12 Burst results for "Meramec River Feline Rescue Society"

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:50 min | 7 months ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The PODCAST Let's go. Welcome to the community cats podcast I'm your host Stacey Librarian I've been involved helping homeless cats over twenty years with the Meramec River. Feline Rescue Society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I. Hope these interviews. We'll help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today..

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"You tuned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's go Welcome to the community cats podcast. I'm your host Stacey Lebaron. I've been involved helping. Homeless Cats for over twenty years is with the Meramec River. Feline Rescue Society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people or improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help view. Learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We're speaking with Megan Laura. Megan is a civil engineer. Cap Mom and cat lover in September of two thousand eighteen. Megan heard of a local shelter with too many adults to handle. They couldn't adopt them out fast. Enough out of this need joy for cats. I was born joy for cats donates toy and treat baskets too adopters of hard to place. Cats joy for cats mission is two prong partnering with rescues and shelters shelters to help provide incentives for opting. Hard to place cats and bringing joy to cats to thank them for the joy they bring us. This is done by sending home. Cat approved items with the adopters. Help bring joy to their new pet and therefore increase the joy. Their new pet is sure to bring them since. Megan started joy for cats. She's continually learning being more and more about cats especially the importance of cat affiliation and routine in a cat's life she uses this knowledge Educate the community so both cat and owner are happy and unhealthy. She has two cats herself screamer and Roscoe or the joys of her life and the joy for cats founding felines both cats are rescues and she proudly supports arts. Hashtag adopt don't shop. She looks forward to a day where no animals are euthanized because of overpopulation Megan donates to animal shelters of all shapes and sizes and enjoys attending rescue events in her spare time. She's always looking for events to support at cats in need that she can help. She recently went to Camp in New York City and met Jackson Galaxy. Let's see a lifelong hero of hers when she isn't working as an engineer on joy for cats you can find her in the kitchen trying out a new recipe. You can find her on facebook facebook and instagram at joy for cats..

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You into the community cats podcast. Ready? Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I'm your host Stacey. Lebaron. I have been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years. With the Meramec river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. I'm thrilled to be speaking with Brian Courtous, the director of national programs for neighborhood cats. And I wanna share with everyone that today is our three hundred episode. Thank you so much for tuning in, over the last almost three years, we've been broadcasting. So thank you so much for making the lives of community cats in your area better and well cared for and just a really really appreciate the support. Everybody subscribing, either on itunes or YouTube or Stitcher. Spotify wherever you like to listen to your podcasts. Join in share and thanks. Again for being with me for three hundred episodes. So Brian liked to welcome you to the show. Thank you. Stacey in. Congratulations on episode number three hundred. That's just a tremendous accomplishment, and thank you for everything. You're contributing to the field. Well, and I'm so thrilled to be partnering with you this year doing a webinar series. We did a great webinar with trappers tips and tricks. We also have a drop trap webinar coming up, mutually June twenty ninth is a true. The drop trap is one of your favorite tools of the trade. Yeah. We'd love to drop trap. It's something we use on almost every trapping. We're gonna go into all the tips and tricks about using drop traps and the different ways that you can use them and the different methods. But yeah, we're out there, every time we were trapping. At some point, we break out the drop trap, mostly so we have to wait around for the cats go into the regular Trump's kind of moves things along. So patients is not you're not you're not a patient guy. We have to be a patient person, no matter what when you're talking about feral cats. That's for sure. Well. We're definitely patient. But if we can get something done in an hour, instead of two or three will take yes. So check out many cats, podcast dot com. And if you want to sign up for the webinar, it's a free webinar, and it'll be on June twenty-ninth from two to four PM eastern standard time. And I'm sure also neighborhood cats will be sharing the information out about the webinar too, so you can be on the lookout for that. So today's show before we take a deep dive about probably a couple years ago. Now you relocated out to Hawaii. So if you wouldn't mind taking a few minutes to share with us what's what's going on out? No. Why for community cats? Well, happy to say that here on the island of Maui where we set up a branch things have been going tastic. We have just like the best partner, you can imagine in the Maui, humane society, and they have been running a high by Spain neuter clinic with a lot of focus on community cats for close to two years now and fixing thousands of community cats year and as a result, the intake. Typically lower than it was a few years ago, and injust last, I would say few years. I'm not sure whether it's three or four. The live release rate for cats has gone from about twenty five percent to this past February it was over ninety percent. So just a great team there that we're really happy to support. And it just shows you that things can get better. No matter how long they've been bad, and how bad the overpopulation is also seeing some progress on a wa who where I'm consulting with the Hawaiian you main society on community in our program there. They hired a community cat coordinator. And they've gotten funding for spay neuter. And we're starting to put a large scale programme together there. That's the most populous islands in why with G probably about two thirds of the state's population so things things are looking good third definitely bumps in the road and difficulties overcome. But

Stacey Brian Courtous Maui Meramec river Lebaron Spotify Hawaii coordinator itunes wa YouTube Spain director partner twenty five percent ninety percent twenty years three years two years
"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You turned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I'm your host. Stacey lebaron. I've been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Meramec river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to mazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We're speaking with Dave Hanley Dave is the CEO of tomorrow, which offers a free legal will to anyone who wants one one feature is that you can pick out a guardian for your pets and let that person know through the app that way if the unthinkable happens, you'll know your Furby are okay. Dave is the parent of twin sister rescue cats and human parent to four kids. He is a serial entrepreneur who has sold companies to Amazon and Deloitte, now tackling the social need of the fifty million children and eighty million plus cats who don't have guardianship plant in place day. I'd like to welcome you to the show. Thank you for having me on how so you have a packed bio here, and it sounds like you have a full house if you could share with our listeners how you got involved with developing tomorrow as well as how you develop a passion and love for cats. Perfect. Thank you for having me on. Yes. I had a number of ventures that I've been involved with over the years, including building a community for book readers that we sold to Amazon and a social media agency that was acquired by Deloitte, and so when I went to work on my latest venture, I was really looking for something that would have an important impact on society to go solve a bigger problem. And as I had my agency full of young people who are now all very gainfully employed at big consulting firm. They started getting married and having babies, and I realized that none of them had wills and none of them had life insurance. And none of them were doing a few of these things despite being super bright and creative people. And so when. I looked at the data and saw that for young families eighty percent to them. Don't do any of these things. I thought I wanted to solve that. And so we set about to create a completely free legal will that you make on your phone using it up. And then there's features in there that also help your family become more financially sound the first one that we had was the life insurance. And so we have this social visual way to make a will. And as we're building out, the family, your children and your spouse or partner, your family members. Ryobi guardians and other things. We added our pets. And so you can now go in there and actually choose who's who's going to watch my pets, and you can do the same. So in terms of my love for cats. I do have two cats lucky and puppy who are twin sisters. I've no idea. What breed? They are. They look probably the most like Turkish N Gora. But I'm sure that they are probably a drop of every blood of every kind of cat, and they. White. They used to have black Mohawks in those of disappeared overtimes. But my love of cats actually came one Christmas when my sister was just a year old with me all see wanted was a kitty and a grey tiger was brought to her by Santa Claus is tiny tiny little kitten, and we had her, and then she disappeared where where he did she go out the door happened to her, and we looked all around in scavenged, and we didn't know what to do and my sweet parents had little kids. And then we done and said a prayer that we could find this cat and my dad walks right over to a height of it couch and reaches inside of there and felt the for of this little gray tiger. And so I always felt a connection whether it's spiritually or physically two cats, and that's where it all began Kat, your sister's cat or did that can't become your cat. She became a family cat. So my sister loved that still. L has cats always had cats. And so that you know, I didn't try and take over that ownership. But it turns out that the cats really like me, and so they they also like her they like to come and sit on me, and especially with I'm working or reading and whatever it is affected like the sleep on my face, which makes me draw down trees about where they do sleep at night. So reading on your website, a little bit about your own personal background and some of the challenges that you encountered with your parents, not only with the finances, but with their cat, would you be willing to share a little bit about that story up -solutely? So it's now five years ago that my father passed away and all the kids were grown, but they had a couple of cats at home, but he he got sick and then passed away, and then three years later, my mother passed away, and in that time, my mom sorted having dementia type symptoms that wasn't specifically dementia. We had to sell the home we had to move her into like another home that was going to be more vantage -able for her. We hired. My sister to move one of my sisters to move in with her and take care of her. It's just a lot going on as she began to slip even more. I finally pulled out all their state documents which were twenty five years old. And I realized that everything was out of date and our research shows that eighty eight percent of people who have wills those wills are out of date. So it's uncommon, but there was complicated truss structures that run necessary. There were all these things, and I finally had to get a lot of things in line for people who I mean, my father was a fighter pilot an airline pilot bombs college educated they were super together people, but just by being out of date created lots of problems. And so that was one of my learnings is these things to always be updated. They need to be living documents that you can come in and change as life changes. And then when it came to the cats of my mom passed away, we still had one and this cat had always lived in one house, and then was moved to another house and didn't like all that disruption. And then when it came time needing to adopt him out. He. He was very angry. I would send people over to meet this cute cat. You would swipe at their kids trying bite them. And he wasn't going to be a cat that would be easily adopted into a family with kids. And so wonderful sister took him in when my mom was sick. And we went through a whole process of finding the right place for him to go. But it wasn't easy. Now. My mom lived in a senior community with a bunch of Singapore homes for everyone senior, and I'm sure someone there would have loved to take him this. But I didn't know who she was friends with and who knew the cat who'd be willing to help. But I'm sure she did. But it was just never a question that was answered and certainly never anything that went into her will talk about conversations, and I'm dealing right now with my mom who has dementia, and there are a lot of conversations. Now that I really wish I had had with our before she got into this point where I now can't have a conversation with her about certain things and windy, you think that's the time. Time to have those kinds of conversations. Well, we just need to demystify all of these conversations. Right. We have somehow wrapped up that having a plan just like an emergency fire exit to your house, like how how do we get out of our bedrooms? It's not dark. It's just a plan. And so having a plan for the very rare case something would happen doesn't have to be dark. It should be reassuring might youngest boys are nine and eleven and we were having a conversation a work conversation at night while going to bed and talking about life insurance that we do at work, and like do you have life insurance? I said, I do I bought it. When meal was born. It's a couple million dollars. And it's going to make sure that there's always money to take care of you kids, and my Nigel just six miles east, get a half a million dollars. I said, well, you know, it's to make sure that you go to college. There's always money. You know, if anything happened to your mom, and I would go to your Marissa's if they needed to buy a bigger house for everyone. They would buy bigger house, and there would have all these things. And there was just you would. Always be taken care of. And they said, oh, that's great. Little smiles face that go to sleep perfectly calm and collected. And knowing that there's a plan for them. And it really hit home for me that we've made such a big deal out of these things that we need to have conversations right away. And if we don't then we'll end up in the primary case with even human children, which is someone is chosen to be a guardian. If you be that there is a will no one ever tells the guardian it's very rare that they sit down and have the conversation because we wanna make it a big deal going to take them up for dinner and make this big gesture when really the information seems to be known and so tomorrow when you learn the guardian is you start typing in the name on your phone. We pull that person in from the context on your phone and actually t- up a message that you can send to them and says, hey, Stacy getting my act together part of its picking out some potential guardians for byles dean. I think you'd be great. Would you be willing to put yourself on a list of potential guardians for them? And you say, yes, or no. By logging in and we track that all inside tomorrow. That's very cool because that's a little bit less nerve wracking than either not being asked at all. In just finding out after something happens or else being asked, but you're like face to face. And maybe you want to say, no. But you don't know how you can say no there's like a pressure situation to or you feel like you're obligated. I mean, if you're a sibling lot of siblings feel like they have to say us moving, but you really don't have to say. Yes, if you don't feel comfortable, but then there's like all that baggage that goes along with it. Maybe that's a way to be able to have a lighter level conversation before getting into the family dynamic thing. I think you're right in part of it is that these very monolithic documents to yes forever. And so the change for who the primary guarding is for my kids wonderful at Melissa it use actually be my sister, who you know, is a little older and has her kids and vice culturally line, but then Marissa who's the youngest sister is far more culturally line with us. You know, I think how she would finish the raising of I kids with very similar to how I would want it to happen. And she had become a mother as well. And so she was out ready. So before it's like, okay, I got a reading my will. And I gotta go call the lawyer, and I got to spend five hundred dollars to change aim in tomorrow, you literally just like drag and drop people around tweak things how you like it at a couple of new backups in case, you know, Marissa's and able to for some reason, and then you just print out your will. And we tell you how to sign it since talk about cats. Yes. Our listeners own cats, many of them own a couple of cats many of them own couple of dozen cats. And so how would you recommend they provide for those cats in your app? Pull out your Android phone your apple phone. Download the tomorrow app just type in the normal were tomorrow. You'll download it get started. And then go into the family section and at the bottom, you'll see your pets. You can add cats you can twelve cats for each one you decide who's going to watch each cats. So you take a picture of the cat. You write down the name of the cat. You can write things that are special about the cat everything from dietary preferences to wear you adopted her whatever it would be. And then you choose someone you think could be a guardian and you can put a few back. So we always recommend always have three people the main person in two backups, and then they'll be notified through tomorrow. Which is optional that most people do it. And then you can say, hey, would you be willing to do this? And if they say, no, then we know if they said, yes, we let you know. And then all of that gets written right into your will, which is great. If you have twelve cats because it's very hard to find someone who's willing to take twelve cats, and there is a person's waiting to take twelve cats. They're probably listening to this podcast. But wanted a time or two at a time. And then also we live longer than our cats. I've lost many cats in my life. And so this idea of doing a will. And then paying each time. When you adopt a new cat, or maybe a community cat that you were Kathy feed out your backdoor, adding some of this detail in adding and removing cats will make it so that your will. And the wishes are always up to date and your cats always second cash. Trying to catch a pregnant cat in time. Are you after that last cat who isn't fixed in your ten cat colony got a wily feral who just won't go into a box trap? No matter how much you spend on roasted chicken, how about catching a litter of kittens all at once with their mom, all these tough trapping situations and more can be solved if you know how to use a drop drop. Join neighborhood cats co designers of versed mass manufacturer dropped trap on the market as they demonstrate how to best use this trappers best friend, the drop trap trappers best friend is a webinar presented by the community. Cats podcast and neighborhood cats on Saturday, June twenty ninth two thousand nineteen from two to four PM eastern. Standard time to sign up. Go to community cats podcast dot com. We'll see you there. Catalog ical exists to help cap parents love their kids better with the most in-depth cat food reviews online. Plus hundreds of other fact-based articles catalog is your one stop shop. When it comes to learning more. Your cat catalogue all works with multiple retail partners to provide custom coupons on everything from

Marissa Amazon Deloitte Dave Hanley Dave Meramec river Stacey lebaron Ryobi Singapore CEO Turkish N Gora partner Kat Kathy Nigel
"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

03:53 min | 4 years ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"We are speaking with Mike hill Mike has worked for the Massachusetts department of agricultural resources division of animal health for twenty two years. And he has been the director of the division for the last nine years. Mike I'd like to welcome to the show. Stacey I'm happy to be here. So I was wondering if you could tell us how you got started in the business. Well, I graduated from UMass Boston with a degree in biology. And while I was still in school. I think it always fantasized about going to African studying lions always been a big. Fan of the cats in an offense. Maybe this is the place to admit it. I'm more of a cat person than a dog person. You can go around that. As I got towards the end of my school. I wound up spending a lot of time in lab settings. And after graduation, my first job I actually worked for the department of public health. I drove around on the south shore, south coast and Cape Cod trapping mosquitoes and bringing them back to the lab and testing for eastern acquaintance, f lightness, of course, that because -squitoes are only around during the summer that job dried up towards the end of the fall. And just so happened that across the hall from the mosquito lab was the rabies lab, and that was back in nineteen Ninety-three when rabies had I moved into the state and the guys at the rabies lab always had the best stories, man. There was some crazy stuff going on with animals. So I got to know them pretty well. And and as the mosquito season dried up they were getting busier and busier, so they were looking to hire. And at the same time. There was a job posted at the department of agriculture for rabies program coordinator. So I actually applied and got both jobs, but. Rather than being stuck over at the lab. I chose the job of the department of agriculture, which is more of a sort of a liaison, I coordinated with veterinarians in town officials in owners as well just to get everyone up to speed on the rabies laws and and the protocols we have for quarantines for animals that are possibly exposed. And I did that for a number of years as I was here. I was asked by my bosses to help out in this harbor outbreak situation or this distemper outbreak situation and other diseases started to creep into my repertoire and at one point when my boss decided he was ready to move on. He had made the suggestion to the Commissioner that I might make a good director for the division. And they offered me that and that's where I've been ever since ASI sort of been in the in the same department for us for the twenty two years. And so you started in ninety four and sort of walk down memory lane of it here too. So I started with 'em our efforts in the Meramec river feline rescue society. In nineteen ninety four also and it was in the late nineties. I think that we were able to get to know one another in the rabies role. So I think let's talk a little bit about your time working as the director of that division in Massachusetts. We have a wound of unknown origin rule for cats that they have to stay quarantined for six months is that correct and went now, it has changed. So you can talk about that too. Vera. So yeah, that has changed. Our concern is we Massachusetts is now rabies endemic state inning. Unlike an an epidemic where disease might wash through an area, we know that it exists in a fairly regular frequency among the wild animal population. And for that reason we have to continue to be concerned about domestic animals that are possibly exposed to recommends or FOX's or skunk. Cer- some of the other wildlife species that transmit the disease. So in addition to those situations where we're aware. That record or skunk has fought with Sayidov or cat. We're equally concerned with certainly free roaming cats that may just come home with wound bite wounds on them..

director Mike hill Mike department of agriculture Massachusetts Massachusetts department of ag Stacey Cape Cod Meramec river Boston UMass Sayidov FOX Commissioner coordinator twenty two years nine years six months
"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You turned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I am your host. Stacey lebaron. I have been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Meramec river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people were improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We are speaking with Angela Walters Rockwell Angela for the past five years has been the executive director of the animal shelter assistance program. Asap works in partnership with the Santa Barbara municipal shelter and takes care of approximately a thousand cats and kittens each year, we are extremely innovative and have fully integrated feline behavior considerations into all of our program and service areas most notably are tiny lion tamers program, which is featured in the July, August two thousand sixteen HSS US animal sheltering magazine. Angela has served in many capacities at ASAP over her twelve year relationship with your position, including working in the TR program veterinary and serving as the president of the board of directors for many years before accepting the position as executive director. She's currently serving as an appointed member of the oversight team working to revamp..

Angela Walters Rockwell Angela executive director Meramec river Stacey lebaron Santa Barbara TR US president of the board twenty years twelve year five years
"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

09:48 min | 4 years ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Getting. You turned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I am your host. Stacey lebaron. I have been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Meramec river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We are speaking with Dr Christine Wilford Christine received her Devia m- from Texas am university in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven and then completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at Virginia Tech in nineteen ninety she moved to private companion animal practice in Washington state, having written a research paper on pet overpopulation and spay neuter in eighth grade she was destined to work for increased access to spay neuter in nineteen Ninety-seven, Dr Wilford co founded a free feline. Spain neuter clinic the feral cat spay neuter project in the Seattle area focusing on feral cats at the beginning. She quickly realized that all free, roaming cats, whether feral tame are in between must be part of any effort to address feral cat populations. The clinic started as a mash style clinic admitting hundred to one hundred fifty cats on one day per month due to the huge void of accessible spay. Neuter for free, roaming, cats, the clinic moved to a free standing clinic in two thousand and three and a larger clinic in two thousand seven Yorgos ation now provides almost ten thousand spay neuter surgeries per year surpassing seventy five thousand total surgeries in two thousand thirteen the F C S N P launched a clinic model website in two thousand seven to mentor organizations worldwide to increase access to spay neuter. Amidst all the volunteer work, Dr Wilford practiced in a six, Dr feline exclusive high acuity hospital. In the Seattle area for seventeen years. Her current passion is to align with like minded, people focusing on solutions. So that all cats and dogs will enjoy better lives. Christine. Welcome to the show. Thank you. I'm excited to be here. Going back to eighth grade. I would just love to read that paper. If you still have it. I think I might auction off as a fundraiser totally put up did on that one. That's yet tastic. So so what what made you think about pet overpopulation and spay neuter back in eighth grade. I think my first words when I was born were I wanna puppy? I'm going to be about an area. So I I don't know how I got wired for that that, and I honestly cannot remember how I got to that eighth grade mindset except for at that time of our world, the dogs around loose in the neighborhood, and my puppy that I finally got in third grade had three litters every cat that we had was dead before a year old and had many kittens? And so I think I think I just had a really soft heart realized there was a problem. But what what I found really interesting. My sister brought me paper, and I found interesting I quoted twenty two twenty two million animals killed an animal shelters per year. And now, it's just that's a standing number to think of but having aged a little bit since eighth grade looking at the numbers now are estimated at four million. A year. We've come a very very long way. So all the hard work that people are doing has changed our culture, and we are doing better way are doing better. Now when I first met you which was quite a while ago. We were both at a event in Phoenix think at PetSmart charities at that point in time viewer doing I think maybe you had been doing the mash style clinics. And then you're just starting to move into a free standing clinic mode. Can you tell me a little bit about what Amash style clinic is like, well, mash style is a whirlwind at least for us than other people that I've talked to where all the equipment and drugs and paperwork and food and blankets anything he can possibly think of as packed into storage Benz and prepared taken to a location usually in in the mall. Morning unloaded setup animals. Arrived surgeries happen all day at the end of the day while recovering into charging your packing up and making lists to restock it. It's a it's a incredibly long busy day that takes a lot of manpower to pull off. But it it's very very effective in certain areas. For me, we ended up with sixty volunteers usually eight surgeons which were not of the skill level that are high volume high quality surgeons are now's is back before that had really taken off so regular private practice. Veterinarians doing surgery so sixty volunteers eight surgeons in maybe a hundred twenty two hundred fifty cats day way would start about seven would be done about seven. That was our level of efficiency. I the organization that I was with for the last twenty years Merrimack river feline rescue society. We started our mash style clinics back in two thousand and we still have them we still we still have one a month. And I would say, yes, the tote schlepping gets very exhausting. Yeah. And we ate luckily rattle local station. Now, we go to the same location every month. So we're able to leave our supplies there. So that at least as one piece of the puzzle that as our volunteers in many of the volunteers have been doing this for over ten years it seats, an amazing family that has developed, but we're not we're not getting any younger. And I so I think that the the backs of many of the volunteers they're very happy that they don't have slept those totes too far around. Exactly. Yeah. Once you had this sort of a pithy in deciding that the free standing clinic was the way to go. You've got that sense that that would be more efficient or a better course to follow are just. You couldn't have your mash clinic handle any more cats and you needed to find another alternative to get a higher capacity. Yeah. It was a kind of a culmination of several things I had flown. Buffalo New York to go some lectures in the audience was about an Arian who asked Girelli think you're making any difference doing one hundred and fifty cats a month. And of course, the answer is always well made a difference for those hundred fifty cats, but his point because I'm hypercritical on over achiever his point stuck with me. And actually just could not stop thinking about that on the long flight back to Seattle of. Wow, we should be doing more. You know, he kinda threw the gauntlet out there. And I you know, I I was a little offended by that was mine defensive mechanism. But then I thought about what he said and got back here to Seattle and started thinking, we should be doing more. Because I combine that with the fact that when we open our reservation. Line within you know, twelve seconds are hundred fifty reservations were gone. And sometimes that was maybe four people in. Andrea people would be mad. They didn't get a reservation. So it was obvious that we needed more capacity. The cats would be there if we built it end. So we just decided how much are willing to sacrifice of our our lives to get this to happen. But that that is the big push was we we could do more in. We should do more than became the challenge of getting the money together in a location all that the beauty was when we moved that we then had four volunteers one sometimes two surgeons and we'd get fifty cats done about five hours, the officiency level went way way up for us the safety level for the cats went way up because the anesthetic period was shorter the surgeries were faster. There were a lot of very very beneficial things in. Of course, we could go from once a month. We immediately went to twice a week in escalated up to five days a week. It was a course a whole lot more work for me but much much better for the community and the volunteers. I think got more satisfaction less chaos. More consistency. More quality all things. And I'm sure they're amass units that operated much better than ours. When way join our mash unit, but we were in a teaching facility. So we had a constant turnover of new volunteers, which makes it more difficult to keep your consistency in quality in place. You're a lot of training on a continual basis. So you didn't have the as I was talking about the family the same family showing up every month. Yeah. When you say that word, I'm so envious. No. I wanted a family, but we shouldn't have won.

Dr Christine Wilford Christine Seattle Meramec river Spain Dr Wilford Dr Wilford co Stacey lebaron Merrimack river Phoenix private practice Virginia Tech Texas Washington F C S N P Amash Arian Andrea New York Girelli twenty years
"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

21:14 min | 4 years ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You turned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I'm your host. Stacey lebaron. I've been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Meramec river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to mazing people were improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We are speaking with Susannah della medal. Leinna. Susannah, join the central Oklahoma humane society in January of two thousand fourteen as president and CEO prior to that as vice president and executive director of PetSmart charities for ten years. She grew the organization from eight million in annual revenue to more than forty five million and lead PetSmart charities to become a sector thought leader and the largest funder of animal welfare in the country prior to PetSmart charities. Susannah spent more than twenty years in the four profit sector in executive level marketing and advertising positions. She was vice president of marketing for Northern Trust bang. Of Arizona, vice president and management supervisor for db Needham and daily and associates in Los Angeles and account supervisor for J Walter Thompson in Chicago, Illinois during that time, she developed award winning marketing and advertising campaigns for Kellogg cereal company. SC Johnson and sons, Safeway and Vons grocery stores and Kaufman and brought home builder's. Susannah started the Zona chapter of the wellness community and also friends of animal care and control the fundraising exhilarate for Marco county animal, Karen, control. She has received various awards for leadership and volunteerism including the wellness community hope award Han ca Cina award and a w L animal champion award. Susannah, graduated from the university of Iowa with a b a in business and Spanish literature and received her MBA from the Thunderbirds school of global management. She is a pet parent to four dogs scooter Loretta Emma, and Hank and three horses cash envy. And shelby. Welcome to the show. Zanna? Thank you have here. So just wondering if you might share with us specifically, how did you get started on your path with animal welfare in carrying about cats? And you also have quite a few dogs and horses. That's true. Well, you know, I am I think like many in our field a lifelong animal lover, and I started my career in the corporate world and the for profit world that always had a desire to at some point transition into something that would help with animals, and so I was very fortunate to be able to run up PetSmart charities for ten years. And then I had always been very very interested in having done the funder side in also having some experience on the grantee side. And it's been very interesting because it's given me two very different perspectives on our world can you expand on that a little bit? Sure, I think that you know, when you're a fund or you're looking at strategy from a national standpoint. And you had experts on your team who know the animal welfare welfare issues, very well. But you know, each community, it's different. And when you're on the ground, actually, doing the work. Sometimes I think you some of the requirements that come from the national funders may not be quite right on from your perspective or you'd like to see different types of opportunities. One thing that's common in the funder world is not to fund staff positions. So when you're writing a grant for a new program, but you're not allowed to ask for staff support that makes it really difficult because an organization that has to pay for the operations and paid for that staff person it can be difficult to raise the funding to do that for a program that would really make a difference in your community. You have learned what it's like being on both sides. I've also worn that hat that too. And I think it's made me stronger on both sides actually in terms of understanding the perspec-. Live from the donor side, the desire to measure impacts and to also measure in units. But yet as you say there so much support of stuff that goes on within an organization in order to be able to support a program from happening that you have to appreciate the needs to fund that support. And you know, I think from the Fender side, you get to see the impact reports, and you see the results of your funding. That's very different experience actually being in the community and making the decisions that result in impact. And then being kind of able to celebrate that because you're actually seeing the faces of the dogs and cats that you know, you're saving and that separately cool thing. So it's it's very fun for me to have gotten to do both sides. So now when you're at the central Oklahoma humane society, you are in concept more hands on than you were before wearing your president and CEO hat. What are your key initiatives at central Oklahoma humane society? Well, we are lucky to have been in as PCA partnership market. So we're relatively young organization will be nine years old at the end of this year. But we have accomplished a lot in that nine years in terms of the services that we offer the community. We have a very robust. Adoption program. We have a high volume high quality stay neuter program that provides services for the community as well as our own adoptable pets, we have our own in house medical clinic. We also just started a relocation program, and we will transfer out if teen hundred dogs this year to four partners and other states where they can be found homes, and then also started about baby program, we work very closely with our city animal shelter. We actually have a formal agreement with them and help reduce the number of dogs and cats that are being used the is there were always looking for creative solutions and creative ways to continue to move that needle and just the addition of the bottle baby program in the relocation program has jumped alive release rate, really significantly. We had for the first quarter of this year the highest live release rate ever at eighty one percent pretty excited about that. And I can attribute it almost directly primarily to. The relocation program. Wow. So that fifteen hundred is represented in that statistical change, it is Oklahoma City is really interesting because in the middle of the country fairly mild climate and a population of six hundred ten thousand people, and so we last year our city animal shelter took in almost twenty four thousand dogs and cats, which is a really big number for a community of our size and Oklahoma has a lot of people issues, which I think translate into than animal problems as well as just a very temperate climate that's conducive to longer breeding cycles. And so it's really exciting. You know when we can introduce programs. We have beautiful adult dogs here. And a lot of puppies that are very desirable in other communities and our partners that are animal welfare partners at. City shelter. You know, they try their hardest, but they're under-resourced, and they have a huge volume of dogs and cats entering the shelter everyday. So we're happy to be able to help with some of those programs and help carry that load. And how long has your high volume clinic around we opened the cleaning in let's see chief and eight and last year, we completed almost fourteen thousand spay neuters of which about three thousand were adoption pets in the rest of them were community animals. That's a fantastic number. I would think you'd start seeing some other dramatic changes in numbers as a result of all that spay neuter going on we have we've seen intake decline very steadily and gradually at the city shelter. When we started working with them nine years ago. They were taking in thirty thousand dogs and cats and had a live release rated twenty five percent as of last year at the end of last year intake hit gone down to. Under twenty four thousand and live release rate was that just a little under seventy percent for the year. Or so we know that Spain Nuder is contributing to that. And you know, we have a very robust in our program. We have a community cap program with a barn buddies program. And so we're really trying to provide service or support all of the animals in our community. Not just you know the adoptable pets. That's great. It sounds like you've got the full community cat as well as animal welfare toolkit going on there. And you had mentioned that the ASPCA had supported the city through one of their projects. Is that correct? Yeah. It has a program their their partnership market program or they will select a market and then come in with resources over a three to five year period. And and the new graduate as a community and the Gulf Liz to help bring together partnerships within the community. He set libra lease rate goal that you can all work for our goal is seventy five percent. And then just you know, provide coaching and mentoring and then as an alumni market. I guess I could say, you know, there is some level of continuing resources available. But it was great for us. Because I think it jump started as at naval this to really introduce a lot of programs very quickly. And also, you know caught the eye of other national funders when I was at PetSmart charities. We actually did some pretty significant funding in Oklahoma City because of the as involvement and also the caliber of oak humane and its relationship with the city shelter. And now, let's take a moment to listen to a few words from our sponsors flashlight tag was fun when you a kid, but no one wants to play hide and seek with their trap. Find your traps location quickly and safely even when you visit at night with the reveal wild application for Samsung galaxy HTC one Sony experience and other Android phones or go to tiny. You're L dot com. Forward slash reveal wild. Are there any other shelters or other organizations in Oklahoma that have sort of the same partnership relationship, or is this unique just to your organization, we're actually Neagh in Oklahoma and another kind of interesting element of Oklahoma? Is that in up in tosa? There are a couple of sheltered organizations in addition to the animal welfare organization, but in Oklahoma City, the Anna our city shelter is the only organization with a shelter. All of us are primarily foster based we do have a what I call an adoption storefront and our cats, go into communal cat rooms, and we'll live there until they're adopted, but our dogs are brought in everyday by our foster families and then picked up at night at they haven't been adopted are typical length of time in the adoption center is usually two to three days for small to medium dog and maybe a little bit, you know, four or five days for a large. But we've amazing fosters and volunteers who relate any blessed to have a big impact in the community. Get how big is your shelter at wits the capacity that you can actually hold in your physical space. We actually can't we've eight cat rooms. And so that would probably be any up to thirty five or forty cats that are before full we do have kittens spaces where we can have kittens. Additionally, and then we have fourteen what we call dog sweets are the dogs to be during the day when they are brought in by their fosters couple of meet and greet room. So we're not really that big in terms of a ton of animals at our location. But what's nice is that we have high awareness in the community. We have regular foot traffic and this year, we're on track to do probably around thirty three hundred adoptions and will actually have to poll a little over four thousand dogs and. Cats into our program. So that we constantly have them in the pipeline to achieve that thirty three hundred adoption goal. That's amazing that with such a small space that you're able to adopt out so many, I would assume you probably have quite a few adoptions that are actually direct from foster care too. So the cats and dogs don't even make it into the shelters. We do and, you know, we're constantly working with members of the community who've requested something specific to try to see if we can match to the best of our -bility. And also, I think that we have such an interesting model, it's very different from other groups in other communities, we actually have five locations, and I always laughingly say that we have all the pieces of shelter, but not in one place, we have an intake facility on the grounds of our city shelter where are the animals start? We also that's where relocation dogs stay until they're boarded to go to the other shelters. And so we walk across. The parking lot to the city shelter. Many times a day to pull dogs and cats. They start their day then are placed in foster we had the in house medical clinic that supports our foster families than Johnson cats with anything they need then they're scheduled for sure degree, and they go to our speed Neuner clinic for surgery and ultimately to our adoption center for adoption in. Then we have a little administrative offices. Well, so I think a lot of times people are amazed that we can do as much as we do with five different locations, but it is a well machine and it runs amazingly smoothly strategically many organizations sit down, and they strategically try and think of things, and they think of well, do we need to build big large infrastructure and coming from your sense of leadership in the thought of running a big capital campaign. It sounds like you feel pretty convinced that even with a little bit of space here. And there are being sort of spread around at still you're still very powerful as a group. Yeah. I think it's possible to have impact without having, you know, a really big sheltered a shelter capacity now for us. I mean, the question really, then becomes can you do more? And at what point are, you kind of mixed out your model, and I think we're probably there in terms of recruiting star homes and being able to do that. So we do have plans in the future to actually build a facility and centralize some of the services only because it will enable us to do more will place more pets. We'll be able to offer. Some more wellness services out of our in house clinic, we'll be able to do more for the community more efficiently. But I would say that said, you know, really do want to emphasize that you can have a big impact without having a honk huge shelter. And it takes a lot of time and effort and strain on an organization to raise funds for big shelter. It does it's expensive. And then the maintenance, you know, is Deary expensive as well. How does an organization make decision to do an expansion plan or how would aboard make that decision along with the lead US president? We looked at the data. I mean, we have a community view our city shelter takes in the majority of animals in the community, and we actually evaluate data on a quarterly basis to see what's happening. And then you're over year to see what kind of progress were making, you know, in our goal is to be able to get to a point where replacing the place abo- animals. And so we look at what we're we'll be talking about actually this year with our strategic plan meeting is really, you know, where are we? Now, if we really wanna get the community up to a consistent eighty five or ninety percent live release rate. What do we need to do? And that means that we just need to have more capacity to do more. And I would assume that your board of directors went. Needing to get on board with that. Absolutely. And that'll be discussion at the strategic planning meeting will get in-depth in terms of you know, that particular topic. And then what we're going to have to do to achieve that as far as capital campaign as far as expanding our income. So that we're ready for the increased expense when we ultimately build something and open our doors. So I have a wonderful staff and board. I have to say, I am my team is just amazing. I mean in terms of their passion and their excitement and willingness to learn, and I have a very engaged involve wonderful board. So very fortunate to have that can be a challenge. Sometimes if you're lacking one or both, you know, if you're trying to make progress. Well, it's good to have if you are embarking on a growth stage to to have support on both sides. That's tremendous. It's the Lutely in my team has been really amazing because you know, we have grown very quickly. And somebody's were so kind of an infant stage. But you know for me coming from my background. I always say that we are all incredibly passionate about our mission. And we wanted to Chievo our goals of saving lives, but we also have to have a business approach to it because we were in the business of saving lives. And so if we're not looking at the financials, and our budgets and holding herself accountable for achieving those financial goals, and we're not going to be able to do as much as we'd like to do to save the animals, and so I've been really fortunate in that my team is always eager to learn and anything they haven't known how to do. They've just jumped on board. You know and said teach me, that's that's great things that you learned you learned a lot of sounds like or your staff learned a lot from the ASPCA program when it was done. Do you feel that other than the potential expansion? There's more components that are needed to help community cats. Yeah. I think you know, we're. Always looking for more ways in which we've been save cats. We Oklahoma's a little unique again, and that you know, from my putting PetSmart charities hat marimba the country mostly UC more dogs than cats. Starting more cats than dogs entering shelters at a, you know, sixty forty ratio usually in Oklahoma is exactly the opposite. We see more dogs actually, enter the shelter than cats do which would indicate that we have a lot of cats living on the street and never make it to the shelter. And so we think that any programs that we can put in place to kind of humanely manage that population of free, roaming cats is really important if we're going to really try to do our best for all of the animals in the community. So right now, we as I mentioned before we had community cap program. We have a in our program will have a barn buddy program, which is really popular here in Oklahoma. Because we have a lot of Phillips that live. On large acreage is. And they have you know, they want mousters in their barn or something. And so it's a really great environment for a cat who's not going to do. Well, you know in some other type of environment. Sue, if there are people interested in finding out more about the central Oklahoma, humane society or reaching out to your staff to find out more as their away that people can find you. Yep. Neck and go to our website WWW. Okay. Humane dot org, or if they want to send us an Email. They just send an Email to info at okay humane organ. They'll be re directed to the appropriate person to answer questions and in closing. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with our listeners today? Not really I mean, I think that just one of my kind of real learnings and being in this field and coming from my background is that you know, it is possible to make a difference. It is important to look at the community overall and not just your organization because if you know really going. To achieve what we need to achieve in our communities. We have to be looking beyond our own operations to you know, how we're helping the animals in the community sue, that's great. Thank you so much for agreeing to be a guest on the show today. And I hope we'll be able to have you on the future. I hope so too. Thank you. Thanks for listening to the community cats podcast, if you could go to IT and review the show, we really appreciate it. When you do take a screen shot of your review, go to community cats, podcast dot com or slash review and enter your information, and we'll send you a t shirt while you're there, don't forget to check out all the ways, you can support the content you're passionate about thanks everyone.

Oklahoma president and CEO PetSmart Oklahoma City vice president and executive d Oklahoma humane society Susannah ASPCA Meramec river house medical clinic Johnson vice president of marketing Stacey lebaron Northern Trust Arizona university of Iowa Han J Walter Thompson Los Angeles
"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

10:28 min | 4 years ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You turned into the community cats podcasts ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I'm your host. Stacey lebaron. I have been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Merrimack river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We're speaking with Bonnie Braun body Brown is the president founder and principal consultant for humane network bunny is the former executive director of the Nevada. Humane society in Reno she dramatically increased adoption rates and led the community to achieve and sustain a ninety four percent live release rate for dogs and cats making wash U county, one of the safest communities in the country for homeless animals and receiving Maddie's funds community, lifesaving award Bonnie is a former chief operating officer for best friends animal society and former campaign director for Elliot. Allies Bonnie is teaching the university of Pacific's shelter management. It's ticket program, and is a frequent speaker on increasing pet adoptions and other life saving programs as well as management and fundraising for humane organizations in nineteen Ninety-two Bonnie founded the Nepal fell FLU mean society in canton, Massachusetts, Bonnie has over ten years of experience in retail buying and management and is a graduate of Boston University body. Welcome to the show. I think so much Stacey glad to be here. You have quite a resume, and I had the honor of meeting you back in the days when you head started in Poncet valley humane society, I was just wondering if you could touch upon those early days, and let us know how you got started in the business. Absolutely. It's funny that you mentioned that because I very vivid memories of lobbying at the state house with you for the. Leg whole track band legislation long before that came into play and the license plate to Spain relicensing plate. So. Yeah. That was a long time ago. Anyway. Yeah. You know, I got into this kind of funny way, my oddly enough, my parents were actually animal rescuers. So as a kid I grew up in a household with lots of rescued dogs and cats my father would bring them home from a where he worked in Boston. And they would for the most part income part family. Sometimes my mother would find homes for kittens? But a lot of the dogs and cats came and stayed with us, and you know, as I got older into college. I sort of got away from the whole animal rescue league until this somewhat defining moment occurred, probably around nineteen ninety I was driving home from work. Let one night and. And in my headlights, I caught this black kitten in the gutter trying to eat something. And of course, he was feral Cav. I didn't really understand that at the time. But did some research was somewhat at the time naive and shocked to learn that if I took him to local shelter. He would be euthanized because he was a feral cat, and so finally hit upon allocate allies and connected with some great local people Valby is one who had started just cats down a Mansfield and Roberta keys is another shade, hilltop humane society in Randolph. And so that was sort of my introduction into the field to this kit in this black kitten. I allot of it to him. Boy, those are names from the past. I remember. Meeting up with fell down and Mansfield backed win. We were it was before the Massachusetts animal coalition. We had was the humane coalition of Massachusetts that what we called ourselves. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So that was that was quite quite a while ago. And I was definitely that was my first experience doing any sort of advocacy work on behalf of animals that day in the state house and strolling around with my daughter my two year old daughter or in the stroller. I remembered that. Yeah, I think that was probably for this Benjamin license plate legislation. More think about it. Yeah. So back then you turn to Roberta and Val for help. But then you started your own organization. You started the Poncet Felli humane society as a result of seeing what these other two women were doing. I did. Yeah. I really felt we needed to meet the need in though, the local communities of ended up serving the Qin share. Bear in area. And eventually took over a good portion of the just cats work from bow down in the Mansfield area to it has to say, you know, early on. I went down to one of the first alley Kelly's conferences in Washington DC, and the that was really quite defining for me as well. In terms of getting a thorough understanding of Trump new to return and how and why it worked so? Yeah, I was really fortunate. Find a lot of amazing people pretty early on and really a lot to them. Yeah. The one thing that when I think of Bonnie Brown, I think that you are great at connecting with people, and you're not I would say not particularly shy about trying to connect and find people what sort of recommendations. Would you give you know, others in terms of say trying to approach potential funder or just a collaborative partner somebody that you want to work with? How would you? Approach someone. Yeah. I think it can be helpful. If you can find a connection to the person who can help make the introduction, especially today through Email Facebook, I can sort of help guide your way to find a mutual connection. But but really? You know, if you approach people with a question sincere question about what they do. And how they do it. And why they do it. Most people even though they're very busy are happy to turn to make time to explain because after all all started somewhere, and it's a great way to make contacts it works with folks in the media, and well pretty much everybody donors, you know, to take the time to try to get them as to know, the mizzen individual and ask about their personal connection to animals. It's very powerful in deepens that relationship. Yes. Some of the smaller groups that I've worked with in my the mentoring program that I ran with the Meramec river feline rescue society, and that I will be continuing to do through some community. Cats grants is a matching fund raising grant where group will be asked to raise a thousand dollars of a new fundraising initiative, and then the grant will. Match that thousand dollars, and that's great. I work with smaller groups like their revenues or about sixty thousand dollars or less, and in many groups, they revenues are like five to ten thousand dollars a year. And some of these groups have never done a mailing. They've never had a board member campaign fundraising campaign, and one of the topics that have came out of that primer. Grant process was the group said, you know, we never realized how important the ask was and how successful just by asking for donation that that really could be what a great comment -absolutely, and people are often afraid to be specific. And explain what it is they need. But really a lot of power in that to a lot of people care deeply vote animals and they want to help. And therefore, if you share a specific example of what you need the help foil at the story of a specific animal that needs funding say to receive tree. Meant or particular equipment that you might need whether it's trap. So or specific supplies are quick -ment for spe neuter clinic, the more specific really the better the results because it takes the mystery out of what you want. Sometimes we said, well, we need donations volunteers. But it's it's very unclear to people exactly what might be volunteering four. So if you can be specific and say, we need volunteers socialized cats walk dogs or come to a special training session to learn how to trap and new deferral cats. It's going to give people a lot more comfort. And you're gonna get a lot better response and done a lot of research into bun raising and they find that the connection of one to one is really magical, and they don't exactly know why. Whether it's wellm ING. When we hear about the thousands of people are animals in need, but people can really identify empathize with the plight of an individual. So whenever you can to pick a an animal that can be the example of the situation that you're talking about it's going to be a lot easier to engage people than just a generic ask that sort of more general, although really any kind of asking is better than than none at all. I mean, you think about how busy we all are. And if nobody makes really clear to us what the needs are what the expectations are. It's really rare. We actually sit down and write that check. So that's a really amazing story in a great. Takeaway, Stacey that people got out of it. The importance of the ask. And now, let's take a moment to listen to a few words from our sponsors flashlight tag was fun when you are a kid, but no one wants to play hide and seek with their trap. Find your traps location quickly and safely even when you visit at night with the reveal wild application for Samsung galaxy HTC one Sony experience and other Android phones or go to tiny. You're L dot com. Forward slash reveal wild. I

Bonnie Stacey lebaron Bonnie Brown Massachusetts Roberta keys founder and principal Merrimack river Bonnie Braun Massachusetts animal coalition Boston Spain Poncet valley Reno Meramec river university of Pacific Mansfield executive director chief operating officer Maddie
"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

09:37 min | 4 years ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"L dot com. Forward slash reveal wild. Since two thousand six to now have you noticed a drop in the number of kittens that you've dealt with on an annual basis or noticed drop in the number of requests for help I-I've only the only started in two thousand we opened our building December two thousand twelve I'm saying my in our program really got going in two thousand fourteen. So I'm not white in looking at those numbers yet, we're still gaining popularity. But what I do notice is if I like I hid an area really hard hit the calmer really hard one year, and sort of ignored or another part of my service area like the town of Sturbridge. And then suddenly the next year. I hardly any kittens in the count of our but time Sturbridge is where every single one of my kittens from except for maybe one or two litters. So I even noticed things like that. So that's good to know. Because if there is a sort of contentious situation going on at to such a point where a group is forced to sort of leave area and stop there are, you know, activities than that, you know, governing body who might be enforcing this should be prepared to see an uptick in cats in that area. If there isn't any active spay neuter right yet, I'm trying really hard to get the government. Get the town governments behind me in. It's it's hard because they don't have the funding to do these kinds of things they of think of a little bit of a pain. The residents complain urine there anytime that goes missing. It's it's my fault. I mean, we were experiencing a lot of being new organization problems. So that's communication and building relationships jeopardy when our best to do these kinds of things and it takes time. And I know when you are small organization time is usually not something that's very much available, and it's hard to manage. But it's also very important to establish those relationships because if you don't have them, then there's a level of trust that sometimes doesn't exist either. And you want those governing folks to be able to refer people to you to be able to help which I know that adds to your list of things that you need to do. But yet, it's it's the best course of action. Right. It's sort of like this Wiki wheel gets the oil. Yep. Bothers so many people that are happy with what we're doing in our on board. There's one or two that are a little louder. The don't like what. Do and complained berry loudly. Yeah. But I think though with enough education and enough sympathy for those people to be able to say, hey, we're listening to what you're talking about an and at the end of the day, usually our objectives are the same. Which is we want every cat to have a guardian or a home in to have, you know, to be cared for to be spayed or neutered and TR can only make a colony size go down. It's not gonna make to TR colony or spay. Neuter colony is not going to make the colony get any bigger. And so we're all in the same page with regards to the objectives. And you know, we have seen trap neuter euthanize, I mean trap neuter new euthanize trap, and euthanize know, it's not not a successful option at all because unfortunately, cat overpopulation as a human problem. With us, basically, abandoning cats at starts with abandonment in until we can address that social service issue of cat abandonment than we have to have reactive ten are in place. Still sort of having vicious communicating that and giving to see like that, you know, the more numbers like get able to show people these things that it's a little harder. They still want to be a little reactive things. So, you know, we're getting there and showing them other towns is harder to convince the they wanna see their towns. But they so we're getting there. Right. It is it's a slow process, and sometimes you can never win people over and then that's when you like you bribe them with brownies or something whatever their favorite food is you Natalie. Again, this show in the money that expensive they're down. They like that. And then when I offer low cost spay neuter in public lines, they like that. So right. So they see what you know what services you're providing. And that's not you know, that's not funded by any public public monies? The you know in Massachusetts, we do have. A checkoff on the tax returns the mass animal fund, and then we also have our spay neuter license plate in. So those are sort of two ways for nonprofits to get access to. I guess I would call them kinda quasi public private funding. Sources but from an individual local town, it's very rare to get any funding. At least in Massachusetts. In terms of your do have been with me in the mentoring program. The did the mentoring program when we had a grant with the PetSmart charities. What was how did that experience help you? That was great. It really helped me clerk to organize at Givi up casts at reach out more for help. It was before I got into that. It was Lord more me myself trying to do a lot of stuff. That helped me sort of get a team on board. He and out some responsibilities and giving that and realize that sometimes I have to be the one I you tells other people what to do. And instead of being the one out in the field all the time responding to everything's. So I can't always be the one doing all fieldwork. I can't respond to every person. But I can push it down the chain. There's other people who want to do those kinds of been. So I can just being not kind of position. And you know, organize a team which is sometime the thing that's needed. The most his not everyone can do that. And creating a team is I would say very critical for success. I support for any organization. You're you're not gonna be able to do it alone. If you think you're gonna create something nonprofit, you know, a. Option center at trap neuter return program. You're not going to be doing it alone. You have the obligations of having a board of directors as well. As having a volunteer corps. We had over three hundred fifty volunteers at the Meramec river feline rescue society, which that's been over twenty years in development, but I have to stress that as an organization grows. It's important to have even if you do have staff on board. It's really important to have a large. Volunteer corps, helping you out and providing different sources of skills and perspectives it helps organization grow and stay stay fresh, stay fresh with new ideas. Now, the good really important nights or take that into every aspect of things. Now, I sort of delegate a lot because I do a lot myself. But if I didn't delegate, I don't think I would get any sleep at all well, and you would burn out, and you know, burn out is something that happens very regularly in this business between that and compassion fatigue. It's very can be very emotional business too. And so we have to be very sensitive to those components. And you know, we are not able to be available twenty four seven we would like to feel. We can we want our programs to be available in that way. But it's just not possible with with one person, Rachel if people are interested in finding out more about here today or even having a visit to see what your cageless facility is like how could they find you? We're on here today. Sanctuary dot or Facebook is the same thing here today sanctuary. You can Email us our general Email in smudge at here today, sanctuary dot or or meet our a c h eighty out at here today, sanctuary dot or and we just started Instagram account, which is actually here today. Dopp tomorrow. I think that's an we aren't located in Britain deal in our dress is everywhere. So you can look online for opening hours or if it's a call or one three three two four eight two to four and making a point to come visit. So when people around. Yeah. So when folks are all going to brim field world's largest

Sturbridge Massachusetts PetSmart Meramec river Facebook Instagram Givi Britain berry Rachel Natalie Lord twenty years one year
"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

08:58 min | 4 years ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You turned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I'm your host. Stacey lebaron. I have been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Meramec river feline rescue society. The purpose of this podcast is to expose you to great people or helping cats daily, and hopefully you will learn a little bit more about what you might do in your community with cats today. We're speaking with Laura burns, Laura, grew up in a suburb of Rochester, New York and didn't realize that there were cats living outside. She didn't think she ever saw one after attending college in Chicago. She moved to Boston. She lived there for many years without seeing cats outside she had to meet someone in the cat rescue business who opened her eyes. She was happy to discover that it was possible to help those many many cats through trap neuter return, just by neutering them and preventing the birth of more. They could live healthy safer lives in two. Two thousand three she founded hubcaps hub cats. Frustrated by the time it took to trap every cat Mukalla. Ni. She made a homemade drop drop based on a picture. I'd seen on the she'd seen on the internet. This was such an improvement with the guidance and support from me with availability of low cost spay, neuter resources, Laura burns, tea and ARD four thousand cats in the Boston area Lor and her father later developed a folding version of the drop trap and sold three hundred of them all over the world in two thousand eight she relocated back to Rochester. And join habitat for cats a TR focused group becoming president in two thousand and fourteen Laura. Thanks so much for being on the show. I really appreciate you coming. And so looking forward to this conversation. I had actually forgotten you had trapped four thousand cats in the Boston area. That's truly amazing. Thank you. Thank you. Stacey. Thank you for having me. I actually I remember one cat in particular that you trapped back in the back in the days when we were still finishing off our colonies in newburyport. We still had a few cats that were hard to trap cats in the newburyport area, and we had just met, and you told me about this drop chap in the ladies who were trapping up on the waterfront had been trying for years and years and years to get this last cat at a colony up in Salisbury. And we got you to come up, and I believe you trap that cat in about twenty minutes, therefore, finishing that colony off. I cannot tell you how many hours Jan spent trying to trap that last cat at that colony and you just went up and just got her right away. So I was sold on the drop trap the minute. You did that. Right. There were a couple. There was the cat also somewhere up in that that area that had been ear tip. But she was never spayed. So we had a cheese snuck somehow snuck through with a with a. Counterfeit ear tip. And so we had to we caught her too. Yeah. I remember that cat to that that polity that was quite a colony there. They were so spoiled, they just wouldn't you? It was very hard to trap them. They were so spoiled. Yes, the newburyport and Salisbury crowd. They definitely loved feeding their cats. That's for sure. Yes. That's right. We had one volunteer who every Sunday. Religiously went to all of our feeding stations and would feed everybody sardines. So they were definitely spoiled. But I guess it's appropriate being on the ocean to get their sardines every every week. So well your story. Just sounds just so fascinating because you were born and bred Lert knowing our wasn't like you came from shelter background UK. You went directly right into trapping Ferrell's. Can you talk a little bit about your experience in Boston and learning to trap well in the city? I guess I started out. I was hoping lady who assure a con who was who had a shelter in the city, and I lost my cat, and I met her and she took me to a fundraiser one day, which was a outdoor. It was an outdoor yard sale kind of thing to raise money for the for her shelter and a woman came up, and she was wringing her hands over. She was looking at the little cat knickknacks for sale, and she was bringing your hands and saying that the cats were just gonna drive crazy. And I just asked her innocently what what she was talking about. And she it turned out that she was feeding about one hundred cats in Brighton using big bread trays big baking trays full of food everyday. She'd bring out these huge trays of food and the cats would just come from all over the place to I had never seen anything like that. I just you know, I'd never seen one cat outside much less a hundred cats outside and. So no one else seem to be stepping up to help this lady. So I offered to help her in the end, they assured me that they told me about you and our at that point. And somehow they put me in touch with D Dennis who showed me how to trap on. I needed that person to kind of hold my hand the first time. But once I saw that cat walk into the trap and the door closed behind it. I was I think I was. I got the bug the trapping bug. And how does that feel to have the trapping bug? What what's that like? Well, it's just feel you feel all of a sudden that this is really possible. You could really do something for these cats a knife could see right away. I mean, I think when you your first experiences with a with two or three cats or a mom and some kittens, you think. Well, geez. You know, I'll find homes for the kittens and all get them on fixed. But there was just no way that would work with this situation. There was just no way that you could you could take that individualistic approach. So I think I jumped in immediately to thinking about the bigger picture the numbers in the realizing that the more you do for any individual cat, the fewer cats, you can help your just say aunt help all those GATS. So. I wanted. I think I from the beginning. I wanted to do you know, I wanted to affect the lives of more more cats rather than fewer debts, and I really think of US sort of the pro with the drop trap. How did you learn to use a drop rep? Well, I remember trapping at Brookline high school. And I just went back time after time. It wasn't even very far away from me. It was just down the street, but I would go back time after time in there would be the cats would were just not interested in the. In in the in the in the box traps, I just couldn't lure them in. And oftentimes that's the case. I think may be fifty percent of cats will will happily go into a box trap. If you set it up, right? And the way we do it here as we tie open the trap a week ahead of time and start the food in the opening and then gradually move the food back to the back. So that the cat gets habituated to going in the trap. And I think you can that increases your odds of of catching the cats, but if you're trapping someplace where you can't leave the trap you need a trap that is less intimidating and looks less like a trap. So so having the drop trap, which is open on three sides. It's a big box with no bottom. Big. Like a like a trap. But it's it's large with no bottom and propped up

Boston Laura burns Stacey lebaron Salisbury Rochester Meramec river Chicago Brookline high school president Brighton Jan US Ferrell Lert Dennis New York UK twenty minutes fifty percent twenty years
"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

04:58 min | 4 years ago

"meramec river feline rescue society" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You turned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I'm your host. Stacey lebaron. I've been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Meramec river feline rescue society. The purpose of this podcast is to expose you to great people were helping cats daily, and hopefully you may learn a little bit more about what you might do in your community for cats today. We're speaking with Mike Kylie, Mike is the director of the noble family animal care and adoption center at the MS at Nevins firm. My Kylie has been working in animal welfare since nineteen Ninety-four all at the at Nevins farm. Mike has been a director there for over twelve years. And during this time has developed outreach and adoption programs to elevate the noble family adoption center to one of the most progressive and successful animal welfare organizations in New England. Mike has also served as board member of the New England federation of human societies since two thousand seven Mike welcome to the show. Having me. So we're going to just kick off with our questions and way way back in nineteen ninety four. How did you get involved in this business? It's funny. Actually, I had no idea what an animal shelter was. And I had always loved animals and decided that I wanted to work with animals for my career. So in high school, my mother decided that I needed to pad my resume for vet school and signed me up to be a volunteer at the embassy at Nevins farm. I got into the shelter. Not knowing anything about it and started as a dog Walker and slowly got addicted to working with animals and started coming instead of one day a week started coming pretty much every day after school, my childhood background is with rabbits. So shortly after I started as a volunteer. The SPCA took in hundred sixty seven rabbits and at the time. No, one knew anything about rabbits. We had to hold them as alarm force case, they were all sick and needed to be Medicated daily. So I helped out with that pretty much every single day and really decided that at some point that a really. Wanted to have a career with animal welfare. And not as veterinarian. I think when I was a kid. I thought the only thing you can do if you wanna work with animals, this to be a veterinarian I decided somewhere along my college career that the SPCA was where I wanted to be long term and have stayed here ever since can you describe a little bit wet the MSP was like that one thousand nine hundred four. Yeah. It was you know, I it's the only shelter that I ever news. I didn't think anything different of it. But it was a pretty bleak place with a big heart in his way. I would describe it the building that we were operating out of was described to me originally as a garage and chicken coop or sorry pigeon coupon top of the garage Nevins farm was never a place that was supposed to be a place where cats dogs are going to be held. It was started as a retirement farm for working horses, but over time horses stopped being the primary mode of transportation took over with police cars instead of police horses and the number of homeless animals started to rise. So that's where that little space got converted into a place to hold GATS dog. At the time. When I first started the cats and dogs all lived in one big room. And that was really all we had been. So every morning we would turn six dogs out into the outside Penn area and give the cats a little bit of a break. But it was a looking back at it. Now, it was a pretty stressful devastating place for animals to be and at some point where he luckily able to get a separate cat rooms while we waited for a new building. And in two thousand four we moved into a brand new state of the art nineteen thousand square foot building that really took into consideration the needs of the animals, so it was a really tough beginning for us. But I think it made us a little bit stronger in hit made us appreciate really where we're at today sell in describing where you are right now. How does that building serve cats, and what sort of programs are you doing to help community cats now? Well, I think the first and foremost our adoption program is become very strong having a building in which the animals stress is focused on right off the bat when the cats come into our shelter. They're able to go into a quiet area. They have sunlight in the back of the cages with a glass Bak cages. So even though they're in cages, they're still getting a little bit more enrichment right off the bat and a little less scary. I experience and then our Dopp shin floor. We have multiple spaces available for cats with different personalities cats like it to be a pie can be in our tall. Townhouse cages gets that need a big wide. Bottom space because they're bigger cats have on the showcase cages that are have good floor space cats like to be with other cats can hang out in our colony rooms. So we have different spaces that accommodate each cats personalities, and I think for community cats one of the things that we've been able to do is we have now a surgical suite. With veterinarians veterinary technicians that are able to do low cost spay neuter surgery right here in our building. And that's been able to allow us to program around the needs of our community and especially with cats. That's

Nevins farm Mike Kylie Nevins firm Meramec river Stacey lebaron director New England Walker New England federation Penn GATS Dopp shin twelve years twenty years one day