's impossible. It's impossible it just and look. Hey did great during the debate. You sound really good. But I'm telling you once you begin to dig into the details of this. And we hear stories from people on the ground. I I don't know. If this thing's gonna fly tissues his gonna pay. Maybe Mark has an idea. Mark you're on the line. Hi, I think everybody's doing disservice by calling it Medicare for all because Bernie Sanders himself when he rolled his out. He said Medicare for and very quietly said single payer system, and there's a huge difference. He's trying to float this as a Medicare plan. Basically, he's you know, it's going to a message single payer plan and one of the items in the plan that he wants to do is reduce all vendors. About thirty to forty percent. That's right there payments, and that's going to go over real big with doctors hospitals, and you know, pharmacies and everything exactly Mark. The idea is that since the government plan is the only game in town than healthcare providers. Forced negotiate lower rates, which would drive down the cost for the government. But here's what happens. It would make the providers unprofitable, and it would force hospitals out of business. And there's some possible struggling ready in the in the current environment. Well, the other thing too is some hospitals hostels won't take us some people and doctors certainly won't take some people. That's the other issue. You know, what kind of care even again? So there are lots of issues. I mean, I I'm I'm not necessarily proponent of what Bernie is proposing here with his Medicare plan. But I think he's certainly did himself a favour by getting this exposure yesterday. And I would certainly encourage more Democrats to go onto Fox News and get these town halls because look we're all talking about what he's proposing. Whether. We like it or don't he's getting all of this exposure. And I think it's you know, I think gains Lee Buddha judge all of them should get on the bandwagon. Take it. My people told me that judge will actually campaign told me that they're going to be on Fox News. And then some other candidates have now come forward as well and says they'll be doing that because to speak to voters that will probably not vote for Trump on CNN MSNBC. It doesn't end the DNC is foolish to allow the primary debates when I have a feeling as momentum keeps currying they have a change of heart. Do we want to take another call? So do you like Cher? Let's take let's take Mike from Long Island every. You're on the air, Mike. Hi. Yeah. So I voted independent, but you know, when it comes to voting for the two sides. I think it's very dangerous are playing with the healthcare system. The one thing I don't hear much about we hear a lot of of what people are going to be getting out of this system. How much taxpayers are going to be paying I work in healthcare do for specialty office, and this been a lot of merger and acquisitions over the past ten fifteen years and with that the healthcare system as taking on tremendous amount of debt. So when you talking about fee schedules, you know, at a Medicare rate one hundred percent across the board. You're not a comedy aiding any other of the land of payers or few schedules in their Medicare can have to increase that schedule even in or contracts pay. Some percentage of Medicare maybe one hundred twenty five to really like might be three hundred percent of Medicare. So these numbers are based on current these schedules. We're not taking into account how much those schedules have to increase unless you wanna start seeing some sale financial bright. And that's that's the problem. That's one of the issues. The big problem. We're gonna be talking more about this lease, and we're gonna talk to Bret Baier next who joins us and tell us all about that townhall experience last night. Plus is going to weigh in on the mullahs report as well, which is now going to be coming out less than forty eight hours. That's next seven ten w are just.

Medicare Bernie Sanders Mark Fox News Mike Bret Baier Mercatus center Cher mullahs Long Island Lee Buddha DNC Trump CNN MSNBC one hundred thousand dollars four thousand dollars
"mercatus center" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Mercatus center at George Mason University. We're looking at Amazon's plans to cancel their New York City expansion, and perhaps share the wealth spread the various jobs the need around the country. They are I believe still building a big headquarters. They were talking about building two additional headquarters of this one. If the Arlington Virginia suburb of Washington DC, I believe that is still going to be built, right? That's correct. Yeah. Your thoughts about about. What was brought up in the preceding call by Sharon. Yeah. I think Sharon made some really good points. I'm glad she brought that up because it allows us to address some of the most basic misconceptions about economic development subsidies. And that is that the actually change where a company is going to locate or where it's going to expand factual matter as most of the academic research finds that they don't actually change where a firm is going to locate at best all they do is change where the firm decides to locate a given region, so it might shift. The the firm location decision from one server one suburb of the city to another suburb of the city. There are other things that are more important tweet firms underlying bottom line production of goods and services or it's access to customers in the number. One thing is the presence of a skilled workforce. Amazon was very clear, and it's announcement it said at least four different times that the reason why they were going to New York in Arlington. Was because of the local workforce. And even when they said that they're leaving New York City. They said they hated to do it because it had such a good tech skilled workforce. And if Amazon had been pursuing subsidies, if they had been changing its mind, then it would have shifted from New York City to across Manhattan to Newark where was being offered over double the subsidies that New York was giving and from Arlington Virginia to Montgomery County, Maryland or Maryland was offering eight times the amount of subsidies are Lincoln offer. Interesting. So I don't know that we've ever had an actual test case here, but if in fact every city in the country got together, and and and signed a pact. We're not offering anything would offering Diddley that you would be able to find out if in fact that he changes were made in the actual locations of these these big moves, but I gather that you educate there's research to indicate that that's pretty much. What would happen? Exactly. And that is actually exactly what economists and politicians are proposing. Now, there's something called an interstate compact that not many people know about, but it's part of the US constitution allows the states to cooperate developed a a above the state level, but below the federal level policy. It's how the borders between a lot of states like North Carolina and South Carolina. Well, regionally drawn up and the actual port authority of New York. And New Jersey is the result of a interstate compact from about one hundred years ago, so states could voluntarily promised each other not offer subsidies and essentially get out of this whole prisoner's dilemma and sorted game. That we found ourselves. The sounds like if if private companies do this would be called collusion antitrust laws would apply. Yes. And no. So it's really just more like treaties because. It's that's what it's modeled on its modeled on interstates treaties colony treaties that existed even before the US with his own nation. I guess there's a way that you could say it's kind of like collusion, but it's collusion in the same way that a treaty between sovereign nations. It's legal the point exactly. Yeah. Exactly. All right. One.

New York City Amazon US Sharon George Mason University Arlington Virginia New Jersey Diddley Washington North Carolina Maryland Arlington South Carolina Montgomery County Manhattan Newark one hundred years
"mercatus center" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:35 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on KTOK

"To American radio journal state, governments often offer a wide range of economic incentives to get companies to expand or locate within their borders. Eric name reason magazine talks with Michael Farren from the Mercatus center at George Mason University about the impact of such corporate welfare, Eric we see this over and over. Again, we see state governments throwing huge amounts of money at corporations at businesses trying to get them to locate in a certain place to to bring jobs to the state supposedly. And then we see over and over again that these economic development schemes don't really work out. And maybe the best example in recent history as just occurred this week in Wisconsin, where Foxconn the Taiwanese based company that was offered more than three billion dollars in subsidies to locate a new manufacturing plant in suburban Milwaukee. Now Foxconn says, well, maybe we're not going to. Build that factory. After all. Hi, folks. I'm Eric bam with reason magazine, thanks for joining us on this edition of American radio journal. My guest today is Michael Farren. He is a research fellow at the Mercatus center at George Mason University. And he's a friend of the show Michael has written extensively about the Foxconn deal in Wisconsin, including a research paper that was published last year ended op Ed published earlier this month. So we're glad to have him here to break down the latest developments. Michael, thanks for joining us. And I hope you're staying warm today. Trying to the twelfth degree temperatures in Washington right now. Yeah. It is very very cold out there right now, I like it cold. But this is this is a little much for me the big chill in Wisconsin, though. It's not just the weather, although it's certainly that too. But it's the news that these thousands of jobs thirteen thousand jobs, supposedly that Foxconn was going to bring this manufacturing plant. Well, that might not be happening. Now, what's the latest? What's the latest? Hear the latest is that the existence of the Foxconn CEO essentially said that that factory that we promised. There's not going to be a factory. It's not economically feasible to build a TV's or liquid crystal displays in the US, the labor costs are just too high. And it's going to be something else. Instead, it's going to be a knowledge campus for research, and everyone kind of said, yeah. Because this was this was supposed to be a manufacturing facility. It was going to be blue collar jobs. President Trump was out there with former governor Scott Walker for a groundbreaking ceremony last year in I think it was may or June. They talked about how this plant was proved that manufacturing was coming back to America. Now here we are a year later and hold on looks like it's actually going to be a lot of white collar jobs instead of of blue collar once what that's not necessarily bad. But it's not what Foxconn was promising. They've fallen behind already on on some of their hiring promises and the real tragedy. Here has you've written about my goal is is the fact that some people have literally lost their homes and their property over this factory. They've used eminent domain there in Wisconsin to clear space for this factory. And now it might not get built at all. Absolutely. So the initial Foxconn plant area covers about twelve hundred acres that's about two square miles and the city of Mount Pleasant or village amount pleasant was actually under contract to acquire coudl twenty nine hundred acres and was four and a half square miles for Foxconn, and it has been buying property and moving people opposite bulldozing farms and some local residents have stopped and tried to fight it. There's an older retired couple that says we've lived here forty years. We don't intend to move. There's a family pumpkin farm that's fighting it, and there's actually a retired couple as well that just built their retirement home there and doesn't want to move. So and that s sense it's actually reminiscent of the kilo versus new London case where she's at kilo was forced off of her retirement home that she had restored with her own hands. When Pfizer wanna be redevelopment firm, one of the property for a Pfizer expansion, of course. I think that's a good a good comparison. And of course, the plant. They're never got built either sues that kilo and other people had their homes torn down. And now there's nothing there at all just a just a bunch of empty space. And I think that's the most part about all of this is when you see people who are literally losing their property losing their homes that makes me mad, but it's it's also pretty infuriating and frustrating to see states like Wisconsin, throw billions of dollars after Foxconn to lure them to this location to lure them to the United States, and and to get them to building Wisconsin. And now Foxconn is is already less than a year later backing away from from those promises. I mean, this is a lot of money on the table. That's right. So or Wisconsin is on the hook for one point five billion to Foxconn it just in terms of job creation. They're on the hook for one point three five billion for capital expenditures tax credits for capital expenditures, as well as number one hundred thirty million for sales tax exemptions for construe. Action and two hundred and fifty million and two infrastructure investments and another one hundred and forty million for upgrading the electrical infrastructure, all of which who knows is actually going to be necessary because Foxconn may not actually build be plants that have promised in the first place. We're talking with Michael Farren from the Mercatus center. We're talking about the folly of these economic development schemes like the one that was offered to Foxconn in Wisconsin are only about a minute left here. Michael let's play a little bit of a hypothetical game though. Let's say theoretically that Foxconn had delivered on all the promises that it made to the state of Wisconsin. Even then would these subsidies have been worse. It absolutely not the broad based academic research on economic development subsidies is that they don't actually work, and what that means is that they don't actually sway a firm decision to locate in one place versus another place the decision that affirmed make. Makes is based on deeper profitability underlying measures. And that's exactly the reason why FOX hunt is a cited to not locate its manufacturing operations in Wisconsin. Because they say it's just not profitable. I think a really good lesson out of the state of Wisconsin, a lesson that will probably be ignored by other states in the future. But a lesson that should be paid attention to about what happens when you when you have these big economic development giveaways that that rarely ever pan out that is unfortunately, all the time we have for today. Michael Farren from the Mercatus center. Thanks for taking some time to.

Foxconn Wisconsin Michael Farren Mercatus center Eric bam George Mason University United States Milwaukee Washington American radio journal research fellow Scott Walker America President Trump Mount Pleasant FOX CEO London
"mercatus center" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"mercatus center" Discussed on WDRC

"To LARs Larson show. It's a pleasure to be with you. And I'm always bland to get to your calls, which I will get to shortly at eight six six eight LARs that's eight six six four three nine five to seven seven emails. Go to talk and LARs Larson dot com, you know, giving companies a tax break to come to your town. That's been a tool used by cities and counties and states for a long long time. But is it finally getting to a point where it's doing some real damage to us? I think you heard me talking about this a few weeks ago when we were talking a couple of months ago when we were talking about Amazon and its efforts to launch a second headquarters, they finally launched two of them one in New Jersey and one outside Washington DC in Virginia. And then there's the Foxconn deal in Wisconsin and a deal that it may actually show why some of these things can be a not just foolish, but damaging to individuals citizens as well, Matthew Mitchell is a senior research. Fellow and director of the project for the study of American capitalism at the Mercatus center at the Mercatus center at George George Mason University sorry about that Matthew. It's good to have you back on the program. Thanks so much for having me, you bet. So let's talk about this deal. Because when the president I talked about this that Foxconn, which is a major manufacturer in China was talking about building a massive new factory in Wisconsin. And I'm sure it was very attractive deal. The problem is they made a lot of promises. The local government said great will help you with it. And then they went out and used eminent domain, and what did they do to people? Yeah. So at this point they've already acquired an enormous amount of property via eminent domain. So they've taken one thousand two hundred acres from.

LARs Larson Matthew Mitchell Foxconn Mercatus center Wisconsin George George Mason University Amazon New Jersey Washington Virginia China director president one thousand two hundred acres
The US, Canada, and Mexico have a new NAFTA deal

John Batchelor

10:31 min | 4 years ago

The US, Canada, and Mexico have a new NAFTA deal

"Nafta yesterday's news. Welcome U. S mc. It is a product that must be approved by the United States Congress. So therefore, it is not right now in place, but it's perspective is to replace NAFTA. Neat to reshi of the Mercatus center joins to comment on what we know. So far of the net of the the new deal that replaces after NAFTA, Veronica, very good evening to you. I my thinking here when I heard it late last night is this is brinksmanship you have been very cautious about the negotiations for some time. You've been extremely unhappy with the tariff threats by the Trump administration from what we know now about the new pact the US MCA does this. Satisfy your concerns about tariffs in the US economy and jobs could evening to you. Good evening, John. Yes. And no, I'm so glad we have a deal. I mean, I'm so glad it's lifting the uncertainty. That investors had weighing over them that was holding back on their investment in the US. And so it's it's a really good thing. We have a deal, and it's a very good thing. We have Mexico US Canadian deal that was important. So this this is a big relief. I mean on the terrorists side. I mean, let's face it. We haven't made that much progress because it was already a pretty great deal that we had with the exception really up Canadian dairy. All US exports were going to connect-, Canada and Mexico duty free, which is pretty remarkable. So we've made a little progress on the Canadian under leftover Canadian imports. But unfortunately, the metal terrorists are still up and retaliatory tar tear from Canada and Mexico are still up the yes. And no one and obviously the auto part, which is firm center at this deal is not great. But it's nothing like it could have been in terms of being bad at. All right. I want to speak to those two aspects. I the metals the I'm following the Wall Street Journal reporting here US negotiators have insisted that any change to US duties on steel and aluminum that took effect in June be addressed separately. From a broader trader deal among the country's commerce secretary Wilbur Ross said recently and agreement to revise the North American trade pact would allow negotiators to turn their focus to resolving the steel aluminum standoff. So therefore steel and aluminum is the obstacle ahead of us. Does this give them momentum to resolve that or have have objections raised in these last weeks may mean that steel and aluminum is impossible? I don't know. I know I mean, I've seen headlines success of the Canadians were going to tackle the metal tariffs after the closing bell. So maybe they'll be more on this front to say tomorrow morning. I think than an agreement between the US, Canada, and Mexico is honestly opening the door slightly bigger to to allow our resolution on the on the metal tariffs. It's also worth noting that the deal this deal. You know as imperfect as it is. And it's just an improvement. And let's be honest about this has also providing a protection for Canada and Mexico against the upcoming threat of Oto tariffs, which would be quite devastating to to the trade between Canada, Mexico and the US. So I think I think we're making progress we're not there yet. But we'll see let's go to the cars manufactured vehicles part of this. As I understand it. And and this details were not rich. But that there's an agreement here to manufacture large parts of the automobiles in Canada, and the US where the wages are high and not in Mexico where the wages are not high is that well and also. Yeah, that's and also by the way for like try to block or create a disincentive to use part. From countries where wages are even lower than in Mexico. That's not a good thing. Done increases the cost. I understand I understand. So is this something that did not exist in NAFTA? This apportioning of say, you have your standard Toyota, did we divvy it up in this fashion in the old NAFTA or did the old NAFTA? Let you make your car where it was cheapest. Well, so they was a requirement or source requirement for your part, and it was sixty percent had to be sourced in the three region. And now it is moving to seventy five percent. So it's not as if they were in terms of sourcing. There was none. There was nothing. However, there was no labor requirement that I know of especially that are so high and putting Mexico such disadvantage. So as far as I know there was none of that. We really exporting are bad or bad labor laws. And and it's even more shocking to be honest that if the Democrats were trying to force these type of labor laws on minimum wage increases on American businesses. Republicans would be furious, and rightfully so because they would understand how much distortion to create in the labor market, the expectation is that this has to go through congress next year and the the reasonable assumption is that at least part of the congress will be democratic. And so the labor part of the negotiation looks to be a compromise with a wit that that they can use in congress. So let's move to another part, which is the dairy dairy farmers reports. The Wall Street Journal got what they asked for a new version, so the ice cream and milk tariffs. Were holding everything up turned out to not be profound. I guess that's not a big number. But it does make Quebec happy. Yes. But it's also let's face it. Right. Well, it will benefit abyss moving towards closer to zero on on dairy Harris. It's it's really good for for Canadian consumers. I mean, these are the true beneficiary of these changes. And and it's is great. And they're a originally. There are a few your few farmers who who benefits from it in the US. But the true to beneficiary are Canadian consumers and drugs. I'm told that I'm following the reporting the deal extends to ten years the minimum data protection period for biologic drugs. And that means that Mexico and Canada will wait longer for lower cost copies of brand name medicines. So that's a concession on their part and that supports our big pharma. Yes. There's there's a lot of I mean, they've been Mexico and Canada definitely have conceded more. It seems to me through those deals to stay in NAFTA. And and the Canadian dairy definitely is is a big one. The the the drug part is another one the labor from Mexico. I mean, there's been a lot of concession on the part of of our trading partners and agribusiness it looks like Mexico is going to get a good deal of business coming its way the US and Canada following updated US Mexico trade deal from August. So I stepped back a little bit. This is in the right direction. And we have more details to learn is that a fair summary of where we are now there. Oh, well, I think I think it's pretty much a wash it seems to me. I mean, don't forget, right. There were no terrorists. Oh, US exports going to Mexico. We're going there. Tariffs fun duty-free, most of vast majority never seven ninety seven percent of the exports exports to to Canada world duty free. So these improvement are just really really small, right? It's it's like and the auto part. I mean, it's it's better than we expected. But it's going to have a real cost. Plus, I think the administration is is completely overselling the impact it will have on unemployment. But but but there's no underestimating the incredible value of having a deal. Even if it's it's not a good deal. I could have hoped for it's dot is just unquestionable, and it I think also opens the door for more and more negotiation and. And resolution in the future. So I think I think ultimately this. This is a good day. And the fact that they got the deal with Canada at the late hour is that significant we have about thirty seconds was was Canada did Canada concede without its best interests in mind is going to face political pushback about thirty seconds. I yeah, I think Trudeau concede some things, but so did the US the US wanted fifty percent of cars sourced in in the US to have a duty free deal, and they didn't get this. They ended up going to an increase in in a little less than fifteen percent of forced for the region. And that is significant and after concession from the US their version of the Mercatus center early moments of responding to the news from the White House, the U S M C A with Congress's approval

United States Mexico Canada Nafta Congress Mercatus Center The Wall Street Journal Donald Trump John Toyota Veronica Wilbur Ross Quebec Trudeau White House
Senator Bernie Sanders, John Stomas and Assault discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

02:43 min | 4 years ago

Senator Bernie Sanders, John Stomas and Assault discussed on Jim Bohannon

"At yesterday's markets good morning John it's the. Final trading day. Of, July, in. The, markets though have been in a slump on a selloff in technology shares that led to triple, digit losses. Yesterday for the Dow. And the NASDAQ another possible food safety scare at your polled lay one, of its restaurants near Columbus Ohio was. Shut down Monday following reports of customers wait they're getting sick if it gets the okay from. Local authorities though it plans to reopen today eight. States filing suit against the Trump administration. For allowing a, company to publish downloadable blueprints for three. D printable assault weapons online lots of jobs in food service cafeteria. Management firm Sodexo says it wants to hire twenty thousand workers in just the. Next sixty days Uber shutting down the development of self. Driving semi trucks Ford today unveiling new Mustang bullet car wants to get a. Whole new generation of muscle car fans and tesla Of the fifteen hundred dollar limited. Edition surfboards, it. Made over this past weekend well at another major auto, manufacturer Honda Motor says its profits jumped seventeen point eight percent in the last quarter driven strong sales in North America and motorcycle sales in Asia three d. gun lawsuit Tom does not. Appear that will be heard in time. For tomorrow's blueprint release the, state of Washington late, on, Monday joined by Oregon New York Maryland four other states and, the district of Columbia sued the. Trump administration to stop the publication of plans for three d printable guns on the internet last week Texas, company called defense distributed. Received the State Department's okay to, begin putting those. Blueprints for three d printable guns on the web following a three year battle those. Plans may hit the web tomorrow trouble is these weapons. Including plans for an AR. Fifteen assault rifle will be made of plastic and virtually untraceable by law enforcement and Anyone tracking terrorist suspects and officials say that already over a thousand people have downloaded the AR fifteen. Rifle, blueprints all right we'll be, watching CNBC's Tom Busby at, twenty three after, a new study says Medicare for all, would mean historic tax increases, for everyone correspondent John Stomas, has more to study, from the Mercatus center at George Mason University in Virginia a libertarian institute says a plan by Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders that would give, Medicare to, all, would increase government, healthcare spending by thirty two point six trillion dollars over ten years the study did find that Sanders Medicare for all plan would. Bring significant, savings on drug costs ended ministration but increased demand would. Drive up spending Sanders said the study was misleading and noted the connection, of the conservative coke brothers. To the center Sanders office has not..

Senator Bernie Sanders John Stomas Assault Tom Busby Medicare Sodexo Cnbc Honda Motor Ford State Department Mercatus Center Texas Mustang Columbus Ohio Vermont Virginia Asia