18 Burst results for "Mental Health Advocacy"

Dealing with COVID Anxiety

The Psych Central Show

05:42 min | 11 months ago

Dealing with COVID Anxiety

"And welcome to this week's episode of Psych Central. PODCAST. I'm your host gave Howard and calling into the show today we have. Dr, just lean shot wall. She is the chief medical officer and Director of Mood Disorders Program at Sierra Tucson, a premier residential, behavioral, Health Treatment Centre Dr Chow while welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. I'm delighted to be here. We are super excited to have you here today because you're also an anxiety expert and many people who aren't used to feeling the effects of anxiety are because of covid. So I WANNA start with are you seeing people that never had anxiety? And stress issues before suddenly developing anxiety disorders because of the global pandemic. I am noticing that there are a lot of people who noticed anxiety type symptoms and since they've never really experienced them before they're really taken aback and they don't really know what's going on and so I feel like one of our big duties at this time is to help people become more aware because I think once you can name the beast benefits a lot easier to tame the beast and I think a lot of individuals will have a hard time if they don't know what to call it or what to do with it. The psych central podcast has been on the air for almost five years psych central dot Com has been around for twenty five years. So we are well versed in mental health advocacy. And for the most part, it's always sort of been in its own little corner. There's the people that have a mental health issue or a mental illness, and they understand it. There's people who developed one or have a loved one who develops a mental health issue or mental illness, and they're searching for information, but by and large the majority of the population. Was Not discussing this openly we've seen that changed dramatically in the last six months where suddenly it's sort of mainstream news about how adult that never had any mental health issues before are suddenly a suffering from the symptoms of depression anxiety stress and on and on and on. It's a lot of people talk about anxiety like it's a pathological thing. I really try to. Explain to people how anxiety is normal. You have to have the neurobiological fear response to see safe as a human being like you are going to the Grand Canyon and walking over the skywalk. The fact that we don't just climb over the rail and try to jump down is because we do have a biological response to anything that's not within the normal human experience or. Scope if you think about having a snake your chair, you want to have an anxiety response so that you can quickly panic and run and what will happen. If you don't have that fear responses, you will die because the snake will bite you or you'll have some pretty negative consequences of that. How can you not having society when you're being told all day on the? News that you need to take all these extra precautions to just be safe to not fall sake to make sure your loved ones don't die. That is something that just normally will cause some degree of anxiety the difference between that type of anxiety and what can be called a DSM anxiety disorder ends up being that it becomes overwhelming to the point that you can't function. And what we start to see people who may have had a higher level of anxiety before were being able to do things to help themselves like going to the gym to work out or going for a run outside or spending time with loved ones all people they're coping skills have been taken away, and that is where you start seeing that they now fall into more that clinical anxiety. Disorder category if you look at most mental health conditions, they are on a spectrum and it just really depends on how far along the spectrum you are. Today could be that today it's a disorder, but a week ago or two weeks ago wasn't quite meeting the criteria. One of the themes that runs through the sake central podcast we try to explain that mental health and physical health actually. Are. They have a lot in common meaning most people have good physical health. Most of the time you can still get a cold. You can still get injured and that's a very temporary problem but you can also have, for example, diabetes, which is severe and persistent and lifelong mental health is the same way I. Think a lot of people think that you either have good mental health or. You're mentally ill and that there's nothing in between do you believe that because of the pandemic people are starting to realize that everybody has mental health and that you can have the equivalent of of a cold which in in this case is stress and anxiety or panic do you think this is helping to educate people that we all have mental health and anything can trigger bad mental health. I think reading a lot more content about that in very popular channels, Navy your podcast, or me this our world. But other people for whom this is not their world. We are seeing them talk more about mental and in my own World I try not to talk about somebody having just mental illness I think about mental health on a continuum. You can do things every day to improve your mental health and you can do things every day that may not really be serving well, the kind of food you e the places that you go to the people you spend time with each of those things can help build up that mental hell.

Anxiety Howard Grand Canyon Sierra Tucson Dr Chow Medical Officer Director Of Mood Disorders
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"When I was reading this research? Is this idea. That mothers with schizophrenia. They don't have a lot of Leeway. One of the things that you just said is that you would need a lot of help. I would really defy you to find a mother on this planet. That doesn't need a lot of help. Now I understand that if you're managing any illness any not mental own if you have an illness then obviously you're going to need more help. That is understood but do you think that the bar is just significantly. Lower for women with schizophrenia. That if something happens if a mistake occurs if an illness symptom POPs up the dislike. Oh well you're schizophrenic. We got to take your baby whereas with other mothers like oh well you just made a mistake. Mistakes are part of parenting. Everybody does do you think that. That is a factor in some of these stats absolutely and I think if someone has some sort of even genetic disorder. Very few people are like. Oh you shouldn't have a child you shouldn't be over. You know another person's welfare but when it comes to mental stuff it's like Oh you have depression. Oh yeah bipolar schizophrenia. Like no you shouldn't be around children and not even like you shouldn't be a mother. You shouldn't be around children so there is definitely a double standard with that. All where anything mental freaks people out. There's just so much stigma discrimination and misinformation that it makes it very difficult and it's interesting because you know Rachel I love you and I think the world of you but I know what it's like to be sick and I can't imagine having to care for a baby and I can't imagine you carrying for a baby when you're that sick and of me is like. Oh Jeez I don't know maybe that's not a good idea but my mom broke her wrist when she had three children she she was not doing well. That six weeks i. My father lost his job when we were younger. Well that's not a good idea. Either I just I think of all of the adversity that my family faced growing up but everybody was like hey band together. Work IT OUT. You can do it. Nobody said Yeah. This is proof that people named Gary Howard shouldn't be fathers. Oh this is proof that people named Susan. Howard just can't Hack Motherhood we just got through it as as a family and a community and I think that more often than not women with schizophrenia. They just don't get those benefits and I think it's worth pointing out because it is another layer. That makes it very difficult for women with schizophrenia. To lead the lives that they would like and I wanNA put a little note on this over and over I could find so much info about women having children as far as like pros cons mostly cons in just lots of people with opinions and yet next to nothing about men with schizophrenia. Being father's nothing really there was nothing. I don't know just an interesting like how society we view people with mental disorders. Having families. It was just Kinda like women obviously. Yeah they're going to deal with this but not men that is incredible and obviously something that will discuss. More next month on men with schizophrenia. Rachel Shifting Gears from Motherhood we have to talk about the aging process. What's the difference between men and women with schizophrenia? As we get older this is fascinating. We talked about earlier. Age of onset. That women tend to get schizophrenia. Later another thing though is that women can have a second peak of schizophrenia. Is What they call it. And it's usually women aged forty five to fifty who have not been previously diagnosed with schizophrenia. It suddenly comes on and it has to do with pre menopausal stage hitting and they think because the estrogen drops. There's something about estrogen that keeps schizophrenia. More in control and hearkening back to what we talked about earlier with periods and shopping. But men don't have this. There is no second part of life where suddenly a man who hasn't had schizophrenia. Will develop it in his fifties sixties. It's just not sane. In fact men with schizophrenia. As they age tend to get more of a handle on it and women. It's the opposite because you have for some women suddenly schizophrenia develops and there's a lot about that. I was wondering When I looked at the different research. These women already have schizophrenia. But maybe because they were so social. It just wasn't recognizable or did it really just come on at that moment and there is no answer for that but I did think it was very interesting and something that. If you've already been diagnosed with schizophrenia to look out for that it could get a lot worse hitting around age. Forty five if you're a woman so I got a little over ten years their clock's ticking for the second round of fun and it's something else that women have to be aware of that may or may not be as researched or as discussed. Oftentimes I think society does forget. How much educated guesswork there is in a mental health. Diagnosis Schizophrenia is diagnosed by observation. It's treated by best case practices and research and then more observation. There's a lot of self reporting from the person living with schizophrenia and all of that really allows our culture and our society and our bias to influence the end result. We have to be aware of it while it does sound scary and it is. I don't like the idea that men and women get different treatment. Obviously you don't like the idea that men and women get different treatment because it it kind of sounds like women are getting the short end of the stick. It is what we have now and for the women listening to this show this is where advocacy is just so important along with education and Rachel. I'm going to ask you. Would you have known any of this information about being a woman living with schizophrenia? If it wasn't for your job do you feel more educated and more empowered today than you did before the research for this show? And what advice do you have for? Women living with schizophrenia. To make sure that they get the best care taking into account the fact that they're women. I would not have known a lot of the things we've talked about today but especially The way estrogen is thought to affect schizophrenia. Did none of that's ever been brought up to me. You know doctors ever said anything like I said. I'm in my mid thirties and you would think maybe hey just so you know Rachel. You know women with schizophrenia. It could get a lot worse here in the next few years. None of that's ever been said to me. And it makes me realize how important it is to do your own research and I'm not saying to diagnose yourself I'm saying to really know an research what could be on the horizon especially with the pregnancy and things like that. I'm like okay well. I don't plan on having kids so I would. I ever like research. Look into all that. But then that's what led me to finding Alabel all of this which leads the menopause thing and again. It's just not something you you normally see on any of the little pamphlets in the doctor's office brought up at any therapists meeting Rachel. Were you surprised to find out? Just how separated physical health and mental health is because it. It just seems to me like before we started the research for this show that it never occurred to really anybody that your physical health would drive your mental health outcomes and while this is a chronic problem just across the board and Mental Health Advocacy specifically for schizophrenia. The fact that what's going on with your physical body has been so far removed from your schizophrenia treatment. How does that make you feel last episode we talked about the Co Co morbidity and then to go into seeing just how the hormones they do? Everything affects your schizophrenia. And it's all connected and yet having a hard time mental health effects your physical and vice versa. Something else that we as people with mental disorders do need to be aware of and to kind of not be so hard on ourselves. But I've done research and just kind of learned about different statistics. A lot of eggs are normal that I just didn't realize where it's like. Hey It's okay that I have this issue. It's not that I'm being super unhealthy. A lot of women or a lot of people schizophrenia. Also struggle with this. It's good and bad. Let's go with that. It's good bad gave Rachel. Thank you so much for your candor. Now you had the opportunity to talk to. Dr Hayden Fitch who is a PhD in a researcher and UNDERSTAND SCHIZOPHRENIA? From the clinical perspective. And you've got to ask her a lot of questions about will really the differences between men.

schizophrenia Rachel Shifting Gary Howard Mental Health Advocacy Alabel Susan Dr Hayden Fitch Co Co researcher
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to the site central show why each episode presents an indepth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gay powered and co host vincent m wales a little reward and welcome to this week's episode of these sites central show podcast my name is gave howard and with me as always is vincent and wales before we get onto our incredible guest and somebody who i've enjoyed working with for a number of years now we want to remind everybody to support our sponsor the sponsor supports the show and that's why we're here so remember you can get a week of convenient affordable private online counseling anytime anywhere by visiting better help dot com slash sykes central and without further ado mr pete early welcome to the show by karamay gabe oh it is absent living glad to have you that's right vince here thanks day i you know i forget i forget ii met pete and i say mad we we met online because that's the way a lot of mental health advocacy is because you know travel and planes are expensive but you write a very popular blog at covering mental health advocates he topics and what i like about the blog is that it covers all sides you you have on the the medical opinion you have organizations like nami the family member voice and then there is my voice which is a lived experience boys that you also include including you include this all in you know kind of a onestop shopping space so that people can get really a well rounded view of a you know this i'm going to say this entire mess but everything to do with mental health so the first question that i have rain out of the gate is why did you create a space like why it's atypical most people create a blog at only talk about their opinion but you want a different way well i think part of it my journalistic background because they came in the washington post and i wish everybody felt the way you do because uh had not everybody thinks it always fair balanced terror they think it's highly opinionated but when i discovered when i did my book um i didn't think anybody for instance could object to the idea.

wales vince howard vincent mr pete washington
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

30:10 min | 3 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

"It worked on the home i probably have about two or three scary episodes a year we're that doesn't seem to work well but our same to bounce my way out of it somehow at at now had that works sometimes i'll take medication sometimes entente i would not recommend going off medication if it hopes you everyone has to learn and should learn their own symptom allergy and when it's problematic and when it's not for may i've learnt to mike not problematic for the majority of life and we these problematic i know what to do that takes years employees at year's envious you really do need to work with somebody professional to fond up what you're triggers a the accelerating factors iron hey can deal with that i trends different and you've talked about the importance of listening to people with experience in mental illness and really involving them in their own recovery but also involving them in developing mental health services tell me a little bit more about that and how that can work i believe that the people who have the most expertise abed mental health issues at those who are living with it and who fled to analyse end research what has been happening for them and i would like to say the time when the person experiencing them into healthy she is the one guarding the doctors through the treatment and care i'd love to say that i also know that if he if a bane in a mental health unit for treatment you now exactly what doesn't work and exactly the sorts of supports that are a waste of time and effort.

health services mike
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

"Treatment in a hospital but what is the case in australia is that this is a big gap in the middle of that stepped care model that is primary care is not that bad you can go to a jeep parapsychologist and hospital care is good but in between is very weak and it's also not got enough of the non medical variables in at lock housing n d suggests that there is a need for economic reform within mental health services what do you mean by that well mental illness costs about four percent of gdp that's a big number seventy billion and there is immense skirt for improvement and reform and just as an economic proposition let's say you got a twenty five percent increase in how well we deal with mental health over the next ten years that could be equated to something lark gum a increase in gdp of about one or two percent and that is a huge number the benefits would dwarf the economic gains from most micro economic reforms that have been talked about which does guns a very very modest at the moment with been really heavily on fail earlier in the system people having disability support pension when with better treatment that might not happen prison problems also a lack of employment by people who could be employed the cost of people who could work that because the uncreated mental illness is about one and a half percent of gdp if we could get better workforce participation they would be quite big economic gains a mental health reform the economics of it dwarfs most economic reform thing talked about today.

health services health reform australia twenty five percent four percent two percent ten years
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

"Recovery doesn't necessarily mean perfect cure no signs of the illness etcetera but you can get john to improvements in the law for people with mental illness if the appropriate looked after and how do you think that the progress at that is going helped to misty can argue that enough changes are going to be made quickly enough well there are some good things happening and are countless thousands of people out there doing great things individually or mental health but the fact is that governments do not make a really high priority of it on the most scientific measure of the burden of illness mental illness always is very high on the list and it forecast that by two three r d probably be the most important illness but it doesn't get a matching priority in terms of funding or other forms of support and that's because the number of votes in it or or whatever it is for politicians somehow it's not made a priority to my mind mental health is the really weak point in our health system it's a sore thumb the thing that sticks out in another was pretty good australian health system governments need to give it a high priority but are also make another point and that is that mental health is not run all that well and spending additional dollars we could do quite a lot all we could spend more on prevention and less at the treatment and we can have a more systematic approach colder stepped approach where say you come out of hospital you could immediately be given good accommodation unreasonable support and then as you get better you step down to another level where less support is needed and so on and alternatively if you start started the non severe and that something appropriate lot is available that end and then this nice collation of possibilities up to.

misty
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

"An cooking but she needs teaching in addition she does run cleaning but she needs a bit of of assad on how she does those things and some help and she needs the opportunity to live independently to retreat into her apartment that she actually lives in a community there's a number of people who live together they've each got their own independent apartment by pay come together through his daughters experience alan fels so the challenges people with severe mental illness face when they wish to live independently so he worked with other care is to establish the haven foundation and this is way isabela leaves now based in victoria it provides longterm affordable accommodation support and care for those with persistent mental illness this initiative reflects the broader philosophy held by the national mental health commission we think the approach to mental illness should be broad is what we call a contributing loft at a time coined by janet mao the other winner of the pros this year but the idea is to look at the whole of loss of a person with mental illness and to recognize that they really have the same route as anyone else to some reasonable accommodation employment opportunities psychosocial care it means that you should not take a narrow medical based approach to mental health particularly this via end that aim to give people as who filling aloft as possible to help them in recovery because we know that recovery can and does occur.

assad alan fels haven foundation janet mao
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

"Has those experiences as you said hallucinations delusions terrible noises in the head gunshot scaring off monks disappearing fears of walking down stairs because she'd folder the bottom of the couldn't be near windows she taught nutcracker she'd folds rose whatever and at that point a person can't be managed and so she went to hospital and she took medicine and although the medicines imperfect it does suppress the saarc cardiac aspect of her behaviour it has some side effects she's caught obsessive compulsive in various ways it can have other effects in terms of weight and so on and she had a period of leaving a away from hind because she wanted to be more independent how did that guy for her and what with the issues that came out there well predominantly incidently she lived at home and we looked after hip is very difficult for the parents to be everything the therapist the landlord the cope the everything so she needed for her on benefit some independent living but also some living where she could be looked after considering that because of the ongoing mental illness monde is not terribly well organized and she finds it difficult to perform normal daily tasks like cooking cleaning and that kind of thing so she went away from us a few times we kept in pretty close contact but living on her earn you can be caught vulnerable vulnerable to exploitation by other people whether it's financed show sexual social whatever and vulnerable to self and to relapse and to going back to hospital so at the severe end of schizophrenia there is a real daytoday living problem and even if you have visited every few days i i social mental health worker that's often not enough and i do know of sad cases where people that live entirely alone visited a bid and during the interim when they're not being visited they self harm and in cases tragically i know about some of them have taken their own life so there's sort of paypal need to be in a setting where someone is a round on more the night non to fought basis and these days isabela lives in a place it's independent living she has an apartment she does.

windows saarc
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on All In The Mind

"Ubuntu tune putin didn't mean to you too have won this ukraine's a great deal because from our perspective are lucrative it is a gift as a prize for all less who live with mental health issues and half now thirty encouraging theme to attain from oman and for me it's a price that reflects their efforts to maintain a place in society and to have a contributing laughs out for them it's just a tool janet ma has lived with schizophrenia for almost fifty years and she's dedicated her life to ensure that those with mental distress receive respectful responsive and humane care she's joint winner of the 2017 ustralian mental health prize more of her remarkable story lighter it's all in the mind on iran omni in malcolm janet ma she's the prize with professor allan fels he's wale nine is forward she if the australian competition and consumer commission more recently though as chair of the national mental health commission he's achievements in the field of mental health have been considerable alan has close personal experience of mental illness he and his wife came for the daughter isabela who was diagnosed with schizophrenia when she was 25 isabela whose about fortysix heard a very difficult childhood she acted often somewhat bizarre lee she is a very nice girl but she has had trouble forming good relationships or relationships of any kind with papal but it was only at the age of twenty five that she heard as psychotic attack and with then diagnosed with schizophrenia she was full of fee wasn't cheat involved a lot of fee that monsters whereafter heard that she was in real danger what was that light to manage hair in that situation well first of all it is shocking for the person who.

putin ukraine oman janet ma professor allan fels alan Ubuntu iran fifty years
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"And there it is it does it provoke your creativity differently i don't know well apparently because apparently this record is a departure effort on talks all right all right let's though i guess that's it since he released your last record the promise you bercy back in 2014 um there's been another and nazi are very exceptional chapter in your story in 2014 you start it's mental a mental health advocacy group in doing so you open up your mental health issues publicly for the first time you open up about them you direct produce gone this documentary that exposes stigma around mental illness and suicide a feels in many ways like you have another job here and i know you i know you feel that way to hire you managing the fit at all in miraculously it's great you know what it some i mean when you're an art your your job is your life it's not like you leave your job and go home and have dinner and watched even go to bed i mean it's just it's your entire life and advocacy mental health care reform is the same thing these are my two jobs but there are also my life and life's good you know and i and i loved my work in both these facets and then it's fair fulfilling advocacy is very difficult a lot of things are mistaken for advocacy and don't actually go anywhere midwest so i mean focusing on changes ferry challenging rant to actually achieve some kind of changes very challenging and that can get you downed changes really really slow especially when it's political.

advocacy group health care reform
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast any sleep has quickly become candidates highest rated and fastest growing matches company and he's awardwinning mattress has received thousands of five star reviews using unique air cell technology the andy mattress provide unmatched levels of comfort and support greatly reducing pressure while you sleep you order your canadianmade anti mattress online and have one hundred nights to try it out if you don't absolutely love it andy picks it up and gives you a full refund questions asked visit andy dow con that's e n d wide dot com and you special listener gift coat cbc to get fifty dollars off any size andy the andy mattress really is the best mattress ever it's enough of a job to fill most people's days being a working being musician if you think that it's just showing up on stage saying in a few songs it's a whole lot more man but three years ago emilia occurring from st john's newfoundland decided to take on a second gig advocate he see in 2014 amelia opened up publicly about her struggles with mental illness talking about it was a big step but emilia wanted to do more she form the mental health advocacy group called it's mental she got behind the camera producing and directing a documentary around the stigma around mental health and suicide called gone and her two gigs as a musician and an advocate came together on her new record watershed on it amelia let's advocacy and activism take centre stage the result is bold lyrically and music lay watershed is out now i spoke to melia current about the album earlier this year but first here's an encore of amelia current performing the title track from watershed right in our own q music studio.

st john newfoundland emilia advocacy group cbc andy dow melia amelia current fifty dollars three years
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

"But if i was to be in the nba if if an nba team didn't see meazza liability and a as an asset a barring a different perspective on mental health i think it would be hard to destroy two i will think there'd be a player to to compare me to you know and i don't say that as if i be the best player i i honestly thing lebron james is the best basketball player on the planet for sure uh been there are some other players in there that are very very elitist will kevin durant has always shown that he's a very very unique and he basketball player i'm not sure how he still out of the conversation in the first place it seemed like it resurged since you know with the finals come this year but uh there there are a lot of great players in the league but i i just really don't think that any of them be comparisons uh one one fan i'll say this pointed out that they saw you having a dream on green type impact could yeah i i i hear that all the time but you know me a dream on are very different dream odds an energy guy uh he he defends really well he's really scrappy we see that he you know uh a gibson to a lot of uh a little a little uh game within a game matches with players and he gets in their head you know he's only desiree he's very kraft in that way you know he's the midwest kid and i got a lot of respect for dream all we kick like i said we worked out together in the draft process in and where the you know where we came out together um so i'm a big fan of his gave a we're very different like.

nba lebron james basketball kevin durant
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

"You know for first of all i want on the ruined make sure you go follow royce on twitter at highway underscore thirty if you have questions about anxiety about mental health if you want to reach out to him make sure you go follow him and and send him a message you know he's very good about responding and as i mentioned yo he's really embrace this mental health advocacy role so bakghtiari go follow in interact with him one of the best follows if you're you know looking for that and and i would definitely recommended i want their he's it you you know i don't want to too much time on this kind of a quick thing but there are a number of questions that came from fans that thought were pretty good so um and number him deal with asking ball to seoul getting some were basketball talk than we did throughout you know some of the earlier parts of the podcast um you know someone basically asked your game seemed like it's a perfect for today's nba with the year ability to switch year versatility the fact that you are such a wellrounded player if you were in the nba today what kind of player would you be you know if there was a mental health policy put in place tomorrow you entered the nba you know what kind of player would you be is there a certain comparison you could make uh what will first off there would need to be and that's a policy for me to play in the nba i wanna i wanna make people clear that as well that oca that that the stance the stance has dissipated from me forcing them to put a policy in place at i talked about this in two thousand twelve is now two thousand seventeen if five years have passed and in a policy than you must not won't one is not for me to force it on my work with mental health has has gone beyond the game of basketball and and that's why continue to do podcast like this and not be dorm all pike as a moments of nonprofit in and things of that nature this this is a global issue and and that's where the fight is now um.

royce nba basketball seoul five years
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

"Right in our and also i i wanna say that you know don't be caught up at the terminology dopey caught up in in the in in diagnosis don't be caught because a thin you know oh well on board to the doctor because i've been fill in this way and i hope i don't have a desire to sort it because the truth of the matter is this that we're still working on the terminology because we're dealing with the most complex system known demand the human brain there's disorders that we could name for every individual we could just give it the individual's name oh his name is john smith oh this is the johnsmith disorder because marais stone year environment in your circumstances so you know a a great example of that is that you know uh john may say listen uh driving gives me great anxiety but charles may say that when i get anxiety or when i feel anxious the only thing that makes me feel better is driving yeah i need reaffirmed dr yeah yeah so you know so that the diagnosis is less important than what are what's going on with you what are the results you getting you're getting who can help view who can help you best what are the support systems you need to start to help yourself uh and and and if you can't help yourself on an ongoing basis and you need extended support that's okay to you know there are people who have had in society disorders for ten years just people who have just had vowed to things icty for six months whenever the duration is the important thing is going to find that support and going to find the right information and be an honest with yourself too because a lot of times the conversation will had you say things that you think you're supposed to say.

john smith charles icty six months ten years
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

"It entrenched me even further in the fight in the stances because i'm like wild right now this feels like a haze there's so much going on not only in my you know just gotten drafted in them becoming a professional athlete and i go from living under the poverty line is a college athlete to having a you know a million dollar contract and what does that mean for my family and what does that mean for for uh you know my relationships or what does that mean for all of these things not only was i deal with that but on top of that i was thrusted into this this huge health business political conversation and it honest to god alex it felt just like a hates light there wasn't you know i the the assumption would be oh may you must have been aches is you wanna start having panic attacks again no i did i am wasn't are actually wasn't have panic attacks what i actually had was migraines which was the new symptoms for me in scared me but it in scared me to have a panic but but again and i always like to mention the reality of mental health emits illness there are people in that situation that would have started have kannik attacks or the migraines would have caused panic attacks and and at the end of this you know two so rounded two rounded you know all of its two two tie it together is that mental health is dynamic okay the human brain is one of the most complex systems on the planet known to man uh our consciousness in our motion the way that we think we feel early interact that is what mental health is mental illness means that you're not getting great results in that area and that's that that is dynamic and is complex and we are at the start acknowledging and accepting how complexes the more we try to create a black and white uh format the more we're just going to underserved ourselves more we're gonna under support ourselves and and that's what i was coming to the realization that you no doubt that's the realize they smell was coming to as this was going on is like wow we want to we wanna keep making his black or white but i'm actually getting anecdotal proof.

migraines alex million dollar
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

"So let's get back to his online now um rookie transition programme has kind of the next step in your in your journey on you go to the rookie transition programme in august after playing summer league you had flown to summer league in and buoyant the houston rockets um chris herron who played for the boston celtics and has been very open about addiction you know he he wrote a terrific book about it his heroin addiction you know he basically addressed all the rookies in the room and talked about you know the substance abuse policy for the nba and i know that you've got you thinking of if there is a mental health policy so kinda take me back to the recotor this rookie is your program and what was going through your head when you realized there wasn't a mental health policy and how that kind of started everything and made you feel uncomfortable yeah the kurt th th the chris harris thing was a was a very pivotal moment in my my it'd be a journey for a number of reasons a uh a in number one first and foremost a deathly always give him great praise and thanks for sharing historic has for people to share stories with with vat dark uh a uh experience or those dark of moments is is special and it's humbling any and they have to be humbled to do it and they have to be really courageous so i got major major respect for for chris uh and and he talked about his heroin addiction and he talked about a number of things in his journey that most people will be shocked up uh you know if you get a chance to go listen to chris hair speak i you know recommend that you do that because it puts a lot of things into perspective is great yeah.

chris herron boston celtics nba chris houston heroin chris harris
"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"mental health advocacy" Discussed on The HoopsHype Podcast With Alex Kennedy

"Welcome to the other episode of the hoop site podcast my name is alex kennedy and joining me today is ross white royce how you doing great briefly forever let me thank you so much for jumping on for those of you who don't know roy or don't know what he's been up to lately he was the sixteen th overall pick in the two thousand twelve nba draft by the houston rockets recently he's been playing in the national basketball league of canada where he averaged twenty one points eleven rebounds six assists last year he won the league mvp award led the london late into the title in their winningest season in team history royce you've been very busy lately been do really well and canada what's that experience print like obviously we're going to get into your nba journey and you know everything that kind of happen some of the misconceptions about you because i feel like there's a lot of that out there about you but i wanna start off with this canada experience uh what did you decide to play in canada what to the experience been like uh you know it was it was the opportunity i came it was presented to me do my asian it to the people that you know i i lean ought to explore my basquoe opportunities year in and year out uh and when i got up here and i met the people i met my coach installment of players already play in you know just felt ready to felt like like it was the right uh situation and it was the right culture the city of london uh had a great vibes to remind me a lot of a midwest town in a in the state and uh from there was history man i i got out of fear and we started to get to work you know we started to chase that wolf is was our team all year and uh we call it that will affect the arrestees in uh this this past season you know we broke lot records while the way we had a lot of fun as well.

alex kennedy roy canada wolf nba houston national basketball league of league mvp london