20 Episode results for "Menlo Park"

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

"Get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply this message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by Gucci N._P._R.. News Menlo Park California as I react technology gauges my reaction how I move where I look I'm flustered and make a mistake of virtual reality while consumers haven't embraced it employers from Walmart to airlines food processors and professional sports teams are using it it's not verizon store manager and walk through a parking lot and then unlock the store unaware of a masked robber right behind me this could be applied in many different workplace situations including harassment or unconscious bias training the benefit of the technology isn't just practice AAC turn to face the gunman an employee Wales in front of me feel paralyzed like I probably would be in real life survived robberies say the video is true to life the emotions that they felt during the robbery experience they feel during the VR experience that of its workers on VR across forty seven hundred of its locations the retailers head of learning is a man appropriately named Andy trainer most been destiny for life this is the teachable moment employers want a screen pops up prompting me to make choices unlock the safe handover merchandise it's learning I used to teach cashiers to treat customers with greater empathy warehouse workers learn how to stack pallets safely Derek Belgium strivers says the basic realism she says makes the employees better prepared and more likely to remember how to react and not escalate an already dangerous situation by the end of the experience taught to show greater empathy mechanics learned to repair planes and employees are shown how to deal with an active shooter this year companies are really embracing this high using a realistic substitute it's also a far cheaper and easier way to train people across a big organization this year Walmart plans to train over a million they they feel like they've been robbed three times and by the third time their confidence is significantly higher this is the power and potential sample Walmart recently rolled out new machines used for consumers picking up online orders previously we had to send three or four people to the store to train at MS is that people learn best through experience as you saw your your Heart Rate One upright you were like Oh my God what do I do it's all about emotional preparedness doubts does that teach them how to do all of that stuff without any human intervention it isn't just physical skills like mechanics and reaction time Walmart and others are increasingly trend as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports Derek Bell is the CEO and founder of Silicon Valley startups driver one of several companies using virtual reality for workplace in real time under duress all right so what do I do as you just pointed the gun your face I can see your little freaked out right now yeah I can see the goosebumps on your arm right training he hands me a goggle like headset that encircles my eyes and ears feel like inside this alternate world the way the stress feels real Lou Tedrick says that's the point tedrick heads Verizon's learning and development she says employees ended up how to maintain it how to interact with customers with it that took

NPR Menlo Park California
When Big Tech calls 911

Reset

29:53 min | 10 months ago

When Big Tech calls 911

"Fiche this is Tesla gigafactory security. We need an ambulance. We have a female employees that She's got a hand stuck between the two modules and she's bleeding pretty bad we. CBS working on it right now. Can't communications officer I with the Security Department Avenue we are requesting. EMS for a middle aged male. She was electrocuted Very kind of communicate emphasis rates on. Rachel Tesla I'm just calling to report a chemical kill in our module a first floor we evacuated this floor area requesting hard apartment to respond. Apparently is an inhalation issue. I'm Jim Russ and today on reset we're bringing you two stories on one theme the relationship ship between tech companies and the communities they move into. It's not unusual to see local governments. Make special arrangements with prestigious tech companies and those deals can have consequences notably on emergency services. Our first story takes place just outside Reno Nevada at the Tesla gigafactory. We're we'RE TESLA BUILDS BATTERIES FOR ELECTRIC vehicles and it starts with the competition that brought Tesla to town a company that makes all electric luxury vehicles. Plans to build a factor the produce cheaper car batteries. If you remember back in two thousand fourteen Tesla was going about this effort to find a place for their very first. I giant Battery Factory Engineer. Damon is a reporter for the Reno Gazette Journal and for a podcast called the city. She talked to me about how the gigafactory came to be. You had states like California. Texas Nevada all competing for this factory by offering really exorbitant tax abatement packages. The Estate Vata is offering tesla up to one point two five billion in incentives California. I think looked at loosening. Some of its environmental requirements. It was a pretty intense is competition winner. Get Sixty five hundred jobs. And the bragging rights pumping a batteries for as many as half a million vehicles a year. So what did Nevada Atta exactly do to attract Tesla one which was critical to the deal. Is We offered by far the largest tax abatement package ever given to accompany by the state of Nevada. Tesla will not pay gigafactory sales tax for twenty years. Those are some great incentives but last night when we talked with Elon Musk. He said it wasn't the richest deal nor is it the money that made Nevada the choice for Tesla so what really clinched the deal for Elon. Musk that CEO of TUSLA was this lack of scheduling risk. What what the people of Nevada created is a state? Where you can you can? We can be very agile where you can do do things quickly and get things done. It's a it's a real get things done state. He was able to come to Nevada. Come True Story County and very quickly glee with very little government interference build a factory. How big of a deal was this? Tesla gigafactory for for the city and for the state it was. It's a pretty big deal in two thousand fourteen of other was still really in the throes of what we call the great recession. We were looking at record unemployment record foreclosure rates recor her bankruptcy rates and so The governor at the time made his top priority to try and turn that turn the economy around so this Tesla Tesla deal really. Was You know his crowning achievement of his administration so how many jobs are actually talking about with this factory right right now. There's estimates that ten thousand people work out there. There were an estimated. Eight thousand construction workers that worked on it and Tesla And Its partner partner in the factory Panasonic employees about seven thousand people full-time and you went to the factory right. What was it like inside the factory itself is I mean number one? The building is enormous. You could probably land a plane on it okay. half a mile long And it's white it's point it's about a quarter mile wide. It's so big that even as we were getting a tour our tour guide Vice President WHO's in charge of operations got lost weight. Are you serious. Yeah just as our producer was asking. Hey do you ever get lost in here. He's like Oh yeah speaking of getting lost I think yeah we got to go around around the other way so that was fun. So what was the activity like inside. What is you get to see its frenetic? It's it's crazy. Busy either are forklifts. Both automated without drivers and human powered forklifts Speeding down corridors There's huge robot arm swinging through the air Moving these big battery modules. And then you know there's thousands of workers So you could see just kind of a a bit of a chaotic atmosphere. You're a big part of your story has to do with what started to happen to. The workers wants to factory was built. What we know about safety conditions there? Well well first of all say that reporting on safety conditions at Tesla is is difficult when there's no requirement FOR INDIVIDUAL ISRAEL COMPANIES TO PUBLICLY REPORT INJURY TOTALS TESLA itself does not want to comment and will not provide data when requested. So one of the ways is that we tried to get an idea of what was happening inside. The factory was to put in a records request for nine one one calls from Story County yes We haven't had injuries here. On average we found that the Tesla gigafactory generates more than one call a day another call we have a track and injured. Okay person when you listen to these nine one one calls. There does not seem to be very uniform the system and you hear that confusion going on so something as simple as someone getting their hands stuck in a module and bleeding. What happens is this person then is injured deep inside those huge factory? A safety officer on a radio to guard shack while outside the building and say hey we need an ambulance that guard and the guard shack will call nine one one. I do not know but dispatchers have a set of questions that they need to ask in order to get help to the person who needs help as a male or female are they conscious and breathing. Are they still bleeding very specific questions that the person in the guard shack is not equipped to answer and then when the person in the guard shack tries to get the information from the scene. They can't get through on their radios so there were more than one. Call where you had that. Unfortunately I do not have anything. Set You guys at the college is for that. Hey these weren't necessarily life threatening situations for my research. I didn't find someone who actually died from a workplace place injury. Okay but if you're lying there bleeding like he went help right away right. ooh So we talk about kind of chaos and confusion reigning when there's something as simple as maybe someone getting their hands stuck in a piece of equipment equipment that chaos seem to be amplified During larger emergency situations so there was an incident where a worker was moving some barrels of chemical waste the forklift hit a lip and one of the barrels tipped over and spilled chemicals inside the barrel. I'm just calling to report a chemical skill in our module as they call nine one one and right away. They're not exactly prepared for this situation. They couldn't tell the dispatcher. What kind of chemical spill okay? What was the chemical I do not have it? Unfortunately I'll have to call them. Firefighters arrived. They found this kind of chaotic scene. Scene of some workers had been evacuated. Other workers hadn't been evacuated the dispatchers. Like no you need to evacuate the entire building. And they're like well okay. It's a really big building and there's thousands of people here. Okay you need to get everyone out of the building. Opt Out of the entire building or the floor I would. I would get everyone out of the entire building. In the end. It turned out to be chemical there. produce respiratory problems and burning eyes and skin and I think about twelve people went to the hospital that all cleaned up. Nobody was hospitalized in there appear to be a mean severe injuries. As a result these two instances wherein 2017 eighteen when the factory was still fairly young so one would hope that those processes have been improved. Unfortunately Tesla meanwhile the pro they provided a statement to my news organization They declined answer any questions. respond directly to these these scenarios. has tesla suffered any consequences from this from you know any fines any kind of of of repercussions you know Osha workplace safety inspectors. Did go in after that. Chemical spill the that we talked about Inspected everything and determine woman that Tesla did not violate any workplace safety laws. I'm so that particular instance. No but you know Osha. From my my reporting we found that Osha. Safety inspectors are at the gigafactory. I think they visited more than ninety times during the first three years of operation. which is you know when we look at other factories in the county? In the same areas Tesla they have been visited on average of once in that same time period. Now so tesla's a huge factory. It's not surprising that they generate more inspection visits but that was a lot while. I'm listening to you talk about this. I can't help but wonder how does this compare to other to other factories of this nature. Is it more dangerous than than similar factories or is it kind of on par. Yeah you know. That's not something. They let are reporting really focused on in particular because it's difficult to get accurate numbers individual companies. These are not required to publicly report injury. Totals there are industry averages that we look at but when I can't get the total number of injuries he's and the total number of work hours which are the two variables that used to calculate that rate to compare It makes it pretty much impossible bowl. Now Tesla Statement said that it has a better safety record than the industry average but again they refused to Provide any of those data and they also wouldn't tell me which industry category they were comparing themselves. Are we talking about batteries or cars right exactly exactly. Yeah if you look. At all of the various industry codes you know there's hundreds and hundreds of them And within manufacturing there's dozens and dozens and within auto auto manufacturing. There's a couple and then you have battery. Men are manufacturing so it was. It was too difficult to provide an accurate comparison person so we looked at at really that the individual stories as well as the strain that this kind of thing puts on emergency services that because Tesla's not not paying any taxes for ten years The really not helping support. The government costs that they're creating so who is paying for for all of these emergency calls all this emergency support that the factory needs on a daily basis. Nevada tax payers are Tesla flip as very very little almost zero taxes For the first ten years of their operations And then they have a substantial tax break for the next ten years and then they'll start paying in taxes but right now As just the General Fund budgets of Story County and the state of Nevada Tesla was not a fan of your reporting from what I gather. They were not. I have not heard from TUSLA since The podcast aired and the companion piece ran in the USA. Today and the Reno Gazette Journal But during the reporting according process There was quite a bit of pushback It the statement that they put out essentially accused my news organization of unfairly focusing focusing on these issues. Saying you know it's not fair to pull out all these statistics when we're a giant operation. Of course we're going to have problems And again they. They refused to answer specific questions about any of this. The company says they do focus on safety issues. I think it's important also for journalists to really scrutinize whether they're focused on safety is working. So how do people in Reno and in the county that the factory is actually actually in feel about. The Tesla factory is complicated. I think overall people are excited It was a game changer. For the economy You know not just because of Tusla but definitely with Tesla's help our economy is has done a you know a one eighty We have very low unemployment right now. The housing market is going. Great But you know as we've found out here is not necessarily a silver bullet And in the rush to try right and win this prize. There wasn't a lot of forethought put into this by The political leaders and the people in charge of of bringing the company here There was no discussion about you. Know workplace injuries. What kind of jobs are we bring in? How are we gonNA keep these workers safe As as the state was competing to win this company Engineer Damon is a reporter for the city. PODCAST and the Reno Gazette Journal engine at. Thank you so much for chatting with me about this. Thanks for having me. We reached out to Tesla for comment. The company didn't get back to US before our deadline. If you WANNA learn more about the gigafactory and its impact on nearby Reno check out the USA. Today podcast the city. So Tesla got a big tax break in Nevada elsewhere. The dynamic is a little different in Menlo Park. California facebook has given a lot of money to at the local government. Question is what does it get in return. That's after the break. This is reset All right we're back and we're looking at big tech local government to end emergency services story number two takes place in Menlo Park. California Menlo Park is a very white and affluent city. On the most part there are pockets in communities of color but it is an area that that has a lot of money and a lot of power a lot of influence. I think Sarah Emerson is a staff writer at Tech website one zero euro. This is an area. That's very familiar with the tech industry. You know the tech industry has been there for decades It's where you know. Google was Komo medically founded in a garage and Antonio a lot on facebook sort of moved until the skeleton of the DOT com darlene called Sun microsystems and they renamed at one hacker way and over the next several years. They sort of expanded. They've spent billions of dollars on building out this campus. It's centered around a quad add. There are restaurants there amenities public spaces. So it's very much Billed as a place. Where you you never really want to leave? I think that was the intent. Are you mentioned these communities of Color Surrounding Menlo Park. What are those communities like there are a couple of neighborhoods within Menlo Park like one specifically called Baal haven which is where a large Latino community lives? And you know right next to Menlo Park. There is the city of East Palo Alto Alto which you know. Compared to Mellow Park is is poor. It has less access to resources is a minority majority city. You so there are a lot of people of color and also an area that is rapidly gentrifying and a lot of people blame facebook for accelerating this so. I think you have a situation where you know. Only a fraction of facebook jobs are going to East Palo Alto residents and these people are perhaps disproportionately. He's suffering the consequences of tex impact in the area. You know like rising housing prices displacement And just changes to the fabric community earlier. This fall Sarah wrote a piece for motherboard about the unusual arrangement. FACEBOOK has made with the Menlo Park Police Department so facebook has has contributed eleven point two million dollars. That's to be distributed over the course of five years with the intent that a special police force will be created and will patrol the area around facebook's campus. So they won't actually police on campus and face because a pretty a big private security force that does that but anything off of its premises any property that's taken off premises Will be within the purview of that police force. So how did you find out about this program. How'd you get the inside scoop? And all of this a couple of years ago. I filed a request under the California public records. Act For for documents that were related to facebook's funding of this Menlo Park Police Unit and I received hundreds of of documents from the city and from the Police Police Department containing notes and proposals and draft and final form emails. Correspondents was citizens And presentations about the facebook. Kin- how did this relationship start. Good Evening Jessica. The proposal to have facebook pay the city of Menlo Park for a police officer. Dozen facts go before the city council council in just a couple of hours so we decided to ask the question. Is this a good idea. Or the beginning of a strange relationship between a small city and a large company so so In two thousand fourteen facebook gave a six hundred thousand dollar grant to fund a Menlo Park community safety officers. So this is a police officer And they're in charge of Making sure that kids go to school and stuff like that. A single police officer a single police officer and at the time it was believed to be the nation's only privately-funded refunded fulltime policing jobs. We haven't seen many public private deals like this before it works out all involved. Say we'll likely glee see more in the future and then in two thousand sixteen facebook approached the Menlo Park Police Department about creating this new unit and internally currently the unit was called The facebook unit. So it's pretty explicit about what it's for And it would be comprised of five officers and one sergeant who would police lease beat four surrounding facebook's campus and at the time facebook approached the police department because it has a very grandiose indios plan for an expansion called Willow village which is slated to become the largest development in the city of Menlo Park's history But what that means is that The amount of people who are estimated to be living and working in Menlo Park by the time this development is finished will roughly equal the amount of residents in Menlo Park itself. Okay and this'll be largely facebook employees Yes largely facebook employees and so you have a situation and were the Menlo Park. Police Department has one officer to one thousand people Ratio so that means that during the daytime there needs to be one officer for every one thousand people and once facebook development is finish that will change so facebook approached the police department. And you know. I obtained a twenty seventeen seventeen email. Warren facebook's director of global security services said quote. We need to show how the one officer to one thousand service population will be stretched without Out Our initial support so it was very clear from the beginning. What the intent was? What did people think when facebook? I gave money to Menlo. Park for policing there was a a lot of concern about influence and favoritism and that became pretty obvious once Menlo Park City Council. Study study sessions began to happen in twenty seventeen or around the arrangement. Menlo Park's mayor Ray Miller who served as councilman at the time was very opposed. It was to the optics of the gift you know. He thought it was bad public policy for the city to accept gifts in exchange for services. But it happened anyways it happened anyway and with a lot of massaging so there are some draft proposals for this program. The very clearly say you know this will be facebook donating money. Eighty two the city for the creation of this police unit. But by the time the drops were finalized All of that language was stripped and what that means is that facebook in the city city came to an agreement where those millions of dollars would be dumped into the city's General Fund as a general and Leo Sales Tax Agreement. If we set it up in this way it's not a gift It's actually an amendment in Lieu Revenue Agreement Amendment which doesn't create a precedent that I would be uncomfortable with doing it that way I can get on board so that means the city can use it for whatever they want Even though it's very obvious that you know it was gifted David with the intent to use for police services but this allows the city to say that facebook isn't paying these police officers salaries. It's just giving us the money to do whatever everyone with. So what you're saying is that facebook initiated this conversation with the police force saying. Hey we're going to be bringing a whole bunch of New People in and you're probably GONNA WANNA have to increase policing around the facebook campus. Here's some money and then the city goes well. Well yeah cool but also the optics of this aren't great so let's just make sure that that money ends up in the more General Fund and we can do whatever we want. Am My getting that right. Yeah I think that's generally how those conversations went down it's interesting. You used a term that I find kind of startling. which is the idea of a privately? Funded Public Police Officer That sounds like a private the privatization Chicago Police Force. I am I wrong in thinking that that is the translation. No I don't think so at all. And that's certainly how a lot of members of of the community Indian Menlo and in East Palo Alto feel about this police force. I would ask you consider the political implications of this decision. The number of racial profiling of East Palo Alto and Belle haven residents by the Menlo Park. Police Department it feels as though it's it's going to be You know Instead of being beholden to the public being public servants that are going to be beholden to a private company. And you know when I was having having conversations with The city with the mayor with the Police Department they were very insistent that it absolutely was not that but I think it's one one of those tricky situations where it just depends on your situation. It depends on what communities you exist in what your history is with the police with tech And that's is gonNA determine how you look at this relationship where things stand with. This police force now is still exist right now. Yep It still exists in full force. The facebook unit became fully stabbed on August. One Twenty nineteen and. Yeah I mean. They're very active in the community. I've spoken to some people who live live in the area who say that you know in the last year or so. They personally feel like the police. Presence has ramped up a lot in public spaces But yeah I mean this. Is the police force who responded to the bomb threat at facebook last year. The seren threat at facebook this year. So Yeah they are going strong so facebook is bringing a lot of new people into that area right which means that yeah. I would make sense that you would want to have a more police officers in that area. Just because there are more people and I could see a scenario where that need occurs and people say okay. We'll facebook should pay for it because they are bringing in more people and what appears to have happened is that that exactly was the case. FACEBOOK said okay. We're GONNA pay for this. So why is it that this might be perceived as being problematic. I think some of this is based on the fact that this isn't how some mm people want facebook to be giving back to the community and you know throughout all of this facebook stresses that it wants to build a better community wants to be a positive force in the community by You know this is a company like many other companies who don't pay a relatively A lot of taxes facebook notoriously off-shores. I its assets so that it lessens the amount of taxes that it pays And instead it decides to give back to communities like Menlo Park Park on its own terms you know it decides what it's going to fund how much money it's going to give and you know at the same time. This is all part of a development agreement that is going to serve facebook in the long run. This is just an example of facebook. You know creating the type of community that wants to see and you know it's happened a lot in the digital world world and now it's kind of pushing into physical spaces as well. We reached Out To facebook to ask about the police unit Anthony Harrison spokesperson said in an email quote to categorize our support of the Menlo Park Police Department as Privatization. The law is ridiculous. We have a long term commitment to Menlo Park and we wanted to remain a safe and inclusive environment for everyone who calls at home this is reset and I'm at Zoom Ross. But you don't have to say it that way. If you WANNA know more about the reporting that's covered vert in this episode. Check out our show notes. We have a ton of links and information in there for you and if you're interested in learning more about Tesla keep an eye out for an upcoming episode so in the New Year about Elon. Musk even Steve. Jobs is relatively buttoned up relative to yuan who is just like tweeting Iheart anime and Lake Doing God. God knows what else. I'm sure we'll also have a few facebook episodes in the near future to if you WanNa follow me on twitter you can find me at ads. You can also reach the reset team by emailing reset at. Vox Dot Com. We publish episodes three times a week on Tuesdays Thursdays and Sundays. So if you haven't already Eddie subscribed to the pod you can find us on apple podcasts. Stitcher or in your favorite podcast APP. And if you like what you hear go ahead and rate and review us on Apple podcasts. podcasts it really helps us will read Martha Daniel and Schuyler Swinson produced the show. Our engineer is Eric Gomez. Golda Arthur is our executive producer. Liz Kelly Nelson is the editorial director of Vox podcasts. The mysterious brake master cylinder composed our theme Music Special Especial thanks this week to USA Today and the city podcast and especially to fill Korbut. Who helped record our interview with engine? Damon Reset is produced in association with Stitcher. And we're part of the VOX media podcast network. We'll be back on Tuesday later nerds.

facebook Tesla Menlo Park TESLA Menlo Park Police Department officer Nevada Rachel Tesla Reno Gazette Journal Menlo Park California Tesla factory Story County Police Department Menlo Park Park Damon Menlo Park Police Unit Warren facebook Menlo Park City Council
Meet Apple's youngest app developer, Ayush

Talking Tech

08:19 min | 1 year ago

Meet Apple's youngest app developer, Ayush

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. Create and publish a stunning website. All from one powerful platform. Go to wicks dot com to create your very own professional website today. That's w I x dot com in stay tuned, after the show to hear you can take advantage of special offer for talking tech listeners. Hey, it's Jefferson Graham with USA today. You're listening to talking tech I am at the apple worldwide developers conference, which is held to have like at makers sh learn about the latest and greatest from apple. I have decided to sit down with one of the app, developers to get the latest say Hello. I use is one of the developers at believe he's the youngest developer, Harry's ten years old. And where do you live? The park Menlo Park. Okay. It was local. You got to walk here. Right. And dad is here as well. High to what's dad's name? I'm a med Kamar. I'm a med Komar. And I used tell everybody about app developing. You are here for the first time. This is your second podcast interview you make apps. Well, I giving I had a special case for the WW DC, but also I like to make absence background. So how did apple find out about you? Well, actually, I entered rate, so I entered the contest and then I gave them a project ten like they had age and stuff like that. So then I got in rape. So then they dislike learn is like, Yep. Okay. And why did you want to be here because I love coding and I really liked coding. And I thought, oh, be an awesome opportunity to be here with all the developers. And learn more about cutting did how long of a shot, did you think it was for your son to get in here to be honest? The, the scholarship is only open to kits thirty in an older and. Hugh is really interested in programming. And he always likes projects to go shoot for, and we I give him a challenge. I said, look, you have ten days to do something interesting. You probably can't even get in. But you can try if you like and is over his enjoyed programming for many years now. And so we didn't think he had any show at all at it was quite positive presence of fries that he let him. What did you present to, to get in? What was what was in your application? Tim later that has, like a tries and the score, and you pull box the little shooting arm, and how you pull back a depends like how you pull back affects of where the projectile goes. So some physics and is supposed to be a physics game but also supports me fun already. So for all the people out there, who would like to know what dub dub, DC is like tell everybody about your first day really excited really fun. You get to learn all about the new things about apple and also things that you seems like so boring. But still, it's like really fun learning about things that people just don't think about privacy and security still learn a fun learning about it. What's the highlight of today? The best thing that the thing that you learned about the. Your big takeaway. Actually, is you're going to have another update update eleven and just about how much swift and execute or over. Okay. So dad, obviously, I use a genius, and he's really good at coding, and I'd say ninety percent of my audience didn't get what you just said. But swift is the programming language that was created for basically a lot of kids and adults to create apps for the iphone right? And, and the ipad and other things like that. What is your goal? I used to do you want to be an app developer. When you grow up definitely. I mean I like Carlisle. So I've been thinking I would start like a business and just make taken all technology for cars, other such. Right. So you wanna do a flying car. I mean, what, what kind of car do you do just kind of have a car and then make technology for that car right like tesla? But they have that big screen like code that big street or something like that. Right. Or start my own car company, and then it'd be like the lead of the technology in that car, but about all righty. What about apps would ups St. us? Like yourself on. Do you have a phone? Do you have an ipad? I've had I mean, I mostly play games and stuff like that on my ipad. I don't use much of the more adult things like news and stuff. But still, I used by a lot for Ames, one of the big announcements here was augmented reality. There's sort of tripling down on their bet about augmented reality, and they really wanna make go of it. And so they also to new tools here. What's your take on reality? I really wanna code with it like I really want to now I've learned all about it. I really wanna make a game out of like my entry into the W WDC. It's too. So I wanted, like, augmented reality it, okay? It hasn't taken off yet. Why is that? People are not. I don't see a lot of people using them like reality because I think it's just because it's really new, and it's kind of hard to use since you have to make things three d to use a are. And it's just hard to air in a thing because like you have to have a flat surface and everything ASA workout, just right? And a love game developers use like turning landscapes in different things like that to make the game, fun and interesting. But you can't do that stuff with they are usually show. Do you think the new tools will make it easier to create deathly? Okay. And dad. How many how many hours a day, does your son work on these apps and coding and things like that? But it's highly regulated. You get maybe thirty minutes of screen time of day in which he has to play Tarare and Minecraft and which videos and then maybe a little bit of coding. So it goes in fits and starts, but he is bay focused and he has a project in front of him. So that helps so a lot of weekend worse for thirty minutes a day, Monday through Friday, Monday to Friday, max and the weekends. You extend it a little bit. Yes. So what are you give them an hour on the weekends? He could do a few hours at two hours on Saturday into ours so Sunday. But when he has a project when we feel that he is actually learning something in the process of doing that screen time, then there's more flexibility involved. Okay. See a big future for you. I used thank you for being on talking tech and dad. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA day, you've been listening to talking tech look for me on Twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham. Please subscribe, it a show wherever you listen to online audio and I'll be back tomorrow with another quick. It from the world attack. Sometimes having a great idea is the easy, part getting people to hear about your idea. Not always so simple. But now there's wicks at wicks dot com. You can start in publish your website for free wicks artificial design intelligence, creates a stunning website for you in just a few minutes. You can choose from over five hundred stunning templates, or start from scratch just answer, a few questions about your business to get started wicks provides you with an all in one business solution to grow your online presence, plus all sites include Bilton SEO tools, so you can easily get found online, and in search engines, like Google, and Bing, build a website of your very own with wicks today. And if you go to wigs dot com and use our code talking, you'll get ten percent off any premium plan with wicks premium plans. You'll get more storage a free domain for a year and much more. That's wicks w I x dot com promo code talking for ten percent off your premium plan.

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Larry Magid: Facebook Campus in Menlo Park Evacuated

Tech Reports by Larry Magid

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Larry Magid: Facebook Campus in Menlo Park Evacuated

"Larry maggot had his news reporter hat on today going live from the facebook's campus because a bag of male had tested positive possibly for a toxic substance prompting evacuations in larry maggot you were on the scene i was along with jennifer hodges from kcbs reporter andy menlo park fire district people in i ran into an f b i agent but she wouldn't talk to be on there but you know my broader thought as i was standing there and essentially actually watching nothing happening i'm i'm hoping that they're worth nothing serious air we don't know of any casualties at this point but i kept thinking about face book about why facebook is such an important part of our national infrastructure i mean because it was saron gas of course the national media paid attention to it but this guy really big billing in national news and i'm thinking maybe it would be like something happening in the middle of the golden gate bridge you're in the middle of the hollywood freeway this would say big deal because it's facebook if the crossroads so much communication that goes on in our country and around the world yeah that's interesting point where it's the infrastructure such a big part of our infrastructure cetera and say i think they f b i would've taken seriously no matter where it happened but again facebook

facebook jennifer hodges golden gate bridge larry maggot reporter andy menlo park hollywood
Larry Magid: Disinformation, Hate Speech, and Facebook

Tech Reports by Larry Magid

02:11 min | 2 years ago

Larry Magid: Disinformation, Hate Speech, and Facebook

"Facebook says CEO Mark Zuckerberg will not attend a British government hearing in London regarding disinformation Leary, you had a meeting at the British parliament last week. You were also to conference in Paris on Monday. When French president Macron announced that his government would be working with Facebook on hate speech. What do you make of the fact that that's Coburg isn't going to be at this hearing, Chris do I wanna say you do a better job pronouncing French president name than I do. You. Don't have very good. But I look I don't think it's that big a deal. I mean, it's it's it's a big ask to ask anybody, especially the THEO over large company to trot across the Atlantic Ocean for meeting, so I would make a lot of that. I would hope that Facebook would at the very least Sunday senior Representative, and they do have some senior people in London. And he he's turned down other requests for meetings. But I think that the bigger deal here is Facebook being under pressure. And if you mentioned I had a conversation with one of the parliamentarian. Member of the parliament about this very issue. And they are concerned not just about hate speech and not just about fake news, but about all sorts of issues and social media. And also, it's really interesting that mccrone announced that Facebook will be allowing French regulators to be embedded at their offices. I don't know whether in Menlo Park or Paris or wear to actually monitor how they're dealing with some of these issues so on one hand Facebook of an extraordinary level of cooperation, given this embedding plan with the French. But on the other hand, you know, they're not showing up at a meeting where not just British by the way for joint meeting the Canadian from want them there. Well, and along the drop in names, I also attended a meeting where Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau spoke about also the issue about him wanting the Canadian government to have better cooperation with those show media companies. This is where you point out that you earlier met with the pope, I we're not gonna get into to convert either not one on one meetings, but they within the. Audience. But that's exactly what happened. If we compare it with digital week. And there were a lot of big of, you know, a lot of heads of state were in town and a couple of them hung around to talk about technology issues.

Facebook British parliament London Paris CEO Mark Zuckerberg Chris Atlantic Ocean Canadian government Coburg Macron Leary Menlo Park mccrone Trudeau Prime Minister Representative one hand
Tech Backlash Hits Gig Economy. What's Next for Uber, Lyft?

WSJ Tech News Briefing

09:25 min | 1 year ago

Tech Backlash Hits Gig Economy. What's Next for Uber, Lyft?

"You're invited to travel the world and discover what it means to live the intercontinental life with more than two hundred properties worldwide intercontinental hotels and resorts welcomes you to who iconic properties in global destinations including New York London and Shanghai discover more about the cities and the tails inspire with stories of the intercontinental continental life a collection of stories that were excited your curiosity and offer new perspectives on the world here more at intercontinental dot com forward slash life. This is tech news briefing. I'm Tanya Bustos reporting from the newsroom in New York and after much freewheeling growth is the GIG economy in trouble that is what we're asking because new legislation by regulators could upend companies like lift Uber Auber Jordache task rabbit not to mention all the other tech startups that have made themselves very comfortable with their business models looking into it after these tabloids the US national security officials and Silicon Valley executives are struggling with how to best combat for an election interference the Journal says at a recent meeting organized by facebook at its headquarters in Menlo Park California Shelby Pearson who was named over the summer to lead the US intelligence communities. He's new election. Threats group threatened a blunt message to the assembled executives and is simply this. You need to share more data with us about your users publicly. The companies in attendance facebook Google twitter and Microsoft said the day-long meeting was constructive. However questions remain about whether these platforms have done enough to prepare for the twenty twenty? US election or for that matter if the trump administration has focused enough on the problem the Senate Intelligence Committee is expected to release a report in the coming weeks reviewing doing Russia's disinformation campaign in two thousand sixteen and recommending ways to improve responses for future elections chipmaker broadcom. Tom Says it has been hit hard by the US China trade tensions and the export restrictions to Wa over national security concerns. It says its core. Semiconductor business has has bottomed out in a very slow growth environment but that the business is not quite in recovery mode yet if you're keeping tabs apple is broadcom's largest customer accounting for about a quarter of its revenue last year and had of this year's holiday season take two interactive launches borderlands. It's three. It's first person shooter game. The company says it is slated to sell seven to eight million units which analysts consider conservative other big budget titles due out this holiday season include. Tom Clancy's ghost recon from ubisoft entertainment. A new call of duty from activision blizzard and a New Star Wars themed game from Electronic Arts. Coming up is the GIG economy in trouble what new legislation a New York California and down the road means for companies like Uber Lift and more importantly for us us. You're invited to travel the world and discover what it means to live the intercontinental life with more than two hundred properties worldwide intercontinental hotels and resort welcomes you to icon properties in global destinations including New York London and Shanghai discover more about these cities and the tails inspire with stories of the intercontinental life a collection of stories that will excite your curiosity and offer new perspectives on the world here more at intercontinental dot com forward forward slash life. It has finally happened. The tech backlash is coming for the GIG economy. The latest legislation in California and New York is threatening its business models and worker flexibility impacting uber lift not to mention all the other tech companies thriving arriving in the economy. We know as GIG. Let's get more joining us from the San. Francisco Bureau Is Wall Street Journal reporter Alessandro Lonzo Welcome Hi thanks EXC so a good decade after companies like Uber skyrocketed to popularity now really finally seeing this big government pushback there really you has been a surge in regulation around the world congestion worker pay all kinds of things. Now we see this crackdown. Break it down for us. How messy have things gotten lately really that's right and in particular that crackdown appears to be unfolding in California where lawmakers have just passed a bill taking aim directly me at the GIG economy companies and their business models essentially saying well they couldn't really use GIG workers or contract workers to deliver all the services that they are known for delivering driving people around delivering them food walking their dog even and that poses potentially attention big problems for all these companies as we've noticed there are efforts to rein in the practices of these companies in various parts of the world right so we'll start. Let's talk about that because you know. This means a whole new business model for a lot of tech companies. What does it mean for a company like lift for company like Uber help us further appreciate their pain pain. It would be a very big deal if they had to reclassify their workers as employees they are going to take their fight uber in particular has said they're. GonNa take their fight simply not going to reclassify their workers. They believe that this new law doesn't necessarily apply to their business model and they're just going to carry on business as usual and obviously what's very likely to happen is court cases will come and they're just. GonNa Fight. Fight it out. companies have said they're going to go to California's ballot. Remember California has direct democracy. You can put laws and initiatives straight to the voters voters and they said that they are going to do this in one form of the other starting next year so at least here this isn't over there hoping to go back to the state legislature next year when it convenes work something out as comfortable as tech startups have become with this gig economy so have we to extend right. So how did these changes. Essentially impact does us as well well. It depends on what happens. you know but the company certainly say that this may result in a decline in services is in a fees going up in you know potentially not being able to go all of like if you're talking about. Uber and lift your perhaps potentially not being able to go all of the places you can go now in these using these apps and using these services again and this is if if these companies were forced to make this change or these changes yet the consumer would certainly feel it. This got me thinking in terms of you know like I said we're hearing a lot from Uber and lift on this matter but there are tons of other examples of tech companies thriving being in this GIG economy. It's a big industry so what are some of these other players in this field saying and and how are they addressing the matter well one well known you know. APP based Delivery Company as it's known. I guess you know they're an APP. That brings brings you food. door dash is is a has joined in this coalition with Uber and lift saying that they're going to fight this at the at the ballot in California next year and and try and make some kind of exemption to these new regulations nations are expected to take place or to take effect next year back door. I wouldn't be surprised I should say if other companies in this realm in the space I would not be surprised if they joined in on this effort what they could potentially do to change their change their businesses businesses if they actually had to comply with these sorts of regulations. I think it's really kind of remains to be seen. you brought up something. That was a little interesting interesting before just when you were getting into door dash because there's this vague meaning in Tech Company if you if you're a fresh start up and use tech and some solid capacity it seems like your company working in the GIG economy. What is somebody anyway these days you know right and you know. I think this question is really the question that you're seeing playing out right now not only in California but in perhaps a lot of these other states or jurisdictions in the US and across the world really just asking asking this question well. What makes you unique. What what are you doing that necessarily exempts you from falling the all of the sort of laws and regulations and and practices that we have put in place for various industries over decades and I think that's a very real debate that now we are seeing kind of spill out into the public with these very high profile measures not only being debated aided but being passed and looking to be put into law as early as next year Alejandro Lhasa. Thanks so much thanks for having me. That'll do it for this edition of of the tech news briefing reporting from the newsroom in New York. I'm Tanya Bustos. Thanks for listening.

New York California US intercontinental dot Uber Auber Jordache Tanya Bustos broadcom Tom Clancy Shanghai New York California facebook London Menlo Park California twenty twenty ubisoft entertainment San Shelby Pearson apple
An Economist Walks Into A Bar

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:58 min | Last week

An Economist Walks Into A Bar

"N. P. R.. I am. I am sorry. Alex Smith. From Atlas Obscure Gastro Obscure. So. We should explain where we are weird bar in Brooklyn. The bearded lady great name Yes it is. That's actually why rear and we were sitting outside he girl socially distanced but we're we're at this bar for very particular reason, right? Because it is apropos we are here to talk about new ideas innovation invention and that leads us somewhat surprisingly to the bar. Yes and to a man named Mike Andrews. So a few years ago. Mike Andrews also was at a bar Joe's place in Iowa city jobs was to hang out spot for all the Grad students at the University of Iowa including for Mike, what does it look like that bar? You know it's got a bar. It's got some stuff on the walls. It's got wood tables they've got beer. Checks alive. As a Grad Student Mike had gotten really interested in innovation and new ideas. Thing that gets me excited I wanNA understand where do ideas come from? So is a really central question in economics because innovation news media's IT fuels economic growth. I mean think about things like the combustion engine light bulb, the computer, the Internet smartphones. About how many jobs those inventions have created? How much money they have generated? They've changed our lives how we work right and so Mike, was spending all this time studying patent data pens are the paperwork people file when they want to lockdown in invention, make a claim to it as their own. So Mike is mulling all of this over at Joe's place here. I was a fat tire guy a lot I guess and just sort of brainstorming things you could look at it and. I, think it was an accounting Grad student Steve my buddy Steve said, hey, you should look at if people come up with more ideas out at bars do bars foster innovation I mean it's a good question. There's a long history of bars and innovation and ideas, right so famous example of this is Steve Jobs Steve Wozniak the CO founders of apple before they were the Steve's. Before they were famous were part of a group of computer hobbyists called the homebrew Computer Club, and they would meet up at a bar and restaurant in Menlo Park California, and in other inventions, things like Buffalo Wings Southwest Airlines and Shark Week. Apparently all were ideas sparked over beers at bars and Mike that is drinking at bars with friends like one of the keys to having great innovations. This is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith I'm. Alex you are the editor of Gastro obscure the food and travel guide. That's right and that's why I so interested to hear about Mike and his research into patents and beer, and today we'll be talking with them about what the connection is between bars and great ideas, and of course, what does that mean now that a lot of bars are closed and a lot of us are working from home so we want. To. Do some boots on the ground research? Yes. Is Why we are here in this database at the bearded lady yes. So we'll get the creative juices flowing yes and Alex The lady specialize in sort of fancy cocktails and got one of the fancy cactus where'd you get this called the Bedford nostrum? The drink has missile, which is very tasty. I have a Margarita. It's in I wait for the less sophisticated route. Hey Greg, newsletter feedback have been loving your newsletter as of late. Oh Oh. They want you to switch to a, Sarah? Font. Switch the Sarah. Font. Yeah. Where can people subscribe? People can subscribe NPR Dot Org Slash Planet money newsletter NPR dot Org Slash, planet money newsletter. Mike Andrews is an economics professor at the University of Maryland but a few years ago he was a Grad student with an idea what role do bar is playing innovation. There is a really easy way to measure this federal alcohol prohibition, right the Eighteenth Amendment, which which went into effect one, hundred years ago. Last January actually prohibition it lasted for more than ten years in the US. All of the bars were shut down all across the country and so Mike looked at patent applications before prohibition, and after prohibition it started to see if shutting down all the bars had had an effect on ideas and innovations found was frankly was pretty striking See a drop in patents by depending on exactly how you measure things five to fifteen percent. So it's large it is really large in fact, Mike us that the same drop off happened during the great, depression? Yeah. The Great Depression when unemployment hit twenty five percent people were starving and living in their cars at that time patent applications dropped by fifteen percent. So, if you, if you close the bar somewhere, that's basically you have caused a patent recession in terms of impact depression event. Yeah. Basically are you saying that the secret sauce for innovation is like beer? that. The secret sauce, this is not a story about alcohol, and in fact that that's something I can look at in the data. So across the US all the prohibitions were not created equal. Some counties just closed down bars they were dry but people could still have alcohol at home and selling out the hall wasn't necessarily illegal other counties though they've been alcohol entirely these were bone dry counties and so if beer was the secrets. Austria invention, we would've seen less invention in those places, fewer patents, the places that still had some booze would have been more inventive and innovative, but there was no difference. So it wasn't that alcohol at the bars that was key to new ideas. It's really the conversation I. Think it's the fact that there's the setting where people are able to get together right? They're off the clock there's no one setting agenda you can just. Yeah. In fact, to companies have tried to manufacture this kind of setting with with some success bell labs which invented the laser, the cell phone, the UNIX operating system that also. apparently famously used to have these really long hallways in their buildings and the reason that they did that was the people would stop and chat and it would spark ideas. But right now we are not chatting among hallways with our coworkers on rates the bathroom I've had no water cooler conversation and months, and we're not striking up conversations in bars and coffee shops or at least not nearly as much. Then might lead you to be very pessimistic or very worried about this. Involuntary Shift to remote work. But I think there's also an optimistic way to think to look at these results. So here's the thing prohibition lasted for more than ten years, but the patent slump did not it actually recovered. Five Years Patent started rolling in again because people started finding other places to unwind and chat and congregate other watercolors. So instead of going to the bar, maybe go to the church picnic or figure out where the speakeasy is open up and we're able to rebuild those informal social networks and really recover. Schorr things like this are disruptive but people are resilient and people are creative and they can figure out ways to work around and come back after disruptions like this. So right now, a lot of people have been finding ways to do this online. Yes. The rise of zoom you know I. It's it's funny that you mentioned Zoom I. I've been on countless virtual happy hours over the last six months and to me. It's been a very poor substitute for in person interaction. Other. The worst, zoom happier. heritable. It's worse than nothing. Going opinion I- feelings about it. I'm one hundred percent with you. Stacey I mean I think. Spontaneity is is the key thing that you lose You know it's it's tough to have side conversations just devolve into people talking over one another I think very poor substitute for the kind of things that happens in places like bars or coffee shops, but you know online conversations as imperfect as they are might be all. We have for a really long time I mean offices are starting to reopen, but a lot of people are going to keep working remotely places like twitter. Pinterest. FACEBOOK and slack. They are basically planning on having a huge chunk of their workforce work from home indefinitely. Mike. Says it'll take a while before we can actually use data dancer. This question, there's a lag between. That happens and his patent data so we'll have to see. Just, to be safe though Alex we decided that it was very important that we come here to the lady and have some cocktails and discuss ideas. For the Economy America is counting on us. I mean it's the least we can do to the economy. Cheers. Cheers. And all kinds of other cool stories people should check out at gastropod. Sarah, that's right. A personal favorite of mine is about the time the Soviet Union paid Pepsi. Entirely in worships oh my gosh. We're going to have to discuss this over drinks. This episode of the indicator was produced by Britney Cronin who is currently here having a beer. Jamila huxtable fact checked by Sean. Tanya. The indicator is edited by Patty hearst and is a production of NPR.

Mike Andrews NPR US Stacey Vanik Smith Sarah Alex Alex Smith Steve Wozniak Joe N. P. R Brooklyn Patty hearst Iowa Soviet Union University of Iowa Menlo Park California apple
The Information's 411  Fidji Simo

The Information's 411

39:48 min | 1 year ago

The Information's 411 Fidji Simo

"And this week we're going to begin sharing interviews for this year subscriber summit held down in Menlo Park we interviewed CEOS from Bricks this is Jessica lesson with the information each Fiji also shared a little about the forthcoming news tab I hope you enjoy so march and sort of rising up oversaw a lot of projects including watching video which is now still part of the purview and then the goal plan focus how do you think about being obviously tremendously important but like is is it a case of in the sense that you know instagram what's up have been these sort of huge rocket ships so tell us I mean what's what's facebook part of facebook we covered a lot of ground from the slowing of the core business to how facebook continues to struggle bouncing protecting users with free speech taking over so Fiji's name is one of those names you hear a lot when you talk to people inside the company repeatedly years year after year so seeing very very shortly and just a little bit about background I think when in March it was announced that you're taking over maybe externally word he took over as I said what we think of as facebook so we'll dig into a lot of the products that you're over walk like a rare disease and what we are seeing is that it's not just communities it's actually a variety of activities that you can be a platform or you came to really one thing which was connecting with friends and family and now it's much more than that so how does that affect newsfeed which I actually hey this is the new norm it's just a mature platform are you focused on reigniting growth like how do you tackle the goals and challenges around that so we're actually growing the video was facebook watch most recently findings your significant other with this book dating and Willie's evolution we've seen his issues the last couple of years so it's people connecting with our neighbors to organize local block party also way to people connecting with other people across the world now do on facebook whether it's attending events selling the old baby clothes on marketplace raising money for something that you care about family friends and family of always been a cough facebook and that's not likely to change but we for example seen an explosion of communities in as well known but Internally Fiji has been a Rockstar at the company for a very long time start joining many years ago to work on ads modernization they got that right my case gelatin communities platform attending events etc but what we're seeing is that more and more people are connecting beyond just friends okay I'm going to start with kind of a tough questions so you know I think as as a sort of obvious the core facebook is the slower growing part of facebook right think is sort of the heart if some ways the product and I wonder too in in a world where mark's talked a lot about this future Komo private communications encrypted communication what's the future of newspeak so thing that's important to descend is while eating you know smaller set of people share context with you whether you have the same interests impassioned so very often people are telling us that groups feel a lot more we are seeing that really as as a spectrum of job is to make sure that people have products that need for all types of that was the innovation was right that it took it unlocked all this other content that would have been different services and put it in the stream and that was sort of this engagement platform last few years so obviously everyday people come to facebook to connect with also connecting with your mom across the world willing to town squares with public things like marketplace is a good example of where you're GonNa meet with someone you haven't met before to exchange goods and services and also just your sharing through all of your friends but fundamentally it feels more private because she back you're getting is private it doesn't stay up for it doesn't tip for so may not show is up to us as friends because context is different stories is another example it's really taking off across all of properties including on facebook where and different experiences monetize differently new speed very advertiser friendly groups and messaging maybe less so because it's more private so how do you balance that want to allow you to open facebook yes you can see on your sheet but you can also go straight up through just watching video exchanging goods and services track if you will or did that why change it did it not work did consumers want something else it's new remains a fantastic takes you from a place where we are really discovering and not having specific intent to helping you discover there is actually a place where you can fast for a second I would say I won't Shell number but this is the thing that I would say that sounds a wheel new stub and all of these are way to have a much more intentional type of behavior so he show really into watching videos more specific I wanNA watch video I also can do that little and I know the ads part of the business is not your focus but obviously different as you can go straight to marketplace so you should sell as a very important role to play as a very big distribution mechanism but we're also developing very specific Salvi racism addition to initiate if you open a facebook up you see a series of tabs facebook watch facebook digging soon so as you know we always told from the point of view of like what he's going to answer people's needs and so when we it's like I just want to know what's most important to me right now I open my new sheet I see that but then if I wanted to develop something that he's like a little bit lot of communications all becoming private is really space for all types of communication and I see that more spectrum on one side you are is for people with specific and what's driving that because I think I remember when news feed was launched I'm dating myself I was reporting on it back then around a while all and and as a result you need to figure out a way to introduce advertising or some kind of business relationship maybe directly you're focused but messaging there has been a lot of attempts to sort of platform a ties it at APPS I mean why perfect for foldout I think thing to understand is that to go hand in hand new she this fundamentally great discovery mechanisms so far instagram what's up facebook why what's the benefit to users what yeah so we are education do on that spectrum I saw newsfeed in particular I think a big part of what has happened in the last few years we've developed new cell why do you think it's harder to figure out how to monetize and well I think it's fundamentally a very very private space that's what makes it so so special we because knew she is fantastic at taking all of the snippets of things that are interesting to you and showing them to you first so that we satisfies simple like you can go through your new sheet and realize a unit that tells you as you have all the items for sale near you may want to check it out and in a with a dozen distract from very specific private nature of the product so that's why a lot of attempts have to do with connecting one formats that respects one connection that messaging is all about another big theme at the company right now is integration right in stitching together that we talk a lot of people were parts of groups about health conditions tele even those groups may have cells and people's chef sings in these groups understands the fundamentals of houses salves people want we figure out ways to monetize out later on in some cases streaky and it will take longer messaging is advertising in Ucla looks like posts and in messaging so what we're trying to figure out what is a advertising of business when you see it's fundamentally because we put advertising so I was completely in line with the consumer behavioral that people already had initiated on on the opposite side of the spectrum messaging which is really one to one but in the middle to prevent your groups are a way of community which we think of APPS can can walk together and provide value like for example insides facebook up and we're going to launch the ability coming up soon too the big blue APP is trying to take over to maybe help capitalize on some of the growth momentum is that fair is that what's happening no along with businesses and then are being a we engagement with his businesses because it's in line with what the platform is if you look at why we've been successful with advertising and do something more specific so that's the next time you want to do something around commerce all around you you can also go straight sex so I cease to actually very complimentary and it's really helpful when you're trying to date someone to kind of understand what's daily life looks like and stories does that really well so by allowing you to show instagram what's up you know no longer at the company so I think in light of that there is this sense that you know facebook is just you guys are trying to seeings trend to private messaging on this well not really sinking primarily like what does that mean for business Washington primarily like where fundamental in business of connecting people we are looking at very specific things when we look at this possibility to apps and it's really driven by what people hey it out I mean is it an should back up and say that you know this strategy hasn't been without critics or controversy right and you have the leadership of talk a little bit about some of the products in the portfolio if you will so maybe starting with watch I think maybe it was earlier this year or recently mark was saying this is really tricky place to monetize but usually we really start from deep understanding of what consumers want in that space before we introduced a no it's instagram stories inside facebook dating we can make so product a lot more valuable and people can connect with one another way so if you sort of not because the thing that we really try to to do is Willie Anderson Watch would add value to people at each moment in time so if you look at when we all and win which people want to connect like Dodsal job to provide ourselves same thing for groups what's usually tends to happen once we really acquired instagram it was a very small company to sing and people love to product like this thing that we really do was continue to grow it understand a big year for watch it's going to really hit it stride has that happened and how has the what is the strategy around original content I know you were show instagram's stories and facebook stores inside traits rebidding and we think it's really important because a lot of people use instagram a lot of people using them stories my messages like I just I think you'd be surprised what what we are seeing is actually that people are really like primary platform of choice ending some are you doing more of that less of that yeah so watch has grown a ton like we have about a seven hundred and twenty million people instagram wars for what he was about and really what we did was very very independently now which is folded weren't just way more things that we could do that with add value that didn't require these complex integration then I don't often check out the other one and so what we are trying to solve for he is really limiting 's is mental over over the and helping people reach France wherever they are and that's really add to call off one of the things that we are talking about but just plenty of the waste and we realize okay like this integration can actually add a lot of value to people so nice right time to stop looking at that but that's why which is into it before that's why we're doing it now because awesome making really good money and how do you think about sort of learning those creators to watch verse IGT INSTAGRAM's product burst visiting every months for watching what he's one minute on average if we did watch for about twenty six minutes so we are seeing like a lot of telling us a one so in the case of messaging example you can sing about the facts that every time I actually message someone I have to think about all the most your what's up but we are seeing that there are differences I g TV's GONNA tend to skew younger FACEBOOK IS GONNA tend to be a lot stronger for building APP First Youtube Pattern so what we talk creators is that should figure out which platforms they WANNA be in based on two communities we are seeing actually a wave of creators really start to imagine Hamas well especially now that we've really tools formalization and we're starting to she news and of course we have to go there I would have but I mean it's so shortly I think there's been a little bit reporting about a new news tabby and for people to consume US inside facebook and we've been working with publishers very much from the beginning conception of new stub where really excited the most near Messenger user because like now to what's up that means nod gunnison message right away so now you have to think about all those people just get notifications I mean I see it's like you know Steph game where Cente- lime town with just watch school but also going for things that are going to be mocked because a lot of the content that publishes tend to post on facebook tends to be politics and crime and we hope that's a new step actually expense abreast this is standing apart to them and that you are paying directly for some content right the model has been before we'll do an ad share and all that kind of stuff and a lot of publishers say you mentioned it tell us what you can about it at home so it's going to be launching by the end of the year Jewish too of a destination access to a lot of different types of content and how are you because obviously a decision like that is going to ripple down through publishers who are going to start adducing content that they think you're going to want so how do you how are you sort of approaching that role in sort of what you select the and comcast pays Disney. ESPN is that kind of model that you guys had in mind and doing this do you think that makes sense we're really focused and and also figuring out like obviously has to make financial sense for facebook on some level that doesn't really need to 'cause you wouldn't notice but onto what people want and so you have talking about our content strategy a big part of what we're going forward is yes having anchor sort of content entity wants so it's a lot of like obviously shorter form content of very personalized very focus on entrust and killed and very often you know says no difference between the communities want to build this should be everywhere and that's totally fine with us that's probably more revenue for them that's totally cool a- actually one was telling me I thought it was interesting analogy wants to know what you thought of it a little bit of like Cable Licensing Model and cable there's sort of an affiliate were you judging the Roi I guess on that those dollars so one of the things that people don't always realize that content it's GonNa be very personalized to you so obvious strengths of facebook is to be able to give you personalized and relevant contents who are very focused doc and making sure that you can see the topics almost interested in just excited about it so when we talk to publishers and you mentioned it I mean I think wide range of companies and very excited to bring you the full unedited versions of these interviews I stop we have Fiji Cmo the head of the hi so when you're talking about our why like it's really important for us that we do a really good job delivering that use case for people so even so it's really depending on what to create a WanNa get out of this engagement but very often depots everywhere that's cool you mentioned richest runs a content you were seeing a lot of creators of boost of content and then a specific group for all of their fans without community becomes proactive and one of the things I'm really excited about east to really have a breath of news content inside this top whether it's and obtain sports health content etc analyzed what people want so like you know they want to go deep news we should have a lot of news clips a willing to late night like making sure that we are of late night the news is actually very important reasons so as we prioritize things that types of values that we want to create for people news ranks out of being a business mall from the get go with Sam that makes world hold them so we're going to be licensing some content as part of this new stab then we ask people why come to facebook obviously as a primary reason saw connecting with friends and family connecting with groups and communities but news and that we hope to attract him his new stuff that's a big part of why we are doing these shows it's not trump trump trump trump sean this is that we can get don't like paying for content that is not already coming to the platform and wishing he's going to be valuable falls in Houston so I was mentioning breath of content I was in a deep relationship creators publishers we would have to prioritize figuring out a way for people to have this catch up use case and engagement what are people watching is it the same they'd watch on Youtube is it something else see what they watch a variety of things and actually a big part of strategy ease obviously licenses and that's why he deserves tyneside's that's why we really want to drive traffic to and and so for us it was something we had to figure it out no matter what that I mean there's been a couple cracks that news for facebook over a number of years and instant stories articles comes to mind where publishers it was sort of a different way of publishing content into it it would be faster to read faster to load from nat- or others we covered a lot of grabbing gain here onto you before you can continue the conversation so it's taken longer to launch fittings and it has taken a lot of other products in the past and that's because ah innocent articles was really geared towards making s`amuse reading experience for people much faster much better from that perspective you can order and you'd be surprised that it is not looks no money it's actually having something in common with the person and so we sing clearly why how's it going what are the goals so we actually saw tun of people were always using his work today ahead of it it's going well we're excited about it because we study and about like what is most important for people in Sydney and so I would say the biggest thing that we've learned south of natural playbook of launching product and really just the self full-fledged product that is built with a lot of the new processes we've put in place to build products following last two years that we've had we need to think about the business model in conjunction with a consumer product and not six months later okay to round out some of the apps house dating going suspect you was really important being said there was no doubt that for many years we invested in relationship with publishers and or any users of faith in the audience might not be or crowd that is the one product I do not use I mean just sort of what do we take two mixes six -perienced butter and digging was an interesting experience because Ding is sort of consumers and really waiting for the consumer aspect of the product to be nailed before we would think about the business model now who are it's a good example of four new way of launching product that is much less reactive to the potential for abuse potential for harm and much more about getting in Pittsburgh profile so that's something we did from the get-go same thing we safety and security we consulted with a lot of people realize that harassment is something you have to get in front of before you launch the products and made a lot of adjustments the product for example like you can only which to someone once and you have to wait until that person too doing on that front and where do you sort of want the company to be yeah so we're very big believers in free speech monkeys on fish talking about so I think probably now as we're speaking mark is probably giving a speech on free speech is very you know he just really wanted to rain on our parade here is what to allow what not to allow videos to allow how do you think facebook is ads the same time we need to balance that virtues pretension people from home and that's that's very very hard to navigate people have told us is that really wanted all's in formations it puts inside phase dating to only be seen by people stating and to be completely separate from the bidding can really do that well because we allow facebook dating people to connect with the same groups within the same event and so that for example is privacy where we've really be able to to act with privacy out so called with consulting with privacy experts and what those experts and where we are thinking about it is that we need to stand up for free speech right now more than ever because we've seen over the last couple of Walpole US I didn't work very well Paul Palmer's and so the biggest learning here is for any new products that we create impact on on our system of how this is probably more interesting how do you think face I mean this touches you write news feed curriculum not just in this area but also privacy deductibility elections integrity like all of the big issues where we don't show like we should be making decisions we will have to stick to it even if more disagrees is that in a Beta Alpha where's that it's GonNa Launch Soon we are in the process us more and more people sit at some kind of speech is dangerous when we'll eat just don't like and goes out so we sort of embark on the journey like a couple of years ago we started really looking into it's really hard at this moment in time is so much tension to stand up for free speech where really committed to that as value who do you think's should decide where we are creating a site board which is going to be an independent body that people can appeal content decisions too so if your client has the thing is I think we can have an opinion on free speech but the most important thing is we shouldn't be the one judging and in fact well actually not waiting for regulation ah you know what what is the threshold of harm that should violate that well we've been very clear that we don't think a private company reform work she go out how we can make the best decisions in the meantime and explain how while making them but also try to sort of like create a set of showed interest that makes it more likely that you will have something in common with a person when you think I'll have to ask my younger friends you've got companies that are unprecedented power governments know UC facebook likes going this path of some sort of independent thing Tori framework but at the same time like I said we stand for free speech so we hope that regulatory framework is leaning towards free speech so yes but but he's the one deciding that we don't think books should we've had to because we don't have the regulatory framework that really helps makes his decision and that's why we have been can down and you don't think it should or if you reported content and we decided not taking down you can appeal to independent body and whichever decisions his body of people makes you don't have it in the US you think other countries are more clear right on speech and that you don't always agree with what other countries that's true I mean ideally we would obviously want standing up we've seen in libra a lot of criticism that that's just sort of shell for facebook's power a lot of the members defected gates's institutions like you're bald talk separate from us and we're going to be empowered to make decisions for us okay that reminds me talks really worked very well that's like people and we're very satisfied are experiencing you said you didn't have to wait for a long time computers and so and what is the status libra and how important is it to facebook so the things that's really important is that one talk and that's actually the best way to build products is to seize always on origin organ behavioral happening on the platform and you can just make it easier and simpler for selecting the right set of people along going into speech and so a lot of what we are trying to do is enes job since his regular point seven billion people who don't have access to bags like we as industry an incredible opportunity to do a lot of good here he's going to be super a heart absolutely like this is definitely from a regulatory standpoint from a collaboration standpoint like also as you can imagine it's going to be hard and like we association that you mentioned like we've really upset it up in ways that it's going to be fully independent and how is that affecting your job I say a main thing that we have to do is members right I couldn't have been part of the plan oh I think when you start something like thought email regulatory environment we the type of tension we have certainly seen a lot of it fifteen hundred entities that I've been interested in joining abrazos Haitian but this is a road that's going to be really hard I mean it's funny this also touches on the theme I mean obviously there's probably more regulatory scrutiny and I trust scrutiny calling for breaking up the company and also amplifying some good so one thing that worries me in this kind of environment is a we've swung the pendulum drastically like a couple of years ago we we protect people from home it's certainly hard because of you see a lot of external destruction and a lot of noise but fundamentally currency and and she's on track books again like those so many steps to kill before we have a valid product Kinda really continue to be focused on identifying the home and really going actively up after this home which we haven't always done and we nice out Jack I don't have details it's far away from what I do but like Kelly Bryce yeah it's it's basically a form of wallet on top of the obscenity we are we wanted to obviously respecting regulation walking onion and with regulators and so as a result we don't expect Sepulveda's just stick around for the entire journey we also like I said expect some of them maybe when we come back later once been cleared but it's going to be the scrutiny like does is it are you I don't think the company's been incredibly acquisitive in the very recent period but was for a very long time it is there a sense of let's uh-huh buys away and you know a lot of what mark talks about today and and a lot of the decisions he makes a whole about balancing things at all really at odds golf that and let the dust settle we haven't had like targets we've been particularly interested in in in recent years it was always kind of part of the plan that wouldn't be smooth so I think a big part of what we're trying to do is operatives there is enough into news that some members were you know well not GonNa be here for the entire journey we also know that some members are leaving nine may come back leader hasn't even launched yet and you lost a lot of fundamentally focus on what we think is right and she has the scrutiny does well facebook how do you think about acquisitions all like it's kind of job to make sure that even in this environment we continue to do good we continue to innovate like on the bad side we minimize about and something called Libra you went there so this is just such an interesting time right I mean the highest level in fact what you're seeing with members deciding to leave it members decided to be added is that it's very much operating separately from us we you walk companies that he's very focused mission and I think that's what's helping us during your still in time to really focus on doing what we think is right which is not always what's popular uh and then the idea is so there's the lieber associations and there's a libra which will be a product inside of facebook and is that when's that expected to launch that on to distribute appreciate the service they're kind of want to ask you to comment on an increasing tension between consuming APP versus plugging fantastic and pursue more mindful activities certainly I've started to reduce my facebook consumption for whatever reason a lot of my friends are doing this off where do you think the equilibrium will be when the dust settles and how do you practice according according to this thank you great question where really focused omission as a company is to connect people and bring them together if using technology really focused on

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#115 Hihi Its The Tamagotchi On

Latest In Tech News

36:11 min | 1 year ago

#115 Hihi Its The Tamagotchi On

"I hi it's the time ago. John and more coming up on today's episode of release in tech news. A gadget here. You're just in time for the latest episode of the world's only three in one show on tech gadgets and gave me news. And it's right. This is the latest in tech news. My name is Taylor American. If you knew here click subscribe button, so that you don't miss out on the latest episode and hold off on that like, but until you get to a section of the show that you actually like speaking of the feature story that we have for today is a new Tamagotchi called the Tamagotchi on. And we'll be looking at that and seen if it is finally a return to the roots that. The player base. I guess we'll call that actually want and if it will do well also be taking look at which programming language will earn you. The most Java PHP or dot net. Must be taking look at discord crossing the two hundred fifty million user Mark celebrating its four year anniversary and in gadget news. We'll be looking at the four cavers eight K trade off is it worth upgrading. Or should you just stay where you're at right now? We'll also be looking at Lenovo showing off the world's first foldable PC, and whilst be taking look at Hermes announcing a plan to build the fastest aircraft in a world. Which will definitely be impressive in gaming news. We'll be taking a look at the monster hunting deem dauntless coming to consoles and the epic store next week. But I did you know that compared to today the battery of the Nokia thirty three ten is quite literally on Spiring current phone. Batteries barely lasted day without needing a full overnight charge. The thirty three ten was capable of fifty five hours. Talktime that's more than two solid days and a two hundred forty five hours standby time in a standing ten days and feel like what's this Nokia thirty three ten we'll go Google it. You got time. You could pause episode and comeback. Yeah. Looks like a really basic smartphone. But it was a really basic phone mobile phone in general had very limited selection of gains matter of fact, I think it might have been one of my first phone that I ever used when I was on a track phone network and L is quite impressive one. Also, did you know that the average smartphone to date takes around twenty seconds to boot up from off to ready for action? Well, the Nokia thirty three ten took a mind blowing eight seconds before you could crack open a messenger or the built in currency converter. So just to show you how technology has quite changed for to some extent laziness of phone developers in trying to. The consumers out of money. Well, come back to vitamin, but but that we already know. All right. What happened today in tech history? Being that today is may thirteenth twenty nineteen on this day in nineteen eighty six d network general corporation was founded the two founders Len shoe, stack, and Harry, Sal found network general corP, which was a major provider of management solutions for computer networks until its merger with McAfee associates in nineteen ninety seven to form network sort see its headquarters in Menlo Park, California. Wow. It seems like all the big companies are in Menlo Park. The company's first product was the sniffer a diagnostic tool for analyzing communications protocol problems in local area networks if you like, ooh, what's this? While s just something as Guiquan nerd in tech heads did back in a day as we fiddled around with stuff. Anyway, if it goes over your head. It's okay. We got more news for you. Also, did you know that on this day in nineteen eighty five the British rock band dire? Straits. Releases their fifth album brothers in arms, which will become the first CD necessary. It's impressive to sell over a million copies. It was the most successful album released on compact disc for over two decades. I guess money for nothing was more than a song title. Goes. You pop a million on that baby. Also on this day in nineteen eighty digital equipment Intel and Xerox jointly announced the Ethernet network specification. If Annette is a predominant networking standard of today's business and home networks in whilst likely what you have your router in your computer plugged into an router is most likely plugged into a cable coming out of wall, which is different entirely. Also on this day in nineteen ninety one the system seven operating system for the MacIntosh is released the second major upgrade to the MAC OS. One of the major features included in system seven is built in cooperative. Multitasking oh boy system. Seven also introduces the count. Sept of aliases, which will later be copied as shortcuts in Microsoft Windows, ninety five system seven was the I MAC OS that some people came familiar with. And it was the foundation of the MAC OS until the release of MAC OS ten almost exactly ten years later. So, but that out of the way, let's get into today's tech news. I up on the docket while you heard it here. First folks, the new Tamagotchi can Mary Amberg. Yeah. I've thought his title. I'm like, oh, I gotta talk. I got to cover this. So for those of you who didn't grow up in nineteen ninety s or have no idea what Tamagotchi is or lived on Iraq, which Hello human. We also have. Gotten along quite fine. With something called tau g it was available trend back in the nineties twenty two years after its initial release and several years after countless revivals in re releases Tamagotchis have retired yet again with some interesting features like smartphone, connectivity. And he ability for your virtual pets to marry someone else's in have kids. Well, there you go Tamagotchi while at Tom got you re teen years, and if you're somehow unfamiliar with a toy the Tomiko CI is like the modern version of the pet rock, but with most of the responsibilities and care that real life animal would require somewhat including up to the point where it would be crying out at two in the morning because it peed itself in the bed, and you couldn't figure out how to get to shut up. So your sister who happened to be playing with a version of time through to cross the room and broke it I think or died or finally shut up only to wake up later that day find out that it it perished during the night as it. We're anyways. What does? This include includes feeding your virtual pet, caring. Playing with cleaning it generally interacting with it on a regular basis to keep it alive and growing. Well, goodness. Latest iteration Tamagotchi on expands what you can do if the digital creature, but as an adult with a lot on his plate already, am, I the only one who is starting to feel these are more overwhelming than fund while the fun fan of the nineties with Furby and everything else that went along with it that everybody had to have it. And then you played with it. And then he got sick and bored and tired of it bounce it off concrete until it broke. I I didn't do that. By the way, if you guys interested in a show notes for today's episode head on over to tech news gadget Ford slash one one five and you'll have the article links for everything that we cover today and also. If you ever on leave a comment can certainly do that leaving competence free. It only takes near moments them, by the way. If you're watching the video version of this you can do that as well. We've become it. Oh, I'd like to know what you guys think did you grow up playing Tamagotchis in the nineties. I think I played like an off version of it. Because apparently me and my sister whined about it so much to our parents, our parents kinda trade off was like, well, maybe if we get him this. We won't have to get them in actual pet down the road, and he can have fun playing with the video game Amplats they'll keep entertained for a while. So the I got guess got us a couple, and yeah, we'll we grew up playing with it for probably a couple of months, and then it all went downhill when my sister brokers or hers died or something, and then like, I think she flipped every single table in the house, which was quite impressive for youngster at the time under ten and that, well, let's just say after every said table was flipped mom and dad weren't too happy in said, that's it. No more video games for you kids, go outside in roll around the dirt. So I got really good education. They're learning in studying dirt, and ripping arms off aunts and legs off aunts that they have arms an burning on with magnifying glass. I'm just was. I was. Kid growing up. Anyways, don't yell at me pita. Do they even care about ants on anyways back to your? The most obvious update to time ago to on his own most gigantic compared to previous versions of the toy that could hang off a key Chang without being noticed. The new version is considerably larger and as a result, it might have a hard time competing for pockets face against a smartphone. Now one thing that hasn't changed with a Tamagotchi on the three simple buttons used to interact with the virtual pet and how to navigate the toys menus it works. Once you get used to the navigation of buttons are unlabeled. But as the menu settings options have expanded quite a bit inadvertent. It might finally be time for BanDai America to consider. Introducing alternative like a tiny touchscreen. Now smart watches have demonstrated or not impossibly small to pull off once law gripe at why didn't bend. I America include a key chain with the new version, it has host who tach one. But it's a B Y. Okay. Which is by your own keychain or bring one depends on you. Also, the Tamagotchi on is full color. But isn't new features introduced as far back as two thousand eight. Tamagotchi plus color in Japan. But it's finally making an appearance here in the US. So for all of you were like got this in Japan. Welcome. Live long prosper. Oh, wait wrong here in the US. We kind of got bored and we've been waiting for products to show up here. So I finally shows up in US the cars are vibrant, even in bright light and given screens small size, the lack of pixel density isn't an issue besides the crude pixelated graphics and stuttered animations are part of their term appeal at this point. But the author of this article isn't sure if they'd want virtual pet that looked in acted more lifelike, I'd be devastated when it eventually died or or perish, and we're looking at a couple of photos right here of the Tamagotchi on quite impressive. A colour screen makes it much easier to discern mood of your virtual pet. So you can better care for its need. So obviously, if it's smiling happy, you can obviously see it. So you also have profile settings in all the fun stuff that goes along with it. So yeah, there you go that being said all the features that have been added to Tamagotchi line over the years starting to make the toys menus feel a little bloated. You'll find yourself randomly digging through endless sub menus to find an option you looking for in a display with more resolution net would allow more options be squeezed onto each screen. So. Well, it it goes on to the Tamagotchi can wirelessly communicate over I are and now facilitates more interactions between time ago she's on different versions. You can have play dates on your virtual pet off to visit a friend or tell or even propose marriage to another Tamagotchi and Hegel if you if you're interested, let's say the Tamagotchi will be available starting in July for sixty US dollars, which is delete appealing feature of the latest version or no longer a cheap fifteen impulse. Purchase bought went launches Ben die America will also be releasing accompanying mobile app. Currently not available for testing at the time ago. She can wirelessly connect to further expand what you've virtual pet can do can go and who can meet including Tamagotchis all around the world instead of trying to compete with smartphones. Well, they might have finally embrace them. So kids have more incentive to keep their pets alive. So it's a nice blend. We finally have going here. But I don't know. I see I see some good things. I see some bad things coming. Out of it. Am I going to get a personally probably not? I I'm married. I have a family in a kid take care of fulltime job in show doing everything else along with that. But if you wanna go ahead and take a look at it. Go ahead and do that. And let us know we'd love to be able to cover your thoughts on your review of it. So yeah, they go or or just let me know what your thoughts are in general. Is this something that you would buy or not buy? I don't know. Let me know don't come section down below. Moving on to some more tech news, Java PHP or dot net, which programming languages will earn you the most. Now, I'm not sure how many of you are listening who are actually in the tech field or or working on programming or coding languages or behind the scenes with startups or security things of that nature. But while pay for some key tech is outpacing others. But one big job has surprisingly seen a salary decline. Now, this is also I feel relevant for those of you who have either just graduated high school in are going into college looking for the. Tech job that you want or for those of you graduating out of college. Hopefully, he didn't suit yourself into foot and got a degree. That's not going to be helpful for the salary that you want. So let's dig in salaries for in demand programming skills, including Java in PHP are rising rapidly. Advertise tech salaries have grown for the third year in a row up. One point seven percent in two thousand eighteen with pay for specialized tech roles increasing significantly as demand for net. PHP and Java developers continues to expand over that three year period. Java developers have seen a largest increase in salaries. Forty one percent their wages also increase six percent between twenty teen in this year. The average Java developer earns sixty three thousand seven hundred pounds though that can rise to seventy thousand pounds, according to data from recruitment company read, I guess, this is from across the pond. So we'll just have to do our conversions later. I'm not doing him a Ugo. Do you have the capability to? Ause this episode due to calculation come back and hit play. I'm I'm recording this live right now. So it a second best paid programming role was full stack developer which pays fifty three thousand five hundred pounds on average rising to sixty thousand three hundred that's up five point six percent on last year and eighteen point eight percent up on twenty sixteen. Now PHP developers have seen salaries increased by twenty point six percent over the three year period and enjoyed the largest increase of any tech role in the past year up six point nine percent dot net. Developers have also seen a significant boost in salary during the period with average pay increasing from thirty nine nine pounds in two thousand sixteen to forty seven thousand four hundred pounds this year in eighteen point eight percent rice, the most popular programming language. Popularity indexes Java scrip- Java in python or most popular languages data. Scientists that analyst technical architect. Db network engineer have all seen double digit increases to salary over the last three years pay. For the more business focused role such as a business analyst project manager has also risen but by smaller amount than for developer rolls. Indeed, one of the few jobs to see pay decline in the last three years, according to the data from Reid is out of IT director, which has said dropped between twenty sixteen twenty eighteen only to climb back up slightly this year. Overall. The average IT director pay has dropped slightly over the period from eighty nine thousand pounds to eighty three thousand pounds these rising salaries are matched by increasing demand for staff with these skills, according to read while the overall number for technology roles. Advertise increase by ten percent since the start of twenty teen. So yeah. Plenty of rolls out there for candidates with mobile experience in front end development alongside debt firms will also need people with cloud based experience and storage skills. The impact of legislation such as GDP are in whatever else might be happening in the world is creating a lot of demand with companies making sure they have the right skills systems and processes in place as a result roles in data are also growing, according to Andrew Gardner, director of read technology. So for those of you who are interested. What tech field should I start making my venture into Bildt Bego you now have your choice, the only become IT director. Now, I don't know it seems like the whole specialization things, especially when it comes to mobile, cloud based storage skills might be in demand quite soon. So if you haven't ready jumped on bandwagon are are still learning more about it to free. You never know you might wind up with a good cushy well paying job just keep this in mind, though. With that always comes the risk of. Retiring ball because I guarantee you if this job is is like any other job when it comes to programming in in language work and a complex mathematical algorithms that go along with it. If you're like me as are pulling my head out when keep running into problems, especially when you have to script on Yamil. K yes, I'm bringing it back again back to my mind craft surveys when I had to run a Minecraft server which ran on Java, by the way, but the only programming language that worked while with the plug ins, it was compatible with Minecraft and everything else that went along with that was stupid Yambol by far the most basic, it was it's worse in basic, basic. At least was a great framework. This was just like, oh, a basic was dead. Throw it out the window all your off by space bar? Oh, while I'm sorry to whole entire codes going to crash, but I'm not gonna tell you. What's wrong with any of it? It was so annoying. And there is more than number times where I wanted to take the PC and throw it out the window or figure out who designed the animal drive over to the house punch him in the face and say, can you please introduce the two point. Oh. And do it. Right. This time. But yeah, see I wouldn't do well in his programming space. I probably be on wild. I'd like Einstein. But except instead of my hair on over. I'd I'd probably be both. I probably be both. So that's why I'm not programming language genius guru. But I'm sure you could do very well and feel especially if this comes naturally to you in it's easy. So there you go you could get paid more. But the expense of losing hair. Don't worry. I'm not going to be in competition for that job. You can have it. All right moving on to more gaming news. Discord crossed the two hundred fifty million user Mark as it hits its four year anniversary gamer social network discord announced it has more than two hundred and fifty million registered users as it crosses its fourth anniversary. This about the same number of uses as epic has plane fortnight since its founding in two thousand fifteen discourse appeal has always been in. It's small living room. Like atmosphere were groups of friends can join together to talk games as dischord has grown has gone mainstream providing everyone away to chat about big passions, including sports, tabletop, games music, pets, news and more. And not only that. But let's say the audio was superior by far too, many of the other programs out there. This is insane. This an article has Nissan is better than Skype. It was better than goodness. The mumble. It was. Gosh, what else is there is a bunch of other. Like talk chat communication servers that you could use discord. Did it all did it better into free? So we bet discord has previously said in December twenty eighteen ahead. Two hundred million registered users a year, go in may twenty eighteen it had a hundred and thirty million ants growing pretty fast. Discard also said that it has more than fifty six million users every month on average, those users ten more than eight hundred fifty million messages a day twenty five billion messages are sent per month across discords web mobile platform, s the equivalent of everyone in the world, sending a message at least four times the top seven most popular verified. Servers include fortnight spell break pudgy mobile class, Royal Minecraft, dams royale and rainbow six this cord now has over one hundred and sixty five employees up over fifty percent from year ago Encinas how they made their move into providing gaming platform where you can buy gains like a game store. For the game store in its own exclusive games that go along with it. Anna bunch of other cool features at discord is always coming out with seeing as how it's a great community oriented server and staff is always very community friendly and always helpful there to help into questions. It's just a win win all around. So great job. Discord. All right, moving on to our last tech news item before we get in some gauge gaming news, four K versus AK. Is it worth the upgrade? While we all know, what your feeling you saved up all your dollars incense in order to buy that state of the art new television. You had your I on in shortly after you purchase said TV a new gen of TV is announced switch promises to outperform. No one that you bought currently just is the same with a car. Okay. So nubile comes out and go rhino abide. Mount we're currently in that situation with four Cain. Eight K TV's in while having widespread access to true, h eight k you HD content. Still a long way off we're talking years here. Guys, many TV manufacturers are hoping that the impressive upscaling and greater clarity offered. By this. First wave of a case that's will be enough to convince enthusiasts that it can already benefit from owning one in an effort to demonstrate the difference in visual fidelity between its top four Cain. Eight K models like the tech radar. Here was invited to Samsung's Australian headquarters suspended fjords. Doing both sets side by side. Here's what they took away from their time comparing the Samsung q nine f four K Q TV from last year to its new Q nine hundred are eight cake, he'll D TV flake ship. So first off native AK content isn't necessary. Let's be clear about something unless you live in Japan native, AK content, probably won't be readily available anytime soon. There are a handful of eight K videos on YouTube, which is likely your best bet for watching true AK content near future over YouTube Stevie app is still limited to that maximum four K for the time being it probably won't be updated to AK until those TV's become more mainstream. That said having spent some time became clear to us that a lack of native, aka content, really isn't a breaker to turns out to be. In fact, they come away convinced that upscaling technology will end up defining the eight Kate era for the foreseeable future. Given that even today the majority of Hollywood's most expensive blockbusters are only finished at two k and yes that includes a vendors endgame. The idea that will be getting a wealth of native e k content in the near future is on realistic. Instead, it makes more sense TV manufacturers the focus on how they can improve with content. That's available which is precisely what Samsung is doing with its eight K approach that we all know that k displays offer four times as many pixels as four K over the same amount of real estate what this means is at eight K displays most a far higher pixels per inch count resulting in pixels that both smaller at much closer together. Indus- harder to individually. Discern did you ever look at a four K television up close even with eight million pixels on a display you may start to notice eight mesh like screen color screen door affect if your is position cults enough to the street. Now, here's some goal on eight K televisions. This effect is almost nonexistent in having looked at it up. Very close. It wasn't until our faces only two or three inches away from the screen that we noticed any kind of screen door effect. And then only because we were actively looking for it. Of course. The extra pixels don't count for much if they're just being used to gently stretch, a low rez image out. So this is why smart upscaling tech is key using AI part quantum processor. The new AK TV is able to intelligently upscale four k content even ten eighty p content in even seamlessly add in detail that wasn't there in the first place. The difference is slight but noticeable so they wash number four k ultra eat the Blu rays on four K an AK sets time simultaneously in each they found that the AK definitely revealed more detail and clarity. Even if it seems like it should be impossible. So here's Riggott funny on a viewing of Auckland. We are struck by additional detail found in Jason memo's beard and faced with individual hairs Portas, more readily viewable on eight K television. Thanks to absence of that aforementioned screen door effect in the same can be said a Pacific rim uprising which revealed more tiny details during the film's large. Scale robot battle in the middle. Sydney. Harbour things like water fire and smoke all appeared more defined in unobstructed by visible pixel separation. So that's all I'm gonna read for now. I know that there's more content to go along with it. But we do have more articles to get through. So is it worth upgrading? Well depends on tech. That's behind the eight K television. You're buying end. Samsung definitely seems to be on top of that was that mean that the we'll have a whole wealth of eight k content to look at. No. But we will in time just give it time. But the technology can upscale along with it. And then as more a cake comes available. Well, it'll already have been there for a while the probably be able to bring the costs down on the higher end of it in the medium range of fall right within the average consumer price point the purchase a new aka T, V Enda. You might have some fun. I don't know. Are you still fan a k four k I dunno just whenever you go to tech show, and you want to K television start drooling. I mean. Gretel? All right moving on to some gadget news while Lenovo shows off the world's first foldable PC. And I think is the first article status. So I think the Nova can definitely time stamp say today was the day that we introduced the first full PC, and you guys weren't even thinking about it y'all looking at full phones K photo phones already being pitched as the next big wave of tech in whether or not net turns out to be true. The industry has no plans to stop there than oval has just announced what it says is the world's first foldable P C a prototype. Thinkpad that it raised foldable tech. We've already seen from phones on a much bigger scale. Awesome. I can't wait I'm excited. So they have a video that goes on with this. We won't be watching a video. But if you want to this is in the show notes at tech news gadget dot net Ford slash one. One five pop opening article now have video right there for you to see this is not just the cool tech demo either Minova has been developing this for over three years in has plans to launch a finished. Device in twenty twenty as part of its premium ThinkPad x one brand the goal. Here's a premium product that will be a laptop class device not neccesary or secondary, computer, like a tablet might be. Nope, cool factor aside, though wall, why build a folding PC answer is largely portability. Conceptually? It's the opposite of what most of the foldable phones there are trying to do their companies like Samsung, and while you're trying to take a device the size of a regular phone and make them bigger. But the idea behind the folding ThinkPad is a full PC in make it. Smaller result is thirteen point three inch four three two K L E D display that can fold up to about the size of a hardcover book. Don't have the exact way till yet. But Nova says it's less than two pounds, which is about as much as a hardcover copy of one of the larger Harry Potter books. That's ready enough to put it on a lighter side of the portable computer spectrum. But decides savings are really when you fold it in half making it dramatically smaller than a regular laptop. And they actually have a foldable pad compared. Two regular thirteen inch laptop look that space. So they got to try to functional prototype. But there's not a lot to see at the stage. The screen does unfold. Enfold as advertised in windows worked well enough as a touch interface, but the real manicure if it happens at all will come from software. Optimizing things to run on the unique form factors at a folding screen can provide. So they will say that they really liked the size of it. More than expected. Folded up is far smaller than even a regular size thirteen inch laptop n while. It's that something exactly fit into your jacket pocket, even large. It's comparatively. Compact. The folded motives also really nice to put in your hand like a giant link book fingers crossed at Lenovo or someone puts proper e reader software for the futuristic to page digital book of my dreams, at least for the author. The harbor is also clearly unfinished at this stage in folding mechanism didn't really feel particularly thirty. I n the screen had remarkably poor viewing angles shifting colors wildly when look debt from different or slight angles pertain. Equally problematic for folding screens, hopefully, all that will be sorted out on Moore, finished hardware. So there's some more photo's goes along with it. Oh, yeah. The foldable web top. It's Hugh, boys. Moving on to some more. Gadget news except well can't really classify this as a gadget Hermes announces plans to build the fastest aircraft in and quote. They want to do engineering. Not science new aerospace company that has entered race provide supersonic commercial air travel was announced on Monday, a US based company named Hermes announced plans to develop an aircraft that will travel at speeds up to mach five that means such an aircraft would cut travel time from New York to Paris from more than seven hours to one and a half pretty impressive. Her me ascended as raised an initial fund round of funding led by costs ventures, but it declined to specify amount. This funding will allow us to develop a propulsion demonstrator in other initial tech needed to make supersonic craft a reality. The the announcement follows three years after another company boom supersonic declared his own intentions develop faster than sound aircraft. As. As of January twenty nineteen boom has raised more than one hundred and forty million toward development of it's over Traer liner envisioned to travel at mach two point two which is about ten percent faster than the Concorde traveled officials with boom supersonic have said its planes could be ready for commercial service in mid twenty twenty s if you happen to hear any screaming in the background. That's my seven month old daughter who is trying to go to sleep. She will soon enough. It's her teeth are coming in. So hopefully, they pop and show up soon because we've been waiting on aided breath Firdaus teeth finally show up their T found babies problematic. But anyways, the ended at virgin group and Japan Airlines have preordered a combined thirty airplanes for boom supersonic the type of vehicle Hermes seeks develop will travel considerably faster, but it will rely mostly on existing technology materials were not getting anything tomb, reckless. We just wanted to engineering not science. Primary materials will include titanium and propulsion system will be powered by turbine based combined cycle engine over the next five years company plans to work towards. A demonstrator vehicle that travels at mach five before developing aircraft for commercial service eight to ten years from now the company both founders who are alumni of space x in blue origin in all four of the principal founders came from generation orbit a company that developed a helper, sonic, rocket plane and other new tech. So definitely definitely interesting to get a video that goes along with it. So if you wanna see who is Hermes like out of video, but we'll we'll see hopefully, they can actually stick to their plans. They get the funding they need. They know what the heck Newin it rolls out. And we actually finally get a plane traveling at mach five so that we don't have to hop across the pond in seven hours, you can do it in an hour and a half. Instead. In moving onto our last article. But not least our final gaming article of today monster hunting game dauntless is coming to consoles and epic store. Next week, PlayStation for an Xbox One version of PC monster hunting, hit dauntless will be released on may twenty first according to developer Phoenix labs, the long running early access game, which is heading to the game store as a PC exclusive on the same day allows players to team up in hunt for a variety of behemoths each but their own strengths and weaknesses under decision to go. With epic. Looks like a smart one apart from the improved revenue sharing terms over steam, m whatever other incentive epic pledge to go along with it make game looks like it might appeal to the fortnight battle royale crowd. Now, you might be wondering we played for night. Well, it helps that dollars players on PC can invite their fortnight plane pals to hop on over in doing in. Now, the author of this article played the game for an hour and Xbox One a faithful version of the much iterative PC games. In which teams of players work together to best heavily armed monsters battles last between ten and twenty minutes on average dauntless is color palette character movement environment variety skins all have a definite fortnight vibe. But this is a very different kind of game and definitely different from the monster under one it's more like a role playing adventure in which each character level up. Their powers weapons nor clothes constantly unlocking new challenges new weapons and new monsters personalization is a key part of the game, including gender choice. That's on slider. It only has two settings currently. But it's definitely a slider in Phoenix labs of the plants offer a range, I guess, do you want that is customization accents to character creation and development as well. World is full of pickups can be crafted into potions that healer improved offenses or attack their four slots for players to equip, those potions as well as four more for armor end more for weapons and throw balls, which can also be individualized monsters dropped body parts that can be crafted into weapons as well. Interesting. So Phoenix labs for those. You don't know made up of developer. It's from by wear in riot has definitely done homework in a free to play kids market. The model is based on fortnight lake beamed seasons in which pain customers access progression. Trees with extra nights goodies non-playing players can also earn in game currency to upgrade though. No knowledge of how long that takes. Hopefully, it's not too much of a grind new season. In blades will be released on may twenty first seasons cost around ten dollars. Each dauntless is designed to be a cross play game. Although final details are still being earned out. Anyone who's been playing on PC via the company's laundry can bring their saves over to epic and two councils plans are also a foot to bring the game to Nintendo switch and mobile. Although no release dates are set on that. So yeah, they go dauntless this game looks daunting. But well, it's kind of part of the name, and you need a group players in order to jump in take down a beast. So you can't just be doing it solo. Good luck. Is going to be fun. And with that said that wraps up this episode of delays in tech news. I see him ready running five minutes over here. But that's okay. Thanks for tuning in guys, new episodes. Every weekday laze in tech news can be found on every major platform, including apple podcast, Spotify, Google, podcasts, YouTube, Stitcher, overcast and more. If you do this up syllabi try to let us know by clicking that like button, and by leaving a comment also double check that you subscribe. So that you don't miss the latest tech news. I'm your host Taylor American. Remember for latest in tech gadgets in gaming news. Visit techniques gadget dot net pretty much keeping all some guys. See you on the flip side.

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Success Factors for AI Business Models - A Venture Capitalist's Perspective

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:38 min | 1 year ago

Success Factors for AI Business Models - A Venture Capitalist's Perspective

"Saying that your company does artificial intelligence might still have a slightly cool ring to it. If you're talking to one of your peers at a conference, but it doesn't mean very much venture capitalists today who've been battered with machine learning artificial intelligence in every pitch, dick. They've seen for the last three or four years. I wondered from venture capitalist perspective, what makes an AI companies value proposition actually strong. What is it? That makes AI firm actually seem like a company that maybe could use AI to really win in the market. Not just to be another company that says they're gonna do it says they are doing it. But where can it actually provide enough of that competitive edge to make a V C wanna pull the trigger? And I think whether you're listening right now, and you run your own company, and you're wondering wherein when you might leverage artificial intelligence, or whether you work at a big firm, and you're thinking about what business processes or products, you might launch that might involve artificial intelligence. I think getting a grasp of. That the answer to that question would be pretty critical. We speak this week with Tim Chang. He is a partner at Mayfield fund in Menlo Park, California, Tim, and I both spoke at the trans tech conference held every year in Silicon Valley focused on wellness and health related technologies. Nicole who puts on the event was kind enough to invite us both. And then to introduce us. I told her we were doing some interviews with the seas around serve competitive analysis of business models and understanding what a competitive edges, and she was kind enough to put me in touch with him. So Tim dies in with us for about twenty minutes from VC's perspective talking about what is it about an AI companies pitch in a company's product the market that they're in that actually makes artificial intelligence not just a metoo, but potentially enhancement to the business in a way that's compelling to someone who wants to invest potentially millions and millions of dollars. So without further ado, this is Tim Chang. And I'm Dan for Gela. You're listening here to in industry. Frey. Let's dive in. So tinware wanted to jump off to I hear is looking at sort of the competitive dynamics of we did a big interview series out in the bay area where you are based around what the appeal is for a obey startups for venture firms our really looking at competitiveness specifically when you look at a company that's leveraging AM machine learning or data in a way that really seems to bode well for their ability to break their way into kind of dominate a sector space. What are those factors? What are kind of tactics strategies that you kinda see involved that seem to correlate in your mind with what could be a very successful dominant firm won't onset. We've shifted ehre where from harness a and have the talents, and proprietary data sets him to arm. There are just not gonna exist. I think AI on machine learning is such sweeping effect in terms of better understanding what your clients want twenty four seven serving them. On almost one to one personal level concierge touch twenty four seven at scale to every single person while reducing the cost basis relative to human. Verve. Anything else out there on the cost side? This will have such sweeping dramatic effect that I dare say the majority of companies won't exist anymore in twenty years if they don't can years if they don't harness this because it will be table stakes at this poker game. They won't even be a competitive edge of like don't have this. The other large platforms will make your business. Go away. Yeah. Well, I'm on board with you there in many spaces. I do think that you know, let's say something like ecommerce might be a little bit faster moving the let's carpet manufacturing him. You know? I'm sure you probably agree that the distribution may be slightly varied by sector or by geography. No Indian retail may be a little bit later than let's say American retail. But yeah, I think even a long enough time horizon in your pretty bullish on this talk to me a little bit about I have my own visions and perspectives on where that, although. But honestly, I had you here. For yours. When you think about what that making obsolete will be there will be a company in everything from e commerce. We already have our Amazon here to carbon manufacturing where there's a real dominant player and from your perspective, and I definitely share your sentiment. The firms aren't leveraging proprietary data to enhance their products inexperience are eventually gonna go, by the way, the dinosaurs. How those dynamics play out in other words like, okay? So people tuned in, you know, they might be in making jet engines might be in carpet cleaning, they might be in marketing services, so companies that don't use AI go away here the firms who do really win and dominate. What are they gonna do? Well, how do you like to word it in nutshell it on its to to cuts of this look at a applied horizontal markets where you will take existing applications Toronto charged capabilities of workers with those tools navigations with and that will take psychot- which vertical and this will be specialists in verticals, aerospace, or healthcare farm, whatever it is that Liberta. AI machine learning to innovate on prox-. So on the first cut in horizontal every business plan. We see today is take successful existing application by line of business. Whether it's humanities was management customer relationship. Managements customer support software cetera et cetera et cetera and a machine learning. Get ten experts vity out of one tenth of the staff. Quick example, one of our star companies fully outreach dot IO in Seattle, basically has machine learning applied to helping sales people right better sales Email, so imagine plug in your g mail or your outlook and salesperson is about the dash off sales Email systems will wait a minute for send that we rent that for you. Because based on the millions of emails, I see and the open rates in engagement rates. I know that these phrases will get a better open rate. And so that in cases to charge sales salesperson to be able to write emails, but not hard to imagine after while that machine which just write better emails than any human period right of repeat that playbook for all the. Existing apps out there CRM marketing automation at central cetera on down the line. Frankly, I think big parts of my job jobs on campus, probably done better by actually two the second cut on the verticals. If you have a as better way to map out and do product are in D, something I like to think about a is it can map out simulate all of the permissions all the edge cases, all possible scenarios faster quicker and less biased than humans can sometimes than ending. If you set it up correctly. So let's take in the case of safe small molecule discovery in the pharma industry resin trial air by humans. You know, you can which are sense here had machine learning look at all this start creating all the possible samples permutations at first the humans there to judge which cases are novel and worth further exploration. But eventually even that might be able to be something that the machine can spot out the notable examples as well. Yes. So we'll we'll talk more about verticals in just a second. In pharma is a big base for us in terms of the companies pay for research. Companies that pay for advertising to reach our pharma listeners, we love that sector lot. Maybe we'll get into that a little bit more. But you talked about horizontally, this is something that we really saw drummed up a lot in our previous kind of big investors series. And I think is important dynamic for people to understand I wanna see home on the same page with you essentially take any given function. You figure out what correlates to success across a whole bunch of different factors. Features and situations for that function, whether it's sales outreach. Whether it's leads goring for selling whatever it is. Whether it's you know, some kind of Email marketing, whether it's kind of conversational, interface, whatever the case may be you take some function you get enough instances under enough scenarios to train a system. And then at some point your system out of the box trained on all these other instances is so much smarter than any other system. No matter who gets funded how much they're funded by all this because you're the one drinking in all the new instances, just like Google, it's really hard to build a better. General search engine the Google? In part because yes, of course, technology to replicate. But also because how are you going to get that many people searching your system to refine it the way Google does. They dominate the instances. They get the train off the instances make this thing up to the millisecond, hyper relevant for everybody it unless you can get a hand on that data than you're not gonna catch up. So the thought is you find a function that you can own you get a critical mass of people to use only you until the point comes when it is clear that you are better than anything else out of the box than they continue to only use you. And then you continue to spiral away with kind of monopolistic dominance in the way that Google and Amazon has is this the general gist, Tim or do you have some color that you wanna throw on that in terms of adding some detailer luster to that general idea, but playbook for enterprise software of with this would be piggyback on an existing behavior. Existing application aren't in trying to get new markets to go. So instead of doing away with that salesperson ride on top with personality today. For example, hence the plug into Email or SIS dot com. Learn from that provided that you've instrumentation set up to see what win cases that you want to reinforce and nowadays all businesses done via digital EMA what you're gonna tracking pixels engagement checks all that kind of stuff. So that you have a feedback loop. And so you can be able to instrument and be able to analyze analytics on what the positive conditions. Are you want to train for and then if you have an of corpus of data in this case millions of emails go today? Right. And then as you're Dopp did as this plug in onto those enterprise applications system learns on top of it and rides benefits by seeing not just the emails in the workflow of the employees when the same corporation, but of employees across all corporations in that's where you as that. They I plan or better CRM enterprise, plus a start if you will is learning across all the clients and getting machine better and better at that specific function this could use case because it's well defined area. It's an existing application tends to. Follow a specific workflow? And therefore, the problem is usually constrained pretty well in terms of drinking all the information. Of course, maybe some of that is more transferable than others to other scenarios. But at least it makes you more broadly capable my thought is here. Tim and tell me if we're on the same page, you take a company like inside sales who may be their goal is to score leads and prompt sales people to do the right kind of reach out to those leads to get them to convert if they work with a bunch of insurance sales people and a bunch of enterprise software sales people and a bunch of I don't know people that sell wholesale fro juice. I have no idea. I'm just making stuff up here that doesn't necessarily make them any better at working with cardio ships. But if they drink in a lot of car dealerships may be does might my thought is that when we drink in examples across sectors across industries across behavior patterns in functions can map, those clustered example. So if you're a new car dealership using inside sales, hopefully, they're not taking the produce wholesale. Practices for lead scoring Email templates handing the to you. They're taking the car one. So I almost see it as clusters of competence. You you talked about this layer on top of a behavior that you would layer. And then you would kind of find those those clusters of use cases clusters of industries clusters of functions. And then those would train similar instances that come in as opposed to kind of again, the produce two cars thing, I don't know if you have a better way explaining that or additional detail there. That's correct part of if you see enough, you know, top the south sales people in that vertical and see their lingo or whatnot. You could probably train offer bat. Right. I know what language in what works for that, particular domain. I think bigger productivity boost here is how you mentioned. Okay lead scoring. And then you knowledge that person go do this. The next step is do it for them. And so that's the big productivity gain. Here is eventually is just look right all my sales emails for me to everybody the whole world period done. And so give crude example, but I'm a musician. And if I had enough pieces of data that could feed into. Machine as ten talk about this than they would kind of know stylistically, you know, my fingerprint music is they say, okay, go do analyze the Beatles. And then go mashed up in go, right? Every possible piece of music. I would do if I remember the Beatles. And then to sift through the most interesting examples or something claim authorship done, but it's so we're moving from systems of record, which are just tools, which all fiction on the worker to do. Then you shift assistance engagement than we've got more systems of insights scoring analytics, but the next is systems of just the automated workflow automation there where it's sort of, you know, help me do it. Tell me what to do in do it for me. I see this still being future. Here can where you have a system that automatically writes, your sales emails, and I have a system to automatically reply to inbound sales emails eat out in the world kind of operates like that in our calendars chock-full. But maybe that's a good thing. You know, for certain kinds of use cases. Maybe that's a good thing. But you're about talk to my bottom. We'll. Figured out. Hey, man, exactly. If only we could have done that with this interview that would have been better than having a goal through the trans tech conference or something became which I want to bring that upward entering era. Even media can get updated had been done away with we've got robo news writers, but with the fake video generation technology. I don't know if you've seen some of the articles demos out that rightly so imagine I could give video blogs in every language said the machine generated for me. A man. Well, did this is I mean, you saw that Chinese news anchor simulated news anchor. I frankly think I spoke about this for INTERPOL in terms of law enforcement implications. Actually, speaking about this for the United Nations Shanghai in like three weeks, this whole programmatic generated content deal back in the day. Tim images in video used to be artifacts of things that actually happened and to shift that within twelve eighteen months from they used to artifacts of things that happened to they are whatever we want them to be leaves people ingesting media in a very wacky and wild place. I think the social implications of that would have to be their own podcast, but let it be known audience that Tim will agree that that's free disruptive stuff. So I mean, we could fly into a little bit more detail here, Tim because I like where you're going in terms of these verticals. It sounds like is the ballgame to image. Those different phases initially. We're having human label everything maybe we're giving them little hints about what to do. Then the system starts to prop. Humans and maybe give them. Hey, you have this sale. This Email you can send to this person pick one of these two or three variance because we think these are gonna work, and then you get to an even deeper level with that E mail already went out at eight oh five in the morning. And it sounds exactly like you in. It's completely unique template, and you never even touched it. So we're going to go through those phases is the point to get to a place where one company whoever you are whatever layer you become you become the layer that meshes with the behavior in the world. And you get so many instances that of that paver that your solution now is better trained more capable than any other out of the box. Solution would be the people have to basically go to you because you're snowball of machine learning improving outcomes ease of serve us is rolling so much faster than everybody else that there's really nothing left to do. But kind of at least monopolize your slice. I'm not saying you'd become standard oil receiving you'd monopolize your slice. Your use case is this sort of what a lot of these firms are shooting for here. I believe so for step is. Can I make my workers smarter or just more productivity by automating? Take more things to play or doing things for them. A better way in that workflow what I do under the will that lead to an escalating arms race of these. Let's call the missing lots if he will. So if I have sales bots, that know exactly the language to give me to open it. But then I now have a sales defense bought which is screening all the inbound ones in and this ongoing cat and mouse game of enac whose attention they need Zach same analogy applies to programmatic advertising the exact analogy. Applies to in some ways applies to even programmatic trading. I think he gets a world where it's table stakes to use these tools, and then it's table stakes use these tools against these tools survived him fingers crossed. So it sounds like I'm going to clarify one detail before we wrap up on this interview. Because you've actually brought out a bit of nuance on this dynamic that I haven't heard before that I really liked you talked about identifying existing behavior in it sounds like you see the entry point here in many cases as. Looking at the workflows, very common important workflows in a business that already happened not reinventing the wheel but saying, okay? Can we take what's are happening? There can we plug ourselves in as valve that kind of drinks in those sets of activities in a little bit of value to them until the point comes where that little valve is one hundred percent optimize better than any human. Could. Do it is that good mental way of thinking through these kind of AI application areas is that a a lens through which sort of good start-up ideas might be generated is that kind of what you were touching on. Just wanna make sure I'm not showing your ideas correctly. It is this has to do with in the startup world. You have reminded time and money end your biggest bottleneck is go to market strategy. And so if you have to evangelize or paint pictures of what could be done with ambition learning as a platformer general will you will run out of money. And so again back to behavior change instead of a whole new fangled workflow. It's easier to say, look you already use Sierra marketing automation here all your are lying metro success. What if I can double triple tax that? Now, what if I can get you more productivity cost savings on the already do. It's an easier sales pitch. And that's the flaw of the frustration of AI machine. Learning startups where they'd come with general toolkit and say, I do stuff. Wait. What can I do for you the customers responsible Inc? Stairs. I don't know. What can you do for me one hundred percent? And we we still see that Tim. I mean companies raise forty sixty million dollars and you go in their website. And the use case list is three page scrolls, because they still haven't exactly you know, they got a lot of smart people. They went out they went to really good schools. But they they don't know exactly what they map onto to make money for people. They just know that machine learning models could be used for these eighteen things they haven't been able to maybe speak the lingo of individual sector and make it click. I certainly hope that more of that happens on hopefully this lesson. It's almost a bit of a conservative lesson in some way. But hopefully, this lesson translates a we didn't get to get into it because we're running out of time here, but translates to the energy. World where enterprises don't wanna have to evangelize internally. They just wanna layer a smarter capability on top of what's already going on to be able to kind of bring AI to life. I imagine a similar lesson team in closing when it just double check on your thoughts on this. But similar lesson might apply to businesses who were saying, how do we bring AI internal sounds like you might have to go the same route. You might have to see what's already happening. Make it seamless. Make it add value off the cuff and don't need to convince your whole darn employees ship here that AI is the future. And you should do these newfangled things grip on the big musically. Mentioning is probably already had a giant pools proprietary data shows that nobody has taken the time to mind through sift or know how to and that's what you can gauge startup or specialist to come in. And do that. It's sort of like, I had this backyard full of stuff. I know there's jewels on nor to look can you go prospecting for me young one hundred percent. And I think a lot of startups are getting their first foot in the door for sales UC as much of this as I do Tim it in this very consultative method where honestly the company's bringing them in because they know is a big deal. But they don't know what the. Heck it is. And they're sort of like, you know, almost sometimes they're just frankly kind of mooching for the expertise. But sometimes they wanna bring him in proof that they're smart see if they can talk shop to make it click with the business case and then potentially by their newfangled solution. So I think start ups are gonna selling to the enterprise, anyway, we're gonna have to suck up the fact that that's that's a part of their reality right now. So anyway, that's it that we have for time here, Jim. But I sincerely appreciate you being able to share some your thoughts here on in industry. This has been great thanks for your time questioning. Thank you. That's all for this episode on the I industry podcast re-explore, the applications and implications of AI in your business or industry when it comes to those benefits of real insight in terms of artificial intelligence applications in business. This show is really just the tip of the iceberg. A and industry is produced by tech emergence over at tech emergence dot com. You can find actionable industry specific coverage, including case studies, unique market research with charts and graphs and regular coverage of the applications of both the hottest startups here in the bay area as well as what fortune five hundred companies doing with AI today. Everything from marketing and advertising business intelligence to specific industries like finance in healthcare. You can stay ahead of the curve and stay on the right side of disruption by visiting tech emergence dot com when you're there make sure to sign up for our weekly newsletter on the left hand side of the page on most of our podcast listeners. Get the episodes. To their inbox. Every week. You'll be joining tens of thousands of other business leaders who join us from all over the world to stay ahead of the curve of AI in their specific industry. So that's tech emerges dot com. I'm Dan for Gela. This is a an industry. We'll catch you next week.

AI Tim Chang Gela Google AI Amazon California Nicole Frey Mayfield fund Menlo Park tinware partner Seattle INTERPOL
What We Know About The California Wildfires

1A

35:24 min | Last month

What We Know About The California Wildfires

"This is one A. I'm Jen. Widen. Washington. Firefighters, California continue to battle the wildfires burning across the state cooler temperatures. This weekend helped fire crews make some progress controlling the blazes but strong winds hot weather expected to return this week conditions that could increase the spread of fires. Over one point, six, million acres have burned. There are seven confirmed fatalities and the fire is having a devastating effect on Air Quality David Ray from Santa Cruz California just addressing the fires got out here your qualities just been hell and never experienced anything like it and compounded with the cove it and not being able to send the kids at school. It's really quiet A. A Juggling Act. But we're so grateful to all the firemen who are working so hard to bring clean air and safety back to our community. Joining us now with the latest from Menlo Park California is Rachel Meyer. Oh she's a senior editor for Kiki Dee's Silicon Valley News Desk Rachel welcome to one A.. Thanks so much also with us as Daniels Swain, he's a climate scientists at Ucla's Institute of the Environment and Sustainability Daniel it's good to have you with us. Thanks for having me I WANNA start with a clip from governor, Gavin, newsom who addressed the wildfires at a press conference. Last week, we're deploying every resource at our disposal every resource. That we have within the state and you'll see in a moment, some the resources we pulled out of state into California to battle these stork wildfires put it in perspective I say historic I, mean with purpose intention this considerate last year at this stage this date last year in two, thousand, nineteen, we had forty, two, hundred and ninety two wildfires in the state of California bird about fifty, six, thousand acres. Today. Thousand Wildfires seven thousand and to Bernie. Now, north of one point, four, million acres. And now that numbers increased to over one point, six, million acres Rachel, these fires have been burning since the middle of August concentrated in central Northern California help us better understand where things stand right now. Well things. Things are getting better as we'll. We'll hear Daniel's say, I'm sure in the sense that at least containment is growing firefighters. have. Gained more people and Resources really from all over the world is as we get. Specialists coming in to help us fight these fires. The one that's closest to me the CEESAY you lightning complex, which basically means it's not one wildfire. It's a bunch of wildfires. Is already near you know it's it's blown past forty percent containment. So that means that that basically firefighters have managed to get a ring around the area more or less and and. Also, there's start what's called mopping up, which is you know tamp down the fires that are located within that region, but it's a giant region, and as you just said, you know High temperatures again, this weekend and this is all about what Mother Nature serves up because all we can do is react at this point at this point in the -mergency. What's the total damage so far? Oh, Gosh well. We've we've lost hundreds of homes. There are tens of thousands of people who were evacuated. Who some of whom are coming back to charred ruins some of whom are just coming back to streets the the been cleared of damage trees that are likely to fall over hopefully have been restrung with new utility lines. And a lot of folks who are going to be talking to the their fire insurance provider about getting made whole at least temporarily, and we know there have been seven fatalities confirmed. Do we know about other injuries so far? You know I can't speak off the top of my head to the specifics of the injuries, but this is a tough and dirty business that involves. A. Lot of as many of our national listeners will have heard a lot of inmate firefighters who are often doing. The hard work of. What's Being part of what are called hand crews where they`re They're little to create firebreaks. Over which a wildfire will not pass this is steep and mountainous rain. It's it's dangerous to be on a lot of these roads for the reasons that engine damage trees downed power lines. And so yeah, you expect expecting to hear about injuries. Even, though the these crews are constantly urged to stay safe to aim alert to not place in every time they're out there but many of them have been working. Huge, long shifts, day. After Day perhaps, you've even seen photographs of firefighters on break literally sleeping on streets they just lie down where they are and go to sleep because it's that level of physical exhaustion fighting these fires. We'll hear from a formerly incarcerated firefighter a little later in the show but meanwhile one listener tweets, I'm an AP reporter covering the fires covered fires for AP for more than twenty years. But this last week has had some very strange and unique situations primarily the lack of firefighters available on the scene it's been baffling to watch entire homes go up with no help in sight we also heard from another California resident about how they're doing right now let's take a listen. Hi My name is stage and I live in Santa Cruz California and it's pretty scary and insane here. So far about six hundred structures that we know of have burned, but they really have just begun to search the areas. Seventy seven thousand people have been evacuated. People are displaced and it looks like weeks to months before they will be able to return safely to their home. The community is pulling together in the most beautiful ways I've ever seen. Not only the firefighters amazing but the community is. Pouring in with donations, offering places to stay hosting pets and animals the donation centers are overflowing. But the need is very great and it's very scary. Sage thinks we're leaving us that message in please stay safe Rachel evacuation orders and warnings have been lifted in certain areas but she said tens of thousands of residents remain displaced talk about the toll on the communities that have been hit hardest. Oh, Gosh you know especially I'm speaking again of of the CGU lightning complex fires that have been burning in San Mateo County Santa Cruz County along the coast There are a lot of small towns love small towns tucked up into. Into, the mountain territory, small roads, which is why happy to say an awful lot of people left early didn't wait for the firefighters to come pounding on the door. Because you know we're all veterans of this and also we all watched. The Campfire in Paradise California where too many people tried to get out too late. You can't outrun. You can't out drive these fires that these small towns that are filled with you know little cabins it's it's the wildland interface that so many Californians cherish and the problem with that of course is is that if your house is surrounded by trees, perhaps your house is is made of. Primarily would a you're you're at terrific risk and so many many people may not have the money to rebuild many people may not have the money to buy a new house was destroyed This is an area that is somewhat proximate to. Suburban silicon. And what we've seen in recent years is. Housing prices and rent rent prices skyrocketing, and this area has kind of become a suburb for Silicon Valley. which which means that you know a lot of locals may not be able to return. Nearly, fourteen thousand lightning strikes have hit central northern California over the last two weeks. Explain a little bit more about that in some of the other factors that have led to these record-breaking wildfires this season. That's right the proximal cause of the the ignition of a lot of these numerous fires that are still burning. In northern and central California was the occurrence of. As you say ten thousand lightning strikes that occurred really just over the course of a forty eight hour period and while that might not be so unusual in some parts of the world in coastal California in summer. That's an exceptionally rare event. That's something that might only happen every twenty years or so. So the lightning event itself. Was Newsworthy unfortunately, the antecedent conditions that it coincided with. This essentially occurred in the middle of record breaking very prolonged heat wave across California. and was also preceded by an extremely dry winter in northern California and in the broader long-term context is sort of occurs in this era of climate, warming and intensification of wildfire risk in this part of the world, all of these things unfortunately sort of stacked on top of each other and led to what is still a pretty serious situation throughout a pretty significant part of California and explain a little bit more about the specific weather conditions that lead to these lightning strikes. What happened about two a little over two weeks ago was that there was already a large heatwave ongoing. So temperatures were well above average regaining essentially record levels, many places. At that time a plume of atmospheric moisture emanating from a sort of a decaying tropical cyclone over the eastern. Pacific. Ocean manage to somewhat coincidentally get caught up in a wind pattern that favored the flow from the tropics toward California and that brought just enough moisture to produce these clouds that produce the lightning. So to produce those thunderstorms but unfortunately, not enough moisture to produce a meaningful amount of rain coming from those thunderstorms. So effectively, what happened is you've got what are known as dry thunderstorms so you get the lightning and the wind. Essentially, without more than just some sprinkles at ground level. So that sort of the worst case scenario for igniting a bunch of wildfires, the vegetation is extremely dry as it was, and you add in a bunch of lightning strikes and then some wind to stoke the flames That's that's a recipe for disaster. Well, you and a team of researchers published a study earlier this year and found that quote the number of days with extreme fire weather during the offseason has more than doubled since the late nineteen seventies and quote what's changed. So drastically over the four decades or so. Well mainly we live in a warmer climate than than we did four decades ago, and while our paper was focused on autumn, Fire California, which is amazingly still yet to come this year our colleagues essentially found some very similar. Results for the summer season. So the same thing really does apply to fires. We're seeing right now in in August towards the end of summer. And really what's going on is the link between warming and climate change in wildfire risk in California and really between climate change and wildfire risk in other places. define link is through the dryness of vegetation. So essentially as the climate warms. And the temperatures increase even if it's seemingly incremental by say, just a couple of degrees on average. That, sustained warming is not just occurring during the big heat ways. It's occurring all of the time at night in the spring when it's nice and cool outside it's still a couple of degrees warmer than it would have been otherwise, and so that accumulated warmth over months and years acts essentially to dry out the vegetation by causing more operation. There's less water available in the soil, which is then. Available to plants than there would have been a given a certain amount of precipitation that falls in the region, and so this warming causes more evaporation. There's less moisture available for two plants and that vegetation which is fuel for wildfire becomes drier. Now, in California vegetation, this time of year is essentially always dry enough to burn. There are wildfires every year in California in summer and autumn. That's the. Way It has always been in the way it always will be, but there is a gradient it does actually matter how dry that vegetation is in terms of how the fires themselves behave, and if the vegetation is drier, those fires are going to behave more extremely burned more intensely be more difficult to control in sort of deviate from what their natural intrinsic intensity would have been an. Unaltered environment which which is to say instead of burning at low to moderate intensity there, all of these fires are burning very intensely because of how dry the vegetation station is, which is in turn product of how warm it has been in the long term. So climate change is a major factor in why these fires are becoming harder to control will things just keep getting worse or is this reversible? Whether there's a couple of of important considerations there. One is that from from a climate change perspective unfortunately, we do expect the situation to continue to get worse before it gets better because. Even under relatively optimistic scenarios for future carbon emissions and the future amount of global warming there will still be some additional amount of global warming we have not plateaued. This, it's this. This is not the the end state of warming. We are still continuing to get warmer and right now our carbon emissions actually tells us through continuing to get warmer pretty quickly. So to the extent that wildfire is related to that warming and we have shown that it is especially in places like California, that part of the problem is unfortunately going to continue to get worse before it gets better when it will get better might be one our climate warming finally stabilizes but there are a couple of other factors that are important to in addition to climate change unfccc in places like California. Not only has is the climate different than it used to be in a way that increases the risk of extreme fire activity but a whole confluence of other factors are also amplifying that situation. You have a lot of people as we heard in the introduction who have now moved into high risk fire zones fifty or sixty years ago there were a lot fewer people living in these regions. So the the exposure, the number of people who have homes potentially in harm's way you might have to. Flee in the middle of the night from wildfire has increased over time, and there's also in certain ecosystems in certain parts of California. The legacy of twentieth century, a forest management and fire suppression policies for the better part of the last century the policy in many of the forested regions in California was to essentially extinguish all fires immediately and as soon as possible. And that disrupted the natural. Fires team in these regions to the extent that resulted in accumulation of overly dense forest, unnaturally dense forest vegetation, which has in those types of ecosystems has made the situation worse by providing much higher. Fuel density if you will than would otherwise have been the case and so all of these things are acting together. The forest fire suppression aspect of this is, of course, only relevant in forests and many of California's wildfires are in fact, not forest fires. So that's sort of limited in its geographic relevance. Same is true of the people moving into the what's known as the wildland urban interface it's widespread, but it's only happening in certain places on top of that climate change is even more pervasive and acting to multiply the effect of the other two. We're talking to Daniel Swain a climate scientist at Ucla Institute the Environment and Sustainability and Rachel myrow a senior editor for K. Q. Kiwi Dis Silicon Valley News desk discussing the latest on the wildfires in California coming up. We'll hear from the California Department forestry and fire protection about how they're containing the fires including the role incarcerated firefighters play in those efforts. I'm JEN white you're listening to one eight. Do, you talk about the news with your friends, your family or maybe perfect strangers. You can get all the facts you need to be up to speed on this busy news cycle on the one news roundup find the podcast in your feet every Friday. Guy Rise and on NPR's how I built this how a simple splash of color accidentally launched Sandy Chile into a forty year career as a designer entrepreneur and creator of the now famous chiller which place mat subscriber listen now. Let's get back our conversation about California wildfires with Rachel Miro a senior editor for Kiki, Dee Silicon Valley News Desk and Daniel Swain. A climate scientist at UCLA's Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, and I want to bring another voice into the conversation joining us now from Sacramento is Bryce Bennett a public information officer for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection also known as cal fire Bryce. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me talk about the last two weeks in terms of cal fire's tact it's for containing these fires would have some of the biggest challenge has been. Just. The sheer volume an absolutely extraordinary situation that Mother Nature. With. Nearly fourteen thousand lightning strikes that had little or no rain, and that creates a phenomenal situation. Last time. We saw something like this occur even. Remotely close to two thousand. Eight. But because of the dry vegetation already being summertime, those lightning strikes coming without precipitation. We just about had. Fourteen thousand fires so it grew fires that we couldn't contain immediately We got eight hundred about eight, hundred, seventy, five fires that we needed to respond to. Spend extended amount of time on. Fortunately. That numbers down to eighteen major fires complexes to well a member of our TEX clubs sent this message. It's important to bring into the conversation that there is important work to be done to help prevent these mega fires prescribed or controlled burns scientists been out there for years but the will has not been there bryce your thoughts have you all use this tactic to try to. Cut Down on the possibilities of these large outbreaks. Absolutely. The fire services long excluded fire from the natural. Habitat and we excluded for one hundred years. Simply, because of policy was to suppress fires will now working with scientists oncologists, environmentalists. We are doing our very best to reintroduce fire into landscape. It is the most healthy thing to maintain a landscape. It's what Mother Nature has been doing for long which has been around longer than us so. Take Lake Tahoe Basin, for instance. One of the crown jewels of the western United States the Lake Tahoe. Forest is completely overstocked the the the density is phenomenal when. Two three four years ago when the bark beetle was rampant due to six year, seven year exasperated drought. there was major concern that the lake tahoe based ended up looking like Colorado, springs so that really kicked into high gear, what can we do? What can we? How do we protect the Lake Tahoe basin force and and keep them healthy one of those things is reintroducing fire landscape and thinning the forest appropriately. So there was a minimal impact with the bark beetle and Tahoe Basin. They were able to control any of the outbreaks forces healthier. You can drive around the lake in certain places in see the lake. In places that you weren't able to before we're having an easier time suppressing fire. it has a cascading effect when you're when you're helping mother. Nature. The trick is when you're doing controlled are prescribed. Fire is smoke and you have to be educational upfront and work with groups of people that may be sensitive to the smoke and can work with Meteorologist to make sure that the smoke mitigation is the very best can be. So it's not affecting public. Well, Rachel something we haven't talked about is air quality right now smoke has from these current wildfires, his added another major health hazard on top of the pandemic how are we seeing that play out in California? Oh goodness gracious. It's put a lot of people into a catch twenty two where you know on the one hand, we've been told that we need to stay at home where you would most likely be opening your doors and windows especially in northern California where many people do not have air conditioning because we have not needed it until recent years. But then you can't keep the doors and windows open. You have to close them up to keep the smoke from coming into the house where perhaps you have recently purchased an air filter because you need to filter out those toxic particles. A lot of people including myself get smoke migraines. If we take in too much of that stuff. So it's it's really changed what it means to live in California right now and I would say that you know culturally we're experiencing a kind of you know. Apocalyptic anxiety because there's just so many things coming at us. Even if you're not near the wildfire zone, you're you're smelling, you're breathing the smoke filled air. you know there's there's Cova nineteen happening, which of course has many of us locked in our houses. But it's it's. The question begins what's what's next another lightning strike because that's not something as we've been hearing. That our system is designed to cope with. Well Bryce Covid nineteen is presented unique challenges to firefighting efforts. This year I'm incarcerated firefighters make up a significant portion of the cruise, but because many were released early from prison due to the pandemic, less than half of these incarcerated crews were active duty in recent months, talk about the contributions of incarcerated firefighters and the challenges of finding enough people to fight these fire over the last couple of weeks. There there. We couldn't do it without them. We really couldn't the amount of. Personnel and work that. The men women from CDC are hand crews bring to our fires is just absolutely incredible We did have a substantial impact on at the beginning due to covid. Fortunately, there are only two crews currently that are on quarantine. In the numbers are down. This program is voluntary so they have to to volunteer to come into the Fire Camp Program they have to be. Very good behavior they have to it. It's the level fender. And in, it's a phenomenal opportunity for. THEM TO GET OUT LEARN NEW SKILLS PERHAPS Working different environment. and. Just. The number of of people because they're on a hint crew of twelve seventeen or so on their buggies, the work that they can do is just absolutely incredible. We heard only on the. Can actually do fire flood and -mergency response in other cases to what we heard from a formerly incarcerated firefighter Rasheed, Lockhart who was serving his sentence at San. Quentin State Prison in California when he decided to apply to their fire department and here's part of what he told us about the work we were more municipal type fire crew. We responded to calls within the prison as well as two calls on the grounds, of Saint. Quentin. And so we responded to things like structure fires and grass fires and medical emergencies in that area you know we didn't get the opportunity to go out and find these wildland fires that are happening right now but we did train every season for the fires. Case. We were called out then also because there was opportunity for there to be. wildland fires around our area, and so we always wanted to be ready to go and they training his heart and these guys and women whatever they want to identify. That are at these camps fighting these fires right now, they are a group of people that are extraordinary. She'd said that for him and many formerly incarcerated people he knows fighting fires is so much more than a job, but then it also comes at a cost. If we take a kid who you know is twenty five years old and he comes from the environment of you know gangs drugs, every part of the broken system that you can think of and community that you can think of, and he does a five year term but there for the last two years somehow gets. This great opportunity to apply for fire cap goes to fire camp is able to to complete his PF t training and get his shirts and his able to go out and fight these fires that individual now is going to gain a sense of purpose, right? He's going to gain a sense of value. He's going to gain a sense of camaraderie that's going to be unlike anything that he's ever been a part of because that's what this firefighting does. It gives you all that. And now you're GONNA ask him to go fight these fires for dollar an hour, which at that time is going to be appealing because while you're incarcerated, you know the thought of maybe. A dollar an hour is like you know I'm going to buy Mercedes you know it's considered to be good money like even within Saint Quentin where I was elite engineer on a type one fire in elite on an ambulance crew and we were on call twenty, four seven. Right we get caught in the middle of the night all through the day and we would only get paid for. Five days of the week for eight hours a day. But it's the opportunity to be a part of the value part of their purpose part of that Camaraderie. that. Makes you forget about that. Only. Where sheet is calling for incarcerated firefighters to be recognized for their contributions with higher pay and the opportunity to become career firefighters when they're released from prison why can't our service in our time while in these camps in in these firehouses be our academy right? We're doing the same things that these firefighters are doing working alongside them and we are protecting life and property together. Why? Can't this be art academy so that's what we want. We want to change in that way we won equality in pay and the opportunities afforded to everybody else who've out there in the free world you know firefighting has had an impact on me and many people behind me currently incarcerated that would love to continue firefighting and give an opportunity they would more than willingly step into that role. So that way, we don't have to hear in the future we lack manpower we lack resources. We'll talk more about the movement surrounding formerly incarcerated firefighters after a quick break stay close. This is one a. from W. Amu and NPR. The way things are going right now even if you can keep track of what's happening in the news, it's hard to know why it's happening. What it really means. That's why we have created a daily podcast that answers your questions about the news in about ten minutes. Every weekday it's called consider this new episodes every weekday afternoon from. NPR. This is one A. we're talking about the raging wildfires in California and before the break we heard from Rasheed Lockhart, a firefighter who was formerly incarcerated dub racers growing movement for people like where she to have equal pay and a pathway to a career in firefighting once they're released, what's CAL fire position on these issues? Cadwell cal fire long since utilize can't program as a training ground to provide individuals with these these different certifications in the opportunity to learn. This crap this trade and fire behavior and understand it and be trained to the same level. And wildland firefighting as a seasonal firefighter, and because of that, come out of the rehabilitation system into the workforce and do have an opportunity to come work. On a fire engine within the CAL fire system, they can also find work within the federal system on on the Usda Han crews and I have worked alongside them many times in my career on fire engines and he's right. They love the opportunity they come to work with the same level of passion. And the desire to help people and they have a phenomenal work ethic and I loved it I think it's a wonderful program and anyone who comes through it. That's successful. It's a great story but Rachel, currently in the state of California having a criminal record pars formerly incarcerated people from getting an emt license which is required for full time work as a firefighter in the state. Is there any push to change that? There is indeed an actually a Sunday night bill was moved from the state legislature to the governor's desk. He's got a month to decide on A. Twenty one, forty, seven, by Assemblywoman, Louise's Gomez Ray is from San Bernardino. This would allow people who have trained at fire camps in prison to have their criminal records more quickly expunged upon release, and it's really those criminal records that that often prevent workers from becoming from from joining city and county agencies. And you know it's a shame because really when you think about it, right. This is a fabulous opportunity for somebody who who's got the the the guts, the bravery and the skills to help us fight fires. Currently being barred from doing so except on a volunteer basis. and. Here's an opportunity to build a new life outside of prison with a great paying job and a sense of mission. So presuming the the governor. Signs this bill in the next month there there is a chance the story could change well Daniel as the wildfire season continues into the fall. How should? How should we be thinking about how best to? Control the spread of these fires even as we expect more of them as a result of climate change. I think I guess there's two parts to that question. One of which is is relates to what's next in the short term in the weeks and a couple of months to come. In in coastal California the peak of fire season often doesn't even come until autumn, and that's because we tend to see these strong and dry offshore winds known locally as the Santa Anna Winds in southern California or the Diablo wins closer to the San Francisco area. These hot dry autumn winds are often the winds that push some of California's largest fastest moving in most dangerous wildfires. From from inland areas towards the coast at this time of year. So we're sitting right now at a season where suddenly we've already seen about as many acres burned To date this year as we have. In the worst fire seasons of the past several decades, we only got about a minute here. Daniel. Okay and so so the worst this season, maybe it to come in the long run as climate change continues in these other risk factors are remain elevated. One of the great solutions that we is sort of what we just heard about, which is allowing more fire on the landscape, and while there's been some progress towards more prescribed fire more managed fire I think the reality is we're going to have to embrace that a much larger scale and realize that not all fire is bad is just bad when we have fires that do what they've done recently, which is burned homes in kill people and spread rapidly and uncontrollably, but the notion. That, we probably will be seeing more fire on the landscape, but we would rather see it in a more controlled low to moderate intensity form. Moving, forward I think is one of the key. Key solutions out there. That's Daniel Swain a climate scientist at UCLA's Institute of the Environment and sustainability also with us. Rachel. Myra editor for Achey DIS Silicon Valley News desk and Bryce. Bennett public information. Officer for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection also known as cal fire Rachel Daniel Brian. Thanks so much for your time. Remember we have a tax club lonely ever send you one tax today. It's the fastest way to connect with US details. About, how to sign up can be found in the ask one tab at the one eight dot org. This conversation was produced by Katherine. Think. Edited by. Matthew Simon Senate to learn more about them in the rest of the team visit the one eight dot org. This program comes to you from W. A. M. U. Part of American University in Washington distributed by NPR. I'm Jen white thanks so much for listening. Let's talk again tomorrow. This is one eight.

California Rachel California Department of Fores Daniel Swain Santa Cruz California Silicon Valley News NPR Washington United States Menlo Park California Northern California Paradise California Kiki Dee Bryce Bennett JEN white senior editor San Daniels Swain Lake Tahoe Basin
Electric Chair | The War Becomes Electric  | 2

American Innovations

43:34 min | 1 year ago

Electric Chair | The War Becomes Electric | 2

"This episode of American innovations contain some descriptions of animal cruelty and is not suitable for everyone please be advised. Its may sixteenth eighteen eighty eight at an auditor logical gauntlet directed squarely at Thomas Edison Edison growing electrical empire is based exclusively on direct current and although Edison convince people to give it a chance but unlike his former boss Thomas Edison promoting himself to the press is not Tesla's idea of a good time address the American Institute of Electrical Engineers about the power and potential of his alternating current system over the last year he's gone from digging riches to attracting investors to securing patents for his breakthrough system this technology works and it works well now Tesla just needs is well aware of DC's inferiority to AC he has endeavoured to hide that fact at all costs Hessler continues I will show that means of alternate currents which I'm confident will at once establish its superior adaptability engineers in the audience are not well versed in the mechanics for the future of AC this has to go well Hessler settled his nerves and steps onto the stage alternate currents will commend themselves as a more efficient application of electrical energy and now I give you the alternating current motor and I give you tesla walks over to the large gleaming AC motors on the stage as he explains in great detail how is system works members of the audience seen anything like it the institute's vice-president Cornell University Physics Professor William Anthony Jumps on stage next to Tesla correct me if I'm wrong Mr Tesla urban his groundbreaking. AC Motor Hesse speech is published in every major electrical journal read by thousands of the countries leading engineers that includes that many results heretofore unattainable can be reached by ultimate current use results which cannot be accomplished by means of direct currents good evening gentlemen the subject which I now have the pleasure bringing to your notice is a novel system of electric distribution and transmission of power by you the future Tesla flicks switch as the motors World Tesla switches them on and off reversing direction in the blink of an eye no one's into not it's all making sense to the Engineers Tesla takes a final stab at Edison so as you can see gentlemen it's obvious that unfortunately he's had some help the editor of Electrical World Magazine has become a fan of tassell innovations he's published stories about the brilliance of the AC Induction Motor racy very few people are what they do understand is that when Tesla claims AC has superior adaptability is actually throwing text you're and tonight is convinced Tesla to debut his work for this gathering of influential engineers it's a crucial PR move there's any hope this motor is the first good alternating current motor that has been put before the public anywhere you are correct sir some in the crowd are filled with that Morais chion while some are flat out jealous but they all recognize the revolutionary display. They've just witnessed overnight industry is buzzing about this ingenious the man who will provide tesla with the faith and the finances to take on the reigning King of Electricity and shift the current wars into high gear unlimited two percent cashback on all of your business purchases think about it unlimited two percent cashback on everything you buy for your business that cash back can add up to thousands of dollars which you can reinvest back into your business so you can keep growing imagine what unlimited two percent cashback could support for American innovation comes from capital one with the spark cashcard from capital one you earn that man is George Westinghouse and because of him things are about to get bloody of corrupt robber barons like Tessa stood well over six feet tall in a time when the average man was five foot nine when he walked into a room you noticed nations I'm Steven Johnson George Westinghouse kesslers future partner was a charming persuasive Titan of industry with a reputation for honesty and a world means necessary eighteen eighty seven was not a good year for Thomas You for your business learn more at capital one dot com what's in your wallet from wondering this is American innovate scattered throughout the country Westinghouse was starting to encroach on his territory at first Westinghouse had focused on less populous rural areas that Edison's power transformers on either end of the transmission the current could be stepped up and down coming and going in between the high voltage allowed. AC to travel thousands about electrifying his Pittsburgh Mansion Edison had given them a tour of his Menlo Park Lab Westinghouse came away transformed he saw the grand possibilities westinghouse was also a gifted inventor who made his first fortune creating lifesaving air brakes for trains in the early eighteen eighties Westinghouse had approached Thomas Edison sits in Buffalo New York word of these triumphs traveled fast in the coming months Westinghouse sold contracts twenty seven more electrical plants in the south the electrical revolution both to mankind and to his own empire even recruited one of Edison's most promising engineers to build him his own DC miles westinghouse was all over the following year he founded the Westinghouse Electric Company and successfully brought AC systems to great Barrington Massachusetts we started selling his generators to another ARC light company to power their own plans Edison was still the dominant force `electricity it forty percent more station doc westinghouse quickly realized the severe limitations of direct current specifically that the system could not transmit more than a half mile without a generating plant. It feels like an open call for war so Edison's Louisiana Manager. Wt Macho travels to New York to report the situation to the boss couldn't reach but now he was offering his alternating current in cities going nose to nose with the pack leader when Westinghouse opens an AC plant in New Orleans sleep on their dammit that's my territory we've had a plant there for over a year right in the heart of town that's part of the problem just can't get power out to the smaller community have to come up with a way to meet demand or or what the noth- nothing good now get out mark my words it'll kill a customer within six months I want people were running in fear from Westinghouse and his damn current very well Tom but still we're going to Edison was getting desperate you refuse to accept what seemed so obvious particularly to his own staff DC power was not the most practical current more than a competition this was an invasion of its territory a blow to his ego this was personal and he dedicated himself to crushing Westinghouse Westinghouse ever expanding market share wasn't the only thing sticking Edison's Cross Edison knew he had to lengthen the transmission capabilities of DC power spitting distance from a Mississippi swamp anxious letters from Edison employees stationed around the country were streaming into headquarters in New York as one field salesman northeast at first Edison had scoffed at his rival the now with Westinghouse establishing plants across the country things that changed for Edison this was episode after just twelve months and business westinghouse had grown faster than anyone could have expected he had contracts for nearly seventy of his ABC stations and for taking out his rival but what this devious plan would be exactly that was the question in November his answer arrived in an envelope in one thousand nine hundred five Westinghouse read about something that seemed to offer a solution to the DC problem it was an AC electrical system on display in London using out there is an enormous pressure everywhere I system to cover distances are we going to sit still and be called old fashioned fossils let the other fellows get a lot of the apparatus connected to an AC ARC light cable southwick was convinced that electrocution was the ultimate replacement for the hangman's noose for decades aimed at genuine the reality was that he simply had too much invested in direct current tobacco down converting his existing DC systems would cost millions in rabbit from Buffalo. UN folded the crisp letterhead imprinted with AP Southwick MD s and read the two page letter handwritten in a strong World Westinghouse's AC was affordable efficient and readily available whether a customer lived Ritzy Manhattan apartment or shotgun shacks they live listen to me mantra. We need to squash this idea that he's gaining on us. I want our annual report to play up the dangers of AC that it that it can't be trusted cents to seventeen cents a pound copper was crucial in the burgeoning world of the industrial age it was used and Trolleys Telegraph and of course entry anew and threaten his reputation which was something Thomas Edison would not entertain if he couldn't win the war on merit he was not above a less noble clan meaning Edison's DC power alternating current needed copper as well but only a fraction of what he needed was a major handicap for the Edison Light Company danced society hanging rarely worked as intended by the late eighteen hundreds horrendous cases of men slowly strangling or heads literally being ripped off a steadfast death penalty supporter to put together a commission to examine different models of execution may of eighteen eighty six the legislature approved the there'd been a growing anti hanging movement among progressives clergyman and reformers who felt it was barbaric uncivilized and should not be a part of America's advance. Aw come in Mr Macho all the way from New Orleans what news have you got for me you're not gonNa like Tom Westinghouse's robbing our business pretty bad the building plants every half mile to transmit the current meanwhile westinghouse is funneling his ac out to anyone from a single station in town no matter where the Jeff who while walking home drunk the night before had grabbed the polls of dynamo to steady has step instead it killed him instantly in fact Smith's but the only way to do that was through highly conductive copper wire problem was in one thousand nine hundred seven the price of copper was skyrocketing going from ten executing a condemned man in a humane way southwick began experimenting with the idea he would round up stray dogs and electrocute using a home builder live near Governor David B Hill called for an alternative to the gallows and Southwick saw his opportunity he pushed his friend state Senator Daniel Macmillan so what about hanging for men but electrocution for women Jerry bristles let's not get ahead of ourselves hail so as you both know I sent out a prevention of cruelty to animals I they created a thorough compilation of every means of execution currently in practice around the planet then much to the head-scratching consternation of his forward-thinking staff heat allowed the patent to expire though Edison's concern over the deadly qualities of ACC actress ity was a notion south had been working on for years back in eighteen eighty one he'd been intrigued by a story in the Buffalo Evening News about a man named Lem you'll see inflow southwick explain that he'd recently been appointed to the New York State Deaf Commission was looking for Edison's expert opinion on the best way to kill a human steph was so clean and quick the city coroner admitted that he wouldn't have been able to figure out what it killed him had he not been told to southwick it seemed the perfect solution following year public sentiment was divided some thought hanging was a gruesome but necessary deterrent others were appalled and disgusted in eighteen eighty methods of execution to consider Hale what what do you think we'll obviously some of these will not work for us I mean beating with clubs Dismemberment Very Best Business Istanha Shing thing was that just a year ago in eighteen eighty six edison had purchased a patent for a European AC system when humane how about shoot that's modern I like shooting or blowing from a cannon really on the list Oh yes they've been doing this painless and clean and really what speaks to the modern civilized America more than Electricity Matthew Hale Sips whiskey and ponders the idea classic Dynamo which employs intermittent occurrence most effective of these are known as alternating machines and factured principally by George Westinghouse the cost of maintenance would be a mere trifle the passage of the current from these machines through the human body produces instantaneous death edison wagered that after the electric five want the guillotine forego for the Garrett seven or divided and eder undecided so jerry it sounds like the choices electricity very called the men together in the back room of local pub to discuss their options gentleman it looks like we have forty on the Bush writing what would you consider to be the necessary strength of current to produce death with certainty in all cases and under all circumstances he also off penalty but by the time Celtic wrote to him again Edison had realized that this could be the perfect way to strike back at Westinghouse Edison could ignite chiefs were rampant newspapers published lengthy lurid stories of these dark affairs in eighteen eighty two the New York Times ran fifty reports and forty to the AH crucifixion impalement. Stoning keep all that in the Bible where it belongs this is eighteen eighty six for God's sakes we're looking for something new how Southwick was one of three appointed members along with Attorneys Matthew Hale and share Albridge t jerry a CO founder of the American Society for the I his thoughts on the design of the actual killing device and since dentists use chairs my own opinion is that share outstretched for the purpose with metal arms type of current would be used to carry out its electrical death sentence for Edison to destroy his competitor the state would have to adopt Westinghouse's AC is their chosen in came Tesla after his lecture at the American Institute of Electrical Engineers debuted a workable efficient AC induction motor westinghouse saw his chance report to the legislature stating the most potent agent known for the destruction of human life is electricity and as Edison predicted the report include Klerk touched an arc light wire outside his uncle store and drop dead as after that same thing happened to alignment who's two stories in the air removing giving people get in the way of business and it's an crafted his reply throwing westinghouse firmly under the bus the most suitable apparatus for this purpose is that around the world the race to develop a motor was in full swing and the clock was ticking the rewards would be tremendous if the tesla patents were brought enough to control the alternating motor business than the Westinghouse Electric Company couldn't afford to have others own those patents so he bought for Tesla Westinghouse was a savior Moore campaign against his rival under the guise of innocently fulfilling this official request from the state why let a little thing like his true feelings about exit the wires are attached passing the current across the chest would be sufficient Edison's initial reply was polite but emphasized his opposition to the retreat to the safety of Edison's brand of DC power it was only a matter of time in February of eighteen eighty eight the three-man death commission submitted its it's like a yes but we're going to need some expert advice on how to actually do it I've been experimenting on dogs and I know you have southwick but dogs are not meant the number of widely reported accidental AC electrocutions that have been catching the public's eye in April a fifteen year old Romanian boy who sold pocket combs take hold the future Tesla had five patents pending related to his machine which featured his utterly unique design with no moving parts coming into contact with one force he knew it could be back in New York popular use of alternating current was headed the opposite way death by electricity was now legally in effect got to do this right pick the brain someone who knows electricity I have Thomas Edison in his letter to the great inventor Southwick doesn't beat support his family was skipping happily down Broadway he grabbed a loose telegraph wire dangling after a storm an instantly met his maker weeks later old wires from a tangled mess of the Sidewalk Sixteen Sixteen Broadway men attempting to remove his charred body perceived serious shocks themselves he was rich powerful and dedicated to beating Thomas Edison it was everything Tessa wanted in a benefactor pestle accepted a year long consulting position with West think of execution George Westinghouse new his AC system was the only true contender for America's future the casualties continued and the newspapers aided up as did their readership. The public provided the nudge that the state assembly needed to pass the controversial Lina for three Hundred Years India to it's supposed to be incredibly fast what do you think southwest I'm telling you gents electricity is the way to go its instantaneous questionnaire to experts in law and medicine and I had the results out of two hundred replies hanging eighty seven electric city eight for poison. It's a stupendous name for sanction execution by Electricity Sir but do do you want something you came up with permanently linked with excellent point death by electricity bill on June fourth but there is much more to be done for Edison to actually bring down the Westinghouse company that is needed to persuade the state to announce what are they gonNA hang on frying a man hard to say editors at the New York Times claim the term electric cushion is to monstrous they're suggesting euthanasia rose condemned of capital crimes but questions from me mainly what to call it there was no pre existing word the referred to executing a person with electric chair made its debut Westinghouse's alternating current and his machinery would forever be linked with instant death the public would then cower from AC and aren't choice but Edison's de system had one advantage a motor that ran on DC power many tried to make an AC equivalent with no success orient in New York City Nikola Tesla is standing backstage and he is sweating through his shirt not because of the heat but because tonight he's going either that meant no friction sparks and no combustion was the only practical AC motor on the horizon they see system sprouting up and city taps and in July the eight he boarded a train for Pittsburgh where he would get to focus one hundred percent of his energy on making his AC system the benevolent life ask and sends a well aimed shot into sp attune on the floor for my money. Electric is splendid electro for electricity and MORT for death so they've got electrifies Electric Electric Taffy Foreman Volta Costs and Electric Volta cuss what the Hell only electric not much of a ring to it though not much no the scientific American is compiled a number of names they include my suggestions Oh yes current so the Edison Manhattan offices they started working on one automa- I have the list you wanted no yes so what name Dinah Mark Hamper marked and Electro Mart there on the list Edison's chewing on his usual wad of tobacco he leans back in his chair and puts his feet on his that he did have another idea to tell well in France they use the guillotine kill a man invented by Dr Guillotine so this Volta Costs no idea sir but I took the liberty of consulting expert in Latin and Greek on possibilities and he suggested Electra side that's not bad his name was Harold Pitney Brown Brown was a thirty year old self taught electrician he'd been in the business for a decade installing arc lighting and working for West Turn Electric in Chicago Brown had no personal history with Edison or westinghouse his motivation came from the deaths of fellow electrician's accidentally killed by hi A. C. Voltage he developed a pathological hatred for alternating current and a fevered passion for the cause of execution by electrocution that made Out Their differences to the contrary Edison was about to raise the heat on his Westinghouse smear campaign with help from a man who merged seemingly out of nowhere fatalities caused by direct current in fact it declared we have the glorious record of the Edison low tension system from which there has never been single instance Alfred Southwick look like a yawning hobbyist brown was just the accomplishment Edison needed to carry out his ruthless plans the day after watched as Edison and his team forced dozens of animals onto the sizzling metal where they were instantly electrocuted or Westinghouse as Edison described it became Edison's Goto verb as he stepped up his war against a seapower is next move was nothing short of appalling laundry list of accidental deaths caused by alternating current with sensational titles like when electric light kills a man there's no keeping mum about it killed by a flat and misleading pronouncements meant to put fear into any American considering leading a sea into their lives beyond the animal killings the booklet offered it also listed the shameless individuals who supposedly stolen his ideas and infringed on his patents at the top of that list was George Westinghouse sadly in a booklet entitled a warning from the Edison light company complete with a blood red cover it was eighty four pages of threats venom loss of life from the current employed they went on to Brag about Edison's accomplishments and the alleged superiority in every possible way of DC over ace and last but not least of the great efforts to Deprive Edison of credit and prophet of his Grand Achievements Miss Branch of Applied Electrical Science House Electric Company I have a lively recollection of the pains. You took to show me through your works at Menlo Park and I was in pursuit of a plant for my house and it would be a great pleasure to me rush fooled with lightning how alignment are injured or killed a horse touches a telephone wire and drop stead the booklet somehow neglected to mention good the stunned reporters with great satisfaction to Edison these death displays illustrated just how quickly and effectively. AC electricity could dispatch stray dogs and cats paying twenty five cents per animal using a one thousand volts AC generator attached to a sheet of tin placed on a table you audience while have you should find it convenient to make me a visit here in Pittsburgh and I will be glad to reciprocate attention shown me by you but Edison wasn't interested in working brown proceeded to demand that AC power be restricted to no more than three hundred volts which would make it unusable what Brown was proposing was nothing the New York electrocution bill became law The New York Evening Post published Brown's letter to the editor entitled death in the wires several companies who have more letter to Edison I believe there has been a systematic attempt on the part of some people to do a great deal of mischief and create as great differences possible between the Edison Company and the West too many who witnessed it invited audience of reporters and other observers to his research laboratory in West Orange New Jersey Edison had asked local children to supply him with adjective less forceful than damnable the public must submit to constant danger from sudden death in order corporation May pay a little higher dividend George Westinghouse junior westinghouse was outraged but instead of volleying back in June of eighteen eighty eight he extended an olive branch in the form of is under the influence of companies that stand to gain from outlawing alternating current companies like Addison Brown approached Edison for assistance to counter the attack regard for the Almighty taller than for the safety of the public of adopted the alternating current for incandescent service alternating current can be described by no you're listening to American innovations because you're a lifelong learner I understand I am too less than putting every AC supplier out of business as for Edison's DC power brown considered it perfectly safe the controversy that ensued it's a villainous budget of perversions of fact this man Brown is obviously entirely ignorant electrical knowledge if you ask me Brown locations would soon put AC to the ultimate test but not before George Westinghouse has his say in the matter serving thing and also a way to shock his audience with gruesome display of what electrocuting a living thing looked like the details of the experiments were described dude led to a hearing on July eighteenth drew officials from almost every electrical company in New York including many from the Westinghouse Camp Round was away on business medicine happily offered the use of his West Orange facility putting instruments and staff at Brown's disposal in late July Brown mounted a demonstration at Columbia College as Brown crank the AC voltage and dispatched to cavs and at one thousand two hundred pound Horse Brown had made his point the next morning to nine nine zero zero zero again. That's a free print copy of the economists and all you have to do is text innovations to nine nine after when asked for comment round told a reporter alternating current only belongs in the dog pound the slaughterhouse and the State Prison One of those zero zero zero American innovations is supported by wicks do you have a great idea of your own put it online with wicks dot com. HBO's death by alternating current for the state and taking the recommendation of Alfred Southwick Steph Committee they also chose a chair as the delivery the anger against him from AC forces was huge. I open the floor to comments on the letter of June fifth by Mr Harold Brown on Special Effects Multimedia Galleries and so much more and with twenty four seven support weeks here to help you along the way so wicks gives you the freedom to create a unique website your way take full control of your design without a developer using the intuitive editor or as of human on December fifth reporters members of the Medico Legal Society in Edison himself stood in the New Jersey lab watching American innovations is sponsored in part by just works just works makes it easier to start run and grow business with just works entrepreneurs there's something in the economist for you and right now you can get a free copy for your free print copy economists just text innovations their teams get access to high quality affordable benefits automated payroll compliance support an HR tools all in one simple and intuitive platform not with advanced code capabilities either way your designs will look amazing on any screen ideas evolve and your website can to bring reading the economist is Smart Guide to the forces changing your world so if you're a lifelong learner like me who's never stopped asking questions the New York Times wrote the alternating current will undoubtedly drive the hangman out of business in the state on December Twelfth Medico Legal Society official ten percent off when you're ready to go premium that's Wicks dot com code ai for ten percent off any premium plan he emphasized that he had no financial or commercial interests in the results of the experiments of course his work was fully backed by addison fact that was barely secret and but to sell AC to the Medico Legal Society of New York the decision makers he knew he needed to kill something larger than a dog something closer to the side it just works for yourself learn more at just works dot com slash ai that's just works dot com slash ai love of learning is also why I love reading the Economist The economist is a weekly magazine that offers insight and opinion on international and US news politics in Manhattan where he would electrocute dogs with AC power for all to see he told the crowd is motivation simply concern about the dangers of AC to the public works anytime eleven pm on Sunday New Year's Eve there round the clock support team is standing by so you can run your business with confidence times he denied working for Edison he also challenged Westinghouse to a strange public sideshow Dul Brown would be connected to cable business finance science technology arts and the environment it helps readers like you and me make a little more sense of what's going on in the world around us and it's been doing that house was killing Edison taking the majority of contracts in small towns throughout America Edison simply couldn't compete and these terrible experiments with listen stood to profit considerably if AC was rejected by the greater public anybody who is anybody in the states electrical community showed up for the presentation including warm the mix work easier and more fun to navigate now how's that for innovation with just works you get fast and easy online benefits enrollment by late December eighteen eighty eight George Westinghouse had had enough he was ready to push back publicly at Brown Edison and the industry press after the brutal death of the first dog officers from the ASPCA closed down Brown's verse show row was on a roll for over a hundred and seventy years I personally have been reading the economist since I was in college they just had an extraordinary special issue on climate change that everyone should be click independent as it. It's all going my letter trust me Westinghouse's accusations did indeed rattled Brown's cage in a response published in the New York Geico legal societies decision that AC power his AC power according to Edison was the ultimate and only current for killing in one of his managers Zayn your dream website today with wicks and for listeners of American innovations if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code ai you'll get agenda Edison who still publicly scoffed at any official connection with Brown Edison relished this turn of events is company quickly distributed a Pamphlet Prison Death Chamber there were a number of companies in the US and Europe manufacturing such machines but Brown insisted that they must be made by Westinghouse your site to life with animation parallel scrolling hd videos when you choose wicks you also get one million royalty free photos unlimited Asian that was somehow allowed to Fi- Brown was acting as an appointed representative of the state yet he had no problem with inflicting his own agenda meaning the entitled the deadly parallel highlighting the fact that the state had chosen westinghouse equipment for executions westinghouse was outraged he had no interest in having his discuss their outrage as Westinghouse prepares a lengthy letter the will run in many New York papers George we need to strike back at these people browns claiming four thousand light orders for the entire year we had forty eight thousand in October alone were beating him and he's not man enough to admit it it was true West D. Seapower Westinghouse connected to AC the voltage would be slowly increased fifty volts at a time until one man backed out Westinghouse animals at Edison and his men Brown doing killing them with alternating current it's all propaganda he knows our product is affordable of higher quality and safe ignored the offer January of eighteen eighty nine the execution mandate became law stipulating that the first person convicted of murder in New York state seamless on boarding for new hires and centralized PTO management plus if you or your team ever have any questions about your benefits or payroll you can call just I of electrocution Brown was hired as the state's electrical expert by the Department of prisons and passed with building the death contraption with a whopping ten thousand any people who made contact with Westinghouse currents it was the ultimate shameless payback to Edison strongest competition and a questionable and he's far more concerned with sales than safety westinghouse picks up a thick pamphlet slams it down on the desk is annual report says that they've got forty about to stop until finally round found three Westinghouse Dynamos for sale in upstate New York to avoid Westinghouse's agents he had the dynamos ship to Rio the Genero then shipped back to New York and finally to Auburn prison after destroying countless animals Edison and Brown finally had their ultimate L. D. of death to be inflicted by the application of electricity in early June things changed color was announced that he had a new attorney claiming he was working pro bono fueled by what he believed was an unconstitutional law

Thomas Edison Westinghouse Edison Thomas Edison Edison George Westinghouse westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Electric Company Edison Light Company Pittsburgh Mansion Edison Tesla Menlo Park Lab Westinghouse New York Westinghouse Edison Company doc westinghouse Edison Nikola Tesla West Orange New Jersey Edison AC Motor Hesse
Susan Wojcicki

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

53:09 min | 1 year ago

Susan Wojcicki

"Hey, guys, Willie Geist here with another episode of the Sunday, sit down podcast my thanks as always for clicking and listening along with us. My guest this week a little bit different used to movie stars Rockstars had a CEO. In fact, one of the most powerful women on the planet. Forbes in fact, currently has her at number seven in its list of the world's most powerful women. She is the CEO of YouTube. Her name is Susan with Gysky she and I got together at YouTube headquarters outside San Francisco to talk about her rise to the top of Silicon Valley beginning with the computer science class. She took during her senior of college that completely change the trajectory of her life. Also, the famous story of her as a young woman trying to cover the cost of her mortgage renting out her garage in Menlo Park, California to a couple of Stanford students who had an idea through names were Larry and Sergei and they are working in her garage. Little did she know on something called Google. Yes. Google was born. Born in her garage. She actually left her job at Intel became employee number sixteen at Google. And while she was at Google she convinced Larry and Sergei that would be good idea. The by little startup called YouTube. This is round two thousand five two thousand six it was a gamble at the time. They paid one point six five billion dollars for you to and now since she's moved over me cum CEO since twenty fourteen companies valued at one hundred and sixty billion dollars. We know about cat videos launching the careers of celebrities like Justin Bieber and being a great learning resource. Did you know five hundred hours of content uploaded to the platform every minute five hundred hours, uploaded to YouTube every minute with that though, come some problems, and I wanna point out that we conduct this interview a couple of weeks ago before the story broke that one user saw predatory comments in some of these sections under videos of children alerted YouTube a bunch of advertisers pulled their ads, including AT and T and Disney off of YouTube until they felt comfortable that you had that under control YouTube. Disabled all the comments on children's videos alerts authorities whenever they hear this pull down videos. They're inappropriate. So we don't talk about that story specifically because it hadn't happened yet. But we do get into the broad challenge of policing so much content, and what the role is what the line is between first amendment rights of people who post there and the responsibility of the company to keep its users safe a fascinating conversation. I hope he enjoy. It was Susan with Gysky the CEO of YouTube right now on the Sunday, sit down podcast. Thank you so much for the Susan. I appreciate it. Thank you so much. There's a lot of one ask you about YouTube itself, but I'm also super interested in your own story. And I soon with someone like you that you were this great science whiz and Superindent computers growing up giving where you've ended up, but I was reading it wasn't until your senior year in college that you actually took a computer science class that you're more of a history and literature. Type what did you? Cover in that class, your senior in college that turn something on and you that led all this. Well, when I was a kid, I was always really into doing crafts and arts, and so always love being really creative. But I just never thought that computers were creative. I thought computers warring they were for people who just want to do statistics. And but then my, and I was a history and literature major in college. But what happened? My senior year is used to come home from school, and I would do temp work at different companies. And I would go to whatever company they sent me something as lawyers doctors and one time I got sent to start up, and I realize these people are doing really interesting work, and I would love to be part of that. And so I decided to take a computer science class, and I was the only senior taking computer science class, and I just fell in love with it. And I saw how creative. Was and that I could could take that creativity. And do it at scale where where did your inspiration come from child? I was reading about your childhood and the word that kept coming up with freedom. You talk about having freedom your mom talks about giving you freedom. What was your household like with those three girls in your parents cyclic on that university campus? My dad is a professor at Stanford, and I was surrounded by all these people who were professors, and so when I was little I used to wonder like wait, where's the postmen firemen all these people that you read about in books, but I was surrounded by people who had spent their whole life studying something like earthquakes or certain type of math. And so what I just learned from that was just the desire to fulfil, my passions and to find something I really enjoyed and could dedicate my life to and try to be an expert. That. And so the fact that I really didn't have any pressure to be anything other than something that would make a difference for the world and something I could really love and enjoy and that was that led to where I am today. Do you ever think about what you would have been if you hadn't taken that computer science class? In other words, you were history, photography and literature where you were headed exactly if you hadn't found computer science, your dream about that or your life would have been like totally different. I mean that that one class changed my life because it opened my eyes to computer science, and it made me realize that I can do s and then be that if I can do this. And they're all these other things that I can do all these ways that I can be part of this future. And the way that technology is changing the world. So what's the gap? So you take computer science class. There's the famous Intel job that leads to Google. The second. What are those intervening years like free? What what are your goals? What are you looking to? Do you go to graduate school couple of times? But what is your life? Look like, what do you think you're going to be? I had really no idea what was going to be. And I I spent a lot of time just actually exploring, and I think there's a lot of value in that should be able to look around. See what's happening in the world. See what's interesting, try different types of jobs, and then from that being able to figure out where the best fit is. Now, if I had had a specific path like if I had gone to college and said, I'm going to be this. And then I graduated and did whatever that plan was it probably would have been computer science because the type of jobs that exist today tint exist at that time, we didn't have the internet at that time as we know it today. And so it was I think because I spent a lot of time I traveled I did different. Jobs it enabled me to look around. And be Ben and see that I saw that the internet and technology were really going to change the way our world looked and I wanted to be part of that. So when I I hope people I wanted to go into computer science, there are completely confused like what how from history and literature science. Why? Sad because I think it's really creative. I think it's going to be an opportunity to change the way the world works and from the moment, I started, and I started working in this industry. I just fell in love with it. And I've been in it ever since interesting to look at it because it's a different kind of creativity than you probably grew up around. Right. You're the. That's not what do you had different creatives in front of me. But it wasn't about computers at all. Now the credence that I would do would be photography right making paper knitting. So I try to all those different types of creative arts, and I love them all and I think the connection that computers are creative and you can use that to build product. And have you think about that as your art? It can be distributed, and it can be used by so many people, and that's what I love about being at YouTube, and that's what I love about technology. So the next big leap. It seems to me is this legendary story where you rent out your garage to a couple of young graduates Stanford who had an idea was that out of necessity to cover your mortgage, or is that because you saw something in the two guys who are going to be an arosh. I wish I could say, oh, I saw them. They were so really, but no I just wanted to cover the mortgage. That's all it was initially. That's all it was. I just wanted to cover the mortgage. And I mean, it was expensive to live here. And I just graduated business school student loans. And so yeah, I wanted to cover the mortgage, but then they moved in the we're working there, and I was living there. And so I had a lot of opportunities to talk to them what they were doing. And I was can't Intel at the time and IBM to use our product, and I saw well, this is really useful. And there was actually a moment where I was at work, and it was so early and Google life. And so the service went down, and I couldn't access it. And I thought, wow, I can't do my work because it's become so essential to me. And it was in that moment where the light bulb went off. And I said, well, I can't do my work because this is so useful. This is gonna be a valuable service, and even that they had no revenue. New or no business plan. And I still had a mortgage. I thought this is going to be important, and I really wanna work here. Do you have any idea what they're up to the garage when they started you really didn't know what the idea was or with the product was they said, we're starting a search engine. And I was like, okay. Well, you know, there are lots of searching rates out. There have another search engine go for it. And they were students, and they were competing with these really big search engines, and they were building the search engine while they were still students at school. So I said shar song as you cover the rent. That's fine. But then because they were there using the product. And I realized how how good it was. And that's alternate. -ly led me to join Google. That's a pretty big leap, though, isn't it to go from an established company like Intel where you only been for a few months, and you knew that was going to be a solid job to kind of take a leap of faith to go with these guys at that point. It was basically faith because in addre-. To my mortgage. I was also four months pregnant, and so it was at the time. I didn't really think that much about it it it didn't seem like that hard elite. Because I saw how I saw this product was so good. I saw that the internet was going to become bigger. And so I didn't know exactly what was going to happen to this little company called cool. But I knew it was going to go somewhere. And I wasn't always just focused on the journey us focus on how can I make a difference? And I was excited about joining something at the early stages where I could make a difference and something that really mattered, which is information the sixteenth employees. I think is that right? Yes. Yes. What are the company? Look like with sixteen employee's four people. Join the day before me. So I just wanna tell you if I hit joined one earlier been earlier. I mean, it looked like sixteen people who are really just getting started. And most of those people were think we had three or four people who were in sales and the rest of the people were in engineering, and I was the one and only marketing person at the time. So how do you explain you talked about all these other search engines that were out there if you look back there really were a lot of them on the same level? How do you explain why Google left to the top and left all the others behind? What was it about their service or your service that was so different? The thing about Google is it was just better. And we used to struggle to explain to people. Why is it better to say try it, and it's free to try to easy to try? It's fast. It was accurate, and it was better. And it became really clear to people that they could get the best information that way, Google was also committed Google v allies value of search and some of the other companies that were existing at the time. They were doing multiple things they were portal's they were also in all these other fields. And so the idea that Google was dedicated to search and focused on delivering information and had we also had some algorithms and ways and computer, scientists who are very expert in this area, and they were able to build a better search engine around two thousand five guess this company. Catches your eye called you to. Yes. And you watched it through two thousand five and then in two thousand six you went to Larry and Sergei. And said what what was the case you made to buy you too. The so there was no such thing as online video when we first started out, right? There was no way for people to upload their video and share it with the world. And we take that for granted today because it's so much part of our life. But at the time that didn't exist and so Google its own. We had done our own work here. And so I had seen a few things, which is I people would upload their stories and share it. And because at first we weren't sure do people even want to share their stories with global audience. Do they want to upload the story of themselves or their families or their talk? And we saw that they did. But what surprised me even more was that other people wanted to watch regular people's videos, and because Google had started and had done something in video. I could see that this was a very different kind of content than what we have on TV. But that people wanted to see. It and that we have our own version of hits and our own version of content that was fairy broadly viewed and so once I saw that then it became really clear because you was leader. And I could tell that online video was just there was just going to be more and more of it as technology further further along and so became a clear choice for me, but it was expensive Google paid one point six five billion dollars for it. So it was an expensive acquisition at the time. It's worked pretty well. One hundred fold at last check it's paid off. It's it's I think it was a great acquisition. Okay. Your homeboy like that. I was here view a few weeks ago, we interviewed Andy Sandberg on the show from SNL. And he was the lonely island guy. They did all the. Lazy Sunday all videos, and he was saying there's no me without you to that. I came along in two thousand five at the end of the year when YouTube I got up and running, and I was making videos, and otherwise it would have been shown in my friends to your point. There was this platform where people could have something to say. And you created this whole culture around it. But I can't imagine it was that obvious to everybody else at that point that those videos would be interesting to other people in other words, Charlie gets his finger bit. And the entire world has seen it and watched it and there was nowhere else where you could see that. So what was the vision you had for the company of? Okay. We've got these amateur videos. We can turn it into something bigger. People. Didn't see it. I that. This was something that was going to be big in fact, when we I did the acquisition. There were a lot of people that really question that. Mission. Even a headline that said only a moron would buy into. So. Track track. Exactly. But it was just that we saw it again. I think what technology the first thing you have to see is their user value are you providing a platform in a new way to do something that hasn't been done before. And this was a way for people to tell their stories and to share what was happening in their lives, and I can see that right away. So you don't know where something's going to go. You don't know how big it's going to be. But the fact that people could share stories had never been shared before that they could connect with with people in a very human way that has real value. And so I understood that and said, let's just go with it. Let's see what happens describe what YouTube is today because I feel like it's something different to everybody for some people to the mazing historical archive. You can look things that speech politician. Or if you love sport to watch highlights from game thirty years ago, or what's the name? In that movie that clip it's all there. What's the top line of what YouTube is from where you sit? So we want YouTube to be the best global video platform that can connect users with the creators and artists that they love, and what's really incredible about YouTube is the fact that you can have to conversation and TV traditionally has been a broadcast mechanism, but YouTube enables us to have to eight conversations and so- fans can talk to each other fans Kentucky, creators, they can leave comments creators can speak to their their fan base. They can go live they can sell merchandise. And so we just see all these different ways to have interactions that we never could have had beforehand, and and YouTube also enables people to come together in a way, they never could have beforehand. So we see people who for example, could have a disease and they. They may be alone in their city or in their region with that disease, and and of heard this multiple times people who say started a YouTube channel because I felt alone with this condition, and then other people on YouTube found that found my videos, and they subscribe to me and now have thousands of subscribers and they're all sharing community about about something specific about condition about a hobby, woodworking sport language, and so you away of bringing people together about their passions and interests. And and I think it's an amazing way to better understand the world in to your point. It went from it seems to me from the time you acquired it here. It went from the Bieber video, and these famous Gangnam style all of a sudden the air ab- spring is playing out on YouTube where presidential debates taking place, a new two was that a concerted thing for you. Guys to think about let's elevate this from just amateur videos of people doing funny things or south selling things or whatever to let's make it a platform where a revolution could take place effectively in the Arab spring. So we definitely we definitely started out with YouTube is known for initially, the cavity ios. But then we started seeing while this is pop form that can be used by everybody, and it can have these far reaching implications. And that's was definitely really I opening for us. And it's really an important revelation something that we have really focused on so right now, we're very focused on the responsibility that comes with that. And making sure that our pop farm is used in a really responsible way. We did a story on our show a few weeks ago about the seven year old kid Ryan who does toy reviews who made twenty two million dollars last year at seven years old. Does that stuff blow your mind that your platform has allowed seven year old playing with toys to make twenty two million dollars? It's amazing to hear the stories have of creators. And these are always the stories that I hear are often people who had a passion to people who did hair. They did make up they did woodworking. They did they want to travel, and then they were actually able to turn it into a career for them. And so those are always I love hearing those stories, and there are craters from all over the world every country. And so I try to hear about all the stories, but we have so many craters in so many different areas that and we're constantly growing. So the number of craters. Example who are earning five or or six figure incomes from YouTube actually grew forty percent here on your last year. So we're seeing more and more creators using this to actually be professional and to be generating professional video on our farm as you've grown so much so exponentially and hundreds and hundreds of hours are uploaded every minute, probably, right. Five hundred hours uploaded every minute every two five hundred hours every minute. Yes. I can't imagine how you monitor and control that and you talked about it being a safe place, and you and the rest of social media companies have had of this reckoning with free speech. So how do you view YouTube? Is it a platform? Are you a publisher? Do you have a responsibility to protect free speech? What's your view of that? So we're a platform, but we retain responsibility very seriously. And that's been my top priority. This year is to focus on the responsibility. And YouTube from the very beginning has had community guidelines. So we wanted enable all the voices out there. But we also have rules about how our community works, and we call those rules community guidelines and in the last that's hit the last two years. We've really made a number of changes first of all in reviewing our community guidelines and increasing our policies tightening our policies, and then also increasing our enforcement around those policies, and that's a big investment for us so YouTube, which is part of Google at Google we committed to having ten thousand people focused on controversial content by the end of last year. So that's it was a big investment very important for us. But we also use machines along with the people to be able to make sure that we're removing content. That is controversial or the problematic or violates our community guidelines and just last last year. We started a report. Where we release every quarter. How we have been doing on that. And so in our last report, which was Q three of two thousand eighteen we release it. We have removed eight million videos in that quarter. Which is a lot of eighty percent of them we removed with machines and most of them were removed without even a single view. So because of the scale because of the five hundred hours that we upload that we have to our platform every minute we have to use machines too. And it's the combination of all the people and the machines that help us make this this farm to be to grow responsibly to people wonder the word controversial in problematic. How are those defined? What is hate speech? What is violent? What's something that shouldn't be on your site? How do you guys decide and how does the machine decide what should and should not be YouTube great questions? And so I will we. Release. We say these are community guidelines. We want people to know what those community guidelines are, but we're constantly refining them. And that's because the world is changing. So the world new things happen new types of pranks happened. For example, we need to refine how our policies work around that. And so when we make changes to our policies, we usually consult with experts, whether they are experts in child safety experts in law enforcement emergency room people first responders like understanding, where's the best place to draw the line? And then once we come up with a new policy on that. We work really hard to make sure that we can enforce it consistently. And that we can communicate to all of our creators. And we have an update we made this update or policy you've taken a hardline. I think just within the last year on conspiracy theories to info wars, Alex Jones off your website. What was the deciding factor there? What was the line that they crossed that? You said this can't be on YouTube so with with Alex Jones and actually with any creator, we have a set of community guidelines and those community guidelines apply to our creator community, regardless of who they are. And so, but in that specific case what we have talked about is that there were there was a community strike, and when we have a community strike, then there are changes to how the live streaming permissions are given and because of a number of issues around the. Streaming and how that was used to became a terms of service issue. And because of that it made sense for us to terminate that channel. So we're sorry about what an incredible resource. It is my kids take it for granted that there's a YouTube in the world because they've never known a world without you to. And so if they think of something that movie clip or something for school, they go to YouTube right away. That's a pretty extrordinary thing for our society. Actually, I think it's an I think to business amazing resource, and I see that in my own family as well. And the way that my kids have been able to use that to look anything. So just actually just the other night. My son was saying I I need help with some math concepts. And I said, well, why don't you just go to YouTube? You look and see I if that helps you and then if it doesn't then we can talk about getting a tutor, but let's try that first, and I've tried that they always can find multiple people explaining that. Sept in different ways. And it's just wherever I go in the world people. Tell me about how they learned their front subjects languages music instruments. Someone told me that even learned how to swim on YouTube. I thought that was a one thing you couldn't learn. It's totally true. I mean, you can learn how to tie tie. I've nine year old son. They're going to tell you that I'm going to tell you and it worked better than I could or cooking. Cooking is huge. Yes cooking. And you think about most things that we learn are visual. And so how did you anything like how to fix anything in your house? How to cook a craft those are visual or language you need to hear it. And so it's an amazing resource to be poll to learn and we're really investing in that area because we want to have more educational content on YouTube where do you have a ton much? Any thing you want to learn how to do we probably have some video about that on YouTube? But we're continue. We're encouraging our educational Huber's to continue to invest there have to say it makes that look good to because they'll be like I'm going to fix the washing machine. Kids you stay up here. Go to YouTube video on the GE washing machine change out the bolt works again. It's pretty amazing. I just the other day. I had a pump that wasn't working in our house. We call them and ask them how to fix it. And they said, oh, we have a YouTube video. You don't have to call ask anymore. I should've known that even call. Have all. Go to YouTube. Yes. Yes, that's specific pump has to pity. It's incredible. So that actually ties in with what we were talking about before. Because there is the question of what kids see when they go looking for things for school. For example, if my kid wants to research nine eleven for example, they will might see some stuff that comes in her niece that that I don't want them to see conspiracy videos and things like that. Have you guys address that in a way that you are comfortable with that kids are protected when they go on while you say still protecting free speech. Well, first of all say that we have a YouTube kids up and in the YouTube kids up we are very careful about the content. That's in there. We also enable a number of tools for parents ability to turn off search or to limit which videos, they're seeing or even hand select a certain set of videos for their children. So you kids is an important part of the solution. But if you look at YouTube what we call our main up just YouTube. We wanna make sure that on sensitive topics like news or where there's conspiracy theories common internet conspiracy theories that were delivering the right information to people. And so we look in news. There's breaking news. We look to use a thorn hate of sources, and we'll put those authoritative sources right up front. So that users can find it and get the right information, or with common internet conspiracies will do is we'll link to. To put in the video information that comes from Wikipedia or encyclopedia britannicas. So that users can get context for the video that they're watching some people might say why not just get rid of those videos, get rid of the conspiracy videos altogether. What do you say to that? Well, we have community guidelines, and if something violates our community guidelines, we will remove it. But I mean there have been conspiracies since the beginning of time where people have said like is Elvis still alive? Right. I mean, they've been speculation about that or people asking questions, and so we want to keep nice balance between free speech freedom of speech, and enabling people that got their point of view. But then also pointing out this Arthur teed sources, here's a digital context. Here's a digital information for our users to make sure that they can get that information. And you mentioned you have five children. So this is something you grapple with and you deal with every day. Interesting question that someone said you've got to ask for this shark on behalf of Americans. What is your policy at home of screen time with your kids? Yes. How much can they watch? Well, that's a great question. And I think this is something that all parents struggle with. And so I have different policies for kids of different ages. Because at some point they're going to go to college, and you have no control. So you need to make sure that you're working up to that day. I definitely even though I work in technology, even on the CEO of YouTube. I limit my kids screen time because I wanna make sure that they're living balanced lives. And although I see how you too can show them the world and conservative video library. Also, see the power in that. And I wanna make sure that they're living balanced lives. So YouTube to be able to help parents to help kids with that. We actually have a timer. We introduced it first and YouTube kids because we said, oh, we'll parents want to manage screen time of their kids and it's much easier. If there's a timer. Timer goes off. Your time's over right? The kids not upset with the parents the device said times over. And what we realized this here is that we had to put that timer in our in YouTube the one for adults because it's also need a timer. So we introduced. Yeah. For adults. And we also introduced reports on how much time you've been using of YouTube. So you can manage it that way as well as how we manage notifications. So we really want to give people the tools to focus on digital wellness. Also been incredible leader out here in about women in tech, which is something you've been very concerned about and remain concerned about that there aren't enough women like you in this area in this field has it gotten any better in your time over the last twenty years, and what more do we need to do to get more women working out here. I think I think it's very important to have women in technology, and the reason for that is that technology is this industry that is changing so many parts of our world. And so you say, well, here's this this industry, but it's not well represented with women. It would be like have. Ving the printing press coming out and only twenty percent of women would be able to write books think of all the literature that would be lost. If only twenty percent of women were writing books, and so I wanna have more women in this industry. I also think that it's a it's a wonderful industry to be part of. And so I want to be an advocate in encouraging more women to go into technology because they see so many opportunities for them. And I do think it's getting better. I think in the last year we've highlighted a lot of issues that are in technology at different companies. And in many ways, highlighting the challenges is fixing the challenges to and we'll make it better for the next generation of women who come into technology, the practical ways, encouraging stems encouraging girls to me, I think, you know, my eleven year old daughter to seeing someone like you or knowing that these companies are out there. We didn't grow up. With companies like this in my daughter's mind, all I wanna work at YouTube. I wanna a Google that's a cool place to be. I think just seeing that helps. But what else can we do as a society to get more women in this field? It's really important for parents encouraged our children, and what we saw in when we did research at Google on this that the biggest factor. A lot of time was that the women who are successful are Intech now someone in their life. Encourage them. It was a parent teacher a mentor who encourage them to be in technology. And so I see this in the research. But then I also see it at home, and what I saw in my own house is that you really need to encourage your kids when they still listen to you. To what's that age? Twelve or something like around twelve or thirteen they start not listen to you getting there. But so what I think is important is to give them the skill sets. And so what I think has happened is if you're if you don't have those skills, if you don't feel that it could be interesting that you could be good at it at some point, you get closed off to and so giving them the skills early on to feel like this is something I could be good at is really valuable on the other hand, I started when I was a senior in college. And the funny thing is when I was a senior in college. I thought it was too late. I was I was like, oh it's too late to change career. I'm a senior in college. But it's never too late. And technology's always changing, and so people can learn it anytime just being open to it just being willing to learn realizing that really anyone can learn it and and just trying and so they're all now all these great programs like code dot org and hour of code. To encourage. There's online YouTube has coding programs and coding classes and encouraging people just to try it. And I think it can really make a difference. Science should be. We grew up with math and English and all these core subject areas today, especially shouldn't computer science beat mandated in high school when you're growing up not just for girls. But for this is the world we live in it shouldn't be an elective class. It seems to me I definitely think that computer science should be mandated, and we take all these other fields and sciences not because we're necessarily going to be a chemist or biologist. But because it helps us understand the world around us. And if you think about all the digital aspects of our world understanding how it was billed how to interact with it. How to build your own version of it would be really really valuable. I also think it would solve a lot of the day. I city issues because you went you would just know we'll everybody knows how to code. Of course, until you would have people of all different backgrounds having those abilities. And I think there hasn't been introduced so far other than there's like a lot of Halsey is there's probably a shortage of skilled people who could teach all of those classes, and it also requires the resources of having the devices and computers, and so it's a matter of time. But I definitely think if possible is very valuable to give kids that exposure and experience early in their careers. But if they don't get it. They can still get it later. You like me. How does it make you feel that there will be a young girl who watches this on Sunday? It says that want to grow up to be like Susan which isky. What does that make you feel? I feel good about it. Because I want to encourage girls to come into tech because I see that tuck is this field with lots of creativity. Lots of possibilities ability to interact and work with so many different people out there and tech also comes in many different flavors. You also don't have to be a computer scientists to work at a tech company companies need people all different kinds of backgrounds. Need lawyers in PR people they need sales people. And so I think it's a really really dynamic and rewarding feel to be part of and tech needs. More women. It needs more women to come in to develop programs for women for Carl's have that point of view. And to either believe it's very important that we bring more diversity into the tech community and that it will pay off. We'll have better innovation. We'll have better products. And it will be better for society in the long term another area where you've been a leader is in maternity leave. And he talked about the importance for that you've lead, by example here at YouTube. Why do we as a country not give more return than we do? Why are we so far behind the rest of the western world in that regard? I don't know why the US is the US is one of the only countries in the world that does not offer paid maternity leave and having gone through having kids. It's really hard at the beginning. And in the US twenty five percent of American women come back after ten days and ten days, I can tell you. They are not ready after ten days to come back to work, and it's very hard. It's very hard. And and so this is something that hopefully will be changed at some point. But it's hard to change how our society works. It's hard to mandate something like this. But I do think that when we look at the data like California has paid paid fan paid family leave. And if you look at that, you can see after it was implemented that most companies state that it was neutral to positive and they actually saw. Benefit to having paid maternity leave. And what's the leave here at you to how many weeks to get our maternity leave right now is twenty two weeks. And we found that when we increase the maternity leave to twenty two weeks that new mothers were much more likely to stay at Google because when they came back to work, they were they were at a stage where they were more ready their babies were more ready, and that extra time really has made a difference for our employees. I love I love talking to people like you who have vision because thinking about twenty years ago your garage Google. Garage. We had no idea what was coming down the pike in terms of Google and YouTube, and I tunes and our phones and everything else that we have. So when you think about the next twenty years, and I know you do because you're that kind of person what's our world. Gonna look like what's the thing that we haven't even thought about in the public that you guys are working on what's gonna be different about our lives. It's so hard to say how technology is going to change because it's always changing in ways that we that we can't expect. But I think if we were to look the next twenty years ahead, I think. If we if we look at our lives the ability to have so many different devices, so many different types of digital experiences that are really valuable to people. So. To the robots are taking over. So you're saying. Takeover. I know people do worry about that. I asked the question. I remember I was talking to Zimmer at lift and we're walking around New York. And he just said this is all going to be Greenspace. All these cars are going to be gone. It's going to be a few driverless car self driving cars taking deliveries and getting people where they're going just that sort of vision of the way, we're going to live the way we couldn't have dreamed of an iphone and dreamed of YouTube and having every piece of video on earth that our fingertips there's something twenty years from now that maybe you even haven't even dreamed of. Well, it's always hard to predict what the future's going to be the area that I'm most excited about I think there's the most benefit for for humanity is the combination of computers and biology and medicine coming together because I think there many many ways that we could make science and cures and drug discovery and personalized medicine that we could extend people's lives and find new solutions in new cures. And so I'm very optimistic about that area. I also think that we will have driverless some kind of driverless transportation that said I've been waiting for it for a while. So we'll have to I think we'll have some kind of driverless community transportation. I think we'll have potentially a lot more devices in our homes. That are connected to the internet. Like, we have Google has the nest thermometer doorbell. And I don't know. I was just thinking that day. Like, why isn't our refrigerator? We have cars like tesla. That are connected. So I think thinking about all of our devices that are more connected. But from an information standpoint, we are at this point right now where there we'll just be more information will be available. They'll be opportunity to continue to give more sophisticated analysis of that information and potentially have it more accessible to us in some way, we keep when I first started it was on a desktop, and then we moved to a laptop, and then we moved to phone, and so then there's this question. Now, we also have speakers so voice is also very very common. The idea. I think everyone will have some kind of speaker, and they can audio just ask it questions. We'll give you the right answer back, and and Google has at today so twenty years from now, I think just many many more people will use it will be more sophisticated Google's also been working on this system. Like the idea that you can just say, doctor and make an appointment or. Or order me Chinese food. So I think the ability to have technology help you in assist you with different tasks will be really valuable. Question. Check favorite YouTube video of all the hits of the last, you know. You know, fifteen years whatever it's been fourteen years. Is there one that maybe that your kids like the most or is there one famous YouTube video that you're like that's the one? So I like all. Children them the same. Videos same as long as they comply with our community guidelines. But there is one video that was is special to me, which is the video that really I opened my eyes to the fact that YouTube could have hits and it Severo of these two students singing to the backstreet boys in their dorm room, and their roommate is doing homework in the background. And the what I remember about that is at the same time. We head license some content, and we spend a longtime trying to license very traditional content and the views of the back of these kids singing to the backstreet boys was much bigger than any of us anticipated. And I still laugh every time I see it and convinced me that this is going to be a really compelling pop form, and it's going to have a different kind of content different genre of content, and then I would say recently the. Youtube channels that I watch a lot. I watch a lot of YouTube channels of all kinds, but one that have really been been enjoying in the yoga videos, and it's pretty amazing. You can type in fifteen minutes, relaxing, yoga, sixty minutes in Yasser, yoga, really anything that you want for any time period that you want and there is a solution. And it's pretty amazing because I don't have that much time. And so sometimes I'll have twenty minutes. I don't have time to go somewhere change. I can just do it right there. And then it's wonderful did twenty minutes feel super happy. So, but I use you to probably like most people I use it for entertainment when I need to laugh and use it to look up information when I'm trying to study something I use it to catch up on shows at otherwise, I wouldn't be able to see because of the they happen at time of day wasn't available and or to see highlights or livestream. We livestream the state of the union. And so just like anyone else they use it to enrich my life until learn until f- mazing how we're talking before we started how kids in particular just associated almost all TV shows with YouTube. In other words, my kids watch Jimmy Fallon on YouTube because they're not saying to midnight on a school night. But they get on the computer in school, and they go into YouTube and there's Jimmy Fallon. It's like your brand sort of capture so much. Can you believe the scope of what it is from comedy the history to user generated matere? It's incredible. It's definitely definitely a big scope. And I didn't anticipate is we used to always talk about how we're going to be in the living room like how entertainment how technology would be living room. And what I didn't anticipate is that once we have phones that people would just watch it on their phone, and it makes sense because if they can watch it wherever they are. And they can choose what they want themselves. And so two technology has changed our lives in many ways that we could not have an -ticipant TV's almost everywhere in the country like ninety eight percent of the country right offer YouTube, TV, everywhere and what we're doing. There is we're taking the traditional networks of TV and using the YouTube technology to be able to make it more on demand to be able to search able to save your favorite shows to be able to get notifications. And it's applying today's technology to traditional TV content. I was just saying my son. When I his room almost all the time. He's on his ipad. He's watching someone else. Play video games. And what are you doing there? What are you doing there? And he loves it. And he can't get enough of it. Are there different things that you've seen Rigo? I'm shocked at how popular that is. That's incredible. That the audience that's gained people love seeing gaming videos, and is because you can make the sports analogy. People don't have to play sport to love watching it. And you love to see the way that those athletes can do things that you could never do yourself. And so it's the same thing with gaming people. Love seeing how people are playing games how they're winning how they're reaching new levels and the commentators are really funny or they're entertaining. And so that has been a genre on YouTube has been very popular. And we're definitely investing in our came in community because it's a new type of content that is really valuable and for our users. And we think there there are. It's something that didn't exist on traditional TV. But but it's important it's important to our community. Does he play for night? He just watch the night. And that's enough because the guy's funny, and it's fun to watch the commentators are very interesting funny. They can get to levels that you never could have gotten to before their championships leagues. And so all the analogy of sports apply to gaming what's the deal with slime. My kids have slime they watch this line videos. What's the deal? So there are many videos about slime on on YouTube. We have probably moved a clue market as a result of all the slime videos. I have a lot of Simon my own house, and I also have big jugs of clue to make Sime that my family has been making. And but it's just an example of something that is how to how to make it showing. How did you something how to do a craft? And so that's a really compelling part about YouTube is that you can learn. All these different trends, and how to how do crafts how to cook that you just could not have learned otherwise tubes? Keeping Elmer's afloat at this point by Moore stock definitely market now you can use slime. I have I didn't realize it. We're so many different kinds of slime. You can actually buy professional sign by it with special sparkles toys and the kids. Those Tupperware's full of it. I made three slimes today. Great there's lots there's lots of. Making. But you know, there's a cooking crafts and creative and any kind of activity where kids are looking and learning how to follow instructions what happens when you combine different ingredients and put them together and produce an end products. Like that's making them, that's enabling their creativity. Nibbling them to become a crater in their own way to Susan would just key for inviting us to the YouTube headquarters outside San Francisco, and for that conversation on a lot of the challenges facing the company as it continues to grow and my thanks as always all of you for this week here. More of the full length conversations with all of my guests. Be sure to click subscribe and listen for free to the Sunday, sit down podcast and don't forget to tune in to Sunday today on your TV that's every weekend. NBC I'm willing guys. We'll see right back here next week on the Sunday, sit down podcast. Hey, guys, Willie Geist here reminding you to check out the Sunday down podcast on the latest episode. We revisit one of our favorites with Emily blunt. I chat with the actress about reprising the role of Mary Poppins, and what it was like to work alongside her husband. John presents keys in last year's monster hit horror film, a quiet place. You can listen to that full conversation with Emily blunt right now on the Sunday, sit down podcasts get it for free. Wherever you download yours.

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Entering Into Mental Prayer During Troubling Times /w Dr. Anthony Lilles and Kris McGregor Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

39:03 min | 7 months ago

Entering Into Mental Prayer During Troubling Times /w Dr. Anthony Lilles and Kris McGregor Podcast

"This is Chris. Mcgregor of discerning hearts. We are all now living through a difficult time more than ever. We are being called a turn toward the light of Christ and to follow him so our work doesn't stop in fact it's more important than ever. Please consider making a charitable donation which is fully tax deductible between now and divine mercy Sunday April nineteenth to help support our efforts to offer spiritual guidance love and hope to the world. Hit the donate button at discerning hurts dot com or you can find it within the discerning hearts free APP. Thank you from all of us at discerning hearts and God bless discerning hearts dot Com now presents a special audio version of a skype video conversation that I had Chris. Mcgregor with Dr Anthony Lewis. We discuss how we can enter into mental prayer during troubling times. We also cover various other topics as well in this conversation. Dr Anthony Lewis is the academic dean at Saint Patrick Seminary in Menlo Park California. He's also author of numerous spiritual books including hit mountains secret garden. A theological contemplation on prayer published by discerning hearts. Many of you are familiar with his numerous teachings found on the podcast. He has graciously given us for over a decade on the beginning to pray. Podcasts found undiscerning hearts. We now begin this special conversation with Dr Anthony Lewis. Anthony thank you for joining me. It's a real pleasure to be with you Chris. Thanks for connecting in and I'm looking forward to our conversation you know. I sat with next to you at a restaurant in Menlo Park the last week in February and as we were enjoying that meal together with our friends it I never dreamt when I I I thought the next time I would see you in person would be in Tel Aviv. And that's not gonNA happen. The end of May. But it's going to happen isn't it? No it will happen and I have Been going back and forth with sister. Mog delete to reorganize are are programming and to get some new dates. So we'll probably be going towards the end of February the beginning of March next year but this is a kind of a little paradigm for. I think a lot of people had plans in the summer. And they're having to change them now and And so this impacted our lives and all kinds of different ways it really has. It is so unexpected. I think we we knew something was coming. We may have even had the thought that there would be a serious healthcare. I don't think we grasped the gravity and the The extent of which this particular. This pandemic has changed. The world literally has changed the world. Hasn't it I think so You know there's a there's a way in which we've been sobered from some of the Some of the kind of energy that was going on before the pandemic you know. I don't know if people notice but there was like an uptick. Ori Exponentially people are getting busier and busier and more connected more connected and and And we were reaching out to grasp for more and more power and we didn't really have A sense of our limitations we were. We were drunk on technology and we were drunk on achievement and And we were drunk on the plans of. What in ambitions about what we were going to do but But I think we've we`re. We're kind of sobered right now and people are realizing The limits of our creature hood in in ways we we weren't doing just a few weeks ago. Yeah when you talk about being over the fact that we have to struggle to find toilet paper. I don't mean to be crass but houseboy you know. We went through this as a family and in the realization that how spoiled we are in this country. Because I know that most of the world most the people in the world may not even have that and yet and this is one of those cases where we just have to What do you really need as opposed to what you really want? That's a that's a thing out of the benedict in the holy rule of Saint Benedict. That you have to ask yourself okay. You do you really need this or is this just something that you want. And you're you're asked to go back to the seller couple times because he has to ask you before you. This is something you really need and I think many of us are going through that right now it Everything's been taken from us as in it Anthony. I mean are. I've seen it Chronicle by many people are are the idols of our sport. Sports sporting events even going to a movie going to a movie theater and going to a concert. All the things that we felt so important now has just been like. There's a hush everything has had to come to a stop and that it yeah sobering. I mean you know the reason why having moments in our lives where we're were sobered a little bit from The kind of the the the cacophony that we can often get caught up in is you know God created us to love and So that we can reveal him to the world and when we're just caught up in the business of the workaday world when we're letting that define our relationships and and an were caught up in the next activity and were not taking time to be with God and to spend time with him He can't communicate to us The grace is that we need so that we can love one another and I think the experience of many many people that I've talked to is that they're finding right now in their lives and opportunity to return to prayer and in returning to prayer. They're they're rediscovering. What is truly important in life and in all of a sudden they're starting to reconnect with family members and friends and their More aware of Some of the struggles that Different different people in their lives or having in they're concerned about that And then and then we all know people we all have friends and family who've been impacted by this virus directly and maybe have had to face some very scary moments when of my very close friends lost his his father and is a friend of mine from Italy and it just happened so fast and so his family hasn't even had an opportunity to grieve About this Yet in a and at the same time The kind of the shock of this has gone through his family and with his children in the same time that's going through he's I would say his spiritual awareness even in. The midst of shock is extremely heightened and And in the you know we we had the powerful conversation about the the need we have right now. In our homes in households a has were isolated or under shelter To return to love to return to the the basic reason that God created us to beat in that his we're made to praise God and who is God God is love. And how do we praise him? We praise him by making love known. And that's that's our our great task right now. Yeah it. It has caused us for many for children to come back to the parents home or maybe it has had married couples who haven't had a chance they might be up to nesters and all of a sudden. Now they're back together in the home and the rediscovering themselves you know we also know people that are maybe having to be isolated in an apartment in New York City. There are people that will will hear that in these times it's as though God had just He allowed it. He doesn't he doesn't he. Didn't make this happen right Anthony. But he has permitted it. He's allowed it. I mean how. How should we look at that? What what is the mindset? We should have for that. Well the reality is the way Many of us have been living our lives at this Hectic Breakneck Pace. That we've been living a a piece of life that doesn't allow for prayer in sometimes crowds out moments. What those tender moments that where we should spin loving one another we haven't been living like that And we've let ourselves get caught up in In somebody could say will no harm done but no yes? Harm done you know. We've we've opened the door to evil forces I I would say we've we've opened the door to Satan and he wants to destroy this world he wants to. He hates humanity and he wants to destroy humanity so he So when we opened the door to him he's going to kick up something like a virus and to cause fear he's GONNA kick up fear to crowd out love. He's going to kick up greed and grasping and anxiety and all that these things he's going to he's going to try to Unleashed on the world through through this virus and so God isn't the agent of the of evil and God is not a murderer. He doesn't delight When people suffer and in it brings him no pleasure. When somebody's life comes to an end in they're not prepared for it he he instead he loves life that's why he created it and he loves humanity that's why he created us and he loves when we love one another that's why he gave us time and circumstances and family so that we learn how to love one another in God is on our side in God is taking his stand against Satan and evil and human evil to. He's taking a stand against 'cause he wants the door closed he wants us to love one another and as we learned to one love. One another this virus That's threatening us right now. It will lose its power. Love is even more powerful than a virus that's love is more powerful than death and that's revealed to us in the sacred scriptures and an. It's what our faith is based on in. It's what we stay grounded in now. I think that's so important for us to remember. I mean this on a global scale. It seems unprecedented but the type of affected has on the family and on a local level a a state or providence. Whatever that might be a province It this is not new. I mean when you go back and you look at the lives of the saints. So many of them have lived. During Times were absolute annihilation came to visit to a village or to a city or to an area and uncertainty and fear and wondering food is going to come and in those moments that they their face sustain them many of them wrote about it. Many of them Tried not so much even about the events of the day. But what was their source of grace and for their hope and in. You've studied so many of those heavier anthony of those saints. Yeah it's true. You know we can even look at the lives of some of the big saints that we know about like a Saint Francis of Assisi You know he was. He was hanging out with lepers and that was considered the ugly thing of his day in other Franciscans during time of prep plague or earlier than that in the early church we had a pope. Gregory the He he All the evils that looked like a whole world was coming down around him and And yet He led the Church in too deep prayer in into a deep love and devotion and he helped people find courage to face the controversy of the time his result there were a lot of great saints. Saint Augustine himself a when he writes the city of God probably his greatest work that he ever wrote he was riding as the Roman empire was falling down around him and the the purpose of the city of God was to help. See that What God was doing A goes side by side with all the evils that are unleashed in the world and an all disasters. God always does something beautiful in the midst of it in. If we have is faith we can choose to live in the beautiful thing that God is doing. Even as we're facing disaster ourselves so we We have been privileged with the opportunity to do the same thing that The great saints. Who came before us in the faith? I did in their time. This is a time for great sanctity. Great Courage and in great love is difficult. I think for some right now. Maybe not everyone but for some the anxiety that comes not only with the illness because this. I mean this is one of those that I mean. When you watch the news listen to music come in many different ways and so you have to be perpetually on guard but then the the loss of a job or the struggle the observance of economy may be a couple that has worked so hard and done everything so right as prepared for this time so they wouldn't have to be dependent on their children wouldn't have to be dependent on others. They're watching their 401k's all that stuff. Just go wash. And there's an uncertainty about All of that so that anxiety is something that I think is very real in the lives of people right now. Sure and And that's what I mean by being grounded in Grounded in something. That's more firm if we allowed ourselves to be grounded in our 401K's or our careers or the comfortable house or whatever other earthly dream that we have right now if doubts where grounding was well that that ground is not strong enough it's not firm enough to sustain the weight of our existence and that's where the anxiety comes in but when we are grounded in God God who is love and we allow ourselves to see from his perspective his perspective eve. Eternal love that breaks into our time Then then all of a sudden so much of the things that I get turned upside down a take their proper place rather than rob us of The piece that is meant to be ours for for Free Spiritual Center where we're not has vulnerable when we're rooted grounded in God and so this is kind of a radical kind of thing at the same time there's There's another kind of anxiety that I think is a good anxiety that we should also be feeling here in the good anxiety is the anxiety we should feel for one. Another out of reverence for Christ The anxiety that we have for friends who are all alone right now or who've gotten sick or the anxiety that we have for our brothers and sisters who've lost their jobs and are trying to figure out how to put food on their table defeat their their their children or or our brothers and sisters who are elderly and who are not sure. How or when they're going to be taken care of I I know a very saintly couple Here here in California if I could tell the story about them I hope I hope a Deacon Ray Donna. Don't mind me telling the story but I'm going to tell the story Deacon raid in a Senate and Donna are friends of mine very good friends for lots of years and They were on faculty at Steubenville. He's deacons for the diocese of Sacramento and he invited me a few years ago to go up to give a retreat at his parish and And when he invited me to go up to give this retreat. We There were terrible terrible fires and mud storm mudslides and things that head a Come through where I was staying in southern California. I was just outside of Ventura and I actually had to drive through a fire to get to his parish now. His parish was in a little town of In the mountains in the name of the town was paradise and I And so when I got up there I said you know on the very first presentation I I I I I shared you know. I came through Hellfire to get to paradise and everybody laughed and and then I talked about the faithful. Who in the that? I knew inventories. Part of the men's group and while the fire this Thomas fire came down on the city of Ventura It was It was the people of faith who were in my mens group who were standing out in front of their neighbor's homes with garden hoses and shovels putting out hot ash to protect the houses their own houses but also the houses of their neighbors and And they were the ones who stepped up and provided home for the homeless men and women who lost everything and and these men of faith They're they're per group The it it was a men's ministry and it was nicknamed o dark thirty because they got up so early in the morning that I I was with them. Whatever our was but I couldn't tell you what our it was because his so early. I I I don't even know what the What time it was. But these were the men who step in the community and by their faith and by their love for one another took care of those who were affected by this terrible tragedy. And and I told the people that At this parish mission. I said I said and And I believe that God has set me to you to prepare you because some days this community will also be tested and now is the time to return to the Lord. Now is the time to root yourself in prayer now is the time to love one another because your faith also will be tested well Everybody knows terrible. Campfire that happened up above paradise that later on that year or the actually the that the next year a where The whole town burned down in a matter of of just a couple hours. A tens of thousands of people displaced by a horrific tragedy. Many many people losing their lives and And it was a fascinating thing to me. I drove up to a paradise with father with Deacon Array Halgason and In his wife Donna and we we looked and we saw that Most of the buildings that survived and there weren't very many that survived but the buildings that survived for the most part were churches in including the Parish Church That I had given this message at it was like is like the fire burned all around but wouldn't touch the church. That and So I I did. Another mission for A Deacon raised perish. We couldn't meet in Paradise. We met at an another parish down in Chico and That was hosting the prisoners. Who Lost Their homes in paradise and And we talked about what happened together and and they shared their stories their heroic stories a faith and hope and trust in God and learning to love one another well. There's much more I can tell you about a a deacon ray and Donna but Because that wasn't the only trials that they face but God brought them from a where they lost absolutely everything in it prepared them for what's going on right now in this pandemic and what it prepared them. They learned not be detached from all earthly things in this world. They love earthly things. They love their families to all those relationships and all the memories that they lost in that house they had let go of all of that into more radically. Trust God but a because of The spiritually prepared They were able to enter into The grace of the moment and so they. The evil one had his disaster. He had this terrible fires in California that that the evil one did what he was going to do. He visited Hellfire on on the earth In our earthly paradise but he was not able to rob these people of their faith and he was not able to rob them of their love for one another or their mutual concern or their courage. In fact the more afflicted they were the deeper their courage the deeper their faith. The deeper the love for one another. We'll just like the communities of Ventura imperative is had to face. These things are early on in a way anticipating the trial the current trial. That were under A. I think we're challenged to follow. Their example in in Deir example was in the face of the loss of all things they keep kept their eyes fixed on. Jesus Jesus said in the Gospel Though Sun and Moon Fall Away. The son of Man will forever in if we keep her eyes fixed on him. He's going to route US and love and no matter what comes no matter. We face the loss of all things he's going to provide for us but we need to trust him. Yeah that that fearless trust. It really has to be that. Because that's the one thing. I think I've I've heard that in the Gospel. Jesus said Moore. The three words more than Love your neighbor. It was not afraid. Be Not afraid. And that's the that fearlessness. That's that's tough that it's almost. You have to surrender that to you gotta you. I mean this. This is why I think it's important that we go deeper in prayer and it's more than just saying and I say this an all reverence and love because everybody is trying to understand what's happening but it's more than just seeing a lot of words isn't it. It's more than that's important. It's important to be able to articulate and to sometimes the the prayers that we have help express when we don't have the words off the top her head but there's a little something a little deeper that is being called of us isn't i. You know what you're talking about. Chris is mental prayer. A prayer that arises from our heart in whenever we pray any vocal prayer even if it say a prayer. That's written now. All our vocal prayer should come from this deep place of our heart. And what is this deplace of our heart that the place of our heart is where God dwells with us by Baptism Jesus in the father sent the Holy Spirit to dwell in us in a temple wherever the Holy Spirit is Jesus is there and so is the father and so we have this eternal love that dwells in our hearts that nothing in this world can take away if we send all we need to do is repent and that life begins to come back to us and repent and right now. We can't go to confession. Most of us can't but if we repent than we have the intention of going to confession and we go to confession when we can go to confession that grace of forgiveness is already working itself out in our lives and we're already been healed the wounds said and a but but for that to work out that kind of contrition that is a gift from God that heals us for us to work that out. We need a to be personally present to God. Who's chosen to be personally present to us? It's a heart to heart. It's very simple movement of faith in so when we begin our prayers we begin our prayers with a sign of the cross. We in the name of the father and the son and the Holy Spirit and when we do action that action. When I see in the name of the father I should be thinking about the father. My heart should go to the father who this his revealed to me at such great price. Jesus has revealed the love of the father to me at the price of his own blood. And so I should let myself be aware that the father loves me and that he's taking care of me The the the first thing we profess in the creed is the hardest thing to believe of all especially in circumstances that we're in right now. I believe in God the Father the Almighty I this means I believe in a God who is personally implicated in my happiness. That's what of a true father is somebody who's implicated in the happiness of his children. I I believe in God. The father the Almighty not only do I believe that God the Father is personally implicated in my happiness. But he's Almighty meaning. He is behind all the things that are going on in my life to bring about something so beautiful in my life that no matter the sorrow or the eagles that I must face the beauty of the thing that he's accomplishing. Any is so much more all of that is as nothing and And if I if part of it is facing my weaknesses my inadequacies my voids or certain hardships and total disasters and catastrophes. If part of his trying to bring about this beautiful work in me involves those things. Those things cannot dim his power. He will bring about what he wants to bring about me. All He needs is my trust. I need to if he loves me as a father. I need to love him as son or daughter. In all of this we call to mind when we see in the name of the father and then an the name of the son and the name the Holy Spirit each of those divine persons we could reflect on if the very beginning of our prayer and think about their presence to us and how much they love us now much. They're holding nothing back for our sake and how much more concerned they are for us than we are for ourselves than they are for our loved ones than we are for them. Then we are. They are for our welfare than we are for own welfare That just like a parent is more concerned for a young child than a young child is for himself so God is concerned for us in the same way and in. He's in control and he's going to orchestrate. What's going on even in the midst of certain disaster so that something very beautiful and good will come out of it if we trust that that trust is something that we will be hearing as we that Sunday after Easter that he has come A. It's amazing when you think of that the devotion of the sacred heart he came in he was essentially was over my shoulder here but we are in that. Chaplin Perelman Elvis Summer Those a place where he came to say sacred heart of Jesus. I trust you. And then several centuries later he came to a Saint Faustina and essentially the same thing. Same type from him from flowing from his center and is being. He's he's imploring us. Jesus I Trust You. I trust you and that you know. That's pretty significant. That the words that he would speak in apparitions. We don't have a lot of Jesus apparitions as we do marrying ones but the ones he does. He's imploring us to trust. Isn't that interests yes? Trust is how we show our our loved to God and so when we find ourselves getting worried in an anxious so worried and anxious that it affects the way we relate to the people that are in our household with us or that are reaching out to us a that. C- a sign that may be the Lord is inviting you to deeper trust so be it now. Today's the day This time is the time for us to be aware of how we're interacting and what we're letting drive our interactions and when you see it's not trust in God simply complained to Jesus Jesus give me deeper trust because obviously right. Now I'm not there and And Jesus will give you other in new opportunities to trust this time. That we're in right now is Is a time of It's a time of profound a testing yes. But it's also a time of a profound solidarity with Christ crucified. I if you think about this what we're going through right now is kind of like a prolonged trade. Tom When the last liturgy that we had in lent together the last time you were able to go to mass that last Sunday that you're able to go to mass And tell when we have mass again this is like one long trade one one long. Good Friday and holy Saturday and on. Good Friday a is true. You can receive In the liturgy. The precinct defied The Eucharist A in in some in some parts of the country have had the opportunity to go to a communion service. And God bless you if that's the case but we're not able to go to mass and so that's what I mean by. It's like trim and then many more of us were not even able to go to communion a you know and so we're we are we're in this time of waiting and praying for and having vigil for the coming of the Lord and in it's true we can watch mass on a a a on social media and I hope everybody is and we can make access spiritual communion. It's true that when father offers mass even though we're not there his offering of that mass is unleashing power in the church power that gives us the ability to sustain our devotion to the Lord and so And so we're so grateful for the priests were offering liturgy for our sake all of that's true but And so now as a little bit different than the trim but at the same time for for us. Existential in our homes it is like a prolonged trid. One where we're waiting for. The resurrection of the Lord is Resurrection in the body of the Christ is the resurrection that will Unleashed the Sacramento powers of the Church and our and our lives in new ways again when we can tangibly receive the sacraments and in so what it what you do during time of vigil in time of waiting you you exercise prayer and you fast and you return to work. So mercy the works of mercy that you can do whether they're corporal or spiritual You you you. The the fasting of this time You know Can include not only food In I I recommend bread and water fast especially on Wednesdays and Fridays but But it can include not only food but but it can also include. You know how much time we're spending Consuming Entertainment Binge watching movies. You know a couple of days of that at the beginning of this thing okay. But at a certain time it's kind of empty and you need better stuff for your food for your soul and so rather than binge watching movies may be we spend a little bit of time reading the Sacred Scriptures or reading a a good spiritual book or a or some other some other thing like that. So A anyway these are the gifts that that are being poured out to us right now. Chris. I'm really sorry I'm going to have to call a conclusion to our our interview. Just right now because Some of my responsibilities here are requiring attention presently so But it has been a delightful conversation with you. How about if I give you the last word thank you? That's I that's all. I want to say on behalf of so many people. Anthony Thank you. You have broken open the depths of prayer. You're the good son of Elizabeth of the Trinity. And I think this is her time when you were preparing us for over a decade or more to to hear her call to remain in him and Just all love you very much. Everybody thank you. That's the last word. Thank you think you Chris. What a great interview have a great day and we'll be in touch soon all right. God bless you Anthony. You've been listening to a special audio version of skype video. Conversation with Dr Anthony Lewis to hear and door to download this audio. Podcast GO TO DISCERNING HEARTS DOT COM. If you'd like to see the video of this discussion visit discerning hearts dot com or visit. The discerning hearts youtube page has been a production of discerning hearts. I'm your host Chris McGregor. We hope that this has been helpful for you that you will. I please pray for our mission. And if you feel as worthy consider a charitable donation which is fully texted to help support our efforts but most of all. We hope that you will tell a friend about discerning hearts DOT COM and join us. Dickstein God bless.

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Ken Kesey's Acid Quest

On The Media

18:44 min | 10 months ago

Ken Kesey's Acid Quest

"Happy New Year this is non the media podcast extra just in time for your first hangover of twenty twenty whether it's fueled by alcohol or just the thought of the year ahead we thought we'd bring you a segment celebrating. A rebellion against is the norm and a way to test boundaries. We first aired this a couple of years ago. In time. For April nineteenth an odd holiday known as Bicycle Day commemorating the moment in one thousand nine hundred forty three. When Swiss scientist Albert Hoffman Rode? His bike home from work after dosing himself was his lab concoction auction. LYSERGIC ACID DIAL F door. LSD Hoffman is who launched us into an exploration of the moment when an evangelist evangelist of acid would emerge from Menlo Park Hospital lab and plows through the nation's Gray Flannel Culture in candy colored bus. I speak of course of Ken. Casey enigmatic author behind one flew over the CUCKOO's nest and the driving force in Tom. Wolves Electric Kool late acid test. His seminal work new journalism we ponder how acid shaped Keesey and normalized American conformity with river. Donovan a filmmaker and writer based in Brooklyn Key story really starts in the late fifties when he was a graduate student at Stanford Creative Writing Program up until that point keyser. Keys's for this all American farm boy. He was a college jock married his high school. Sweetheart he had a very wholesome childhood but when he got to Stanford he needed money to support his family family so he got this job basically being a guinea pig for clinical drug trials in a nearby hospital. The drug trials at Menlo Park Veterans Hospital spital were marketed as research for treating mental illness. But we know today that they were part of project in K.. Ultra the CIA mind control. trolls study keys. He was given a few different drugs and early antidepressant called it to ninety vomit. Inducing antibiotic called D.. Trim Trim and one of the pills was LSD. And so how did he feel honesty. Well I mean you got to put yourself in keys shoes at that point right. It's the the end of the fifties. It's it's like madmen era. It's dislike suburbs and housewives and like dad with the briefcase and the soup going off to work. It was very repressed time. There's a very narrow window. What was socially appropriate and LSD cracked? Keys's brain opened all these new possibilities and new perspectives and new ways of viewing the world. We actually have some audio audio from one of key's first experiences with LSD in the Menlo Park Hospital. This was in nineteen fifty nine or sixty. How you doing right now showing some drug now? He's in this little white boxes tiny little room in the the hospitals mental ward and sitting there taking this LSD and periodically orderlies and nurses are coming in and out taking blood samples and urine samples is not really the ideal place to have an acid trip quarter to one. Should you and couldn't in that. I suddenly feel great loving and understanding of people. Nobody's trying to get high on a rape somebody in my hand. Give her a public flowers town hall so I say public support has to get behind the huge missionary. We need a messiah. We need a huge missionary. We need a Messiah Dr. Yeah I think key really had the spiritual awakening I think he saw that. There was a path to go down that all. These structures sure is that he had sort of accepted as reality weren't really reality. And there were all these different options out there and that he had the ability to go explore and sort of figure out where he fit within within those he found himself catalyzed. Creatively by those sessions and Menlo Park in doing these drug tests in experiencing LSD QC had an idea. Oh naturally I'll go get a job at the mental hospital as a nightwatchman and you know sneak. Some of that asset out for my friends back at home and also as a night watchmen have a lot of time to sit and right and that's where late one night high psychedelics. He has this vision of one institution. Patient called Chief Broom Room this hulking native American man and he just starts writing and he writes five pages six pages of this book that ends up becoming one full of the CUCKOO's nest a humanizing portrait fortress of mental illness and civil disobedience. One flew over the CUCKOO's nest released in one thousand nine hundred sixty two made Keesey a literary sensation at the age of twenty seven. It also boosted his profile as a burgeoning acid messiah devoted entourage that he would later dub the merry pranksters pranksters began to coalesce around him. Jesus took some money from one full of the CUCKOO's nest and bought this house in Honda. California out in the woods and that house Donda became sort of this Proto commune with people flowing in and out and also had the LSD and he was throwing really good parties out there in the woods so people naturally gravitated weighted towards him. Among the Mary. PRANKSTER's neal cassidy a speed freak and the Muse of the beat generation inspiring the main character and on the road by Jack Harak and the heartthrob vagabond in Allen. GINSBERG's poem howl Neal Cassidy Secret Hero of these poems joy into the memory of his innumerable lays of girls in empty. Lots and diner backyards cassidy who would ultimately drive that legendary Gary Bus to get into the bus trip. We have to start in nineteen sixty. Three one flew over. The CUCKOO's nest became a Broadway. Play starring Kirk Douglas and so cheesy and a couple of his friends and drove out to New York to go check the play out and on their way back President Kennedy in Texas governor. John connally were shot from ambush. Today in a motorcade aide both are still alive but in very serious condition in the Emergency Roma the Parkland Memorial Hospital. And they're sharing sharing this very intimate moment in this collective space in the car passing through America in the small towns it gave cheesy understanding of the road trip as a quintessentially American work experience and so once they got back to La Honda. He said let's go back next year. Nineteen sixty four. World's fair is going to be happening in New York about the same time as the publication of his follow. Up to one of the CUCKOO's nest. This book sometimes a great notion. Unfortunately there's so many people hanging out around keys's house you know. They can't all fit in the station wagon so need something a little bigger and that's where the bus comes in. It's this nineteen thirty eight International Harvester School bus. They bought it for like like fifteen hundred bucks from a guy who had eleven kids and he had sort of outfitted it so his kids could sleep in cheesy and his friends cut a turret in the ceiling and put this big deck on the roof and wired for sound. There's the famous paint job. They had a bunch of day GLO paint floating around and somebody decided to throw a big smear smear orange on there and somebody else decided. Well we'll add a little red and add a little blue and a little green you know the thing with LSD is that it doesn't really inspire great fine motor skills so by the time they were done it was like somebody ate a bunch of markers and through a mop you have two documents that depict this trip. One is the electric kool aid acid test. Tom Wolves at the time that electric ruler acid test finally only came out hippy movement was in full swing. I guess the book functioned as this behind the scenes. Look at how everything started how the hippie movement became what it was Kizzie taught the hippies hippies before the phrase hippy existed before anyone knew LSD. was I mean they were in the bus and people didn't even know what to make them people. I thought maybe they were in the circus. Where like escape from the looney banner? Something what Tom Wolfe makeup them. Tom Wolfe saw that. Keesey was as quintessential American figure a little P.. T. Barnum little spiritual guru we actually spoke to Tom Wolfe. His favorite thing was here. Either on the bus off the bus Have you off the bus that you out of the greatest experiences human beings Keesey was striving to become the leader early entire psychedelic movement. What appealed to me? The most was just as news worthy goal for me. I mentioned that they were two documents. The other one Keesey and the Merry Pranksters documented their travels for movie that they never released. You had this this concept of everybody's movies that everybody is living out. A script. Keesey believed that acid could serve a way of recognizing your script and way to break character to live freely in the moment. A feel like you only come to this movie once and if you don't get something rewarding out of every minute you're sitting there then you're blowing your ticket. We've got hold of the key tapes most of which have never been heard by the public and let me tell you a a band of Proto hippies cruising through the south drinking acid laced who late in the PSYCHEDELIC school bus with a manic neal cassidy the wheel. It all sounds just asked about and we're just barrel asking the desert and guessing you've got his shirt off and he just sweating wetland sweating talking very band onto pranksters won't be around vert. Come on come on no none of this misery stuff come on merry gang they get that the yes my chilling just. My reaching New York was their final destination. They were really expecting this. Heroes welcome welcome and first cassidy sets up his party with Karaoke. And easy of course idolizes KEROUAC. But once they got to this party it just it just. Didn't work. KEROUAC was pretty late in his life and an alcoholic. I've seen film of that. He looks very glum almost sour. And then after that they drive up to visit Timothy Leary Former Harvard academic. He's kind of an acid acid philosopher. Turn off your mind. Relax float downstream. It was supposed to be at least in Qisas mind. A meeting of the foremost psychedelic experimental of the East in the West. But it didn't work out like that no Timothy leary was in this big mansion and Millbrook millbrook with Rolling Hills and stone bridges perfect. It was lovely. But he's he and his friends roll up throwing smoke bombs off the top of the roof and and all the members of Leary's group to sort of ran inside scared leary himself was just coming down off of a psychedelic trip and was in a very peaceful place and and didn't really want to be involved with all that raucous energy that Keesey and his friends brought along and then go back to La Honda and start trying to cut together the movie that they shot what they would do is every week they would cut the footage together and then on Saturday they would have a screening of the weeks. Cut these big parties. His became very unwieldy until finally keys. You decided okay. My family's living here I have a couple of young kids. Maybe we should find another place to screen the movie and out of that came. These things called the acid tests. What was an acid test? I've never been clear on that. Well again the pranksters defy definition finishing a little bit. Everything the key was prototyping. Atla Honda this sort of communal experience. In this proto hippie lifestyle like the acid tests were the opportunity to bring that into public. It was like a church group by early Christians trying to read their message message cheesy. You had a gigantic party wild multi media experiences around the the San Francisco Bay area. This band the warlocks play before they changed the name to the grateful. Dead and like early psychedelic visuals like that oil and water projections actions and strobe lights. Of course Keesey was attracting the attention of the police. LSD was still legal in the mid sixties. So the cops. CBS eventually pinned him with a marijuana charge. Since that was his second marijuana charge he was facing five years in prison with no chance of parole and in typical prankster fashion keys. The hatched a plan to fake his own death then go on the run to Mexico and did it work well well. The run to Mexico was successful even in the suicide note that Casey wrote he said in parentheses like. I don't think anyone's actually going to believe this. But I'm going to give it a try. He had one of his family members that looked like him drive around the bay area and then go up to a cliff and throw his keys signature boot route in the water and leave the suicide. Now I don't know if it really through the cops sent very long but it. It gave me enough time to make across the Mexico border. He fled to Mexico Texaco in January. Nineteen sixty six and spent the next eight months as a fugitive. Well aware that he was being tracked by the FBI. Meanwhile hello word had spread about the movement he had helped start as kids from all across the country flocked to Haight Ashbury where he'd staged many acidly acidly happenings. They were in search of what he created whether they knew it now while he was gone it took shape without him and while he was in Mexico Decaux cheesy sort of came to this realization that he had gotten everything that he could from that that awakening conscious that he got like it was awake and to have sustainable ainable. He had to find sort of chemical free psychedelic experience in October. Nine hundred sixty six Keesey was picked up by the FBI outside side of San Francisco. He struck a deal with local law enforcement. Promising to hold acid graduation. Ah Public Renunciation of LSD almost a year before the summer of love. This graduation was a radical notion perhaps too radical. You may have gotten out of jail but the followers Chris that he had inspired that sort of grown up without him and weren't really keen on the idea of stopping taking drugs like the drugs. I think that the moment is that the hippie movement refused to give up acid and follow Keesey further. It's the moment that the the movement stalled and I think whatever last vestiges of they've movement still exist. Today they are still stuck there in that same place you know. Sort of leaning on the crutch of drugs. Why do you care so much about Ken? Casey so I grew up in Eugene Oregon. which is where Keesey sort of retired to with the pranksters in the seventies and Eugene is a place fundamentally changed changed bike easy? It's sort of the last enclave of the hippie ideals I mean my name is river I I sort of come from it and I come from a different piece of it. My parents were more this new age personal growth movement in the eighties there a full generation after keesee. It's right but some of that comes from Keesey. I think that creating this heavy heavy deepen real emotional group work without drugs is sort of what this personal growth movement in. The eighties was also attempting to my father gave me a copy of electrical lead acid tests us when I was in sixth grade and he said here's the history of your home. My mother wasn't so happy with that. He's he said the acid acid tests the noisy parties fueled by LSD where wait a measure a person's willingness to discover what was out there if you moved beyond the norm Orne was attest and there were people that pass through where people didn't pass to give you an example of somebody who passed some I am businessman just walking around the street came in for a buck. You got to see US they call our noise and the dad call is and and anything else that happened. This guy was in a suit had an umbrella and he got the Customary Cup of stuff about midnight. Tonight you could see him really ripped probably never been anything but drunk on beer but he looked around so all these strange people and he looked out of the spotlight was showing down on him. He saw shadow will stand up straight. Put the number L. over shoulder. He says the king walks. The king turns around food now. The King's bench and fifty years after the electric Kool aid acid test. We're still being tested connecting to something bigger something beyond what seems to be a profoundly. Glee abnormal conduct norm is back. Or maybe it's being fueled by the realization that the norm was never normal or shouldn't have been anyway anyway creeping back and so as LSD. If only to make moving beyond the more a little easier so much thanks to filmmaker and writer River Donaghy who brought us the story and then talk to us about it so on the big show coming up on Friday. We replay a favorite hour and an important one about about restorative justice and how it can strengthen and redeem the nation online and all happy new year

LSD Keesey Keesey Keys neal cassidy Casey Menlo Park Hospital New York Mexico Ken Menlo Park Veterans Hospital Honda Tom Wolfe writer LSD QC Timothy leary Donovan Albert Hoffman Stanford
An election database leaks. Phishing from Firebase. Shiny Hunters sell Mathway user records. COVID-19-themed scams. On that return to the office thing...

The CyberWire

25:48 min | 5 months ago

An election database leaks. Phishing from Firebase. Shiny Hunters sell Mathway user records. COVID-19-themed scams. On that return to the office thing...

"Everybody Dave here as you know we've been fortunate to have built a pretty influential audience over the years security leaders across the globe. Trust US and depend on us every day to deliver the news and analysis. They need to do their jobs. And that's also why so. Many top security companies and hot startups. Trust us to connect them to the decision makers and influencers to help get the word out about their brand and filled their sales funnels. We've got lots of great sponsorship opportunities that can help you get the word out to just visit the cyber wire dot com slash sponsorship to learn more and connect with us that's the cyber wire dot com slash sponsorship thanks. Indonesia's election database has leaked N. P. I is for sale in the dark web. Phishing campaigns abused firebase. The shiny hunters are selling math way user records. Us agencies warn of COVID nineteen themed criminal campaigns contact tracing technology hits a ROUGH PATCH YOHANNES. All Rick on fishing. Pdf's with incremental updates. Our guest is author. Peter Singer on his new book. Burn in. And what are you going to do when you return to the workplace? If that is you've left the at all and if you're in fact ever going to return and now a word from our sponsor extra hop securing modern business with network detection and Response Security and it teams are under more pressure than ever any workforce that can go remote done so almost overnight that means more stress on critical systems more potentially unsecured IOT devices on corporate networks and an urgent need to see and respond to threats as quickly as possible. Extra helps organizations like wizards of the coast detect threats up to ninety five percent faster respond sixty percent more efficiently as chief architect and information security officer. Dan mcdaniel put it quote. There's no other company that aligns to supporting the devops model the speed and the lack of friction than extra see how it works in the full product demo free online at extra hop dot com slash. Cyber that's Stra dot com slash cyber and we thank extra hop for sponsoring our show funding for this cyber wire. Podcast is made possible in part by McAfee security built natively in the cloud for the cloud to protect the latest containers to empower your change makers like developers and to enable business accelerators like your teams out security. That accelerates business. It's about time go to McAfee dot com slash time from the cyber wire studios at data tribe. I'm Dave bittner with your cyber wire. Summary for Friday may twenty second. Two Thousand Twenty Indonesia's General Election Commission is investigating the release of voters. Private information on a hacker website. Reuters says the two point. Three million people's data have so far been released but those claiming responsibility are threatening to expose data on two hundred million Indonesians. Authorities confirmed that the data were authentic. And that the included such items as home addresses and national identification numbers. The source of the leak is unknown but the General Election Commission said that it didn't happen in the commission's own servers. They suggest that it may have come. From the presidential candidates or political parties with whom the commission is obligated by law to share such data researchers at trust wave spider labs have observed fishing campaigns abusing. Firebase the Google owned application development platform that offers user secure storage on the Google cloud the phishing emails are fairly routine using commodity level templates. That misrepresent themselves as coming from such well known brands as outlook office. Three sixty five or the Bank of America but the use of firebase. Url's in the fishing is significant as many of those will pass through. Automated screens established an email systems. These shiny hunters gang appears to be offering stolen math way user records for sale. Math way is a highly rated android and IOS CALCULATOR APP. Bleeping COMPUTER REPORTS. That math way is currently investigating the incident. Zero Fox has been tracking the shiny hunters in their other criminal activities. The gang has been an unusually active player in the criminal market for data for US federal agencies the Department of Homeland. Security's cybersecurity and infrastructure. Security Agency the Internal Revenue Service the Department of the Treasury and the US secret service all warned that the government continues to encounter attempts by criminals to steal personal and banking information using Kovic Nineteen Fish Bait to lure their victims v Domain reports. That many of these attempts involve drawing people in with prophecies of assistance from the cares relief. Act and other programs established to help people during the economic stresses of the pandemic computer weekly reports that authorities in the UK acknowledge that the NHS contact. Tracing APP won't make June first deadline for a national rollout. This is due in part to skittishness by the governments of Northern Ireland and Scotland about the privacy and efficacy of the system Northern Ireland for example doesn't WanNA system that will impede travel across the border with the Republic of Ireland. Nhs highland responsible for healthcare in Scotland has undertaken development of its own system designed to protect residents visitors and staff in care homes from the infection by creating virtual zones around care home and particularly sensitive or quarantined areas to control access as well as dynamic personal two meter gio zones around everyone with the APP. It's also due in part to what's increasingly perceived as an unacceptable degree of buggy in the APP source code itself as Gizmodo. Uk put it. It's just getting silly now. In any case a June first rollout is now generally regarded as an impossibility the US federal government has undertaken development of a national contact tracing APP along British lines. But some of the states have north and South Dakota have deployed care nineteen an APP that collects Geo location data under conditions that require often anonymous and no sharing with third parties but researchers at Privacy Specialists Shop Jumbo privacy have looked at care nineteen and report has the Washington Post reports that one of the first contact. Tracing APPs violates. Its own privacy. Policy in particular jumbo says that CARE. Nineteen shares location data with foursquare best known for its offerings in support of advertisers. And also that the APPS data aren't really as anonymous as one might think they include devices advertising identifiers jumbo recommends that users not install the APP until care nineteen. Privacy Policy is updated for accuracy and until the APP can shore users that their data won't be shared with third parties. There are other state level under development. The Telegraph reports that British Tech Company. We Ho has contracted with eight states to develop a system for tracking the movements of connected cars. The better to help the states ensure that people are following. Stay at home orders. Going out only for essentials like groceries and not simply gallivanting around like a bunch of Sunday drivers comments on the story generally evince a negative reaction to this kind of tracking as well as some expression of relief. That thank heaven. Commenter drives a primitive rattle-trap without newfangled Internet gizmos remote work appears likely to remain widespread. Even after the pandemic abates facebook is the most prominent corporation to announce that. It's all in on teleworking future. The Wall Street Journal reports that Menlo Park sees many advantages in terms of cost savings productivity and employee quality of life. When it's people won't actually have to show up in Menlo Park and of course. Mr Zuckerberg forsees more geographical and ideological diversity. If the company's workers can live anywhere and not remain so closely tied to the San Francisco Bay area the US federal government has also found that many of its jobs can be done from Home Federal Times reports that the US federal cio. Suzanne Kent says the government has been able to rethink its ways of doing business and now has a better grip of the sorts of work. That in fact require physical presence to accomplish. This is good news for vendors who specialize in remote collaboration tools as the Wall Street Journal also observes the effects on individual workers will vary. Depending on their home circumstances they may also have to accept lower salaries. Few places have a higher cost of living than Silicon Valley and that will surely factor into compensation. Plans there are some downsides to both returning to the office and continuing to work from home police in the UK are concerned that businesses take proper precautions to ensure that the offices they've abandoned during the pandemic are clear of cyber threats when People Return SC magazine quotes. Peter Goodman Chief Constable for the Derbyshire Constabulary national lead for CYBERCRIME and for serious and or Crime National Police Chiefs Council as saying quote because unfortunately some may have locked the front door but have forgotten to close the back door as they left. We DO ANTICIPATE THAT. There may be some malware sitting on people systems as they get back to work and quote. Imagine an infestation of evil maids. If you must but at least take a look at security upon your return another issue that might be easily overlooked by organizations continuing to work remotely. Does your cyber insurance cover risks of telework? Jd super advise you to check your policies and finally Monday is Memorial Day in the United States. And we'll be observing the federal holiday with a break from publication. We'll be back as usual on. Tuesday may twenty six in the meantime spare a thought and memory for the fallen for their families and for those alongside whom they served and now a word from our sponsor psychotic psychotic protects companies from cyber attacks by developing innovative technologies that secure privileged accounts across the modern enterprise psychotic recently partnered with Cyber Berry to conduct a global survey of IT professionals focusing on how organizations are implementing least privilege. Their new survey report shows over. Privileged users are still a big challenge for. It professionals the report reveals important insights for anyone planning or already down the path with their own least privilege security program from the survey. They found that even though least privilege is a top or urgent priority. Most organizations struggle with complexity and user complaints when implementing a least privilege security strategy go to Thi- CONIC DOT com slash cyber wire to download the report now and get more details about the survey results the key takeaways and recommendations for how to ensure success in your least privileged implementation again. That's Thi- conic dot com slash cyber wire the download this special report on the state of least privilege and we thank psychotic for sponsoring our show. Pw Singer is author of a number of noteworthy books including like war the weaponization of social media and Ghost Fleet which he co authored with August coal. Their latest effort is the techno thriller burn in a novel of the Real Robotic Revolution. W Singer joined me to discuss the book. What we did with burden is that we designed into it from the very. Start the idea that it could be a blend of both storytelling but also that people would learn from it. So it's a it's a new kind of a book it's a mix of novel and nonfiction so it's a techno thriller at follows a character an FBI agent twenty years from now set in Washington DC as. She's on the hunt for a new kind of terrorist. Who's using new cyber means irrelevant to what you and I are gathered to talk about to conduct the types of talks. That weren't possible before in fact to hold entire city hostage but along the way baked into the story are some three hundred explanations and predictions that are drawn from nonfiction style research and literally. They've got the footnotes in the taxed. So it might be anything from our when two characters talking and in the distance a delivery drone with six rotors flies overhead. It'll have a footnote to show. That's not what singer dreamed up. It actually has to be Amazon Patent for that specific design. You know you mentioned The extensive and notes for the book and and it really is sort of a hybrid. I've ever seen a work of fiction. That is so well documented The way that you and your co author have done here. And I'm I'm wondering. Can you give us some insights on These boundaries that you set up for yourselves I it's it's almost like you. You put a certain set of rules like a puzzle that you had to solve by Not Allowing yourself sort of hand waiving that you'll see with with many books that deal with the future the deal of technology. Yeah I. It's a lot more challenging a be a lot easier if you could just say. Oh and then the you know the the good guy pulled out is XYZ thing in solved it or the way some of the TV shows are where we have the system. Clicky clack okay. We're in and but again it goes back this concept of a cross between a novel and nonfiction For some people. It's just hopefully going to be great summer read. Now I don't know whether it's GonNa be a re While they're still stuck at home or maybe they'll be allowed to go to the beach but some people will just enjoy that way for other people they're going to go. Ooh and maybe look at dot footnote. And that's because I. We spent literally years on this double track one which is no building up the characters and the scenes but sometimes you hit the idea of a puzzle. You know character faces a certain challenge How do I 'cause this bad thing to happen? Okay what would a real world bad guy do or the bad guy is just done x. How would a real world? Fbi agent or a Marine respond. Yeah well The the book is certainly very entertaining. It's quite a page Turner but You'll beyond that. You're going to have to have that quote out there and blast it out to everyone really no but I I'm curious Beyond just the entertainment factor. What are the things that you hope people take away from it? A couple of things one is this challenge of understanding the world. That's changing around us. We have a certain irony plain out right now. Where the technology's of science fiction they're coming true and yet science fiction hasn't well equipped us for either. It's something that is never going to happen in the distant future. You know. The the Secretary of Treasury said that automation is not something we have to think about for fifty to a hundred years in quote. And that's why it's not even on his Not even on my radar screen and we talked about it. We're already seen the effect of of automation in everything from Critical infrastructure systems. Be a regular business. Be It at a power system out of hospital. We see automation playing out in our homes. And we're only at the start of this so you have that one its way off in the distance and then you have the other that it's all about you know the only risk factor to think about is in a one day. They might kill us all the the killer robot narrative. It's gotten so much attention. Know we've got all of these issues. We have to think about everything from how it changes our economy how it changes our politics. It changes our security so the book raises these issues but also it helps share the basics of them for people that don't want to read you know an academic white paper and I'm academic and I get most people don't Wanna read it so you know we explain through the story everything from How a works to some of the issues. We have to figure out like The concept of Algorithm bias. What happens when the machines train the wrong way and it gives you a Bum? Steer we explain that but in a way that you don't feel like you're being you know spoon-fed the the vegetables So I hope it's helpful to people in understanding what looms and giving them sort of the basic terms and concepts and then you know maybe we also steer towards certain things that hey you have to fix this if we want to be a lot safer. That's P W singer. The book is titled Burnin. There's much more to our conversation. And you can check that out when you sign up for cyber wire pro and now a word from our sponsor black cloak securing your company's data intellectual property and reputation is job number one but you have a big gap you can only secure your executives computers and devices that are part of the corporate network. You can't control the cybersecurity or privacy of their homes devices personal accounts or other family members attackers. Know This. And especially in these trying. Times are actively exploiting the soft underbelly of the company by targeting your executives digital lives black cloak cyber security platform solves your coverage. They're trusted team. Actively protects all personal devices accounts homes and family members. So that a breach on the personal side doesn't take down your company in fact over thirty seven percent of black cloak. Customers have an intrusion discovered during their on boarding onboard. Your executive team in under a week. Protect your company by protecting your executives. The learn more and partner with black cloak visit black cloak dot. Io that's black cloak dot io and we thank black cloak for sponsoring our show. And I am pleased to be joined once again by Yohannes Elrick. He is the Dean of research at the Sans Technology Institute and he is also host of the storm. Cast PODCAST YOHANNES. Always great to have you back You all have been tracking some reflective DNS De dos attacks Philipson here what's going on? Yes I'll be just want to know what's happening with these attacks. They used to be way big like a few years ago when he hit some large banks but hadn't really heard much about these attacks. So what we did. Is We set up a little honeypot. That basically acted as a reflective Guinness servers. It could be used to amplify these attacks be put of course. I'm controls around it. That wouldn't cause any damage but then we just looked. How's it going to be used. We did see actually quite a number of Reflective attacks being launched. What sort of notices a couple of things first of all the targets for small businesses are hobbies sites and things that looks like the banks the large targets that used to be in the news like if few years ago well they found bark arounds furnace as I see they. They managed to buy their way out of it. That's what you do some surveys. You'll buy more bandwith To block these attacks these small companies L. Data. On have the option to do that. Can you give us a little bit of the background? What's going on? We're talking about a reflective DNS Diaz tank. Yes all the weight. Essentially virk is that and had hacker will spoof. Cleary saw bill claim to be like that small business. And they'll ask a question and the questions very small like hey comey everything you know about. This particular domain district the host's name and then the server that's badly configured in this case will respond with a very large response now responsible go to the victim that the attacker claimed to represent and the this can lead to amplification zoff's of the order of twenty to a hundred since it's DNS. It's also kind of difficult to defend against. You can't just easily block the S. You have to be a little bit more selective in how you filter this and so the amplification plus the fact that these responses come from Valette innocent bystander. Dns servers are really It makes it difficult to defend against and also The attack and be quite massive There can be no gigabyte. Gigabits per second which again for smaller website is difficult. Defend can be quite expensive. Do you have any insights as to why these small businesses and hobby sites End Up being targets but sometimes a little bit hard to tell a thing. We noticed a lot of irons. See Servers and yes. Irs's the around IRC has historically been sort of a fan target forties sort of nuisance denial of service attacks kits getting angry at each other mobile way back. When I started his business was like around two thousand. There was this game of Jousting there to people sort of gave each other their Ip address and then launch of service attack against each other and whatever trucked off the Irish channel. I lost in the process. They took down. Of course a couple of is peace and such well. It's all right sort of an interesting little side note on this. I noticed that a lot of DOT GOV domains are being abused here and to reason for this. Is that the gove mandates. The use of Guinness SEC now. Dna SEC is security technologies would think as a good thing but it does make the response of Lord. Large aren't because no you have to include all these keys and such of all websites. Peace Corps Dot Gov is like one off the top targets. We have seen there. There's a small irony there all right Interesting as always Johanna Sell Rick. Thanks for joining us. And that's the cyber wire links to all of today's stories. Check out our daily briefing at the cyber wire dot com and for professionals and cybersecurity leaders. Who WANT TO STAY. Abreast of this rapidly evolving field. Sign up for cyber wire pro. It'll save you time and keep you informed. Listen for US on your Alexa. Smart Speaker to don't miss this weekend's research Saturday where I'm joined by Alex Tilly. He's a senior security researcher at secure works. We're going to be discussing some of their ransomware research and the effects of business email compromise. That's research Saturday. Check it out thanks to all of our sponsors for making the cyber wire possible especially are supporting sponsor observe it approved point company and the leading insider threat management platform learn more at observe. It DOT com. The cyber wire podcast is probably produced in Maryland out of the startup studios of data tribe. Where they're co building the next generation of cyber security teams and technologies are amazing. Cyber wire team is Elliott Peltzman. Precaut- Stefan vizier. Kelsey bond. Tim No Dr Joe. Kerrigan A -Tario Benny Elon. Dick Valenki Jeanne Johnson Bennett. Mo- Chris. Russell John Patrick Jennifer Ibon Ricard. He's guilty and I'm Dave Bittner. Thanks for listening. We'll see you back here next week.

US Dave bittner Indonesia Uk McAfee Peter Singer FBI Response Security Rick Us Google Dan mcdaniel General Election Commission Pdf Reuters Menlo Park Bank of America Fox foursquare
Facebook Photo Fallout

Pro Rata

10:34 min | 2 years ago

Facebook Photo Fallout

"Welcome back is pro rata. A podcast addict, just ten minutes to get you smarter on the collision of tech business and politics. I'm damper magnet. Today's show beeping future. Just got much hazier and crypto companies come to Washington DC. The first. The big shakeup at Facebook, five years ago, the social network paid one billion dollars to choir, Instagram, the photo sharing app that literally just days earlier was valued at half that by venture capitalists, the tech press was kind of split at the time particularly because of that big price. But today there is no question that it was a masterstroke by Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg Instagram's a huge driver of growth for Facebook, and it helped brush off challenges from rivals, like Snapchat. But last night, the two co, founders of Instagram, Kevin system and Mike Kreiger who had stayed with the company announced that they're leaving no word yet on their future plans, except they wanna work together on something new and we could just chalk this up to two guys who have had their time and have to move on. But there seems to be an emerging trend here, Facebook, several months ago, co-founder of what's app, which Facebook bought in two thousand fourteen for nineteen billion dollars, not only left the company, but also its board of directors and in late two thousand sixteen the remaining co, founder of Oculus of virtual. Oh reality company that Facebook bought also quit in short, something smells rotten and Menlo Park where Facebook used to have a reputation for being the big tech company that founders wanted to sell to the one that let them do things their way. It's not yet clear exactly what's changed, but there's speculation in it's growing already this morning that outside pressures like fake news and the Russia scandals, etc. Have affected Mark zuckerberg's management style, making him more difficult to work with. And no matter the reason there are consequences to the Instagram founders, quitting I, it might be harder for Facebook to expand through other acquisitions of other hot startups. Second, it could create a new opportunity for rivals to eat into these services like Instagram, for example, Snapchat just struck a partnership with Amazon, and there's some talk that that's prelude to an acquisition there which could become a massive new rival. The bottom line here, Facebook isn't liking any of this in fifteen seconds. We'll go deeper with axios chief technology correspondent in afraid, but I this, there's. More news out there than ever before. But these days it's harder than ever to find it and to know what to trust. Axios AM takes effort out of getting smart by synthesizing the ten stories that will drive the day and telling you I, they matter, subscribe at sign up dot, axios dot com. And now back to the pro rata podcast. We're joined now by INA, freed chief technology correspondent for axios. So let's start with this. How important right now is Instagram to Facebook? It's critical. When Facebook bought Instagram, it was the future. It was kinda thin. The distance these days it's critical. That's where the growth is. And the main reason is simple. Kids don't want to use the same social network, their parents to. I'm on Facebook, there's no way my kid's gonna wanna be there, but they wouldn't mind being Instagram, which they don't exactly associate with Facebook even though Facebook owns it. Yeah, that's been the incredible thing is people like I'm leaving Facebook and Instagram, so it's really worked well for Facebook to have these multiple brands, but Instagram is the young hip. Cool. One. I'm curious if Facebook were to want to buy a nother, Instagram might even have anti-trust problems right now, like buying it. Whatever was, I guess, five years ago or six years ago, that was key. It was huge and the fact that they were able to do it then was big. And I think you're right. I think they would have a very tough time buying a sizable competitor. I think if you are in the department for. Facebook, the key is spotting that app super early, so it's not an antitrust issue so that it's a tiny rival, you know, they couldn't buy a sizable rival, I'm guessing, and it's worked both ways, right? Like for Instagram, even though it clearly is worth more than the billion dollars now that got bought for originally, this deal worked out well for them to. 'cause if they'd remained independent, it's entirely possible. It's something like Snapchat would have overtaken them for sure. I mean, and, or you know, we've seen Facebook's pretty good cloning. So you know, I think that's what they'll have to do with the next Instagram which they have with Snapchat, and I think they will have to do with the next one. So it did work out for Instagram and don't forget Instagram had critical mass and a few things going for it, but it didn't have a lot of defensible turf there. I mean, it was it was a photo sharing? Yeah. Okay. Now this thing last night where the two founders of Instagram are leaving to you, what does the say about the broader face? Because again, this isn't one guy leaving to spend more time with his family because he got a better job. This is to people leaving at the same time and in a at least public resignation statement that they. They don't think Burke. Yeah. I mean, I think you know, it's always hard as a foundry. You know, they the fact that they would leave at some point isn't a huge shock, but it is important is important that it's now and I think there is a reason I think you've seen Facebook grow increasingly interested and meddlesome in the social networks at acquired what's up and Instagram. Whereas in the early days they really left them alone. They said, we want them to grow the way they were growing. And now they're like, oh, we need those growth dollars. And you mentioned what's Facebook's made three huge acquisitions and his time, Instagram. What's happened also Oculus and in the case, now of what's up the co, founder that even got a board seat, but he what? Maybe three months ago, four months ago said he was leaving is this as you say, reflection that Facebook is no longer a good place for startup founders to sell their companies to and live. I don't think it's necessarily not a good place, but I think it's not the place it was. You're not going to sell your giant company to face punk while you're probably not gonna sell it for antitrust reasons. But even if you could, you're not going to be able to sell it and expect to be left alone. Loan, and that's not true of most companies. Most companies don't really leave their acquisitions alone. You think that's just Facebook's maturity or how much of it and now not even conspiracy theories, but how much of that do you think is Facebook over the last year at this point has been under an incredible amount of outside pressure because of the political stuff, the the Russia's stuff and sucker been under pressure before because the stock prices and I o that didn't go well, but never anything that's been going kind of at the core of his mission. Like all of this stuff has been in my reading too much into this to think that maybe one of the reason a bunch of these folks who are direct reports to him are leaving is he is no longer the exact same person to work with that he might have been before. Well, you know, certainly wouldn't surprise me if all the pressure is taking a toll on his management style. But beyond that, I think the issue probably the core issue is Facebook can't afford to leave them alone and it's not. And so it's just a lot less creative freedom, a lot less canvas that founders tend to like. And you know, I mean, it's not an easy time to be at Facebook or to be Mark Zuckerberg or. To be any top executive there. So now you have these two guys who create Instagram together, sell it for a billion dollars. It becomes far the top and it photos or how people talk to each other. Now they're the kings of that. There's been lots of speculation about what they're gonna do next. They haven't said anything sept-. We wanna work on new ideas. Is there any reason to believe they could do something that tries to compete effectively with Facebook or with Instagram, or do you expect that they're going to do something completely new? I would think they would do something largely new impart because the Keita Instagram wasn't features or anything else. It was really building that critical mass which is super tough to do. You know, I do think whatever that next idea is, they'll be no shortage of people ready to find it. I saw tons of VC's last night on Twitter, praising them singing their praises. So if they wonder marketing e, I our job, I think there are plenty entrepreneur residence that does make sense. Final thing for you, do you feel long term, you know, if you look at Facebook and when you hear their quarterly earnings calls, etc. Instagram has really helped drive their growth. It's been a huge driver there. Do you think going forward if we're. Having this conversation a year, maybe in two years, do these resignations significantly impact that growth? In other words, are these two guys that integral Instagram, Facebook, and put it in another way? The question is, can they keep innovating and is there enough creative blood in instrument? I don't think we really know. Certainly if I were Facebook, I would be looking throughout the company for the next good ideas and then matching them with Instagram, the product. That's how I would be thinking of it. That makes sense. Thank you so much in a free chief technology correspondent for access. My final two right after this axios gives you the news and analysis. You need to get smarter faster on the most important topics in our unique smart brevity format. We cover topics from politics to science and media to tech subscribe to get smarter faster at sign up dot axios dot com. And now back to the program podcast. Now it's time for my final two and first up is the hazy future for keeping companies like jewel. So earlier this month, the federal food and Drug administration sent a letter to all the major e cigarette companies, giving them sixty days to prove they can keep flavored products away from minors. So there was some thinking, initially, these companies would reply by the end of October, and the FDA would spend months reviewing in negotiating, but that doesn't seem so likely anymore. FDA Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb. This morning appeared in axios event in DC where he said to expect action by sometime in November. That could mean within two months, you'll have flavored. Vaping pods pulled from store shelves, and there could even be a rulemaking process launch to end online sales of all tobacco products. What golly seems to realize that the keeping companies whose products often include more nicotine than traditional cigarettes might be unable to meet his challenge about keeping them out of the hands of minors. Even if these companies develop age verification systems online and at the point of sale, there's just no way for them to definitively police. This stuff. For example, online retailers can have research. Sale of the product, and there could be convenience store owners who simply look the other way. So if I was somebody who'd invested in jewel at fifteen billion dollar valuation with Chapin just couple months ago, I might now be reaching for a cigarette or maybe something even a little stronger. And finally a group of crypto, currency executives and investors are holding a round table in Washington today on the future of their industry. It was put together by Ohio Republican, congressman named Warren Davidson, and it'll look at things like initial coin offerings and crypto ATF's. And if regulators will call all currencies securities or just some of them. And on that last point Davidson this morning used an analogy on television of how apple stock is security, but individual iphones aren't. It's actually not bad. It's not perfect, but it's not bad. Anyway. The bottom line here is that crypto companies actually want regulations. They want rules of the road, and today may be the first major step on that path, and we're done so much thanks for listening to us and to my producers. Adam Grassi in Tim show vers have a great national comic book day and we'll be back today. Zero with another pro rata podcast.

Facebook Instagram Mark zuckerberg axios founder Washington Snapchat food and Drug administration Russia technology correspondent axios Snapchat Menlo Park Ohio co-founder Twitter
Ellen Goodman on Smart Cities

Good Code

25:47 min | 1 year ago

Ellen Goodman on Smart Cities

"The big question for me when you ask about what's the texture of life gonna feel like is gonna be like that sort of totally act mediated? And what is the price that we're gonna pay for that? Have you ever dreamt of a city in which every single interaction you had when smoothly, you'd never wait for the bus because you'd know exactly when it will be at your stop you never be stuck in traffic. Thanks to intelligent algorithms and forget about destroying your shoes snowy sidewalks, because smart tiles would absorb that snow in real time. Welcome to good coat a weekly podcast on ethics in our digital world. My name is she lobby. I'm visiting journalist at Cornell text digital life initiative, and I'm your host, French. Yes. But you know that by now in two episode we speak about smart, CDs. Our guest is Ellen Goodman. She's the co director and co founder of the Rutgers institute for information policy and law in Camden, New Jersey, she's currently working on a book about smart CD governance. She's also conducting research on one of the hottest smart city projects at the moment, sidewalk Toronto in which alphabet sidewalk labs. Tends to turn to Ron eastern water firms into a neighborhood and Tirlian built from the internet. Should we be excited? Should we be kept ical? We sat down with Ellen Goodman, last January in Philadelphia to talk about the future of urban lights. We have this desire, this natural desire to live in a smart city, 'cause it's a fish in its gleaming, and something we may not citizens think about. But our city leaders think about is attractive to global capital. So part of the allure of all that it's also in that, that the dangerous and the risks lie because what we know now from our last twenty years of binging on digital technology. Is that it holds a lot of promises? But if. If rolled out in a way that ignores the public interest and values that are harder to understand our ticket late and actualize than efficiency goals, if we're not attentive to those things, we end up in a place where we feel are human agency is compromised in our democracies or compromise. So big picture. I think those are the risks the same risks that we faced with digital information technologies we face with these kinds of digital urban technologies so more. Specifically, what are some of the biggest risks? Let's put aside because that will take us to a whole nother area sort of the risks of bias. There's another area that I'm also leaving to others which actually has gotten the most attention, which will be most familiar to people, which is privacy. So that's a whole nother basket of concern, the things that I'm more focused on. On partly because I come from a telecom background. It's more. The infrastructural concerns that we might have. So I'll just mention two things which is private and concentrated control over urban functions. And the other is kind of a loss of democratic accountability, you know, we know that these digital technologies and especially when they require massive amounts of big data, they tend towards concentration, we have seen big companies operating in this space. We've seen sort of concentration in specific applications, like criminal Justice or like these family services algorithms. So we have to be on the lookout for that, right? And we actually I think need policies that try to advance small businesses local businesses so that it's not big BMX coming in and taking control, because when they take control as much concern as we've had over Google and Facebook take. In control of our information space to me. It's even scarier, if they're taking control of our grid of our water supply of our transportation of our office space in our housing. So there's that issue of control which, you know, so you can think of economically, as competition, you can think of it democratically, as sort of Tani, and the other piece of this. I mentioned was our loss of democratic accountability. There's a risk with all these automated systems that has been well studied is that when you ask for an explanation or you wanna understand why something has happened. The answer is the machine said. So when we don't really know because it's to complicate in the outcomes are impenetrable, Zach book sub blackbox, exactly in the smart city context, there's a risk of that pervading decisions that the city makes about trash pickup and bus schedules. And the. Development of park land, or the maintenance of facilities or the opening and closing of libraries and other kinds of public accommodation and amenities and so on and so forth, these decisions that were used to being made in messy and perhaps sometimes corrupt. But usually relatively penetrable processes when you've got sort of a digital light layer. That's ingesting a lot of data and that is spitting out answers as to where resources should go. There's a risk that there's no accountability there. And I guess let me add their particular ways of living and doing business that so far the smart city mentality favors. And so, I think we can think of this by analogy to digital platforms, and in a way it's the same thing it's kind of the platform is Asian of city life. So if you think of. Of the gig economy, your Uber's in your Airbnb is right. They privilege efficiency, they don't particularly value other kinds of public interests, like employment or the quiet of certain streets. So they're public interests that are just not included in the platforms sense of the good, and what one of the things that we see with kind of smart city, rhetoric and plans is, especially to extent that they are fastened onto this tech kind of world view is that other that kind of platform is Asian, just in time, everything as a service comes to invade more and more territory. So you begin to think of housing in the same way, and we kind of have this. Right. So the we work model for offices and the, the co housing, which is, which is a great idea in many ways. But there's a risk that it becomes basically a housing platform. Where there are couple of entities that have all the data about that and may have ownership interests in the real estate. And everyone else uses the space in, in time housing as service way. And in some ways, it's very efficient and in many ways, it could help solve housing crises, and much more. Flexible and can give people the kind of very short term leases that they want, but there are other externalities that may not be fully accounted for, in the model about neighborhood community peace and quiet. So I you know, I think this third cluster of concerns is think we need to be very vigilant about the theory of the good. That is driving some of these innovations, and make sure that we're okay with the with the world and the third of sort of value chain that is creating with an officiant world, right? With officiency sort of over everything. When thing that was going to ask you, it's philosophic. Question. One thing one can wonder is is it a good thing? Even if we the smart city goes as we wanted to so taking all the other fears assigned it's respecting privacy, and it respects human dignity. What have all of these important values? It would probably it's L about officiency takeout. Serendipity out of the picture. Is that CT? We wanna leave in maybe humans don't meet one another in the street anymore. Those who construct and our boosters of smart cities, might tell you that a more efficiently planned and utilize city can create more opportunities for serendipity. So one of the smart city applications, I believe is about sort of sensors on park benches. So we know what benches are getting used who's using them. We know where to put more benches that if we sense that better if we sense, our environment, better plan accordingly. Suddenly we have more spaces for people to be in public and bump into each. Each other. So I don't think we should necessarily equate smart city in ovation slash developments with a loss of serendipity. But I, I get your point is that if we're efficiently whist from here, and there in autonomous vehicles, and all of our needs are delivered to our doors, or we even living in a city anymore. We just living in isolated pods Ken, we design for friction which is which would drive an engineer, I think undercurrent kinda value systems crazy because that's what they're trying to get out of the systems. But maybe we need to be thoughtful about where efficiency yields to friction, the idea that private companies are put in charge of previously publicly managed task so basically doing government work. Why is that an issue just feel offically theoretically couldn't that be more efficient or you're talking about less less of accountability? But if we designed it the right way with. With transparent algorithms, and a partnership that worked y need that be issue after all, while so public private partnerships have been around for a long time. Now, I tend to be a critic of public private partnerships in general. I mean at least we know we've seen some real problems and charter school movement and private prisons, and there's reason to want to cabin the role of private entities. They generally for profit motive and so that may not be consistent with the public interest motive that cities have, but I don't think they necessarily, they're necessarily a problem. I think the problem that we've seen with smart cities, sort of writ, large with smart city projects. Writ small is that cities have not had the wherewithal to kind of take charge of the relationship in their procurement contracts. And in their passing the baton to the private entity Dave really passed it with not enough. Rings attached. And this is certainly been true with data that could be changed. Their definitely some really forward leaning cities, that are beefing up their capability with chief, data officers, and chief information officers who are really trying to kind of claw back. Their rightful domain is the senior partner in these partnerships. I, I don't think they have to be a problem, but they have been a problem. I just wanted to ask you about some of those smart city projects that make the headlines and there are being built by the tech companies, so Facebook Google Facebook village in Menlo Park. California dubbed zek town by the press. We have a piece of land in the Arizona, Arizona desert. That was bought by Bill Gates and we don't really know what it's gonna be. But it's going to be cold Belmont, and it's gonna be smart seedy. And of course, we have site, walk Toronto, the child of Google, when, when Menlo Park when the Facebook village was I talked about every member, the New York Times asked. Do people love, tech company so much they will leave inside them in that sort of the question, do we love them so much? And that we trust them blind lease that also part of the of the problem I, I wouldn't wanna leave in Facebook land. I think but maybe some people find find attractive. I don't think we know much about what those things are going to be. And right now, those companies are not very popular right? So but has changed a lot. Yeah. I mean, the to the shadow the big was CISCO's originally CISCO's project. In South Korea wisps to be, you know, one of these shining smart cities. That was going to attract everyone was gonna wanna live in. I think it's underperformed at has not. It's occupancy rate has been disappointing. I've seen many explanations for that. It's to stare all it's inconvenient. People were put off by all the surveillance, though. I think it is not as highly surveilled as was originally -ticipant did. So I think it's hard to know when. When there are plans, sort of occupancy plans, whether or not, they pan out. But look, I mean, this is not new either. So, you know, one of your regional kind of smart cities in the United States was DisneyWorld, which was Walt Disney's idea of a city that was gonna need everyone's needs. And it was gonna look like smalltown America. And, you know, and it didn't pan out in some of the, the company towns that early industrialists built where all your needs to be taken care of and you do your shopping, and you would live and you would work there. So there have always been these utopian slash industrialists slash capitalists. Paternalist resonant society. Yes. You know, I think they will attract people if if the price is right. And they, you know, sort of deliver an fine not pen out like, and they might not tanned, and they might not pan out and I'm less interested in slash scared of slash hopeful about them as I am. And I think it's much. More likely that, these companies will find a way to penetrate this places where we do live. You know, I think there we talk about voice and exit. You can raise your voice, and change, your place relive or you can leave it. But we know that exit is not always available as particularly not available to lower income people, and so much more concerned about the entry of smart city technologies into places where people already live. So let's talk a little bit more about once Pacific exemple sidewalk Toronto. So I understand that you ding research about it right now. Just explain to us why you decided to look into this particular project sidewalk labs is a sister company of Google. So it's alphabet company. It responded to an RSP although it was also, we think kind of instrumental in creating this RFP to create a master plan for a twelve acre plot of land in the Portland's area on the water in Toronto. It's, it's an obvious choice to study. Because it's just it's unique the fact that a private company, and the fact that it's Google is creating the master plan of what will be a city is already sort of a private user patient of governance. Right. I mean cities often will contract out master planning to private planners. But here, it's really Google is driving. This is. So that's already if interest. But really, you know, I think what's interesting about it is that they are spending a lot of money so fifty million US dollars just to do the master plan on the publicity around it. So it's a chance to really see because there's so much communication about it, and so much vision and language and reporting and public meeting, how does a company like Google kind of harness utopian progressive ideas of how a city should operate the phrase that its using. To do those things is what it calls the digital layer to us. My co-authors Julia Powell's on this to us. This whole notion of a digital layer is really fascinating because it ties in to kind of telecom concepts of infrastructure, and rod band, and fiber. It is an infrastructural layer. So it immediately brings to mind kind of governance mechanisms that you might wanna have in place, there to ensure that you're taking care of access your access of consumers, but also access of other entities that need to plug into that digital layer to offer their services, and it also brings to mind, you know, the sort of ubiquity of internet of everything surveillance, because the digital layer runs through all of the other functionalities systems of a city. So what we're doing right now because it's very much in progress in it's changing very rapidly. And there's a lot of now public engagement, but what we're trying to do. Is take a snapshot of this project at the time at which the RFP was answered in maybe a little bit beyond that to look at the vision. And what is it teach us about what we need to be cautious Val, the questions we've been talking about how do we avoid concentrated control? How do we avoid sort of democratic deficit and loss of accountability? How do we recognize what futures? The digital layer is pushing us towards and grapple with whether or not, that's the future, we want to do we know how it's gonna feel. So I mean first of all we have to say it's twelve acres. So it's sizeable, but it's a small neighborhood there aspirin is for close to five hundred acres larger area that is really not on the table. But clearly yet, right? Because the systems that they're imagining only make sense and much larger area. For example, a Thomas vehicles, you don't need. Thomas vehicles in twelve acres. So that's one basic question is how big is this neighborhood gonna be the visions? Are for the built space in the built environment are pretty glorious, right? That's not something that the tight walk labs will be responsible for they will develop this place, but they won't have the building. Right. So that's something they can envision it's not something they can control. But I think it seems like it will have lots of green spaces in lots of public amenities and various officiant, transport. And I'm today if it snows, the tiles will yes or the snow stuff like that ice skated pretty cool heated straits and canopies than right? So that's sort of what I mean by the topi- in, but, but will it feel like to live there? I think that's the question and I think that's really dependent on how the data works whether or not everything is quote unquote, as service delivered over platforms that are mediated by apps. I don't know if you've had this experience that, you know, I've been in a city where I just wanted to get the airport bus and to get the airport bus you had to download the app you had to pay. Your phone. The had to download the app and yet to give all these permissions to the app in order to get the but we're gonna use one time in your life. You know, that's the kind of platforms -ation app economy that we may not want in every aspect of our life. So the big question for me when you ask about what's the texture of life gonna feel like is it gonna be like that sort of totally app? Mediated. And what is the price that we're gonna pay for that? But it said this moment. And that's another reason why think the sidewalk labs project is, so interesting is because there's a beginning to it right now is the beginning to it, and they're sort of inflection to inflection point where we can have those conversations yet that the, the Atlantic coal did Google's Guinea pig into the question. I guess the reason why so much is at stake. Is that the my mushroom afterwards late we might have CDs designed the same ways being built around the world? And so the wave with these this one is is important. Right. So google. Has or sidewalk labs has what they call patient capital. Right. So that's why they're able to spend fifty million dollars basically on PR. Yeah. Design and PR. Why are they doing that one place? You can look for why they're doing it is, what did they do with Google fiber? It's Google fiber was a couple of years ago. Now they had a big competition to among cities, sort of like Amazon did with its headquarters. Right, who of a lucky city be that we will come into, and we will put down fiber to compete with Comcast. And for Reisen, they did that in Kansas City, and they did it in Austin, they didn't few other cities, and it's very expensive capital intensive business to lay down fiber, and they were never doing it because they wanted to get into that business. They were doing it in part to sort of experiment with what it would take on. But I think in larger part because they were gonna make their money on top of that infrastructure. And they wanted to go the incumbents to build out faster, so they. Wanted to be sort of a competitive spur. So here was smart cities. It could be that sidewalk labs right wants to try it out here and then wants to take the show on the road and roll this out another places. It could also be that they want these sorts of experiments to be copied by other companies because they don't need to be in this digital layer business. They wanna be in the absence services and the data gathering that rides on top of it. And so they wanna be a spur to other companies to do it at it could be the ideal place on earth to leave in, and it could be a surveillance nightmare, and all of what we talked about, where there's no, there's a passively in known no accountability. What is your research suggestions in terms of the Wade's going into the third possibility to, which is that it just doesn't happen that there's just too much friction and they pull out and that, that doesn't seem likely does seem likely that something will happen? There were a lot of people. Who quit over privacy concerns, a lot of firings. And right, right. So it hasn't gone completely smoothly and to rights given all of that. You could imagine a situation where they sort of bad on Toronto being a place to do this, and it turns out, it's just too much hassle. And maybe they go somewhere else, but I think it will proceed, I think it'll probably be sorry to disappoint. You knew it's something of between those poles. Right. Will will neither be a utopian destination, nor will it be a dystopia one? And I don't think that the stakeholders are going to allow it to be this disturbed man. There's there some actually it's, it's been interesting to see what they've proposed about a data trust. Which is a new way to think about how to manage this data resource there. Some real problems with their proposal. But the idea in general is promising weathering. The idea is that the data you collect as a sidewalk labs, or any other contr. Tractor if they're collecting data the data would go would reside in a data trust. It's sort of less open than open data. That's not that, that data would be there would be a free for all for access to that data. But the trustees would provide access on certain terms. It's moving so quickly. It's really difficult to say with any confidence, but something will happen at it will probably much be much less ambitious than we saw Navision document. We'll know a lot more in the spring when the master plan comes out which may already be as sort of retrenchment from the most ambitious plans. It you'll hopeful that it'll be molded or modified Yahoo conform with values of privacy and the ass, Lor. Unhoped huddling helpful. Yeah. Just to end. If there was one thing more generally that you can change either in the way, we build technology, or in the way we interact with technology or consuming, or in the way, we think of technology or the wave technologies being rolled out. Out. What would that be you could change? One thing is to make sure we're going in the direction that is best store that you would want to see. I will say one thing that it encompasses many things, which is more human centered design. And I think it, you know it relates to what we were talking about before, with introducing friction not making efficiency the beyond end. Also, we the administration of public affairs and the way we structure rules and laws. We have always had officiency as one goal and then there have been other goals, and especially in the field that I know best telecom in media, we've often chosen less efficient solutions, because they advance other values like fairness local autonomy. We do that in our analog administration, and we need to do that, in our digital administration. Well elegant, thank you so much time, his grains, have you? That was good codes collaboration. In with Cornel texted to life initiative this podcast. He's produce, edited and hosted by yours. Truly Debbie dot tree is our Meeks engineer Zoe sorry, neck is our music composer. Thanks for listening. And if you liked it spread the word around, you leave us review on the apple podcasts up or wherever you listen to podcasts. But most importantly, tune back in next week.

Google Toronto Facebook Ellen Goodman United States Cornell Menlo Park engineer Philadelphia Camden New Jersey Ron Airbnb Tirlian Bill Gates South Korea Tani Rutgers institute Zach
Venture Capital is the fuel that helps entrepreneurs launch their rocket ships

Pulse of AI

35:21 min | 9 months ago

Venture Capital is the fuel that helps entrepreneurs launch their rocket ships

"Aw Cool too. I in the poll survey. I'm Jason Stoughton here. In Silicon Valley Venture capital is the fuel that helps entrepreneurs launched the rocket ships on this podcast. I sit down with shocking Farshid flex capital where we talk about. His career journey explore questions around the current and future state of AI. And we dig down into just a few of Lexus. Many investments including Brain Health Zouk Eva mythic implant. This a really fun interview and I hope you enjoy. I started started out by asking Shaheen to tell me a little bit about lex capital venture capital firm been around for about fifteen years and we invest across technology in healthcare. We have offices in New York in Menlo Park. And we've funded over one hundred twenty when he companies over the course of six funds we've about two and a half billion under management we love to invest in seed and series companies and partner up with amazing founders are leveraging Special Technology London. Would you believe that our properties so tell me a little bit about your journey. How did you get to where you are today? It was a serendipitous when I started life with a A huge passion for cars computers in space grew up in the bay area. Dad Dad was an engineer so I watched a lot of science fiction growing up a lot of Star Trek Knight Rider and developed a passion for making the next great gadgets and machines means I wanted to become a car designer and ended up going to college during the Dot Com bubble so greed took immune to doing computer science in electro engineering with the expectation of buying fancy cars and planes after starting dot com company. And unfortunately I graduated in the bust and so I decided to pursue my passion for cars in of all places. I went to Detroit after seeing the empty parking. Lots in the empty cubicle areas my interviews here in Silicon Valley immediately after the bust and spent some time there and came back to California Shortly after and went to graduate school gene. Watch won't you nearing I was lucky enough to have a very entrepreneurial Ph D. advisers so I started a company around my research. I learned the hard way that it's one thing to have have a really interesting technology. Another to have a really interesting business. So I decided to take some time off to a post doc who some research rush and get a better understanding of business and so that prompted me to reach out to venture capital firms and offer my expertise critise and semiconductors electroncs to help him find new investments. Diligence them so I sent a bunch of blind emails to venture firms across Silicon Valley offering to help them find new companies. I had a lot of friends that were joining. Startups in starting companies in the fabulous semi conductor space which in the mid-2000s was still somewhat and a lot of them said. Hey Short you know send us deals and Lux capital said. Hey listen we'll give you a business card and email address in go. A lot in source deals on our behalf and so I actually did that for about a year and a half dollars might start off idea and doing a post doc to pay my bills and about a year and a half later. They asked me to join and here I am. That is an absolutely fantastic story. I love that so one the core things at least in my opinion that makes entrepreneurs venture capitalists and scientists unique is their ability to think outside outside of the box but more than that sort of look at things differently. And I know that when you're a teenager you went and lived overseas for a while and I'm just curious. Do you think that that helped you. helped you sort of gain that ability to look at things from a different perspective and I'd love free to talk a little bit about that. Absolutely it was a Interesting experience I moved to Iran When I was thirteen years old and spent spent my teenage years there and I quickly came to realize is how diverse a relatively close-knit population would be? I had friends and relatives that were as versed with social of social norms and technologies Ask Ask folks are here in the United States and people who probably live the same way as their ancestors did for hundreds of years and how wow those people can get along in Iraq and actually engage with products and technology a very similar way and as I came to appreciate how important it is for any product to have a diverse spectrum of applications and be able to resonate resonate with a diverse population. And you see something's being done the wrong way here in Silicon Valley where a lot of companies in products or directed towards the kind of local silicon valley ecosystem whereas for a company to succeed Whether it's a B. Two B. or Vita C accompany the product and the story really needs to appeal with very very broad set perspectives and people with their different experiences. The values what you really love about being a VC. I love getting to work with very very impressive ambitious on bright entrepreneurs so one of the quotes I really like from Bill Gates. Bill Gates has a lot of great quotes is that we tend to overestimate. AH The change. That will occur in the next two years and we also tend to underestimate change. That will happen in the next ten. Are we underestimating reading or overestimating the impact of Ai in both the short term and the long term and if so how one hundred percent agree with that statement and one hundred owners percent agree that we are overestimated the impact of ai in the near term and underestimating sent back in the long term. I think that people are expecting to do things that are not equipped to do today. A I is a a spectacular tool extremely powerful tool for performing inference. But as you know a lot of problems That we deal with today are not solvable exclusively through inference and need to be solved through a combination of traditional compute and inference as a turbocharger. So use the automotive analogy and I do expect every single problem in the future in the next ten years to be solved with some type of AI. technology technology related technology as part of it. So if you think about the analogy. Let's say in the nineties the expectation Shen in. Let's say the early to mid nineties the expectation for the number of people to be on the Internet pry particularly on behalf of technology companies in technologists was probably much greater than the level to which the Internet actually grew and penetrated However as we look today every single technology related products has some kind of connectivity element associated with it so I think folks expected it to accelerate faster than it actually did and folks did not anticipate the level at which connectivity connectivity has penetrated every single product and service? That's available to us today. It's been around for a long time and it's gone. Threw fits and starts. And you know there's been hype and then Hits Wall in the last sort of wallet. Hit was in the mid to thousands referred. Take a winter if you will but over the last four or five years. We've been some amazing advances in a lot of deep learning neural nets and stuff like that division. It's really caught. The imagination of everybody and my question is do you think it is going to be different this time. or where are we potentially going to hit an AI winter in the near or midterm which. What are your thoughts on that? What are your insights? I think it's going to be different in the sense that a I will already has have a measurable impact as it relates to search recommendation. Engines is pretty much accepted that is has had a huge role if you look at the auto completing Lubo or if you look at the products and movie recommendations from Amazon and Netflix. were all seeing a at work. The I think the next big area where. Ai will touch humanity will be in a form about cars. Now when that's going going to happen we're seeing some of that already in the form of autopilot in Tesla's and I do expect it to become far more mainstream In the next five years again to the earlier question. I don't think all cars will become autonomous. The next two years mess longer conversation but they will slowly become more and more autonomous autonomous over the next five years and there could be future. Let Sanford in the next six or seven years where we suddenly realized that. Wait a minute pretty much much. Every single vehicle on. The road has a moderate to high level of autonomous capability. And going back to your earlier. Points is going into. We will underestimate the level of of proliferation. In the long-term you've touched on a ton of vehicles what are some other opportunities sectors occurs that you're really excited about for A. I think a is going to have an impact on everything that we do now. The question is going to you become to what level so when we for example cook a meal well you know. Food may be prepared in the same way it was before but I'm sure there's going to be processes both in production and bution and its consumption. That's going to have a level of impacts from so if you look at the preparation of or the production of foods there's going to be a lot of AI associated with how agriculture is done. how Dr From Or perhaps even how animal based SFU's could be eliminated. I think a I would have a useful in that if you look at the distribution food. We talked about autonomous cars and the automobile transport of goods and services You can look at the way food is prepared. And there's going to be a lot of the old which is traditional heating and mixing of ingredients and is going to be a lot of new associated with the way different options are presented and the way folks can go about exploring different types of meal options using AI based on their prior experiences in their prior preferences. So I think that would be one area that will be hugely impacted to look at the way. Education takes place today. Hey it's very similar to how it was maybe seventy eight years ago where we all have to learn and regurgitate a bunch of acts. I do see a future. Where with the help they are? We can build Taylor custom Curricula for individuals and based on their capabilities and their interests and folks can have a far more efficient path from Learning basic skills to Ashley contributing in the workforce and that education pation being something that is ongoing so unlike today where you spend a large amount of money and time at an educational institution and then it's on you to go out there and you keep yourself train and keep yourself Up to date we can have the. I related tools compress the amount of time that we have to spend in preparation Shen also helped train us over the course of our careers and keep us At a at an optimal level from a skill set perspective to prepare us for future technologies. That are likely to be accelerated. into the workforce so I can go on and on but I do expect to somehow touch hutch every aspect of what we do what we consume. So let's talk about a couple of your investments. You've obviously have lots of one hundred twenty. I think you said which is a lot What's one of your favorite health care investments but really excited about brain health braid is using AI to help urgent care care? And other members of the healthcare system empower their radiologists and leverage to do better image analytics or radiology so basically what they do is connect into existing imaging systems and they provide expert analysis on these images that are produced from Imaging systems to help better diagnose conditions for patients and healthcare systems is. It's a tool that helps empower and help also empower the systems that employ these radiologists zoo cts. Let's talk about autonomous vehicles. Nichols you spend time in Detroit. It's obviously your passion where Where is this going? I see dual future for autonomous vehicles. There's one future and by the way these two futures can co exist. There's one future where autonomous miss cars manifest in the form of driver assistance going back in conversation around humans. Plus say I where a I helps people become better. Drivers become safer drivers and Media Times D- focus from mundane stop and go traffic and have a more pleasant driving experience. There is a second future. which again can coexist with officials? The first future where mean leave vehicle has no steering wheel and it's completely self piloted and UCS is working towards that second future where offers transportation to consumers so a consumer is no longer buying a vehicle. They are buying trip the same way. Do with an Uber. Rift xanax is reinventing the vehicle from scratch taking into mind how the vehicle is designed how it's built how serviced and how it is operated as part of a fleet of vehicles to offer a direct to consumer transportation service. I think the second future will take longer. I think the second future will only be offered in the form of a limited Geo fenced area. That will likely grow over time. I'm so it's my expectation in the next three or four years you're seeing companies like Waymo Aurora's Dukes. GM crews in partnership partnership with other car companies in ride sharing companies offer rides the small GIO fence areas under limited conditions. And I five years that continue from there you'll see more and more coverage to the point where there is a future where you and I are able to get the most the places that we want to go through a autonomous rideshare like service. And in the meantime there's going to be more and more. Hey I enabled. Each Other's in vehicles revived from showrooms making are driving experience safer and more pleasant. So let's stay on Zouk for a minute here so so two questions is oops currently out testing today with an autonomous vehicle or are they still in the RND stage a have been testing their vehicles in the most challenging in dense urban urban environments they are in San Francisco. They have been testing in Las Vegas. It's a have dozens of vehicles on the road. They are are navigating. Some of the most difficult situations with double parked cars triple park cars. -struction jaywalkers intersections sections that are super complex with five or six entry points into the intersection and assuring extraordinary results. They do have test drivers in the vehicle to oversee the I.. Vehicle they have people in the vehicle overseeing test drivers. You don't have tragic events like what we saw with Uber over and we're very excited about the company has in the second question is followed so when you're talking about it's more about the experience is Dukes also working on the internal experience for the consumer within that or are they just focused on the vehicle itself. We're getting from point A to point. Be Great Question. So the internal in-vehicle experience which is exclusive to the the second future that we talked about which they fully autonomous service. No steering wheel is a core part of the company strategy meaning that they expect to offer a service that is unique and special and memorable For the passengers meaning that the experience experience that you have hailing his oops getting into Zouk sitting in the zoo is one that is very unique and special in different from any other the ridesharing experience. So it's not simply a vehicle without a steering wheel without a driver and there are many pieces of Ip that they've created to work towards the a future and that sorta vision where as all these autonomous vehicles are competing within these sort of geography bounded areas areas right that will keep expanding that it almost becomes the choice between us a blackberry. And in an iphone when you take a ride Haitian. It's it's interesting that you bring up Apple if you think back in the eighties there were countless companies building. Personal computers and Apple Apple came along and offered a product that wasn't the cheapest and wasn't the most powerful and didn't support all of the applications pins but it was one that created a very unique and special experience for the user and Lo and behold that became an iconic brand Mike Connors Company and was oops is trying to achieve here is very similar where it's not trying to offer the cheapest ride or the service that will pick you up the fastest pissed or the one. That's going to be the fastest way to get for me to be but it's going to be the one that most consumers where to services available double will prefer over other alternatives. Now that's pretty cool so another autonomous vehicle investment you have is eva how how does that differ. Is that for the first vision that you see. or where does that fit in the On the spectrum of this that applies to both futures there's so the technology can be applied to both the future that we discussed around enhancing the existing car buying car driving experience and also accelerating that future where vehicle has no steering wheel and you purchase arrived as a service. which is the future? The Zeus is working towards Eva. Does several things are very special one is that it collapses Mrs Multiple Sensing Modalities into a single device. So if you look at most autonomous cars today that are being tested on the road. A have this jerry rig of cameras and radar short range light our long range right lighter and cameras that are all magically synchronized with one another calibrated with one another defeat into the vehicle is a is that where the signals are processed. Whatever is doing is is doing something similar to what we do with our senses with our bodies where all of our senses are somewhat tied together? So we don't rely on sinking between our senses and with minimal processing were able to escape dangerous situations and Orient Ourselves in in our environments. So if I think about evolution the reason why we have evolved is because we didn't have to scan the forest without to have to the notice or to be able to notice a Sabertooth lion emerging from a Bush. We quickly notice ruffling. Were able to quickly sense danger and we run away whereas whereas those ancestors of ours who did not master this sinking of sensing task where eaten by those lines. And so what. Abe is doing something very similar where it is collapsing collapsing. These multiple sensory modalities whether it's the law city whether it's position whether it's three d sensing into a single device which empowers the developers upwards of these vehicles do a lot of processing in the sensor itself without relying on a bunch of compute in the back end which creates latency which creates complexity Pity which is obviously bad for a vehicle the newstalk rates safely and reliably with their model licensing to other Autonomous Vehicle companies. Like Zoo cts. Yes the crowd. The business model the combination of selling a device in a system with some kind of licensing think of softwares raw. Those very early but there is going to be to your after questions. Are they selling a system in solution. The answer is yes to another one of your really cool companies. mythic total audience about mythic mythic is collapsing. The power of a rack mounted server into into a toaster priced incised microchip. So think about how Moore's law it celebrating few where now we have the equivalent of a data center from back probably a couple of decades ago into our smartphones. That go into our pockets. mythic is taking better step further. They are using conventional technology. That's used in our smartphones cameras and they are repurposing repurposing that to do a novel in unique function. All of our devices today have a type of memory called flash memory and that memory the performs a function today of storing information. What mythic is doing is repurposing that technology to achieve computation? So you can basically take one of those devices and apply the secret sauce that mythic invented and do a lot of the AI. I computes that typically is done with GP using application specific integrated circuits for a six very very very efficient way. That is that that's really exciting. What what would their target industries? Be I can see so many applications for that but like what are all their applications range from where we talked about earlier. Which is autonomous cars? All the way to new consumer electronics. Kiu military hiring defense to Surveillance and Computer Vision so there is a wide range of applications applications where you need extremely powerful. A An inference capability in a small form factor that is battery operated or needs to be low power and unless investment before we go on. It's a company that we've had on here on the show before but you're talking about planet. Planet was the first company to propose the notion of launching a constellation of low the galaxy polity yet high frequency earth-observing satellites so contrary to the scale yard of the time which which was extremely expensive extremely capable high resolution satellites that need to be tasked to sit over A location of interest planets decision was to offer these super high frequency at lower fidelity satellites. That are able to visit a location and several times a day so planet has since launched largest constellation of earth observing satellites and rather than relying on pixels. They're relying relying on advanced computer vision in AI that would process those images and provide you with information formation regarding the area of interest so rather than relying on visually inspecting pork to see how many ships are in the court you can catch a lower fidelity image and perform advanced inference ai on that image. And then you confer the number of ships in port or the same asked you how much concrete is being poured to build skyscrapers in certain parts of the world or order to look at the level of oil tankers so rather than rely on Super High Fidelity images you can couple lower fidelity images with Ai. And and get the information that you're looking for and also do that at a far greater frequency which allows you to do far more interesting mix. Your Dad was in NASA. When you were young could they even have imagined it goes back to that? Bill Gates overestimating what you can do in the short term and in technology is going to do over the long term. Could anybody twenty thirty years ago imagined thousands of these little iphone size or shoebox-size satellites in low orbit doing this. That's a very good question eastern and that was something that my dad never brought up and when I told them about landed he was very excited and on a hundred percent bought into this future where you have consumer electronics and conventional civilian technology. You being put up or do interesting things. At otherwise previously required military-grade high cost higher reliability. Pretty special technology show. We're seeing somewhat of a reversal in trend which he saw in the eighties where military grade kind of stop was being Trickling its way into consumer and now a future where a lot of the space age technology is will be graduating from stuff that's invented in the consumer world so perhaps visiting see us will give you a glimpse as to what's going to be long washed into space in the next ten years ears so moving on a couple other questions you know one of the we talked a lot about digital transformation larger companies right and you and I could talk for hours about this but you you know at its core is is really science right in science differs fundamentally from Software Development. It directors obviously in larger companies are used to you know sort of designing building and deploying software right identified the problem woman in and building to that scientists fundamentally different. How do you see that plane out? Is it something that big companies are ever going to be able to culturally adopt opt or are really are we talking about the the movement forward in. Ai is going to be within the startup world where you start as an AI. I company I don't think it is wise to start as any scientific discipline. Guiding your product thinks guiding your business I think every single scientific discovery should be regarded as get another tool in your toolbox. Six I think it is short-sighted and dangerous to look at any company or any businesses in AI first business if you are for example building an autonomous car you are building a transportation business for you are building a business that sells into the automotive or transportation supply chain and you will take new technology very. Are we seriously and make it clear that you plan to integrate the best technology to improve your products products. I think it is dangerous to simply use technology for the sake of using technology or incorporate technologies he's that don't have a meaningful benefit to the end user or the customer that's going to be paying for this Product so so I encourage Mike Companies. And I'm very excited. About companies that are open minded and receptive to adopting new technologies. I tend to shy away from companies. That can't make it clear as to why they are adopting this technology and how technology benefits the product accurately benefits the business and their customers and their broader eco-systems. So let's talk about. You know the people winning I you know. There's there's thousands of companies that are trying to pursue from startups to large companies including military governments. You know everybody they sort of after this relatively small group of people. How do you see that playing out in Silicon Valley Silicon Valley in the broad term ride in the technology industry is is the talent shortage going to be a problem for sort of pushing forward? A lot of these A. I. Projects I think if you look historically there have been shortages talented given areas and then there has been an abundance of talents in that area lead to a shortage of talented another area. I remember when I was in high school. There was a big shortage of Java developers. And by the time I graduated college. There were Java developers that were literally shifts from other countries to the US that were now being shipped back to to their home countries because there just wasn't enough jobs available to them. I post dotcom bubble bursting. I don't believe believe that these shortages are permanent. Shortages are obviously Very much noticeable when a new technological trend or a new tool becomes popular and I feel feel pretty comfortable today that there is a good deal of folks that are well versed in the realm of. Hey I and building networks and implementing them for different applications. I think there is always a shortage of of amazing technological leadership There's always a shortage of folks that apply technologies across disciplines and work with cross disciplinary teams. To that is not exclusive to a certain technology and I expect expect there to be a lot of amazing people trained overcome some of those shortages and further accelerate the companies. That we're that we're we're building. So what are we're sitting here in a new decade New Year of a new decade. What are some of your predictions for a I in twenty twenty Am beyond going backwards. I think that we're going to have to the earlier. Conversation is going to be part of everything we I by everything we consume and we won't know it and we will and we probably won't really appreciate it. It'll just be part of it and we'll take it for granted. So that's what would I expect by the end of twenty twenty in the next couple of years. I do expect folks to struggle as to to how to put a I to work because ultimately I believe that. Ai needs to be paired with conventional conventional programming in conventional technologies and tools so that interface between the inference that ai does with the conventional conventional algorithms. programming that is done today that interface that impedes match will be one that could be a challenge in the next two or three three years and once that impede mismatch is addressed will have a massive acceleration between say twenty twenty five and twenty thirty three and penetration of AI. And so before we go. Do you have any other final thoughts for our audience. I think we're living in a very exciting time I think that I would encourage folks in the audience. Think about careers where you are not just developing interesting new tools in interesting using new technologies that apply to directly but how to reduce this to practice in how to interface with existing in kick in tools to make them better well. Thanks for joining us today. Thank you Jason. I loved it. Well there you have it. I hope you enjoyed the discussion. And don't forget. Follow me on twitter at the pulse survey and connect with me. I'm Lincoln until next time.

AI Ai Silicon Valley Bill Gates Detroit Jason Stoughton United States Silicon Valley Venture Lexus New York California Lux capital partner Menlo Park Iran engineer
Ep 93 - Author, Spirituality - Liz Lewinson, Calling for Athena

Get A Grip On Life

1:56:58 hr | 2 months ago

Ep 93 - Author, Spirituality - Liz Lewinson, Calling for Athena

"Welcome back folks to the get a grip on life podcast on today's show. I Have Liz Louison an author, speaker, teacher technologists, and feminist. But before we get to her, if you're listening to podcasts, it's probably because you like podcasts a lot in a certain percentage of you probably thinks that they can start their own podcast. Well, started a lot of podcasts lots five that's a lot and they're successful and I'll tell you this. The production and technical part of it is so boring ridiculous and takes up so much time. That you should probably pay someone to do it for you. If you'RE GONNA start a PODCAST, hate to say it everybody thinks they can download an APP and the next day they have the Joe Rogan experience but unfortunately, it doesn't work that way. So my suggestion would be to get studios dot com that's right Scotty right here he can. He can produce show. but right now we got Liz Louison on the get a grip on life podcast. Hello. Liz. Hello there how are you today I'm doing very well. Thank you. Where are you in the United? States I'm in northern California near in Mark New Menlo Park. and. I've been dying to ask this question to someone for a longtime when I read your. Biography and read some of your blogs. I think you're probably going to have an answer that's very interesting to me and I'm going to want to know more about. Okay. When Liz? Lewinsky, she's a feminist. Mean to Michael. Call again. Okay. To me it means that I believe completely in the power of women. I believe that women have been suppressed for at least five thousand years give or take a very. Harmful way to the whole planet. I leave that women have capabilities which even today are just being covered because for so many years medical science women were so heavily down endured that they wouldn't even test for all their capabilities until very recently. So me a feminist is a kind of. A full circle. Mindset that is just without being negative toward men at all is just extremely supportive of women and their capabilities their power. And their. Compassion for the historic repression. It's interesting that you you said compassion okay. And in your blogs. That I read you talk a lot about maleness and female nece. Now, this may make you a little bit unpopular today in the recent environment you know and I know there's been a lot of leading feminists. WHO HAVE BEEN I've heard i. read like his I. I. Don't know the community that while so I don't know which ones are actually the leaders in which like who's really top dog and the whole feminist world thought right. But you'll read things now about how? Feminists are not agreeing with certain thrusts of Zeitgeist right now in terms of the male and female nece. Would you say that your type of feminism is? Is the The biological suppression I ever penis you have a vagina so I press you. Buy On that based on that those characteristics as a starting point. Do you. BELIEVE THAT Someone that doesn't have because I have to understand this before I can really ask you questions about it. Do you believe that someone that doesn't have the biological makeup of a woman can become a woman and face those who pressure forces Yes I do believe that because. I'm fine with gender fluidity bisexuality trans. Gender whatever people choose time. But what? I talk about in my books and where I say there's a starting point is that men and women? Millis. Millis. You're born with certain nervous system at a certain energetic configuration and remember I am of Meditation Teacher and Roping Gotcha that a longtime practitioner meditation and one of these teachings. One of my basic teachings comes from a very basic Buddhist teachings, which is that we haven't energetic system as well as physical system that's different for a female body than a male body. So I believe totally a man can express. Quote all feminine qualities, but I'm described highest feminine quality is power. And so the fact that most men don't have even a concern, they actually resent it or jealous or completely misunderstand female power. So let me early on here in our discussion say how I define power. I actually really spent time thinking about this because the Buddhist teacher years ago he said, what is the difference between men and women and he said women are more powerful. One liner women are more powerful. So. I spent time thinking about it and I thought well, what is meant by power? and. I thought wow, we're finally any time. Called the twenty first century below clearly by mid twentieth century. Think we did have understood this. Power is not domination control. which is people get nervous about it. Power is fluidity and change. That's how it is in nature. So, a wind is like just kind of going along doing something we do not consider powerful. But when it speeds up. Really you know gets like. Little forced tonight is going hundred and fifty miles an hour in there's no human unplanned. So. Powerful just weaves. Okay. You. Win Nature. Nature in nature power is all about fluidity change every phenomenon in nature that we consider powerful that you can think of. Earthquake is when the planes of the Earth. Move. A forces released. That's what nuclear power is. Is Actually, based on fishing remember that I have to ask you a question okay because I think you're one hundred percent, right? Okay. In in the fact that women are more powerful than men, I think are or are women. Are It's even higher than that. There is a feminine power and there's a masculine power. And I believe that women can have masculine power traits and I think that men can have. Feminine Power Traits. But the female power is the creative and the destructive force. That that's what it is. So Feminine Power. The womb. The womb, the idea of nature, the growth of the mother Earth Power. That's very powerful. But there is a masculine power as well that balances that out. And like when you say that you know the female power is this creative destruction and it can be the fluidity. The male power is stability. The Sun and the Moon I feel like you're I, if your argument would be complete if you adopted that the tension between those two things. That's very common at I do actually say that we just so when I otherwise split it into two puts I, have another book called the power of the loving men, and in that one again at this is. Of course, we have both qualities and you're not a complete person until you have developed both qualities You I. Think it's through meditating but not too too I focus on this question what's the power of men? So let's talk about this energetic quality of man. It is just like you said, it's more solid. It is a dozen little. I've seen these things in my meditation. It's a little more like a network of golden lives. Beautiful, but it's not a big Russian. Huge Soon Nami, which is what I've also seen for the power of women. There are two different ten things I hate to keep using his dancing to do all women men but let's just say there are these aspects of male female qualities. It's better described as masculine and feminine it's like the. Start using those terms and. It's not male and female because like that has a biological. Inference to it, there's parts to that like makeup technical thing. The masculine and feminine kind of Like A. Like. There's something that. Elevates you above something or whatever I feel like anyway. Well, yes. But there again, just if you're born into certain nervous system depending on how you grow, you were raised you probably have some tendencies that force. Either repressed female side or force on the masculine side. This different quality so Excuse me what I said is that what a masculine power? This more solid, slightly more held closer to the physical body nature is loving. Kindness is all this whole. Both but. Men are actually extremely well suited the male qualities extremely well-suited. Qualities of love. And kindness and gratitude and. In respect, all kinds of very high beautiful qualities that have been greatly repressed. In the masculine side of most men, I agree with him one hundred percent. Say. Look around the world right now except for the small group that's really trying to bust out of this and you will see that many many. Females are still heavily repressed in their power in many many males are still trying to assert. Pardon self that actually isn't the part they should be focusing on instead of just pure beautiful. His loving kindness of there being so I believe that. There is indeed as we progress in our life. We should be developing both eminent and masculine. But again, inexperience masculine side of loving kindness and. Gentleness, humility is always seemingly held down in so many people who identify as male the. The I couldn't agree with you more. I, think that. What will call if I may like the Benevolent King? Like everybody loves the benevolent King, masculine idea, right the the confident ruler of the lands. The person that doesn't need to interfere in other people's business because that power is innate and in a way, there's like a joining with the benevolent queen in a sense that offers something completely different than the benevolent king but. I would also argue that while there's this Tarango King, there's this tyrannical mill force that is absolutely rampant in our society right now I would say that. The there is a tyrannical male element. At work in the world that people are choosing in a spiritual sense. But I also feel that D- You would you not agree that there's also Torrential mother, Taran ICAL, feminine is can can create just as much chaos as the tyrannical male in his structure in his order in having things to be this way in the chaos of that are those two forces not play at the same time in our society. I read that They're both play and I would say I'm just going to. Have a little lane over toward the this feminine side. Female side. Says spend this life. The shore. Look. A woman imitates the power of the tyrannical man that domination and control. It's a bad thing for her. Hey, she's not what she's doing. I used just into other in New Zealand is a role model. She's powerful right now but she uses power in a very fluid way she can change she can change. On a dime, she can pivot in the Senate and she does and she has and she uses her tuition and she is expresses both love and kindness and extreme leadership I was in New Zealand when she was running, she is one tough person. You don't WanNa go up against her. Debate, she will just if she has years take you gab just really smart, but she's not too radical to me. I didn't believe in most cases. The word like you know bitch as your friend Ao was recently called because if you're strong and your confidence and you have wisdom you should lead is a woman to me tyrannical just means a kind of utter control ego that. People and has no ability to take advice or. Input from others in is leading not with their intuition in her. A higher being, but with this kind of. Basically follow the tyrannical male model is. Just snap out in destroyed what they don't understand. Fear. So that would be I read the existing both male or feminine masculine harder being. Part of the reason why I suggest people change in our mindful is you can find places inside yourself, but you're much were still in those qualities don't exist there. In fact, male female don't exist when you become very still inside and then you meet merged back after your meditation in this idea that you have to be a certain way to be successful is really softened, and then of course, the Millennium Mindfulness is if you catch yourself being. Very angry or competitive, or any of these qualities which actually literally take down your mood in your mindset that you sort of nip in the bud can do something like take a deep breath mindfulness is about catching yourself before you dip into negative emotions and feelings and that it isn't be as real. Is True, there is mindfulness. And their Israel Meditation, and. I think is probably the most. Powerful solution, dead men, women have. To, find out what is real power However. There are certainly been in history. been cruel women. Getting the nut too many leaders throughout history. You been women, I always hop onto Elizabeth. The Senate. I would say that you're wrong about that. I would say that there was lots of female leaders. They were never recorded in the annals of male authors. I would say that the human species. Would never have survived without their strong female leaders it just men never took any notice of them. and never. Recorded in the history, the only recorded the sexualize women, the women that that they were involved like a Helen of Troy for example, mix appearance in Afro diety it makes. The seductresses of the of the ancient world are very powerful women because in a sense, they embody the only female power that men innately understand, which is sexual seduction is very powerful for men on men. Men can be easily manipulated by women very very easily, and so the only thing you get in history for men, the history of men, which is what history is really history of men. Is that man you to look out for those female seductresses? They sure 'cause a lot of trouble for everybody. We sent ten thousand ships over Troy over that Bitch Ellen just because she slept with period or whatever his name was, and we had to go kill all those guys and my brother died, and then there was this Afro diety lady she was pretty nuts too with her African charm. so that's male history. I mean. I'm going crazy here but like that's what we think of female power. So tell me what it is other than that. 'cause I think from my perspective I think that's the most powerful feminine power is the SEDUCTRESS. Now I have to agree with you on that it's one hour women. So the description of female energy body is it extends way beyond the visible is you're right. It's like shooting fish in a barrel for a woman to Seduce a man why? Because she's sending her energy sexual energy literally us. Into a man and he thinks is his says he go is not is hers so fine. That's-that's understood but why and I'm just so first of all the earth is really old and when I saved from the last five, thousand years of the Jesus trivial. Earth is very old. If you're in Egypt when they dig under the sand, they all other civilizations there and so I think what's happened in the last five thousand years has been an aberration and somewhere along the line I believe there were totally women's societies that were very attuned to the earth. The landed the men and women were extremely are onus and there was no real issue about females being powerful strong. It was understood that this vast extra energy body was helpful and would be useful but when you repress people for so long generation after generation and the only way out for a woman for centuries in in the everywhere Bible is. It was marriage. Now let's just say is zero sum game. If you are in a little town in you over the urban of big town and you think you're only way into survive as marriage to a man, will you're GonNa definitely use your sexual attention to get somebody the richest guy in town if you can. To grow up it's it's very practical and actually. If you look at the. And then again, the. Of Women you mentioned a few women I. Agree There's a few women that stood out history but the whole new don't know. Who they all women leaders were, there are starting to emerge as a feminist destroy. Matt and they say well, so and so really actually was the CO inventor of something. Amazing. It just never got into the boats. It was literally only the man got the credit. So I think yes, there's tremendous always has been, but we wanted raise a generation I think was happening now as many women are getting. That you don't. You will. It's like all expression that says you cannot be what you do not see. So. If you're a girl growing up and you never see a woman leader except when I was growing up, it was awful. Really the role model was sleeping beauty and Cinderella and things like that where. Sleeping beauty she has. She has to wait for some prince. Kissed kids on the lips, right? Worst one is beauty and the beast beauty and the beast is really about one. you know I mean there's a lot of negative messages and Disney Children's movies man I sometimes I wonder if they were written by pedophile weird people because I mean beauty and the beast come on man. All you have to do is put up with abuse in for a long enough time for man he turns into a prince. Like come on. Come on. Like now, I don't know what the original story is. I don't know what the original I've read some of the fairytales I've read in some fairy tales of the old ones. I've read the original stories and that sort of stuff but the modern version of beauty and the beast produced by Disney teaches girls that they should accept abuse and terrible FBI from a man until he changes from the of your love that is the most ridiculous nasty stupid thing. Anyone would ever tell my three daughters if you came near me and you told my three daughters that they need to save like bell and beauty and the beast no chance Powell. Get away from my family. I mean that's a horrible message to give young girls. I, actually in my generation, there was. There was no other message and there's still plenty of midst messages. As I'm sure you know you three daughters you have to Tripoli tiptoe your way through all the terrible messages. I think they're still terrible messages I recently was looking at this. Drake video and there was beautiful woman there at all she was doing was exuding sexual energy. That's it. That's it, and well, that is so on him and it was so limited I thought wouldn't crummy message to give out. I'd like to see every single girl get involved in stem. Science Technology Engineering. Develops the rain if some fabulous income, and then they don't need to rely anymore on the sexual energy, they have it. And that's part of the power of women. It's not just the womb this sexual energy of women now that it's finally been measured is least twice that of a male and there's multiple orgasms a woman there there is the capability for childhood this one of the other evidence. Of childhood I mean of power, but we're talking really. About and will there's a tendency in human nature not just so anybody that is to destroy you are threatened by. So. If you're threatened if the banner threatened by the power women somewhere long ago, it was some kind of a switch. And that's what some books. I read talk about switch and. It was obviously not a very good one, but it happened and then the female. Civilisations Matriarchal Scott stamped out. And got completely superseded by the male power structures for many many thousands years until recently, where now women are starting to come up a little bit. And when I go on Instagram I, just see so many messages about where powerful we can do it. We're really the you know we're not GonNa let a man of us us we believe in ourselves. You don't have to go far. What People Women in our twenties or raining right now they're trying to find their way into their own being and power levels. But are they are I don't I don't want to like. I don't know how to express this but. From a father's perspective from loving father I. Love my daughter's I'm not I'm not I'm a light bulb salesman I don't teach at the university. I like to read a lot of books but I don't think women are happier in two, thousand, twenty twenty then they were in the past I think they're less happy and I think that I think it especially teenage girls I think they're really struggling right now and I think the message is so obviously mixed up in muddled and back and forth that it's the worst it's ever been. and. That doesn't mean that they're not financially. I think financially us there have been made there's been progress made, but just looking at what young women are exposed to. On instagram at talk and these things in the standards they're being asked to live up to and the songs with look at that. But look at that look at that look this kind of stuff and all that matters is how their body looks I. Think it's worse than ever. I can't disagree with that. Because we're bombarded with more media than ever. And I think this is my point at the true message really hasn't gotten through you and I are talking about it. But the powerful female. Who is Really in charge of every aspect of her life, I don't think has through still a lot of hold dowse especially in rock music I mean, there's a tremendous. still think misogyny that gets communicated and if you're growing up today as a teenager and. A woman if you hear on that and even believe it for a second is debilitating in literally because we're all psychic interview I am one of my books is a marriage set something just said something that I have to interrupt you. Okay. Okay I have absolutely have to because it's I. Don't know if we'll come back to it and you have to tell me what you mean when you say we're all psychic. You have to like I. Need to know what you mean by that. Is I have a Human Beings. Ability to up socks, feelings of other people. So when you just a natural quality is partly because we have that energy body in, it's more fluid. So you can be around somebody angry and depressed and actually pick up those feelings. They're not yours mine up this original teacher with these at ninety percent of the thoughts you have are not yours, and if you are actually one of those people watch, a lot of TV listened to a lot of stuff is so easy and also really read from the Internet and social media. You can easily feel what other people are ceiling. Actually the more you meditate the more sensitive you get, but he said our minds are like. Transmitters. And you can be thinking thoughts about someone who's all around the world. And they can feel those thoughts we're are we are second transmitters we just don't necessarily. Always up become aware of it, and when you become aware of the good news is you can actually become a lot more of a kind of empower warrior because you can say to yourself. I'm feeling this feeling is my feeling or did I just get this from reading the news? So when I first started meeting, Coleman Stories I actually felt so much fear I got into a panic mode which is very unusual for me. And then I realized I'm getting it from reading the new store. It's if there was a certain spin on it. I was picking up on and. When I saw that and realized that I thought well. To mindfulness I'm I want to be a capable person who generally emitting positive buds because I think that helps the planet as we're all saket. So therefore, I shouldn't be getting sucked into this really negative mindset that and reading in the news I cut down my news taken was doing regulate knits and I'm fine I take enough news in to know what's going on. But I don't buy into the fear side. You know what the funny thing is. It's interesting. That I I've also. Had to cut off my news and take his I I don't know what I am, but I can feel energy from people and I can. I can feel stuff. I spend a lot of a lot in a lot of time in what you call meditation. I call it something different okay. But I know what it is. You're speaking about those places that you're talking about where you can go and where you can find. Like you can almost witness yourself in a way you're separated from the body in a sense it's. For me I call it prayer, and in that place is a deep humility. When you pass the humility, you get to a point where you're you're actually all you feel compassion for yourself, and then that compassionate starts to go out towards others and people can really cultivate this. It's something that can be cultivated. It's real. It's powerful You know when you say psychic or when you say that you can feel people's energy and you can send across the world and two I totally believe that I think it's kind of like. I think there's were I think we're actually going to find out what it is like I'll tell you why I'm in the lighting business and I do a lighting podcast and what they're scientists are discovering a boat light right now is that we're of like fish figuring out that we're in water all of our other presuppositions kind of have to fade away for us to really understand what light is like. Energy of light and how it affects the earth and I think in that, that's where they're going to find out that people are connected in these fields and that they can. Feel one another and that the energy system that. So many people talk about in religions talk about is true and that they're going to actually discover it But I don't see how feminists get to capture that doesn't that isn't that available to the the masculine and feminine. or Yes. Like I feel like women don't own that place it's that's not a feminine lows. Being Psychic. His fermented women both there's no difference in that. Women. Tend to be a little bit more intuitive because of this. Unless. So a healthy. Female Energy System Actually, you can see looks like a butterfly's vibrating rather extensively around the physical. And it's also quite sensitive more sensitive to anger a an art and negative emotions then. A more held and solid. Male energy by so both your psychic because their energy bodies both equally, you can be very psychic is a man, the more you meditate the more second you be because you're becoming a little more fluid. You're actually extending that energy body. Offense starts at. The getting it to be more fluid in us. So rigid and you will be very second. So you're saying it. Qualities are accurate and. His second I did not mean to imply that this is a female only quality. However, again, tests have shown that women are more intuitive so far so far this the reason I think that's true is men in their minds have drawn tyner boundaries around who they are. Very small definition emotionally particularly of of the range of motion so that would make. Your more. You believe that the tighter you're GONNA be women haven't had that luxury because they've been again in general. Been A. Cer- Princeton so many ways that they've gotten used to sort a if there's a little hole in the dam, you know. Go towards a car can through that one opening. So Psychic and we're all influenced by the thoughts and feelings of. and. Then again is why during this particular time period I am trying to be To meditate as well as I can to be as positive, all the time as I can, and it's not selfish, it's actually the opposite I feel like we're all beacons in some way, and so if you can have some even in the midst of any crisis radiation that still says I am. Hopeful. I, see deeper equality in human nature, which is so luminous. Bright. And I'm holding onto that and I believe in it and I believe that there's absolute. In interest, we're in a very interesting time right now transition. I just heard last night someone who's astrologers so many things are coming together right now. And literally being now until about April of next year where there's so much transition in all kinds of forces. People are served reaction to that in a little way. I. Think you can also react I'm GonNa Transit in ways that are helpful and beneficial, and that might mean new career skills. It might mean going up emotional qualities which ones that you never really did before and made me whole spate of things my new sports athletics, new ways to help other people. There's so many waves and so there's you sign away. Did you say wave? W. View. Yes. With actually both ways with a W, but it could be waves with a V. as so. Animal disorienting choose it. Yes I think. So the it's interesting I think from the from a masculine perspective, right? The writer that most spoke to this would've been like young with his archetypes and he was speaking, but he could never touch the female archetypes. He couldn't go there. He couldn't find it but he maybe could or whatever I don't I can't read his stuff I, find it that my level. Of intelligence is not able to read his work I I hate to say that like a Pretty Smart Guy, I can read complicated things and I can read like a fifty page document that's boring as heck can get through it and figure out the main point or whatever. But I can't read that Carl young and I can't read the people that are like him. But anyway. He talks about these archetypes and then he talks about archetypal typical damage and archetypal diseases that can happen right and then you look at like social media. And you look at that and you say like ego to instagram say or one of these websites. And you see female I don't know what to do it like what to call it like. It's like the ultimate place of vanity and wrong stuff. Wrong. Messages Right. And I feel like it damages the female archetype for women that their worthiness is or they're they're the power of their woon should be on display before others that they don't know or know about or that the to compare themselves to those who wished to put themselves on display and I understand that at the same time within feminist thought, you could have someone that would be say that's empowering and then infamous thought you'd hung you could have someone that would say that's actually disempowering, which is it. I don't know it might be okay in my opinion. If, you're focusing on the auto as eliminated, portraying your sexual energy and you know. Showing your sexual side and being sexy candidate photo. You're on the negative side you disempowered yourself for a couple of reasons. There's nothing wrong with sexuality but let's go back to what? We're all saying what kind of attention are you going to draw to yourself negative attention and for a lot of men they associate anger sexuality is very linked. And when I did my book, the power loving man I talked to a bunch of men who forty, fifty, nine, hundred. And sounded an almost every age group starting from. Thirty five down. There was a lot of porn watching that was almost like how they learn about sets. Okay. So this idea that women were really those a lot of anger suddenly associated with sets because that's how they. Literally kind of trained as you dominate females. Even before that years before there was porn, there's a lot of. In. Many men's mind with sets. Why I think when you think about it let's say you're a man who was brought up to believe you're the you're the power guy you're empower. Your and then you have sex with a woman whether you're saying, you can feel that power of sexuality in the woman. Now or the lack of it or the lack of it. Or the lack of it, either way could make a man angry and I point out because we're sekine. If you're this close human body to human body, this is true of any partnership. Meals. invo any. Yeah if you're this us in your open, emotionally during sets in some angry partner. You just pick it up like a sponge man. I. Totally Hundred Right about that. You you know it's interesting because when when people most people talk about marriage A crude sense they're speaking about ownership of someone else's sex organs, right? But are you like what you're talking about is kind of. The to become one spiritually and physically during the act and if there's anger there, if there's if there's worthlessness there, the the energy is last or something is that what you're saying or it's negative energy yet actually is not only less, but it's also negative for the person who's on the receiving end, right? Partners. Issues and that's how a lot of women get very sick they. They're picking up the and also. I AC-. Is Interesting. But I see a change in in girls at a young age. Who have been told completely cleanly mistakenly that they need to have sets. Okay. At an early age because that's what your peers are doing whatever reason sure they should way. But anyway now. That say they have in man just doesn't value is with a fellow who doesn't value her? So in that intimate moment, she's picking up all thoughts and feelings of the man and she'll. Looking drained, she'll have a lower opinion of herself. She'll be making choices for years that are not the right ones and I tell the story in the book when meditation of power a friend of mine told me and she was but fourteen fifteen, she had sets with some guy who didn't care about just thought she was Bimbo to end. She said she felt like she'd been run over by a mack truck. And It took her years to recover. And this wasn't rick. This was consensual. Dumb Teenage. Sets of my friend who just a lovely. SMART. Really radiant person but then person she fifteen no, she was just. You know the same. Sort of person that many girls are because they don't get early enough that they should add that point hold onto the idea that they're the power species are early. So, early on, give your daughters my book. Okay. I. I have to read it but I think I think you and I are absolutely. was written for for more for younger. Yeah. I I actually think I might because I even though. On the surface you may think that you and people might think that you and I would disagree on everything I actually think no I. Think we're probably pretty close to being on the same page with most things. I mean for me the sexual, the female from the perspective of the Male, the woman should call too vague I call. You're not gonna like me maybe but I call it kind of wound theory. So, there's like A. Men in a way there's like this instinct to like men the tyrannical king is kind of like an abuser of women he's like. He doesn't like he doesn't protect women or allows them to be to to to The, made worthless and I think the benevolent king is very respectful to women and. UNDERSTANDS, their power, and how important they are, and that they need to be safe and cared for in a way. That is not that is that is not about, I don't know how to describe it. Maybe I, haven't completed it yet my head but do you understand what I'm getting at that? There's a balance in these forces that I think is completely out of balance right now and that's why we're suffering so much. I agree with you, and that's actually what this teacher said years ago could bring with your. The reason the world is so screwed up the fundamental core whole imbalanced. We're seeing today is the imbalance between A. Feminine, masculine or male and female if you suppress. The female. So that she is not spread that. So she's left at a politics economics religion. Education. In many cases. If you do that repeatedly dome allow that female quality to truly in leadership positions, you throw the world off balanced so badly that that's what we're actually seeing today. So I feel that they're. Violent word to define my. You know really cool role between men and women. Again, I'M GONNA look in if you haven't checked it up. Other has a very. Nice masculine male partner. They aren't married. They haven't yet. Oh Yeah. She's not married to some weird like he's a he looks like a good guy to me I mean. Fishing. That's very new in New Zealand fishing shows, chart. He has a fishing team Egypt and it's very popular and so he's celebrity in his own right for going fishing and catching a cool fish and but his role I never feel when I look them unify we're second you can check you can feel things even from a photo. When you look at those two, you feel according her he is allowing he doesn't care how powerful she gets because it doesn't diminish him. He is like her he backs use covering her back sensually in emotional way and He, ensures friend who companion he is. Charges On. TV, fishing show is Kennedy's world. No serious is not a competitive situation and I feel that's also a role model because. To me a courageous man will allow a woman to keep stressing new levels of power earn more money if she needs to get a higher title. You know take news for do things and he's not doing and still feel totally okay about it and be a really funny nice kind person in his own way and they have a compatibility on that level. So. and. He should be exploring the power I'm talking about. So I WANNA leave the why would why would men? Why would men be intimidated by that? That doesn't sound like a big deal to me I mean like what? What I? What I don't understand is is like for me when I look at that sort of thing. You know whether she's the Prime Minister of New Zealand or not. I don't think the. Approach to loving a woman as a man should change. Just, just because your wife is not the Prime Minister of New Zealand, which is an extra role model and people can look at her and say, that's a good female leader. I would just say that's just a good leader actually doesn't matter that it's a woman that's doing. What. It's like there's a lot of female scientists in the lighting business for some reason. There's lots it's like four to one. For every male scientists enlightening there's four female scientists and I had a I had a a futurist on my show and she challenged me and my. Co Host to name female scientists in both of us right away named female scientists and she and asked her if she wanted us to keep going. But she said that's the first time man I've ever been able to do that. But what I don't understand is like I don't think that the eminence of the woman dictates the treatment I think the treatment of the woman. allows. The Eminence to grow. That makes sense. Well, it doesn't make sense. Descended there's. Is that she apparently grew up in a family that said her. You can do whatever you want. I mean you be whoever you want to be. There was never restriction. And so I think that. I will say New Zealand is much more sheltered environment and still so cheesy. But I think that. I just think it's very rare. I for still for many men. Female Leadership Pushes, butts and you know you I did read the story. What happened on the steps the other day when? This congressman. Called LLC. littler. Melia or her. I know the congresswoman. Insulting your in front of a lot of people had a reporter. ENDED UP CALLING FUCKING Bitch effing bitch. Okay. So Burst. In burst additive yet. And I mean, that's not that's Saying tears us our. That's not honorable though like so here's the here's the problem. Okay. Like the fundamental problem with the way that I think people look at things like this. Okay. The idea that somehow it's become the norm to think that the average man like who's out there what he wants is to woman is. And that that is what men are. No. That's actually a very, very negative mail archetype the womanizer actually that person the person that forces sex on women or lies to them or does things that manipulate sins not honest that does stuff like that. That's a very negative mail archetype in needs to be discouraged out of boys from a very young age. You need to start saying that you can't be a womanizer that's not a way to be the other thing is that This idea of equal treatment. You know there's certain ways that people shouldn't speak to one another. No matter what. And All, that's a violation of that. So while I think that you know why I think that it's wrong. I don't think that's the masculine I. Think I think that's like an anti masculine behavior. It's that you I think what? What, what, if this is what I'm saying your brand of feminism wants to get rid of cowards and womanisers and people that hurt women. No I mean that's what that what I see. That would be true and I would just say that. What men need to do is. And women have different process by the way bit but mindy to do this look through the ways in which they were shown or. They were in some way superior to women and get take those ideas out of there being, and then they have to look at the way as in which they haven't definition of power is threatened by women becoming. Vocal and influential, which is right now. So if you're a she is powerful in her own right because she does get out there and stand up for things. So you should as a man, you WanNa look at that. How can I even if I don't agree with her politically? When is there in me? That would react negatively and what is there in me? That would look at a woman as purely a sexual object. And actually you know run my eyes up and down her body that who really to. Natives. Band mental programming because you're. I think then you're you are turning into an object in your turning somebody into something that's less than they are in that hurts them. So I am saying that's the man said the worked for males who still have those habits whether again it's Just were to be done internally. Women also have plenty of work to do because women. If you have one woman in a room full of men, which is often case, it works situation. It takes tremendous courage to go look inside yourself ago I wanna say what I mean and not. Cower just sort of put myself a little lower than whoever perceived to be how. I'm going to push back at you a little bit here going to push back a little bit here because anecdotally now we did a back when the whole metoo thing started We we looked at women lighting business. And we started talking to women and we talked to a lot of women about what it was like to be in the lighting business. And you know what? A lot of those early risers, the people that came up early. that were like you know were you know chief of marketing and CO C. Suite in the eighties and early nineties okay. They actually reported liking that crowd better than the new crowd now. Mom. So they felt like that the lighting industry didn't really have much. discrimination against them overtly, and that in fact, there were many men that sponsored them and that they had found that now it seemed that it was harder for women. Than it was that like as if like things have gotten worse in some in some senses that things are more sexualize now than they've ever been and that there's more while there's maybe more women in power this. I can't believe I'm going to say this. I can't believe I'm going to say that this space is less safe. Than it was in the old days. How like how is that possible like I mean is that actually possible but that that's what's been anecdotally reported to me that things are worse now than they were before. I I. Don't know what to say because. My background especially in the last couple of decades mostly has been is I it mission technology? It is true there that. You can have some. Sexist behavior there is, but there's also a sense in his smart professions if you didn't get the work done. And you can still lead to stand up for yourself because you may be getting paid less. There's plenty of stuff still going on but I probably haven't seen. The space has gotten a lot choppier myself. Personally I believe it could be because. It's kind of like you're saying. We're exposed to so much more now. So we know in general that. People growing up in getting their college degrees, whatever they're having issues finding employment as appropriate there. And rocked with. Your route inferences in debt in debt. One. Hundred. Thousand Dollars College. Right. Yeah. So it's already a rocky lifestyle if I may because you know there's. There's good Hanley's templates in mind which is. I'd like to see. And this individual at the end of the day sure like to see. That if any sollicit earlier, there's there's things to pull out of your being the male side and there's things Pelota. You're being a female side I'd also like to see many more people just go and try meditation because a lot of people started and they stopped because they were expecting some dramatic results railway and. Meditation. Actually is always a focusing exercise. It never right away when I started it took me three weeks to feel anything whatsoever. It was like this little fountain tour of King It's coming up. And that's persuaded me keep going and now I have beautiful meditations they're literally. Maybe they just don't have happy you know what? One and I think you can have things little promises of that. The reason that mentioned in this context is that. Interpreting give us year. Are you kidding me? The planet is so overcrowded. All the stories that aren't happening right now include. All Forms of injustice and the the. Climate change climate change is going to go stop. On all of us in the next twenty to thirty years or less, and this generation growing up is inheriting all of this and so it's not an easy time. Anything is the time we are happy to go within to get strong more than ever. You know where you know what you said a lot better and like I could go off in like nitpick you on this or that like what you said but I think we can agree upon the the idea of waves of negative energy is coming at Gen Z.. Waves of decorative energy and whether you WanNa, get stuck. We WanNA die on some hill over here with related to this particular social issue or not. There's definitely a lot of energy but. Let me let me because it's hard to break come back when when you speak like that and just. I totally agree with you. When you talk about meditation you've got to meditate for a year. There's a world out there man an inside. You can go to that people really need to start going. There are trying to go there. This will change the energy it will. I'm not kidding you like everybody whether and you know what? It doesn't have to be the way Liz Linson does it or Michael Colligan there's no. You just have to pursue the inner life in a way that starts there and do it for a long time. But I need to ask you I've read feminist thought in the past that was in some ways pro prostitution pornography. And then I've seen feminists thought, which is anti prostitution pornography and there seems to be like a rift in fourth wave between those two things. I'm very uncomfortable with people that Think, that pornography empowers women. I really don't believe that and I, think it disempowers both men and women actually. And I also think that. You know while I have a lot of sympathy and empathy for sex workers and people that adults that are choosing that and I it's a very complicated issue and it's it's different in many different countries in the in the developing world in Europe and it's a different problem in different places. I'm uncomfortable with its promotion or as it or like an uncomfortable with an acceptance of that is a meaning that can be a really meaningful life for a woman. I just have a hard time. I can't I can't swallow that pill. That's a tough one for me and so I see I see there's feminists on both sides of that argument where do you stand on that? I'm a feminist that would never ever ever recommend to a woman to. Go into prostitution. I would say that if life somehow forced you into it, which I can't imagine why anyone would choose that. The right way to put it the. Computer Coding School for six months and get a job that will. Keep you and your children in. Poverty for the rest of your life. In other words prostitution history major. That's I was going to I was I always I like history. So, for many thousands of years, it was no job for women and if they didn't get married, you know if or if the president too soon or something happened. Hey. Their job was prostitution. There was no other job maybe. Somebody bit very little choice but today no in my opinion on and I didn't even know that feminists said, okay one sex were. I don't think it's a good profession period for the woman doing in. So for the woman actually engaged. If I she is GonNa be picking up the thoughts and feelings of all kinds of people bad idea for her mentally and. If she looks around, there's plenty of help us actually government. Agencies that they're saying if you're in this profession, you don't WanNa be. There's places to go for help because what you WANNA do is get enough money to get back to school and get into something. That's valid. Honestly. Say for six months and you want certified in something go coating school go to a tech school. Can I say something really controversial? Can I say something really controversial to you. Or Mary a man that really loves you and build a life with him. So that, if you're if you feel that you wanna work you guys can talk about it and he respects you and if he knew if you WANNA take some off to raise your kids, you can count on him to stick around and he can count on you to raise the kids. and to find a meaningful relationship with somebody that actually loves you you know what I mean I hate to say that but it's like I want to tell my daughters that you know it seems to me like people are promoting sexuality like it's the greatest thing in life is how you have sex with and you know you need to have the best sex and everybody. And it's like, yeah, I agree with all that I'm not against anybody wants to do but for me I, feel like. If people would respect one another and I think some feminists are calling for and I would love to support a feminism that. Really elevated the value of women in the eyes of men like that that it wasn't a. There's no like there's no force that. We're not locked in this. Interminable Struggle Forever In a women and men are not they're there's a beautiful co mingling of energy that can happen between men and women. That is the life force of the universe in a sense I. I don't know and how do we encourage people towards that? It's like a minefield. But it's so simple in in some ways to. How does how does how does the how do we do that because I? There's too much conflict between in this space. Well I think that women should. Try. To find a male partner or just even a friend this loving and kind. In help nurture those qualities A. men in general. Male side of the mass inside should be focusing on nurturing the power of women in a all kinds of ways that are not native, very positive ways in. General be. Very. Happy about each other's successes in commingle I. Think you're right about sexuality sexually is Great. In always has been and a beautiful union of two people who carry bit about in. But you'd asked me about prostitution. That's a whole different thing. Remind, there's no talking dealing with emotions. There is just a functional thing is not good for the woman to saying she's going to pick up a lot of very draining energy so she should not be in that profession. Even any any profession for women. Profession not for people they love you don't necessarily want to be a massage situation anywhere where women's hands on with anyone they're picking up too many thoughts, feelings from the other person better. so much more empowering to get into all the many mental professions which are available today. Get didn't museum to be there years ago with now, there's many as one path have declared as far as. I knew discouraged. Heard. As. Men in any way I'm just get certain things being. A. Too hard on the nervous systems of women I. Agree with you one hundred percent I think I think that I know you know how you hear like women's saying things like I WANNA have children. Like. That's like. That's women are saying that like that's You know when when, when that's a really strong message to men. That of rejection based on the way the society is like what they're saying is two men is you have not created a place or this womb feel safe adding life to. You need to fix the place. Right like that's like a powerful rejection. To men and men are very sensitive to the rejections of women, they don't want to be rejected by women. Right so I actually believe you know I'm a Christian I go to church while I haven't been able to go to church since covid but I mean I'm a Christian. But in a sense I actually believe like that there's a goddess right that needs to be served in a sense to you know like I don't know how the Catholic Church you know it's the Virgin Mary that like she's almost a goddess within the church you understand what I mean like it. You can say that it's one God, the Trinity and they go down all these holes but you're if you're a Catholic Mary is pretty damn close to being a goddess. Really really close. You know like you can't call her a goddess. She's the mother of Christ. She's the mother of the son of God. What does that mean? What they're saying is we have to worship the feminine power to, and that's a masculine made feminine power the Virgin Mary like think about it come on like what? Like that's a very interesting masculine made female power the power of Virginity, Virginia has no power actually there's no power in it. It's just the there's like purity in it that that that wants to be claimed or something, but I think that the power is in the womb. Yes. I think the power is named. See Years of thin. So, I never had children and I made that choice when I was in my early thirties I thought. I, always wanted them and then I thought wait a minute. I'm not sure I do want them and I really do want it's conflict but I have pursued a spiritual path I have never missed having children. I've even had women come up to me and say. You did have children. In Stay Lucky Of why the sick? It's hard. All lines are hard. My life is no less hard than a person who had children it's no different is just that you have to love in a different way we back to the system in a different way. To me that I I'm not I'm also not a Catholic I didn't grow up in a Christian family, but I've always had a lovely feeling about the Virgin Mary in a bad Jesus. Is like one of my wonderful things in my life to be honest so I always such I don't choose but anyway, that was no we you know what we could we could. That that's actually fascinating topic to me because you know. They anybody Catholic that hears me say what? I'm going to say, his GONNA rip me to shreds like you. How could you say that the Virgin Mary wasn't a virgin? I I actually think the the story like if you believe that the angel of the Lord. that. Came down an impregnated Mary was A. was like a spiritual force rather than real person. I think that you're missing the whole point of the story. The understand that like yeah. I, you know the that God used the like he doesn't work outside of the the realities of the universe. Okay. Who knows what they meant in the ancient script when they said the angel of the Lord Right the angel of the Lord like what an interesting concept, right? What is that? Is that a force? What is that and then Joseph accepts? Mary. And cares for ENTR. Elevates her. As the mother of of of God and we're in a way we're all meant like that's why the Christian story is whether you believe that Christ was crucified or Nadi Rose People. Get obsessed with whether there was a real, Adam and Eve or Just, you missed the whole point of the story. You know like the that you know of, of Christ and and that one is called to be like, Christ. Yes. Those stories are beautiful. They have. That's why we preserve them. You know the idea like my favorite feminist is eve who hands that him the apple like and you notice that the the serpent didn't lie he was being honest with eve. In the story serpent says, if you eat that fruit, you'll become like, unto God, you will become conscious of of the world around you and the first thing that does this comes and gives the fruit to the man. You gotta you gotTa be conscious. It those are beautiful stories and people say that that Oh it's such a it's such a It's such. A anti-feminist tale. Oh Eve is the evil one I don't know man I saw this painting once and It was a painting of. Of to like half ape human creatures and they had the apple. And Adam was walking out of the garden giving the finger to the to the angel of the Lord or whatever. Right and he's with Eve Right? We're out of here we're conscious right and so like these stories are not are I guess misinterpreted or something but. I'm going on here but I think that I don't think feminism is that far away from a you know what? Is like the idea of a feminist aesthetic that. promoted the elevation of women and their safety and the safety of their of their offspring. Whatever it takes to do that I would do that right away. Man I. think that's what exactly what men should do. I think will you said lots of things? I? No, I'm going crazy there but yeah. I believe first of all, I WANNA. Tell you for a fact that I believe. That Jesus was crucified in that was stupid and state wasn't. Okay. So vow. Far As the story, most of the portrayals she looks in art in g looks like the seductress in that is like we talked about it. In creates a native image for most men that women are manipulating and using their sexual power to manipulate and that creates anger and that I would say came out of the only reason women ever got using their sexual power to manipulate was it was only waiter survive for so many many many many centuries you had to snagging catch whatever word best guy in could because that was how you're gonNA survive now the difference today is I read that in his lovely. For both partners to feel in a situation where there's children that you're going to nurture care. But if both partners or even just one partner in might be case the female one. Has the ability to earn an income. Is income in money. It's how can you? Feel, it is too. I could be working and also raise a family beautifully, you just pull bringing more help you might hire a nanny, you might get somebody to help you. But this the idea is they're just what's changing over time I. Think it's a healthy thing is the idea of the roles have to be so rigid the idea idea that you nurture new care and you show demonstrate values you don't just talk values. You are those people. That's what children pick up on if parents are making himself stay together for some idea. But it's an unhappy marriage and There's nothing loving going on. That's a very tough role model for children. And it don't grow up too well. So I, think the main thing is that. I'm. I feel that feminism is right in every religion or non religion because the portrayals of women however been kind made end limiting and I had a shopping moment didn't know this starting some people are starting to write about it. I was I looked up online when I was writing the power that looming man I wanted to get quotes and I looked up aristotle. What was his view of women? You know this that he actually wrote women are inferior into to writing. He said, they should be given less food you describe them as you know cranky and. And he said they should not be educated. Guy This is a guy who thought the highest value in the universe was the knowledge of geometry. So I mean I don't really like the Greek started things off they started thinking about stuff but the overemphasis on Aristotle Aristoteles, thought I mean you should know it when you're studying philosophy but there's a lot more powerful philosophers than aristotle and Plato. Yes but here's my final point. Okay. I also that he had his thinking had a deep influence on the formations of church Christian Church thinking thirteen, th century and below, and also Islam, and I had such huge moment when I saw that I thought my God you could have been many more positive views of women. But if people in religious adapt to the times, he was revered not today but he was revered for his thinking for a long time shore it. So therefore is ideas of women were obviously Islam and In. Many parts of the church don't. Give leadership position still women. You know it's funny though you know what's interesting is that And this is what always oh I'm going to say something controversial here. Okay. It's interesting that There was a lot of. With, those two that the the the Greek philosopher crowd, there was a lot of homosexuality in the Greek floss crowd. You know and. They probably didn't know women that all actually they probably the they were probably self-satisfied in their own gay world of thought and I mean I say that with all due respect to however you WANNA respected. But these are people that probably very rarely interacted with it was probably a group of gay men like how many times? How is it possible that we know that Aristotle might've gay and played on like how did that make it through time to today? Is probably because they were and that's important about understanding their philosophy and when when they talk about it, and so these these are men that probably never encountered women there are life almost never and. So, their philosophy reflects that. I hate to say it. Over we're he apparently was married that doesn't mean he spent much time with his wife, but he was according to history he was married. His teacher was Plato. Plato was also married Plato however thought women could be educated. It was aristotle the said dump do not educate. Let. Me Ask you. Can I I want to ask you something because it goes back to those institutions. So of those men were both married because of an institution of monogamy right. Okay now here's what's interesting. And the average feminists would say that. that. or I've never heard. It said see I think that monogamy is the ultimate expression of. Patriarchy. I. Think it's the ultimate expression of it. There's every if and in a sense, it's very good. It's a good idea like the institution is a good idea I'm a part of it and want to stay in it. Okay. I like my monogamous relationship. I but I I'm sick of the argument about whether people think monogamy is natural humans. It's so obviously it's not like to me. Humans are not monogamous creatures like we're not like crazy but. Obviously, everybody knows like think about sexy you don't always think about having sex with the same person. We're not monogamous where attracted to other people. This happened throughout our lives we go through periods where we're more attracted to some people. And everything else. But we choose monogamy and it's created and I the institution is created and we go after it for for one reason. But one of those reasons originally I think was because monogamy makes men not kill each other like if every man just has a woman that's his that he gets to have sex with his possession that he owns the womb of and he knows that that's his womb. And they won't kill other men but if one guy starts horrid all the girls, right? If one guy starts to hoard all the girls, then he's going to have to do something about those angry men over there that aren't getting any girls right and it still creates like this instability. So men said one woman one man nobody touches anybody else's wife we won't kill. Each. Other like I actually think that's the fundamental basis of it but I think it discriminates against women because I think some women would rather be the second wife of guy was status seventy five in the first wife with guy was status five, hundred I actually believe that some women would accept that second wife status to gain access to more resources or better tent. Or maybe the guys got thousand cattle who is big shooter he's got a thousand cattle. So if you just go sleep in his tent and you know You'RE GONNA get access to a lot more food and your children are going to be cared for better. But if you stay over here, your husband's a subsistence farmer slave guy and he just pulls rocks in the quarry and I think that monogamy is not is not is not something that females would instate her like women that don't have access to power like you're saying, would they would use that sexual power to gain status and move up the ladder so to speak and I think that. I don't know is that correct view of monogamy? I don't know. Like with a feminist agree with that. Well. First of all, you certainly talk about you know the example you gave Biblical Times but the second wives situation. Just. Read a book called the Red Tent does is nice job of disturbing that. I but we have to the present time. My feeling is that. Everything is a choice having children's choice getting married is a choice because we're so many possibilities for just leading independent lives and. I think because women haven't done it for so long that they are intrigued by it. Now if you do get married. Personally think monogamy is although at tough choice. For probably everybody I just think it makes sense because. Is Part of this, one of the reasons people get married is I found this perfect partner I want to stay with them for the rest of my life. And there's a vow taken and I think it will if they can. Should stick to. That's also chance to be what breads up marriages. The other insoles clearly, not a very good situation but yeah but you know what's interesting though you know what's interesting hey, a lot of people cheat and are glad that they don't get caught so they can stay in their monogamous relationship. Okay. It's not like every every affair is uncovered. Okay. There's a lot of sex going on and monogamy to me seems to be like this institution that we're all working towards but we've failing at it very badly and our society makes people fail out of even worse and that's the source of the instability in our society I think in some senses. Well this certainly one source I mean. There's other cases will cases where the wife found that the man is cheating and she still stays with him. I guess then vice versa and vice versa. That an investor. So so I think that. I don't know that feminism in monogamy. I didn't really realize that they were that related because I think. To me again, feminism is just a stance where we're saying that women who have been deprived of power decision making and re spent an independence, all kinds of things for so little now have these lines and like you said. So if you have that situation, we've just discussed a woman finds out her husband's cheating. They work it out. She says, he finds out she's been cheating thing work it out they still respect each other. They still love each other than marriage goes on and I'm not thinking in terms of feminism for this thing. I'm thinking more in terms of. The a woman's. Self respect and again her age and. Health and I don't want. Ever a woman to feel that she has to feel less powerful. Then her partner, whoever that may be I think everyone needs to find their own ways to express power that are healthy and progressive, and that's where again I'm going to go back to meditation again, these steps become so much more evident when you meditate because you're going to this her. Yourself with just more natural. You're less likely to go. To. Get sucked into something. Oh, some person over there really attracted him and I had no control over my feelings whatsoever Dassler I totally agree with you I think that I think that this idea that one is impelled towards every sexual desire by. An uncontrollable urges a very negative message to give to people. Whether you're gay straight, whatever it is I mean I'm not saying that you know only the gay instinct is bad or. Would know if you're in control of your body, you can say no stuff and that's where the problem with alcohol and drugs you know you have this the campus, the whole campus situation that's going on is because it's just like it's because there's there's there's a lot of booze involved in all of those things that happen. You know like what's the problem? Here is the problem here you know that You know that underage drinking or drink excessive alcohol consumption here. That's making people very vulnerable to their instincts. Maybe you know. You hear about this campus stuffing everybody's drunk. You know it's like, okay I was drunk and this guy was drunk and then this crazy thing happened it's like maybe maybe maybe the alcohols the issue I, you know I don't know. I see you know that this this idea. That sexuality is encouraged or the exploration of multiple sexual partners. The Expo like sex is a dangerous. It's a wonderful thing, but it's also a dangerous thing that can take people down. For the reasons I explained because you pick up the thoughts and feelings of your partner guess negatively or the spiritual. Says it's just being just to the physics of it to bodies are this close together just The women is. Tina buddies more sensitive. So she still those negative feelings. So this guy is used just. Whatever anybody's feeling either in either partner is just say I. Manipulate that allows you. Just to better. Put Care, what state in mind the? Try to enjoy this. Success doesn't party is likely to get. Drained and not feel good afterwards could be days and days afterward you get back into their usual mine stands to be an element of. there. There has to be an element of traction for has to be. Well I you know. I hope. So I, hope. So there is a thing is some cases it can just be habit and. I I think that you we have the society now where Birth Control. So widely available and a did you watch that series fleabag in all know was pretty horrifying to me. On the very first episode is Netflix man who's a woman I guess She's supposed to be in her late twenties. I guess maybe very early thirties but she she needs to sky through the Internet he comes over to her house. He's attractive she she's like Nice looking. There's this interesting moment of acting where there's so relieved seach other. Actually go immediately they don't even know each other the seat of. The. Best. and. Of course. Our Weird. Sexual counter and then you leaves she'll never see him again. And it just that was the scene, the opening scene of the first episode. Because, then it just shows how her mental health is already not too good but she's already self him in Geneva. fleabag basically and. I think it was supposed to be very funny but I didn't find it. Funny I've found it. Sad it really so sad that has. To be relieved that you found somebody that looks decent. Isn't the reason? Ladies. I if you're listening to this. I. Need to explain I think it's important. One of the things that maybe someone didn't teach you but a man is actually entering your body like he's entering your body and he's depositing something inside. You know you may think this show only technical. It's only a technical thing and it's all about pleasure. It's all about pleasure in me and I feel good after whatever maybe I get a dose of some chemical gets released that I need and makes me feel better or whatever but. He's leaving you with something inside you. For sure that's right. That's right. It isn't I. Actually say that in women meditation power then but I say it's not just. You know if a man is you're not just opening your legs, your opening your mind you're opening your spirit you your emotions will get a game that's been show repeatedly for women. Instead it's and if there is like this cases show, there's these. Have never even had a one-sentence conversation and the. They're strangers they. She's left with the sense of total emptiness lack of self worth. and. whether it came from him totally or not. But the truth is just what you said. Someone's inside your body somebody depositing something inside your body is not just physical. Mental is psychic is emotional spirit and you at least pick up whatever man you've been within. I was told that. It can take up to seven years to get rid of some of wines of feelings and that inaction that you meant just through sensuality. Ears. Yeah. I think it's a long time I mean I'll tell you this. I had a friend of mine and I'm a Christian. He was a he's like. he's like a a Buddhist kind of. Eastern kind of guy and he walked me through a bunch of meditations. that. took me back in cleanse. You can actually cleanse through meditation, but you have to be able to. it's like you you have to a year of learning how to meditate before. You can actually begin leaper meditations like those kind of things where you go in through a process and there's no like you can be a good way to do it for men maybe not for women but a good way to do it for menace to is to explore their ancestors in their religion and who they were as a person and go back that way through that masculine energy I don't know what it is for women, but that's how I do it. I go back to that but. Man. Liz We've talked for almost an hour and a half now. I know isn't fun it has enjoyed. His you're honest in your fun. So. Is Up to you we we could continue longer not I have time I'm just wondering for you if there's some direction or something that maybe you know about yourself or some area that you to speak to and just tell me something or asked me some questions and open that up to you. I think. I have used to said there. And one's called the power loving man and the others women meditation power. And I feel like. I like many younger. He bowled to read them and. I guess, let you get your opinion. Based on talking to me. Where the lax with where where these? Books. Don't get read. We've talked about some things which seemed to me just common. She our people. Why are people. Not. Getting messages. So I'll give you an example. Okay. So someone who case so these concepts are very easy to understand when you understand them, they feel natural to you. So like when this is why when I when I read your bio, I wanted to talk to you a lot about feminism because. I if you're a feminist I'm a feminist. Away. Okay. But I'm very careful because I feel like there's a there's a hate man thing going on out there which is different and then which is a different thing like especially hate white men for example, that's a that there's there's there's certain forces right now that are very negative and they seemed to be pointing fingers at a group of people and that see those kind of waves I get really uncomfortable with you know. When a group is isolated by an identity type, you want to be careful with that. That's what happened in Germany. You know it's like Do you know one of the things that's interesting about Hitler and I'll get to your question the second one of the things that's interesting because you just draw me out a little bit one of the things. That's interesting about Hitler's he started with a campaign of sanitation and disinfection right and right now we're in a phase where everything wants to be sanitized and disinfected humans are gross well, which humans are gross which ones do we need to get rid of the ones that don't wear masks like what you know what I'm saying there's like there's like a murderous. In zeitgeist rate now that I'm uncomfortable with and in Germany, it's like you know with all of our problems relate to those Jewish people. That's our problem right there. That's what we need to. We need to rally against them. Everything is their fault, and if we just counter that position, we're all gonna come together as a group and we're going to get rid of those people and everything will be fine then right and we have that in reside gay straight now. And that is working. That's that's working its way through things and you know they yeah out whenever they do that, they point to like historical facts like things that happened this Thomas Jefferson was a slave owner tear down his statue. Right you Oh hang on a second and then no one will he was a slave owner all the statues are coming down and then eventually you hear that Frederick Douglass statue, the ex slave. Statue get torn down to like they've got completely nuts they're even. You even tearing down Frederick Douglass Statue like what come on the you know clearly, you have no mission, your purpose other than destruction. But what I'm saying is that people that point to these virtues for some reason. They get pilloried and they get called extremists extreme feminists on you know what I'm saying she's in extreme feminist. Right well, no. What is she saying? What is she calling for? Right like what change or maybe? Maybe she's calling you back to something. You were actually when you were. You know what I'm saying like don't maybe she's not asking you to be something. You're not maybe she's asking you maybe that feminist is asking men to to be something they were. You know what? I'm saying there's a doesn't necessarily have to be A. A change to something you weren't. It's maybe it's an inward call. To be the benevolent king. I think if you mixed in an something for men with your feminism like something that men understand because. When I look at your message when I listen to you when I read your blog. You're not anti men, but you're not. You could really cultivate that like what you need to do and I'm you might not like this guy but what you may not like him Jordan Peterson. So, George Dr Peterson, was calling for the benevolent King Okay to emerge. Okay and and a lot of people were uncomfortable with him. Because A lot of things would have to change if the benevolent king were to emerge. Right Donald Trump is not the benevolent king. Okay. No benevolent king whatever grab a woman by the Pussy. Okay like let's just beacon that terms now whether you like Donald. Trump, you want to vote for him or whoever's listening to this look he's not the benevolent king he like that's not how that is not how men should speak about women ever in any circumstances cigar room locker room bullshit. That's not how good men speak about women. That's not what they do and the fact that people all men speak like that about women when they're in private, that's actually not true. Okay not all men do that. Not all men want to do that and we need to instruct men that in fact, if you hear a man speaking like that about women, maybe you should tell him not to actually. You know it's actually the opposite. And People. Have a right to know if they're president speaks like that about women to. You know what I'm saying. So while I don't WanNa Wade into US politics right now because it's pretty complicated at the moment. Jordan was calling for the the benevolent king to emerge and I think you're calling for is Athena. The Goddess of Athens of wisdom of power. Athena, was powerful. She was a soldier she was a warrior she was a warrior goddess right? We need that to emerge right now right where I think if feminists called for Fina, the goddess of wisdom in thought and that you know that sprung out of Zeus head, you know that's what feminism should call for is, is Athena not to not the crucifixion of Christ he should be calling for fina to emerge you know and that spirit and then Jordan Peterson was calling for the masculine aesthetic, the benevolent king, the the the to emerge from the belly of the beast like. We know that something's wrong. There's a lot of signals coming at us that we're not doing something right? Okay as a society. And I think we need feminism to stop or eight maybe maybe they're not doing this, we need the dialogue to stop being. Men are bad or women are bad or women need to stay in their place or did it at a we need a dialogue to be something like. We need to return to a supporting. Structure that support for people and safe. We need people to love one another and respect one another we need people to You know understand the vulnerability of women, women and. Respect it one, hundred percent with. Women are more vulnerable than men this they're more vulnerable. Like I'm sorry but my daughter's our wombs and they can get pregnant and they can be. Like the damage done is Wu. Spiritually yen and and sexually in the consequences are far worse for women than it is for me. And I think women need to call for that and call speak to that not that women and men are the seem and men women can do the job as of like we're not talking about competence or conscientiousness I. Think There's also a calling to the vulnerability of women. That's the Virgin. Mary represents and that's what we worship in a sense. I don't know if that makes sense and I'd like to see feminism call to that. Here's some. Here's what I would say first of all, what the reason I wrote the second book. Women Meditation Power then will the power and the loving mad because I knew than to just were only for women without men also. Talking about what you're talking about this loving kindness. Noble. It's it's very honorable. The sight of men also really focus on on knowing how wonderful a power that is not something just talking is actually the maze power volleyed for man? To me, I felt like I had to do it, and so I think of a feminist quote hits anybody should be hurting anybody because there you're in a lower state of consciousness. So the women. Reno, on the one hand women are more vulnerable but on the other hand, they too can do many things to. Work with them selves. So their vulnerability is is where they didn't want to be right. You can be vulnerable to beauty in the garden or to all you know to impersonate you trust. You can be vulnerable in your family of it's a good family, but there's times when you don't WanNa be longer than if you're on the street, you don't want to be vulnerable but right in I is in part the Feminine Power Is housed in the vulnerability in a way not just. Me I think vulnerability. Fluidity and Change Nuclear Fish. Fission. There's nothing vulnerable about actually the power of women in the role models of women's warrior women are not vulnerable. And one of the things of this. Team recommended everyone male enough masculine feminine to Take Martial Arts. Why? Because you don't feel film you feel strong and you feel capable and you have respect is a wonderful study and I would recommend all three of your daughters do it because it's practical if anybody ever messes with them and they actually studied martial arts for your to. Takes a lot of fear factor. In some you're working off. I just don't like the word vulnerable too much. I like it for certain. I like it for a sense of openness to certain higher on. Emotions and sensations, but I don't like it means weakness and I don't know of. Right. So that's it. I think I'm so obsessed with the definition of terms when I'm talking to people sometimes like what do you mean by discrimination? Tell me exactly what you mean when you say that you know what I mean I, a lot of these words get lost in nuances in this sort of stuff it's in a way it's like. If you if you want the female full dawning of Athena. To emerge. Like that that power that the the feminine wisdom and power that can that is represented in that? The. There's like men have to agree or because there's a sense in which In that in the in the mixing of the female and the male that destruction occurs when the men male forced does not serve the female in a sense right so the male power structure if it when it gets when it goes out of control crushes, women pushes them down but this leads to the destruction of the men in their own sense like it's like you can't win this right it's not like you win. So there's something in it where there has to be an elevation of. The, and this is what I read in. There has to be an elevation of the feminine. And for you that represents you know elevation to political office. It can be financial success. It can can push out in different directions, but I think at its heart is that women need to be in a safe environment so they can be free to make the same kind of choices that men make. And and whether the whatever those choices are to, there's, but that's where they're free. The vulnerability vulnerability is is there's to give they don't have to. They're not making choices based on fear that they're going to lose their vulnerability. If they enter that space, they can just be who they are and they can enter that place or way right and that's based on choice. So if the male and female forces are balanced Comfortable to do whatever they want when it's out of balance. You have destruction and that's what I think. We're out of balance now and everybody knows it. And they don't know how to describe it and and so I think feminism. You know I. Think it it. It needs to become more about women in less about men. Does that make sense? Sense Everything new of just ends right I think again, the word quote vulnerable is is. The one that is tricky word the way you're describing it as absolutely accurate and I think women just have no idea how strong they are, and I am actually in the last week or so I've been reading these. This is Buddhism. But they have the most incredible fierce fierce is really the right word imagery of their female. Deities, deke knees or goddesses mean we're talking you know. Weapons fans it just their fierce ends not that they're not loving because they represent the highest qualities of wisdom virtual just they're. Clearly Helpful self-contained fierce waves. That's a good were there and. I think that had this little imagery which. Sina existed a long time ago, kind of buried and so. Feminism at a high level to me is restoring the power women in respecting the power men cannot we balanced muster exist it absolutely must exist her the whole planet when again goes out of order but what has happened is that? Way. Back. There was this turning point. where this domination of women took precedence in that was had wasn't has been farmed artful. So probably as a feminist Iowa. Spiritual feminist metaphysical feminist that doesn't make me less effective anything that makes me more powerful because of a balanced feminist and. I do see. Like that still go on the do strike me as the male female. Bad conditioning on some side that came misunderstandings of their innate. Power Levels. So my wish would be that who whenever you identify with with their male or female whether you're both were now saying June fluid that's fine but or transgender I think that's fine but I would be sad if a man decided to be. All operations to become a woman so that he could have feelings and emotions. He has Biz Amash Room. How Edward Same Thing Gee, I want to be. Used as a sexual reasons but. Not The whole transgender thing, and this is our walking on eggshells now right but I mean. For me the the. Rejection yeah. If I can say this but their rejection of oneself as is like as you came into the world, right so if you believe in your spirit you know if you're rejecting yourself based on who you are. So you I think they call it sexual die morphism or something no, no it's called There's a name. Morphine I think it is where they don't know which are they're confused right and now it's gone to the point where people are. Like. There's something anti-feminist in it because. Rate now. The movement is gone from being mostly boys men that WANNA be women. To now girls that WANNA be men like it's switched in the last five or ten years, and if I were a feminist or something like that, I would be a really uncomfortable with that trend while not like discriminating against you know people who whatever they WANNA call it the the technical name or you know whatever whatever it is. But what you're seeing is like an uptick of like optic three, thousand percent four, thousand percent increases. On young girls that don't WanNa be girls. and. Like. That's all like it's a massive massive number like the increase in. Mostly men would want to transition to be women in a certain percentage of women want transition to be men, but it's actually inverted in all these young girls. Now that are in puberty or younger than puberty that WanNa be men, and if I was a feminist I'd be very concerned about the change. Why did all of a sudden that change? Why do we have so many people that are thirteen, fourteen, fifteen years old that are wanting to to take hormone and puberty blockers so they don't become a woman I think that's that's trouble for feminism to me. That's that's a real feminist issue. Guy. I can't speak for, but I go back to the individual and I would say before someone went through a lot of painful surgeries in expensive surgeries to i. find out the really deeply what what you hope to accomplish. Today in this society of homosexuality. So you're viewing. Eat whatever you want to be. So, why change your body's shape it? I would sit for quite a while and Understand too, and this is a Buddhist in this comes from the East in general, which all believe and I heard the Christian. Church did earlier in reincarnation because the truth is we've had a ton of lives of women. and. Now like you're born a man apparently that sexual tendency doesn't A. Onto the gender is another navy and same thing with women, these Gals, they have been men in many many many many months and so they're going to be attracted to women still very likely in this in this league and Mayfield really. Mind Meal Bunny and you know what? We're all in fighting to learn something. So I'm rushed to get surgeries have not upset about it because I have to begin with view Sarang Meditate These same people everybody usb the one thing this has nothing to do feminism. I'd like to see everyone tried meditation in there isn't one way to meditate. By the way, there's many ways. So learned a few civilians says the only way they're wrong? And but you are learning to still stop thought. So if anyone says, you can just space out of your meditation. It's correct. That's not necessarily true. Just Berg Make it part of your daily practice because you as a human being has so much value. You'll learn that in your whole life will change everything we're talking about. From my side this from the perspective of a longtime meditators in teacher and. I've had transpeople in my classes and they say, well, you're talking about men and women here you're being very dual. And I, it actually just going in the I ever you identify with Sane and I'm saying if you have both sides, will lucky you already again right that means you UNIM- power and you'll plenty of love. The workload right. I was GONNA. Say That men can express I believe men can express feminine. Power. An and they and. They in fact, they become more powerful when they explore. Their Feminine Energy in a way, there's like a and you know folks if you're listening to this. I don't think Liz being. Over. It can over exaggerated. I think she's one hundred percent right that if you choose to explore the spiritual side of your life, whether that's by reading her books going to one of her classes or just choosing to start to explore the spiritual part of your. Life. Like that's the first step may be, and then you start searching and there's something to that man and whether you work with Liz Reader books or do or maybe do some online classes or whatever. Liz. I would encourage everybody to start opening the spiritual open themselves up to the spiritual side of life as a way to find peace. But also answers and and you know what? I mean for guidance I think it's really important. So that. Subsidy I because I not arbitrary about what spiritual path you follow I just you everyone needs in the path should include meditation and there's no religion or thought form that I. Know of that surprises says you should not. If you do meditate meditate twice a day. You can set aside the time usually before before dinner. For it. Work. Where can people find your books? There on Amazon just. Look under Liz Louison DOT com you can go to. WWW DOT LIZ Lewin said dot com. I'm on facebook and INSTAGRAM. That's pretty much where you find me. I do have a weekly class and teach meditation is pretty sweet at some Thursday and said, six PM Pacific in that details are on my website. Zoo of course. We'll post those details to on the get a grip on Life Dot Com website folks thank you for making all the way. I really am thankful for Liz, Louison and getting to know her it was really great conversation and and I learned a lot less. Thank you and thank you for making it to the end folks. Remember if you want to start your own podcast Ooh, he go to get a grip. Studios DOT COM.

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