35 Burst results for "Menlo Park"

"menlo park" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

06:29 min | 3 months ago

"menlo park" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Built hollow cake two, a working experimental device using holographic displays that can already play PC VR experiences. Headsets right now, they have LED displays. They beam them into your eyes. They have these lenses that refract them so they look like they're bigger. This would use a very, very powerful laser. And it would shoot it through this almost flat lens that then bends the light and the upshot of this is that you get an incredibly thin headset compared to what you have now. Incredibly thin and light, it's one of the things where it seems like they haven't quite cracked what actually would make it work, which is the powerful laser part. But it's one of those things where it genuinely does something you can not find in another headset, at least a sort of major commercial headset. If you're looking at high resolution headsets, those exist, if you're looking at really bright headsets, it seems like it's still pretty speculative and it's a kind of a view just turn up the dial. This seems genuinely pretty interesting if they can pull it off. The thin and light thing is, I mean, for lots of IV reasons, a huge, huge deal, and seems like where we're all going to go. And I will say that was my favorite part of your story. Your story is very good. But the thing that made me laugh the most about your story was the photo of the wall of designs that they have, and it's like, what is it? I think it's four rows of 6 different designs. Most of which are just insane. They all look like sort of exploded Oculus quests, which I guess is literally what they are. They just took a question and put some wild new stuff in it. And then there's two that are just glasses. And it's like, you look at this picture and it's like, I know the correct answer. It's the glasses. I almost wonder like, are they doing this in the wrong direction? Where it's like, let's figure out how to build this cool tech and then hopefully fingers crossed someday we'll be able to make it really small. Whereas you get a company like snap, which is saying, we're going to start with glasses and then figure out how to build them into cooler stuff over time. It just makes me wonder looking at these prototypes. It's like, there is just no chance that anything other than these thinner and lighter options is the correct answer going forward, right? I mean, am I overthinking this? This is where it gets really complicated, which is that you have this section where meta starts really big and goes smaller. And then you have this separate division where they start with things like the ray ban smart glasses, and they build up. They have so many pieces going on right now. This wasn't even talking about the part where it's just AR glasses. Yeah, wait, what was the balance there? Because I think you're making me realize I don't actually understand meta strategy for any of this at all. This was very specific about just like this is a VR thing, right? But hasn't meta even talked about the fact that ultimately it thinks AR is more important than VR or two. Yeah, it's not necessarily the difference between VR and AR, although that's kind of part of it as much as the difference between pass through, which is where you have a screen and if you see AR, there's cameras and they're passing this feed through and something's completely blocking your eyes. And something where they're just projecting holograms into the real world with glasses. So this was all about display tech where in theory you could have full VR. It's completely blocking your vision. It involves some level of screen projection mostly. And then they have, as far as I know, a lot of separate AR prototypes. Right. Yeah, what's your sense of how overlapping those things are? Is all the stuff that's happening in VR, eventually going to be useful to the AR headsets too, or is this just the thing we can build now? I was really interviewed that duck did in the course of doing this where I think he basically said, we have to invent all kinds of new novel stuff for VR, but we haven't even invented the stuff we need to invent the stuff for AR and it's just like, oh, this is all way further out than people think before this stuff is really good. But what is your sense of how much this all kind of coalesces and how these things feed each other over time? It's really hard for me to tell. I'm sure that anything where, say, eye tracking is really important for their VR efforts and I'm sure that's very helpful for AR two. I'm sure that anything they do with lasers also if you're doing projection tech and AR is very useful. And so I'm sure there's a lot of crossover. I don't actually have a great sense of how much overlap the individual researchers are doing, especially then when you get into things like they're trying to build a bunch of hardware like smartwatches and AR control devices. The thing that's interesting about meta is that they're a software company, all the things they're known for are software. They have an incredibly huge hardware research division at this point that they're trying to spin up. It also really seems like the hardware strategy has basically been to just write giant checks to every individual person on the hardware team and just be like, just go chase your bliss. Like whatever cool wacky thing you can come up with will try it out. We'll see what happens. And then eventually maybe someday a product road map sort of magically emerges out of it. But right now, it's just like, it's just a crazy research lab in Menlo Park. It's nuts. Yeah, they're just a vet features like one of the things that wasn't really part of this presentation, but that they referenced is that they have this system for displaying your eyes on the outside of the headset. Terrifying. And they announced this last year with this long blog post that's just like, yeah, so I was like, this would be really cool. And so I dropped a phone to the front of the headset and it displayed my eyes and it was terrifying. And then I created this whole other system. And now I ended up with something that actually looks, again, deeply uncanny, but is really sophisticated. So what is your sense of the road map right now between what we saw in these prototypes and where we are right now? The rumors around the headset with stuff we've learned from Alex heath and other reporters that other outlets is that there's going to be Cambria this year. That's just confirmed. There is an upgrade to the quest two, which is going to stay this more affordable consumer pathway that has maybe less advanced tech. And then there's going to be an upgrade to Cambria, those seem like they're maybe going to come and 24 who knows. And then from there, it seems really up in the air. It's unclear to me how quickly they would be able to miniaturize a lot of this stuff. It seems like one of the things they're very interested in is very focal displays. They've been working on that for a long time. It was also referenced, but not in these prototypes. Where it seems like there are features that they're going to maybe focus on getting these different focal depths. They're adding eye tracking to Cambria that's going to be a big deal. They're probably going to keep trying to up the resolution. But it seems like they always try to do a sort of vague 5 to ten year road map. And so that's maybe what you would assume here. Okay, so the stuff coming in the immediate future, we can safely assume it's going to be like better versions of what we've already seen rather than some of these sort of wild new ideas actually brought into products..

Cambria Alex heath Menlo Park
Self-Censorship Is the Most Powerful Form of Censorship

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:24 min | 11 months ago

Self-Censorship Is the Most Powerful Form of Censorship

"So let's talk first about censorship. So Dennis and prager you did a great job. They're Google lawsuit. They were way ahead of the curve by the way. They tried to warn everyone that Google was going to shut everyone up. And people took them seriously, but not enough people, and then next thing you know, Donald Trump gets kicked off YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, all in one day, and it's kind of, I told you so, right, Dennis, it was one of those things. And we kind of have a separate government that exists in our country, one that we elect and one that is technocratic and one that is headquartered in Silicon Valley and in Menlo Park. So I could get into that form of censorship. I could also talk about the former censorship that exists on college campuses, whether it be the administration or antifa, and all that. But the type of censorship that I think is actually most helpful to talk about is one that every single person in this room participated, which is when we shut ourselves up. Self censorship has become the biggest form and most powerful form of censorship. Now, it's not only we don't shut ourselves up because we always want to, it's largely because we're afraid of the price or the cost associated with speaking up. And a great example of this is when people say Charlie, what can I do? And I asked them, I say, at work or with your Friends, are you allowed to express your political or religious or moral beliefs? And a vast majority of the people that listen to my show say no. I say, well, then you are not free. I said, let's just start there. You know, instead of you running for governor or whatever, what you're all great things and say, why don't you next time at your lunch break, tell the people around you how you view the world like Charlie, I can't do that. I mean, I'll lose my job, I'll be ridiculed. I'll be marked. I'll be smeared. So, of course you will be. So why won't you do it? And that's really the issue, isn't it? And this has been one of the genius moves to the left is that they are able to hold hostage our decadence to use a great word. Our lifestyle our luxury over us. We have a great life here in America and conservatives know they have a great life. And it's actually this very interesting thing. It's this inverse relationship, and I love Dennis thoughts on this. Because conservatives are more thankful to be an American and thankful for what they have. I think we're also more afraid to lose

Dennis Prager Google Donald Trump Menlo Park Silicon Valley Youtube Charlie Twitter Facebook America
How Do We Keep Red States Conservative?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:56 min | 1 year ago

How Do We Keep Red States Conservative?

"So people say charlie. How do we make conservative. State stay conservative liberals will self deport. The more of these wonderful laws will pass so right now. Somewhere in menlo park california. Some triple mask wearing vaccine mandate suburban mom who drinks her smoothies shakes and goes to yoga class. Who has a. Let's say complicated. Relationship with her beta male metrosexual husband who works for dropbox. They are looking at real estate right now in texas and elbasan. They're like. I don't know if we want to move there. All of a sudden they might change their zillow search box from highland park texas to boulder colorado and honestly sayonara to boulder the point. Is that for the triple mask wearing vegan smoothie wearing soul cycle attending complicated relationship upper middle class white liberal mom that lives in menlo park and doesn't want to live in california and work tax. Too high she's now going to have a conversation with her husband tonight. Honey i want to go to denver instead. Not texas texas will become more conservative because this is how you repel liberals from moving into your state for example conservatives are not flocking in major numbers to new york and by the way out of all the list of the things that he mentioned love. The pro-life law loved the voter law. The thing that if you want all the sudden repel liberals from your state like mosquitoes have opened carry as soon as california liberals start to see people walk around with guns they will sell their homes and they will leave. You wouldn't believe the reason why liberals have been coming to. Texas is because the haven't been implementing these sorts of laws and by the way securing the elections in texas allowing people to own firearms and to protect young lives that can protect themselves in the womb. God bless texas doing that

Elbasan Texas Boulder Menlo Park California Dropbox Charlie Highland Park Colorado Denver New York
When Sea Levels Rise, Who Should Pay?

Short Wave

01:39 min | 1 year ago

When Sea Levels Rise, Who Should Pay?

"We're beginning with a giant pile of dirt. Okay i'll go with it. i'll go with it. okay. It's not just any pile of dirt. It happens to be right outside of facebook's campus in the san francisco bay area where we're standing right. Now is the outboard levy of the facebook campus in menlo park. That's kevin murray. He works for the san francisco creek joint powers authority which is an agency that works on flood protection in the area. We're walking on top of that levee which surrounds the tech companies brightly colored buildings. So why does facebook need a levy. Well the company's headquarters is right on the shoreline of san francisco bay and over the last decade. They've built huge state of the art buildings on the waterfront. So the levy is protection from the bay. But kevin told me levy isn't exactly the right way to describe it because a levee is designed to protect people at has to meet engineering standards that ensure it holds up these don't those structures that are providing flood barrier now are not adequate and are subject to failure if we have a really big tide or a big wind event or a big storm surge so lauren did facebook know that when they built their they did and now the risk is getting even bigger because sea levels are rising in a hotter climate so the region is looking at building a bigger levee. Sixteen feet tall. It will cost more than one hundred million dollars and the federal government. Just preliminarily awarded about half that money. But that's raising questions about who should be footing. The bill for adapt into the consequences of climate change. Coastal cities are going to need billions of dollars to protect their shorelines from rising

Facebook San Francisco Creek Joint Powe San Francisco Bay Kevin Murray Menlo Park Kevin Lauren Federal Government
Facebook Delays Return to Office Until January 2022

Tom Sullivan

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Facebook Delays Return to Office Until January 2022

"Delaying its return to their Menlo Park office until next year. Yesterday, Facebook announced it will delay its plan to return US employees to their offices until January due to the ongoing concerns with the Covid 19 Delta variant Facebook, following other companies pushing back their returns as

Menlo Park Office Covid Facebook United States
Is Democrat-Led California Running Our Country?

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Is Democrat-Led California Running Our Country?

"California's running our country. Nancy pelosi speaker of the house. Adam schiff is out of the house intel committee eric. Swale well is acting like the sultan of brunei shirtless and a foreign middle eastern country with slaves around him and some sort of country. That's awful for free speech protections. We have camera harris vice president. United states menlo park has google facebook and twitter all headquartered there. California runs the whole country. And you're trying to tell me that if republicans can't win back the governor's mansion in california that you can't take back the house of the senate.

Adam Schiff Swale Nancy Pelosi Brunei California Intel Eric Menlo Park Harris United States Facebook Google Twitter Senate
"menlo park" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"menlo park" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"While silicon valley you know was placed to attract talent and all sorts of different industries tech in common. Yeah but but it's the reasons The pierce that that is an outflow I don't know not not specifically a silicon valley but california in general is losing lot of people have losing people for the last seven years companies will begin to austin there. You sit so what the staffing nominated and this is sort of a kind of contemporaries nominee. I'll be explain that well again. Talking about california. I mean a lot going on I don't wanna talk right now about things like taxes Which is one of the reasons why were were received. People migrating out of california and moving to texas. But let's just sort of stick to cost talent getting so at some stage It's gonna be very costly. The operate and one of these talent does if everybody wants to be there. It's become very expensive to do business. So that's sort of what's happening in silicon valley and that's actually something that we see in our data again in our data. We're seeing that these firms these locations. We're seeing that. Their market values are going a lot Because they're innovating But at least temporarily their profits are not increasing nearly as quickly because the cost of doing business its iron higher from. What i'm seeing here in austin is that used to be the case that if you are up programmer in silicon valley and you're pretty good programmer A lot of these guys are making three hundred thousand dollars a year. And so the amazing thing is that you could be enter download of the year and You know menlo park. And he's still can't afford a place to live you can't raise a family in Menlo park on three hundred thousand dollars the year. So a lot of those guys are wanting to you know..

california austin silicon valley texas menlo park Menlo park
"menlo park" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"menlo park" Discussed on KGO 810

"Was on the tax man. Um yeah. Tights. My good afternoon. I'm Pat Thurston. We're talking about this indictment. It's a grand jury indictment that came down against the Trump organization and their CFO Alan Weiss, Ahlberg, and there are people who are treating it like how home that's what Donald Trump wants you to believe. And he's like Who knew who knew you had to pay those taxes. You knew it was a scheme. It was very specific the way you went about doing this so that you could sheet And it was cheating. And in Weisberg's case, it was also stealing because he filed for refunds that he was not entitled to. He did it willfully. He did it intentionally. He did it, knowing that he was perpetrating a crime and that is theft. So Bob Emails High Pat Leona Helmsley set, Helmsley said. We don't pay taxes. Only the little people pay taxes, he says. Will that be Trump's defense? Well, Trump himself has not been charged. Not in this indictment. We don't know if he's going to be charged in this crime. But he wasn't charged in the in this recent indictment, and Eric says it's simpler than you think. It's not just his cheating makes my taxes more expensive. If Donald Trump cheat on his taxes, he's not just cheating the government. He's not just achieving the I R s. He's cheating us. He's stealing from all of us. We the people, and we should all be outraged. You know, I would add. We should be doubly triply quadruple outraged. Because he was the president of the United States. He wants to be president. Again. He runs the Republican Party. He lies to the American people consistently, and he doesn't believe that he has to play by the same rules as anybody else. Let's go to the phones. Charles is calling from Menlo Park, Charles Welcome to K G O Hi, Pat. Great work on bringing up those two contradictory. I know everything about taxes. I love that was a great job. Thank you. And you should make that your show's logo. I would say every day play that I mean, it was wonderful. I have just three points and I'll be very quick and, uh, and then respond. However you wish Um first thing is the rich always control the narrative in this country. Corporate media supports them. They're always crying victim and they're always threatening us. They're always saying, If you take our money, our taxes will take your jobs away. They're not very nice people. Okay, a lot of them. They're just not. That's point Number one number two. I am so tired of people like that guy. I find Trump despicable, but it's nothing burger. And then they go on to defend and neutralize the charge. I'm sick of those people, too. And the last point which I hope you watch this. I'm not saying everything is accurate. But you may know about it. There's a three hour documentary put out quite a while ago called JFK to 9 11 JFK to 9 11. Everything is a rich man's trick, and it's put out by someone that British and it's pretty amazing. I mean, it's very wide and scope of history. It goes way before JFK through that. And then after, and I think you I mean you and I think I like I think as far as I can tell, and I think you will find it fascinating, You know, do it in little chunks if you can, but take a look at it. And as I say, I'm not. I can't verify everything's accurate, but I think people should really look at that and then think of the context of this society because everything in racism and everything else falls under The rich versus the poor. It's all under that umbrella. That's why they like our division. That's why they like all this stuff. You know what? I wrote it down and I will. I will check it out. I'm bigon documentaries. I'm not big on massive conspiracy theories. Although the truth is there are conspiracies that are absolutely real, like the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. That was a conspiracy. It was an actual conspiracy. There were a lot of people charge. Not just John Wilkes Booth. The first woman ever executed in the United States was a part of that conspiracy, and that's the reason she was executed. So you know, we can't just say that any conspiracy is a tinfoil hat, and I'm not sure if that's what you're alluding to here. Um, yeah, but I will say that it is interesting. I I believe that I believe that it's the wealthy who do control the narrative, and it's and I think also I, You know, Sometimes I think it's the people who are the craziest that sometimes control the narrative. I mean, I think it's nervy that the Republican Party right now is trying to establish themselves. And establish the Democratic Party in terms of the midterms. They want, uh, to paint themselves and this is what's coming out now. They were there. Two things they're doing for first of all, they want everybody to be afraid. They want to convince you that black lives matter is starting a race war and that they're out to get you. They want to try to convince you that Democrats don't believe in, uh, police. The Democrats don't want there to be any police that they just simply want anarchy, and they want you to believe that they're the party of law and order. Never mind that they voted against substantial sums of money going to local police departments around the country. Never mind that never mind that they all voted against the not only the, uh, 61 Commission that would be a bipartisan commission. Established along the lines of the 9 11 Commission to look into the insurrection on January 6th Never mind that they voted against the select Committee being established by Nancy Pelosi, a bipartisan select committee to investigate those same things. Never mind that they're trying to rewrite the narrative of January 6 to try to convince us that we didn't see what we saw with our own eyes. We didn't hear what we heard with our own ears. We didn't hear and see them repeating the same. Accusations that we say today that they accuse us of being crazy is for, um they are now trying to convince us that this was at least some of them that this that the FBI perpetrated this. They want us to believe that they're the party of law and order. And yet they didn't want to give the congressional Medal of honor to the officers at the Capitol police who fought to protect them on that day of the insurrection. They want to try to convince us that they are the party of law and order. And I think that the Capitol police officers have something to say about that. I think the FBI has something to say about that. I think our intelligence agencies have something to say about that. I think that the people the police departments who have been receiving the funding that were that was granted them through laws that were put into place by Democratic only votes. No Republicans involved they should understand that. But they have this machine..

Pat Thurston Eric Nancy Pelosi Charles Donald Trump Democratic Party Pat Leona Helmsley Helmsley January 6 FBI Abraham Lincoln K G O January 6th Republican Party Pat Bob John Wilkes Booth 9 11 Commission Democrats Republicans
The Facebook Headquarters Are Slowly Re-opening

The KFBK Morning News

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

The Facebook Headquarters Are Slowly Re-opening

"Headquarters in Menlo Park will reopen in a limited capacity today. For the first time in 14 months, Facebook will reopen the office to tell Percent of the employees at their headquarters. Their offices are in San Francisco, Fremont and other areas. Those offices remain close

Menlo Park Facebook Fremont San Francisco
Kevin Jones shares how he expanded his sports podcasts network

The Business of Content

05:06 min | 1 year ago

Kevin Jones shares how he expanded his sports podcasts network

"Hey kevin thanks for joining us. Simon man pleasure to be here appreciate you having me so before we talk about your podcast at work. Let's talk about what you were doing. Prior to your podcast network you like you got your start in radio right. What didn't you like about that medium. Yeah i kind of had a long winding journey before and got to blue wire tv in washington. Dc at wsh nine Where i actually like a digital blogger. It was bryce harper's rookie year. Rt threes rookie ear there space on the website to create content kind of l. Put my way into media at a tv station. That i turned that opportunity into the cleveland. Crowds dot com. They were growing their media operation. They had Space on espn eight fifty. They had their own radio show in studio in the building. The i broke into radio there. I was on the team side for the browns. You kind of don't have your own voice in. They were losing quite a bit of game so eventually took an opportunity. Came biard in san francisco. The main am station. It was a wonderful experience for the most part. I saw kaepernick kneeling i the warriors when titles. I got to go on the radio every day. I created digital content. But i didn't see a path forward for someone like myself who was twenty seventeen. I was twenty eight years old. I wasn't going to become a radio host. I wasn't gonna be on tv. And i didn't see enough opportunities and saw a lot of really good free agents on twitter and that's kind of how i stumbled upon blue ir but Yeah my background is really creating content for older digital media platforms. And were you like talking head on the radio. Where you're like a court correspondent like bose kind of your role way more correspondent. I came here in san francisco. Be at the warriors games calling in kevin. Jones live from game six of the western conference vitals. Kevin give us the mood. It would be five ten minute had sometimes team not just the update guy so i got to show up my personality. I wrote digital content. I was tweeting all the time And just treating you making better content. For came we are the most of the radio host For my age group which was articles about the warriors tweets about the forty niners. I was giving kmby. Are that brand name digitally. I wasn't getting rewarded for it and that really pushed me to found blue wire. 'cause i thought i was actually giving more wrong to the radio station online and wasn't getting paid properly short. Did you feel like you had a brand like where people obviously wouldn't recognize you on the street Because they only heard your voice today. Would you be like a bar like. Oh i totally know who you are times. Nothing crazy but you know. That's really what they found. Blue stems from dairy. Is that person in san francisco. He had a warriors podcast. I would getting drinks with him. If people were literally coming up to him and dabbling in sam. I love light years. Love what you do on twitter. It was up one of my a ha moments before i came into company. Is that twitter. Influencers in sports are so undervalued beat reporters for newspaper are kind of going out of style. In my opinion it's a it's a necessary way to get facts and information but Radio hosts are being replaced. In my opinion my twitter influencers youtube post snapchat users who have built communities of people. Yeah i think it's fair to say i have by own brandon. We have one hundred podcasters. I know we're going to get to blue i They have their own brands. And i think that's what makes us different. What's the world's going that way man. It's niche you can be this fantasy football funny guy you can be nerdy a little on the browns. Anyone can pick their lane right now. And then from the radio you went to go work at facebook on like content strategy. What kind of content where you strategizing on. Yeah it was on. The business helped team work out of building. Sixty one in menlo park so anytime. There was a new product launch across functional team facebook. There's a product manager. There's a marketing manager. There's someone who also writes help contact when a user gets the pay what is and that was kind of my role. It was definitely a lower tier. Get your foot in the door at facebook. But i learned a lot about scaling and how the task and project management and just it was a even though. They're not in the news in a good way. The culture they're working there was pretty good. People respectful a challenge each other in a polite way. I was coming from media where people throwing dictionaries at each other in the room. People were getting fired left and right backstabbing each other. Facebook actually gave me a little bit of hope as weird as it is saying this big evil giant stealing all the ad revenue move fast and break things but working inside. That building collaborated with people. Who admired and it kind of gave me the wings that eight. I can take some elements of facebook. Mix it into a sports media company

Warriors Biard Kaepernick San Francisco Bryce Harper Kevin Twitter Browns Simon Espn Cleveland Niners Washington Jones Facebook SAM Brandon Youtube Menlo Park
GameStop shares surge after Robinhood eases restrictions

Bryan Suits

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

GameStop shares surge after Robinhood eases restrictions

"The Bay Area have caused their financial partner to change its mind. The stock trading at Robin Hood says it will again allow investors to start trading Gamestop shares, a small group of investors have protested outside Robin Hood's headquarters in Menlo Park and outside the New York Stock Exchange. Robin Hood had blocked users from buying up shares of stocks and companies like Gamestop, AMC and BlackBerry Robin Hood restricted buying when Reddit users caused the stock prices to soar. Ah lawsuit filed in New York claims the APP deprived retail investors of The ability to invest in manipulate the open market. Rob Newton

Robin Hood Gamestop Shares Bay Area Blackberry Robin Hood Menlo Park New York Stock Exchange Gamestop AMC Reddit New York Rob Newton
"menlo park" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"menlo park" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Thank God for blessing us and our fans, man, it can't talk enough about him. Keep listening to I heart radio for more Florida Georgia line and all your favorite artists. On Now we'll look back at this week in history on I Heart radio this week in 18, 79 and the first public demonstration of his incandescent light bulb. American inventor Thomas Edison Lights of a street in Menlo Park, New Jersey, Pennsylvania Railroad company ran special trains to Menlo Park on the day of the demonstration in response to public enthusiasm over the event. Although the first incandescent lamp had been produced 40 years earlier, no inventor had been able to come over the practical design until Listen, embraced the challenge in the late 18 seventies, jumping ahead this week in 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill issue a declaration signed by representatives of 26 countries called the United Nations signatories of the Declaration. Val to create an international Postwar peacekeeping organization. The U. N began operation in October of 1945. This week in 1961 President John F. Kennedy issued a statement extending his sincere wishes and those of the American people to Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev and the people of the Soviet Union for a peaceful and prosperous new year. Although Kennedy and Khrushchev both pledged cooperation is 1961 came to a close to went on to play a dangerous game of chicken over Soviet missile sites in Cuba in October, 1962 and this week in 1999, the United States, hands over control of the Panama Canal to Panama, putting the strategically Waterway in Panamanian hands. For the first time, crowds of Panamanian celebrated the transfer of the 50 Mile Canal which links the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and officially opened on October 15 1914. Since then, almost one million ships have passed through the canal. I'm better. What happened? Thanks for listening to this week in history on my heart radio. Hot radio goes one on one with Bryan Adams to talk about working with the legendary Jeff Lynne. I think that one of the great things about Jeff Lynne, he's sort of able to become Member of the band metal band he's works with so You listen to any of his projects, Signatures all over serendipitous that we actually met up. And he asked me if I didn't want contracts sometimes. Oh, yeah. Seems to go. The track back was like when we didn't explain. Even Jeff was surprised when he got the tracker is like, Wow, way got tons of other songs, and so I would send Demo that Jim and I would have written and then sending the files and then Jeff would use whatever he wanted to end. Replace whatever you wanted to send back a master. Keep listening to my heart radio form or Bryan Adams and all your favorite artists. I. Heart radio.

Jeff Lynne Panama Canal Bryan Adams Nikita Khrushchev John F. Kennedy Menlo Park President Franklin D. Roosevel Soviet Union Thomas Edison United Nations President Pennsylvania Railroad Florida Prime Minister Winston Churchi Val New Jersey Cuba United States Georgia Panama
"menlo park" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"menlo park" Discussed on WTVN

"Trains to Menlo Park on the day of the demonstration in response to public enthusiasm over the event. Although the first incandescent lamp had been produced 40 years earlier, no inventor had been able to come up with the practical design until To send embrace the challenge in the late 18 seventies, jumping ahead this week in 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill issue a declaration signed by representatives of 26 countries called the United Nations signatory of the Declaration, Val to create an international Postwar peacekeeping organization. The U. N began operation in October of 1945 This'll week in 1961 President John F. Kennedy issued a statement extending his sincere wishes and those of the American People to Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev and the people of the Soviet Union for a peaceful and prosperous new year. Although Kennedy and Khrushchev both pledged cooperation is 1961 came to a close to went on to play a dangerous game of chicken over Soviet missile sites in Cuba in October, 1962 and this week in 1999, the United States, hands over control of the Panama Canal to Panama, putting the strategic waterway in Panamanian hands. For the first time, Crowds of Panamanian celebrated the transfer of the 50 Mile Canal, which Links the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and officially opened on October 15 1914. Since then, almost one million ships have passed through the cow. I'm better what happened? Thanks for listening to this week in history on my heart radio. Looking back at the world of sports. It's the I Heart radio weekend. Sports Time capsule. What's going on, fellas? Sports fans. It's Andy West, and I'm here to take you on a journey back to this week in sports history. We'll start off this week in 1911, Brooklyn Dodgers. President Charles Abbott announces the purchase of grounds to build the new concrete and steel 30,000 Person capacity Stadium have its field would be around from 1913 to 1957 this'll week in 1958 in the first overtime game and league history. The Baltimore Colts defeat the New York Giants 23 17 in the 1958 NFL championship game. The game was played at Yankee Stadium and famously ended on a touchdown run from cult running back Alan and me, chief Tightness of the game mixed with the significance of the team's playing in the 45 Million viewers watching on NBC help dramatically increase the popularity of the NFL This'll Week in 1969 Jack Kent Cooke, owner of the NHL's Los Angeles Kings, finds each of his players $100 for not arguing with the referees and their game jumping ahead this week in 1993 the comeback Backup quarterback Frank Reich led the Buffalo Bills back from a 32 point deficit to defeat the Houston Oilers. 41 38 in overtime in a wild card playoff game, the greatest comeback in pro football history on this week in 2007. The New England Patriots complete a perfect regular season, finishing with the 16 and record following a thrilling 38 35 comeback win over the giant's New England is the first NFL team since the 72 Dolphins to win every game on the regular season schedule, they would end up losing to those same giants..

Nikita Khrushchev NFL John F. Kennedy President Franklin D. Roosevel Panama Canal Soviet Union Menlo Park New England Patriots Yankee Stadium United Nations President Charles Abbott Prime Minister Winston Churchi New York Giants Mile Canal Brooklyn Dodgers New England President Dolphins Jack Kent Cooke Baltimore Colts
"menlo park" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"menlo park" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"One of the inventors who was working at his Menlo Park facility was Edward Hibbert Johnson. Johnson had actually been responsible for giving Edison a job at the Automatic telegraph company, but later on, Johnson would end up working closely with Edison to develop Menlo Park itself and became an inventor and executive at the Edison Light Company. So it's funny because he helped get Edison a job early and then he ended up working for Edison later. It was at the Menlo Park facility where Johnson developed string lights and these were lights that were wired together in Syriza and would serve as the basis for Christmas lights just moving forward from that point. He used those lights to decorate a Christmas tree. And so Johnson is sometimes referred to as the father of electric Christmas tree lights because the original version, the earlier version that Edison did, that was a string of lights. They hung up on a building. This was the first time where someone was using electric Christmas lights to replace the candles that were found on the Germanic Christmas trees. His lights by the way, had bulbs that were red, white and blue is quite the patriotic Christmas tree and, like Edison Johnson intended for this not just to be a festive display in the spirit of America and the holiday season. But also a marketing effort to get more people to support and adopt electric lights. There was a general distrust in electricity around this time, so These were the ways in which Edison has associates could try to win. People over to this new technology and adoption did not take off right away. So for one thing, no New York based reporters wrote about this Christmas tree at all. But one reporter for a Detroit newspaper did publish an account of.

Edison Edward Hibbert Johnson Edison Light Company Edison Johnson Menlo Park Automatic telegraph executive reporter New York Syriza Detroit America
"menlo park" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"menlo park" Discussed on WTVN

"And 18 80 on the outside of Menlo Park. Which was an easy view of trains passing by, and it got a lot of attention. Now. One of the inventors who was working at his Menlo Park facility was Edward Hibbert Johnson. Johnson had actually been responsible for giving Edison a job at the Automatic telegraph company, but later on, Johnson would end up working closely with Edison to develop Menlo Park itself and became an inventor and executive at the Edison Light Company. So it's funny because he helped get Edison a job early and then he ended up working for Edison later. It was at the Menlo Park facility where Johnson developed string lights and these were lights that were wired together in Syriza and would serve as the basis for Christmas lights just moving forward from that point. He used those lights to decorate a Christmas tree. And so Johnson is sometimes referred to as the father of electric Christmas tree lights. Because the original version, the earlier version, that s and did those a string of lights, they hung up on a building. This was the first time where someone was using electric Christmas lights to replace the candles that were found on the Germanic Christmas trees. His lights by the way, had bulbs that were red, white and blue is quite the patriotic Christmas tree and, like Edison Johnson intended for this not just to be a festive display in the spirit of America and the holiday season. But also a marketing effort to get more people to support and adopt electric lights. There was a general distrust in electricity around this time, so These were the ways in which Edison and his associates could try to win. People over to this new technology and adoption did not take off right away. So for one thing, no New York based reporters wrote about this Christmas tree at all. But one reporter for a Detroit newspaper did.

Edward Hibbert Johnson Edison Menlo Park Edison Johnson Edison Light Company Automatic telegraph reporter New York Detroit executive Syriza America
"menlo park" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"menlo park" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Of Menlo Park, which was an easy view of trains passing by and I got a lot of attention. One of the inventors who was working at his Menlo Park facility was Edward Hibbert Johnson. Johnson had actually been responsible for giving Edison a job at the Automatic telegraph company, but later on, Johnson would end up working closely with Edison to develop Menlo Park itself and became an inventor and executive at the Edison Light Company. So it's funny because he helped get Edison a job early and then he ended up working for Edison later. It was at the Menlo Park facility where Johnson developed string lights. And these were lights that were wired together in Syriza and would serve as the basis for Christmas lights just moving forward. From that point, he used those lights to decorate a Christmas tree. And so Johnson is sometimes referred to as the father of electric Christmas tree lights. As the original version, the earlier version that Edison did that was a string of lights they hung up on a building. This was the first time where someone was using electric Christmas lights to replace the candles. They were found on the Germanic Christmas trees. His lights by the way, had bulbs that were red, white and blue is quite the patriotic Christmas tree. And, like Edison Johnson intended for this not just to be a festive display in the spirit of America and the holiday season, but also a marketing effort to get more people to support and adopt electric lights. There was a general distrust in electricity around this time. So these were the ways in which Edison and his associates could try to win. People over to this new technology and adoption did not take off right away. So, for one thing, no New York based reporters wrote about this Christmas tree at all. But one reporter for a Detroit newspaper did.

Edison Edward Hibbert Johnson Menlo Park Edison Johnson Edison Light Company Automatic telegraph Syriza reporter New York executive Detroit America
"menlo park" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"menlo park" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Of Menlo Park, which was an easy view of trains passing by and it got a lot of attention. One of the inventors who was working at his Menlo Park facility was Edward Hibbert Johnson. Johnson had actually been responsible for giving Edison a job at the Automatic telegraph company, but later on, Johnson would end up working closely with Edison to develop Menlo Park itself and became an inventor and executive at the Edison Light Company. So it's funny because he helped get Edison a job early and then he ended up working for Edison later. It was at the Menlo Park facility where Johnson developed string lights, and these were lights that were wired together in Syria's and one serve as the basis for Christmas lights just moving forward. From that point, he used those lights to decorate a Christmas tree. And so Johnson is sometimes referred to as the father of electric Christmas tree lights because the original version, the earlier version that Edison did It was a string of lights they hung up on a building. This was the first time where someone was using electric Christmas lights to replace the candles that were found on the Germanic Christmas treats. His lights, by the way, had bulbs that were red, white and blue is quite the patriotic Christmas tree. And, like Edison Johnson intended for this not just to be a festive display in the spirit of America and the holiday season, but also a marketing effort to get more people to support and adopt electric lights. There was a general distrust in electricity around this time, so These were the ways in which Edison has associates could try to win. People over to this new technology and adoption did not take off right away. So for one thing, no New York based reporters wrote about this Christmas tree at all. But one reporter for a Detroit newspaper did publish.

Edison Edward Hibbert Johnson Menlo Park Edison Johnson Edison Light Company Automatic telegraph Syria reporter New York Detroit executive America
"menlo park" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"menlo park" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And 18 80 on the outside of Menlo Park, which was an easy view of trains passing by, and it got a lot of attention. Now. One of the inventors who was working at his Menlo Park facility was Edward Hibbert, Johnson. And Johnson had actually been responsible for giving Edison a job at the automatic telegraph company. But later on, Johnson would end up working closely with Edison to develop Menlo Park itself and became an inventor and executive at the Edison Light Company. So it's funny because he helped get Edison a job early, and then he ended up working for Edison. Later, it was at the Menlo Park facility where Johnson developed string lights, and these were lights that were wired together in Syriza and would serve as the basis for Christmas lights just moving forward. From that point, he used those lights to decorate a Christmas tree. And so Johnson is sometimes referred to as the father of electric Christmas tree lights. As the original version, the earlier version that Edison did that was a string of lights they hung up on a building. This was the first time where someone was using electric Christmas lights to replace the candles that were found on the Germanic Christmas trees. His lights, by the way, had bulbs that were red, white and blue is quite the patriotic Christmas tree. And, like Edison Johnson intended for this not just to be a festive display in the spirit of America and the holiday season, but also a marketing effort to get more people to support and adopt electric lights. There was a general distrust in electricity around this time, so These were the ways in which Edison has associates could try to win. People over to this new technology and adoption did not take off right away. So for one thing, no New York based reporters wrote about this Christmas tree at all. But one reporter for a Detroit newspaper did publish.

Edison Johnson Edison Menlo Park Edison Light Company Edward Hibbert reporter New York Detroit executive Syriza America
"menlo park" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"menlo park" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Support myself out of Beirut once I think I could get out of Jersey. Don't be so sure. Others have tried and failed the entire population. In fact, his arm was facing towards New Jersey itself. Vehicle himself, Paul, You know, I'm going back to Jersey business again. Don't even tell me you met her down the shore and was planning a class field trip to a French bread factory in Trenton. All I said was used for bunny at the Menlo Park Mall is marking Vincey. Do you blow it? Another night. Hello would like to taste in Jersey Jersey. Sold out, sir. What? That's a lovely accent. You have New Jersey live from New Jersey. It's Tyminski and Doyle. Hey there. Good afternoon to 11. It's a Monday. We're dnd. I would be just a minute. Doyle, get on that radio and I'm building oil. Bill? Yes. I'm sure you'll know what I mean. When I say Were you watching the game? I did watch the game. Fortunately, I did not see that part. I had the game on.

Jersey Jersey Jersey Menlo Park Mall Doyle Beirut Trenton Paul Bill Tyminski
A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:11 min | 2 years ago

A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

"Google and its parent company alphabet on the precipice of several major challenges regulators are expected to file antitrust lawsuits as early as this month and other example some faith company isn't as innovative as it used to be. A CEO of alphabet sooner Pechanga will play a key role in how the company navigates the headwinds, and while Pichai, is not nearly as in the spotlight as the other tech leaders. He's already had a long history Google, and by taking a look back, we can try and get some clues about how he might move the company forward a reporter Copeland joins us with an inside look rob. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. So, at the tech hearing before the House antitrust subcommittee earlier, this year Pichai himself as an immigrant sort of the picture of the American dream. And wonder if you could start by telling us more about the Chinese upbringing shore so Definitely outlier in many ways in Silicon Valley perhaps the most famous way that he stands out is that he was born in. India. So he grew up middle-class for India but not necessarily add western standards. He famously talks about growing up and getting in his first. Rotary phone. He is in such an older guy that the technology was just a lot less developed there. So he speaks frequently about the connection that he feels to technology and the knowledge that new technology can really change someone's life. So pettah eventually came to the US for Grad School. How do you find his Google? He worked relatively ordinary corp jobs until he joined Google right after its IPO google was not the Google that it is today it really was just a search engine. Quickly impresses people for his ability to one build consensus, which is true to this day, but also get the job done his first major job at Google. toolbar product. So before there was chrome there actually was an add on on your browser to search google. So his job was to convince companies like Dell when they sold you a laptop to have an automatic google search bar on there. So he's moved through the ranks since then becoming CEO of Google and then last year taking over as alphabet. CEO How did he make his way up the ladder? What's so remarkable is he's been at Google for sixteen years and we even though we're the Wall Street Journal have never done a full profile of him. So a big part of my task for the last few months was really unpacking who he is and how he got to this position and what really emerges is that Google was a place and still is a place with big personalities people who scream at each other people who say we should bet the farm on this or that and what sooner sort of did. was stay in the background, but he was also very careful that whatever he did it worked starting with toolbar but that extends to chrome the browser which he co lead and is now by far the most used web browser one of the big reveals of this reporting for me was that he's a very strategic person. It's not an accident that he stayed in the background for instance, someone who used to report to him. Told me early on in a meeting with with Larry? Page. who was CEO of Google before soon Dr Sooner made sure that they never disagreed in front of Larry. He really didn't want anyone to see any cracks and this also emerges in a lot of the people I spoke to some of whom sooner himself suggested that I speak to. But then when I got on the phone with them, they didn't seem to know him personally well. So he he keeps it very close to the vest. So it sounds like he's pretty deft at navigating the company politics now that he's in the top spot. What's he known for as a leader? So to a man to a woman ever and I spoke to said that sooner has a tendency in the middle of meetings to stand up and begin pacing in the middle of your presentation. He won't say anything necessarily sign that he likes or doesn't like it. It's just signed that he's thinking. So you can imagine people have spent weeks preparing for the CEO and he leaps up in the middle just starts pacing it can be quite disarming frankly this comes back to the criticism. Of Soon Dr to standing up in the middle of meeting and pacing as you think is not necessarily your traditional hey drive the car forward leadership. There's a big knock at Google today it's that and this comes from investors analysts even some executives of the company it's that the company is pretty much operating on autopilot. It makes almost all of its money from online advertising and you don't really have to do much besides sit there and the money comes in adding an extra add to youtube isn't exactly a high level. Decision. So the criticism is that sooner hasn't necessarily made the big move to position Google for the next decade on the other hand. When you have such a head start that Google has just not messing up is a billion dollar proposition. And what about as a coworker? What's he known for that? The best thing that's has going for him is that people genuinely like him in fact, one of his deputies Caesar. Gupta told me he loved sooner Pichai. He said the reason I stayed at Google this long as because of Dr He's someone that I trust. He moved to Jakarta because soon are asked him to. People. Say in this world where everyone is obsessed with Silicon Valley with what is happening in Menlo Park and Palo Alto and San Francisco that soon Dr a truly global outlook that he cares for instance, about Google pay in India where there are many multiples number of people using payment products in there are in the US. But tacitus surly had as much investment and one of the really fun things that is in the story is he's very much a creature of habit. You can imagine your CEO of of Alphabet you're traveling the world whenever he's in Korea he goes to the same burrito place an orders, the same Veggie Burrito. And in this world of he's hard-driving CEOS who appear in TMZ or go through high profile divorces. Everyone says that sooner Chai's legitimately just a kind nice guy.

Google CEO Pichai India Silicon Valley United States Larry Tacitus Jakarta Dell Wall Street Journal Copeland Reporter Caesar Grad School Korea Pettah
Growing Weed in the Garden with Johanna Silver

Cultivating Place

08:35 min | 2 years ago

Growing Weed in the Garden with Johanna Silver

"Joanna. Silver is a gardener. Writer and editor formerly the Gordon Editor at Sunset magazine. She is a regular contributor to Martha Stewart Living. Better homes and gardens and the San Francisco Chronicle the author of the old dry garden on the garden and legacy of famed California plants woman. Ruth Bancroft this week. Joanna joins us to talk about her newest book growing weed in the garden. A no fuss seed to stash guide to outdoor cannabis cultivation out now from Abrahams press cannabis in California has been legal for medical use since nineteen ninety-six and in November of Two Thousand Sixteen California. Voters approved the adults use of Marijuana Act to legalize the recreational use of cannabis the use sale and possession of cannabis over a certain level of THC remains illegal under federal US law that said according to a recent report on NPR thirty three US states currently allow for some form of sale and consumption of marijuana and of those more than twenty states have designated the cannabis industry as essential during the corona virus outbreak from her shelter in place with her young family in Berkeley California. Joanna joins us today to shine a brighter light on the often confusing. Growing we'd as Gardiner's welcome Joanna. Thank you so nice to be here back with you. The last time we spoke we were speaking primarily about your first book the Bold Dry Garden and this new book is something of a An adventurous kind of Tangent. Or like offshoot from your original. Garden writing work. I want to start though with your current relationship to plants and the garden world both personal and Professional Joanna. What do you do everyday tell listeners? More about who you are and what you're up to. It is so nice to be talking to you again even just anticipating the conversation that I would be having with. You got me just like thinking about life and anyway thank you. Just thank you for having me. Thank you for making all the room to talk to people about about exactly this. Their relationship to plants I am home now as you know. All non-essential workers are and I am doing the very essential work of raising my son who turns three in July and In a non pandemic situation spends most of his day in a share So we gardened some But it was more like gardening light and now that we're home together. I am gardening heavy and doing with him I salt. I was already going to have a vegetable garden this year. I was already scaling back on the. We'd I'm only really growing at this year to continue to write about it It's a it's a really fun plant to grow et Cetera et CETERA. But I really have this urge to grow fruits and vegetables with my son and so even though that was already going to happen I dug up to maybe like eight by eight feet by thirty inch. Beds right in the middle of our meadow grass to with him to create more space. So as I talked to you he's asleep. There's dirt all over my hands and I'm feeling really really connected to the hard honest Labor of garden creation and it feels so good so good and you. You touched on a couple of things already right there. One being the fact that many of us are home as quote unquote non essential and yet in this moment so many people have turned back to activities and connections that are so essential like our own attachment and connection to how you survive how we make our out. We make our lives not just livings. And that is in raising our families and cultivating art pieces of land. So okay I'M GONNA I'M GONNA have a go back just a little bit before we dig into the structure of the book in in some of these levels on which you got intrigued. Many listeners will remember the bull dry garden. But just for those who. Don't give us a little background on you. Where where were the people? And the places and the plants that grew into a person who would wanna be a person that wrote about gardens and gardening with her son as a matter of both principle and practicality so I got my start farming in college after traveling so really interested in food and food security. I had a very meandering path and ended up in the editorial Test Garden at Sunset Magazine. Back in the Menlo Park days through to the Oakland and New Test Garden in Sonoma's county days and went from outdoors at the magazine to indoors. Writing and editing and timber press reached out to me looking for a bay area writer to write this book idea that they had about Ruth Bancroft S- Garden cactus in dry garden in Walnut Creek California and I pitched myself because I was young and ambitious and so I wrote a book about. Ruth's life and Roots Gardens. She just passed away actually also twenty early twenty eighteen late twenty seventeen at the age of one hundred nine And so just a couple of years before that. I wrote this book about her life and her garden. I think the fun one of the fun things for me as a gardener and garden communicator journalist person is seeing so many come back to gardening and recognize it as this essential thing that it is and that you and I and kind of die. Hard gardeners have has always known. And we've been advocating for now. You also indicated in this first question this sort of interesting Almost conflicted feeling about growing weed. And I think it's a perfect segue into the conversation for us on this on this program. People have been telling me that I should do an episode on weed for the longest time. Because as you note in your introduction to the book it's one of the largest crops in California and many many people are interested in it and it has this deep historical ritualistic medicinal blige intimate like wait and Gravitas to it but that is so blurred by the the other baggage that comes with it that I have stayed away from it until now because I was so compelled by yearbook and the way that you handled that year and maybe it was a little bit more of researching documenting and writing about this project. You took on as a as an assignment not necessarily a personal passion but an assignment and So we really kind of want to get into that the I just WanNa say by the way that your documentation of life at home with your To almost three-year-old Garden intern as you call him on. Instagram has been in total pleasure to watch in. Its true sort of honesty. Raw dirty fingered honesty. Thank you. It's been. It's been a massive creative outlet for me. Yeah Yeah Okay so. Tell us about this book. Why this book how did it happen? What made you decide to take on writing a book about growing weed in twenty seventeen? I had a baby and I was headed back to work You know six ish months later back to Sunset Magazine Garden editor where I thought I'd have the job for the rest of my life Kathy Brazil before me held the position for forty years and I was all set to go back. It was the week before. Maternity leave was over and the place was bought by private equity in lost my job I felt desperate to keep writing and working and reached out to everyone. I've ever written for asking for assignments Just to keep going to feel some forward momentum and a former editor in chief of the magazine. Kitty Morgan Worked at the Chronicle San Francisco Chronicle and I reached out to her until I wanted to write for her you know. The chronicle does garden design edible gardening whatever and She said you have a new baby. I bet you don't have time to do lunch But I may be called her bluff and I was like I totally have time to do lunch and met her for lunch and she. It was right before recreational use went legal and including recreational growing in California. And she was like I have this whole other idea for you. I want you to grow wheat in your backyard and documented as a gardener. I think at that time everyone like it was coming but it still felt even more taboo than it does now. We were all sort of figuring out how to talk about how he felt about cannabis being something that we can talk about and And so I told her I didn't know where to get seeds. And she said emphatically. That's your opening line and it was supposed to be for this part the separate website run by the Co Chronicle called Green State Which has since been folded into the magazine or into the newspaper and it actually got got lost its funding for a while but kitty was so dedicated to me that they ran the series in the food and wine section on Sundays and I worked through this ten part series for them on growing lead in my backyard as a gardener starting from knowing nothing to having a big crash course in the plant yet everything about the naming and needing to forge new contacts. I had I was starting from zero other than my years of experience being garden writer And a gardener no for sunset.

Cannabis California Joanna Sunset Magazine Ruth Bancroft San Francisco Chronicle Sunset Magazine Garden Writer And Editor New Test Garden United States Writer Martha Stewart Marijuana Berkeley California Joanna. Silver Co Chronicle Abrahams Instagram Editor
"menlo park" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"menlo park" Discussed on KGO 810

"For schools planning graduation ceremonies under the order permitted gatherings would take place in large outdoor areas such as parking lots for no longer than three hours except for the host and staff running the gathering in Contra Costa county participants would attend inside their vehicles with only members of the same household each vehicle motorcycles will not be allowed prepper card KGO eight ten the city of Oakland has expanded its restrictions at city parks to encourage physical distance thing vending in city parks will be suspended through the end of the month that includes food trucks and lake Merritt parking lots will remain closed on the lake Merritt lots will be closed only on weekends rapper E. forty is donating hand sanitizer to San Quentin state have long pocket presence E. forty says he's using his own resources to make one thousand gallons of sanitizer rapper says when he heard about the corona virus outbreak among inmates he wanted to do something about it an Instagram users will soon have access to a bunch of new short videos to dress up their posts Facebook has announced a major acquisition buying animated picture platform giphy per four hundred million dollars the Menlo Park based tech giant says that they'll integrate give me into the Instagram app so that quote people can find just the right way to express themselves a Facebook has long used give these application program interface and actually tried to acquire the company back in twenty fifteen giphy meanwhile said in a press release that despite the partnership with Facebook people will still be able to upload and have the same access to the give.

Oakland Facebook Menlo Park Contra Costa lake Merritt San Quentin Instagram
"menlo park" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"menlo park" Discussed on KGO 810

"I am going to switch topics at seven thirty after the Runnels report only come back up because the president is now claiming absolute immunity in Lynn Sloan the preserve this problem just ask me well the Supreme Court be broadcasting the arguments tomorrow I don't know so she's looking into it and we'll try to find out let's go to Gail I tried you before Jaylen glad you stuck around welcome Haley with me hello from Castro valley put on hold again all right let's go to Charles calling from Menlo Park Charles welcome to KGO good evening John I just disagree with you upon the fact you say trump is not trying to be a dictator I have a very short list as evidence first of all he's trying to control everything himself he attacks the press daily he's attacking boating with the mail ballots he doesn't want to mail ballots he wants to destroy health care he was a destroyer roe versus Wade he builds a wall despite Congress not approving it he he wants to appoint all these justices in the lower courts and then the number two biggest things right now he controls the narrative and he keeps making like outrageous statements and the more outrageous like the one about Obama and also he obstructs justice like no other president ever has so all those actions those behaviors show that yes he does want to be a dictator and he would love to install this family in there forever if you could I mean the guy just is scares me like no one else on the earth and and the rage I feel that at his actions I mean I I I'm trying to hang on to my sanity here because I cannot believe the number of sleeping people in this country they're just absolutely asleep well I have no ability I'm going to protect you I'm going to be here on November third and because I believe the American people are smarter than many people give them credit for I think this president is going to be defeated overwhelmingly I think it's going to be defeated because his own pace the swing voters are gonna turn against them and I I you know he certainly should lose his deserves to lose but we'll see welcome from your lips to god's ears that's all I can say all right Sir and hold hold on to your sanity Charles and I know.

Congress Wade John I KGO Jaylen Gail I Runnels Obama president roe trump Charles Castro valley Haley Supreme Court Lynn Sloan
"menlo park" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

11:22 min | 2 years ago

"menlo park" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"America's public schools she joined onstage at Kepler's books Menlo Park California you have said the question that more more Americans parents teachers administrators grandparents and concerned citizens are asking is whether we as a nation can continue on the path of blowing up our public education system without doing serious damage to the future of our nation and democracy across the country in state after state the answer is no tie that the public education system blowing up to charter schools to what they were promised to be versus what they've turned out to be well I was I was there at the beginning which was to say in the late nineteen eighties when Albert Shanker who is in the presence of the American federation of teachers and a few other people came up with this idea of supposing we have public private trip of the partnerships and basically say that instead of having the school board run the school would be run by private persons and shakers idea was that the charter school would be like an R&D laboratory for public schools and it would be collaborative with public schools would not be competitive and I thought that sounds really promising and I like the idea and we talked about it back in the late nineteen eighties and then the first law was written and checkers idea was also that the charter school would come about because the teachers and an existing public school would agree to the experiment so the charter was not operating in a hostile environment and it would be like a small school within a school that had the support of the surrounding teachers and whatever they learned they would bring back to the school and if it didn't work out they would lose their charter and start over or or go back to just the regular school but would not be anti union it would be it would be a friendly with the unions and part of the union but when the first law was written everything that he recommended was subverted the laws began to be pressed by business minded corporate minded groups and very right wing groups that said charters could be started by anyone not by educators they could be run for profit in this there's only one state in the country actually where they they are run for profit Nath Arizona but in many states there there are nonprofit but they are running a nonprofit organizations mmhm so in in the state of Michigan for instance eighty percent of the charters all of which are nonprofit eighty percent are operated for profit so you know I have to be pretty awake to realize these are based these are for profit making companies and they they make a lot of money but it was the the laws as they were written eliminated the idea that the the local school district would have anything to say about whether the charter was open and also they became and not only nonunion but most of the charters today are are created and funded by organizations that are anti union so ninety percent more than ninety percent of the charter state or non union schools and about a quarter of the charters that exists today refunded by the Walton foundation which is the Walmart corporation and they are very anti union and a lot of money and I have a chapter in their and it's about the people who find charters and vouchers and they tend to be the same people and the books not just about charters it's about charters and vouchers and the idea that our public schools need to be replaced by privately managed schools of I have a list of the billionaires supporting this and they are many of them come from the very extreme right like that the co brother the one remaining coke rather than he and his brother were very anti union very anti public schools they support a shake at a shadowy organization called Alec the American legislative and legislative exchange council which ugh rights bills which its members carry two different states about how to get rid rid of unions not just teachers unions brilliance I had to get rid of gun control how to how to eliminate environmental regulation so you have this very for extreme far right that his use the charter movement is a way of moving the American public to accepting consumerism and education and and essentially turning the public from being citizens giving consumers so we will go out and shop for schools instead of saying this is our neighborhood school let's make it the best we can but there is an American tradition of doing well by doing good there's not anything inherently wrong presumably with doing something that you feel is right that you feel can benefit the country and making a profit off of that or is that inherently flawed I don't think it's a bad idea I think that it's it's a great idea if you can do do well and and make money on it that's fine if you can make money that should be going into children's education and that should be used to pay teachers salaries then it's evil if you could take that same money and reduce class sizes and instead it becomes something that you used to buy a bigger car or to put into your pocket that's evil the idea that that that we hear that unions are a way for teachers to kick back once you're in a union you don't have to perform to a certain extent you can be a bad teacher and be defended well this is been part of the right wing line and you know I my history which goes back to the George H. W. administration and then for years I was at the Hoover Institution I was on that side so I know all of the right wing lines and I probably said a few of them myself but not in my book thank god only in some of our and it's been aligned that unions are evil actually this is wrong unions are a pathway to the middle class unions are the way that poor people get that to have a decent working up let's say health care to have a decent salary to have a minimum wage if you're working in a big corporation and so many people are today you have no rights at all unless you have a union and so it's been the it's been the project of the far right to kill unions completely the European nations which are doing very well in education have very powerful teachers unions so they don't seem to hold them back at all I once in and as I was transitioning from my my the dark side to the better side I remember going to a right wing organization of philanthropist and challenging them with this question I said can you name a non union St that is a successful fate educationally that that doesn't have a union can you name a non union state that it has a good education system and and as high up on the apron no one could think of any so I think that there's a kind of connection between let's say the Deep South in an increasing with other states were wiping out the union has done nothing to improve education and what teachers unions gifted to teachers is the right to due process and people confuse the word tenure with lifetime tenure because college professors have lifetime tenure and they can do almost anything that's not as long as it's not openly criminal and will never be fired teachers can be fired up most teachers don't make it through five years with within the first five years of being a teacher of the forty to fifty percent of the teachers are gone so we don't really have a problem getting rid of teachers we have a problem the first full recruiting teachers and second or retaining teachers so our efforts ought to be not at not how do we get rid of teachers because soon we'll have none and then what kind of education system will there be will just be relying on what I think a lot of the oligarchs want which is that children be taught black screens and there is no teaching that goes on that since her early between the screen and the child the child has to be human beings that's called personalized learning there's in in Silicon Valley now they they like to refer to children being taught by screens they call a personalized learning I quality personalized learning I can see the position of the parents who can understand the charter schools on the whole could be a net negative and yet if they have a choice between schools where teachers are leaving every five years they're undisciplined kids they're the kids that the charter schools won't take which is something we'll get into and here's their one and only child they're trying to get the best thing to I can see the appeal of a charter school absolutely and I've every time I speak someone says well what do you do if you're that parent and I always say if I am that parent I make whatever I think is the best choice for my child but be aware it being that parent first of all the charter school may not take your child because if your child has a disability they probably don't want them unless that's the purpose of that particular charter school which is you know that's fine but if your child doesn't speak good speak English they probably won't want your child either if your child has low test scores here she will soon be kicked out anyway and if you want stability the charter is a little bit scary because they might go out of business in the middle of the year and and you may show up for school one day and see a sign on the door saying your school's been close go find another school mmhm and that never happens in a public school so I think that what we need to we really do need to improve our public schools I don't think that our public schools are flawless by any means but I think that what we're doing by investing no one thing we should increase the pie they're saying we should divide the pie up into more slices this much for vouchers this much for charters and the share that goes to the public schools which have in this state about ninety percent of the kids eighty five to ninety percent in most states the public schools have about ninety percent of the kids and yet they're getting a shrinking portion of the pie as more and more sectors claim part of it and how can we possibly have good education when the schools at ninety percent go to have larger classes lose their arts program lose their counselors don't have nurses and and close the library we're increasing those two competing sectors and the Supreme Court may be on the verge of saying that every state has to pay for religious education this is a scary time in that sense because it isn't just charters it's it's vouchers as well if you want to have a case study of how ravenous some of the for profits can be around this there was a case study in New Orleans the post hurricane New Orleans about how the charter schools wanted to come into what happened the public schools can you talk about that well the people who call themselves reformers are in this book I call them disruptors not reformers they immediately left on New Orleans is the place that they would make their model and when the hurricane just destroyed a.

America Kepler Menlo Park California
Why Do People Have Dreams and Nightmares?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

10:08 min | 2 years ago

Why Do People Have Dreams and Nightmares?

"When you're asleep. Sometimes strange things happen. You fly through the air like a bird but you don't have wings but then all of a sudden you do have wings and you go all the way to Antarctica and float over the ice watching Penguins Waddell over the edge into the water and seals swim up just below. Sometimes after you've gone to sleep you travel to a magical place. Sometimes scary things happen. After I stay down the hill I went into a cave near the bottom of the hill and I was super scared Saw The bay on his hind. Why and then after that. I put up my covers over my head and that helped me stop making that. Lean Jameson from Walpole Massachusetts. Sent us that dream that scared him but as he points out. Then you wake up and you're actually still in your bed. Everyone Dreams and dreams play an important role in the way our brains function. But we don't always remember our dreams today on but why we're GONNA listen back to an episode. We made about dreams. Here are some of the questions you have sent us recently about. How AND WHY WE DREAM? Hi My name is Nikki. And I'm six years old. I live with faceted California and my question is how do we get dreams? And why Hello? My name is seven years old. I'm from Turkey stumble. My question is why do we dream an have two mayors my name is listed and I will live and hair. Some Burke Virginia and I'm seven years old. Why DO WE DREAM? And can you control your dreams? My name is Anne. I'm from California and I'm seven years old. My question is why do you? Sometimes I feared trips mining this connor. I am in nine years old and I'm from Menlo Park California. My question is why. Did you sometimes have dreams? That have nothing to do with your day. My name is penny. Sure I'm ten years old. Eleven thinks burden Maryland. And my question is why when you watch things or scary things get bad. Dreams about. Halloween was real anna from Passer California and three years old and my question is at what age do keister having dreams harmonies my name is Liam. I'm eight years old. I live in New Jersey and my question is how do we wake up this? We have a nightmare today. We're going to get answers from Dr David Kahn. I'm on the Faculty of the Harvard Medical School in the Department of Psychiatry. A psychiatrist is a doctor who studies the way our brains make us feel and think and behave and a psychiatrist helps make sure your brain is keeping your mood stable and your emotions healthy. That's often called mental health. Dr Kahn got interested in medicine. Partly because like so many of you. He was really interested in dreams. I dream and I said Oh my God I dream a lot. And what is that all about? Why am I dream so different than when I think during the day? Let's see if I can learn something about it. I'm a physicist by training and so I decided that's a really good new area to investigate. And it's very personal. Sometimes physics can be impersonal. Dreaming is very personal so I decided to learn more about it. Here are a few more of your questions for Dr Com. Hi My name is Colin. I'm seven years old. I live in Phoenix Arizona. And my question is why do people have dreams and nightmares? Any is luke got MS seven year. Old Girl. And I live in New York City. My question is why do you have daas nightmares? And why do you have good thoughts? Good Dreams dreaming is thinking when we're asleep when we're awake up. Rain is actively able to think but when we go to sleep. The brain doesn't stop being active. It's just as active in sometimes more active than when we are awake. So dreaming is the way the brain thinks so if dreaming is the way the brain thinks when we're asleep why does it seem so different from the way we think when we're awake? I mean I don't know about you but even when I play pretend it's not quite the same as the magical worlds. I live in when I'm dreaming. James can be very strange because parts of the brain change compared to the way the brain is when we are thinking and awake what happens. The emotional parts of the brain are very active when we are asleep and dreaming often our dreams therefore who be scary or joyful or affectionate or even nightmarish because the emotional areas of the brain become highly active when we go to sleep and start to dream however. Why don't we say okay? This is a nightmare. I don't want to happen nightmare. I'm going to stop it. We can't because another part of the brain when we go to sleep and trim the logical part stops working. It's off line so in other words. I can't tell my brain to stop having dream whether it's bad or good because that part of my brain is shut down while I'm sleeping the part of the brain. That's logical and rational and tells you you should do this. I should do that checks out when you go to sleep. And you're dreaming so right now you're listening and you can decide. I'M GONNA listen or I'm not gonNA listen to Dr Kahn or I'm going to go and get an apple from the refrigerator or a cookie. You decide but when you go to sleep and you dream you don't decide vitrine just goes on as if you weren't there of course you are there but the part of the brain that lets you decide to do this or not to do. This is offline checks out is not working. That might sound a little frightening. A part of your brain isn't working but think back to our last episode. All about sleep sleep is an important time for your brain and body to recover from all the hard work you do. All Day while you're awake and it's also a time for your brain to reorganize itself so some parts of your brain need a little time to go offline as Dr Khan calls it to get a chance to recover and clean up but those other parts of your brain. The emotional parts are still very active. And so your dream continues and Dr Khan points out. That's actually pretty cool. Anything could happen. Which is not bad because you get experiences that you wouldn't have if you're a weight because your logical mind would say or this can't be. I can't fly sometimes. People fly in their dream costs. They don't know they can't fly when you're awake. No you can't fly so essentially when I'm dreaming if I'm flying in my dream or if I am a lion in my dream my brain actually thinks that I am that thing or can do that thing. Because there's no part of my brain that's telling me it's wrong when you're dreaming the part of the brain that knows you're not a lion or you're not a tiger or you can't fly fat part of the brain coast to sleep so to speak meaning. It's not working the way it works when you're awake when you're awake if you imagine you're a lion you can imagine that but you know that you're not a lion you can imagine you're flying like Superman but you know that you're not when you go to sleep and dreaming that part of the brain isn't working the same way and so you believe you're flying you you're superman or tiger. It's great to have all these interesting experiences when your dreams are good but if you've ever had a bad dream you know that they're not always fun. Hi Lendings Friday. I'm five years of Dover Massachusetts it island. Now why are they have scary deums? I'm Mac I four years old. I live in Michigan. I question why people have bad dreams. Wait was waiting for us. Owed I was an pence. Oh Bay Neha and I'm Wendy. While he getting night why do we have bad dreams that make us feel terrible and sometimes wake us up scared or crying? Dr Com when we were asleep and dreaming the emotional areas areas of the brain. That make us feel feel good feel bad. They're highly active. And since we can't control what the dream is going to be like. Sometimes it's very joyful and we're very happy. Sometimes it's scary. Sometimes a monster might be there or a bad person is chasing us. But we don't have the brain that tells us no. There is no bad person like we do. When we're

Dr David Kahn California Dr Com Dr Khan Lean Jameson Turkey Walpole Massachusetts Virginia Maryland New Jersey Menlo Park California New York City Nikki Physicist Harvard Medical School Anne Colin Phoenix Arizona
Facebook's surprise hit Oculus Quest is sold out

Talking Tech

05:00 min | 2 years ago

Facebook's surprise hit Oculus Quest is sold out

"Offer just for talking tech listeners. So today we are at facebook in Menlo Park One hathaway and Sean and make with me they are Vr and our folks here that they oversee the oculus platform which turned out to be a big surprise smash hit at the holidays so popular. You can't get it. It's sold out for weeks but sean working hard. What MESSAGE DO YOU HAVE FOR FOLKS? Who are itching to get that headset on their head while we are making them as fast as possible also. Please stay tuned. Thanks all community for being really excited about this. We have been really a thrilled and really grateful for all the response Believe that it's about a four week. Will YOU'RE SAYING MARCH? That's right that's right. We are aiming for right now in March but We're still trying to work as fast as possible and trying to see actually how the Asia side with the current virus might or might not impact things. Let's talk about why it hits such a chord. Because you've got a a headset that did not have to be connected to anything. It sold for four hundred dollars and something happened to people that made them. I've got to get this thing. What happened yeah? It was really this coming together of a lot of things. So we've taken a lot of learnings from our previous. Headsets really tried to focus on this amazing sense of immersion content. And bring that to a new form factor. The second thing was really trying out all in one and we did this with actually our previous headset. Oculus go which is more focused on media but this was bringing a lot of the gaming side of rift combining that with the standalone form factor of Oculus go and then really trying to nail a great price point for consumers and I think all that came together in a really magical product oculus quest. We're proud of okay and games too. Because they going overseas the Games. Was there something new about the? Games in two thousand nineteen that that struck a chord or was it just the fact that you've got more well. It's both that we have more fantastic games coming to the platform but as you pointed out this is an untethered experience where you really can use that full range of motion to take advantage of these immersive games. And so you look at one of our top games on the platform beat sabre where you are effectively dancing and moving through the space to score points as these music blocks run towards you if you can turn three sixty degrees and you don't have to worry about a cord that becomes truly immersive and delightful experience. Megan your your vision is to start with games but really move into other categories. So explain how. Vr works in other media. There are so many use cases for VR. And we're so glad that the game category is strong and we can start with that but people who play games want to experience other things as well. So we're also investing in a lot of areas around media and around productivity and enterprise and one of the really exciting APPs that came out last year was National Geographic. Brought a new experience to go explore Macho Peach you and that's the type of content. Where someone who comes in for? Games is still gonNA love that and someone who wants to find those new use cases around travel or exploration. They're going to find something as well so explain how. How does it work? What are they seeing How do we explore Machu Pichu On a headset well once you put that headset on. You really do feel like you're transported to that location but you get the added layer of having information about what you're seeing you can learn in real time as you explore that space you can move through it but also see notes from famous scientists and explorers that help you understand that experience there so if you WanNa go travel there in real life which many people want to go do you have that. Added Layer of understanding. And if you can't make it there you still get a taste of what being in a place like that. Feels like. It's also talk about music. Because you're you're exploring concerts and make an jeff can go attend billy. Bush or some other concert together in the front row inexperienced together. Tell everybody about that. That's right. We have a product called oculus venues. That shows concerts sports comedy events from all around the world. People can represent themselves as avatars put on the headset. And then see each other in real time and jump in and watch those events so as you said we had billy eyelashes a performer in venues last year and it was really a special experience for people who hadn't seen her live to feel like they were there for the show with their friends but from the comfort of their own home five each other and do a letter. Well you can. You can wave. You can engage in. It is really special to feel like you're sharing that with other people in the space and back to Sean. Your vision is to wear a headset today. Where is it five years now? Yeah we ultimately want to get to a pair of glasses that lightweight. That's small form factor. You can wear your head

Sean Billy Facebook Menlo Park One Asia Machu Pichu Hathaway National Geographic Megan Bush Jeff
"menlo park" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"menlo park" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Got my Texan will components are fully certified by one of the world's leading ecological testing facilities details online it's sleek works dot com right back to one day in about a minute out into traffic a problem on the peninsula now this is in Menlo Park it's north by one one before March road I collision involving multiple vehicles occurred about forty minutes ago to write him lanes remain blocked there's a back up in that direction north one on one Americans are worried this foreign governments will interfere with the twenty twenty election the threat landscape has probably grown exponentially since twenty sixteen and false information on the internet has voters wondering who to trust it doesn't matter if you're a Democrat or Republican they all got behind the corner and try to get what they want with this information looks like in twenty twenty and how to avoid that's tomorrow on morning edition from NPR news on the air from three to nine AM coming up on the California report in just a few weeks Californians begin casting ballots in the state's presidential primary so we look at the role of grassroots campaign so what we need from every single volunteer it's a knock at least a hundred dollars today presidential campaigning at the grassroots level that and other stories from around the Golden State soul can solve this that's coming up on the California report support for NPR comes from this station and from the pew charitable trusts committed to improving public policy invigorating civic life and turning indifference into.

Menlo Park NPR California
"menlo park" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"menlo park" Discussed on KGO 810

"Calling from Menlo Park Wendy welcome to KGO hi it is a tragedy and I have been advocating magnetometer is all over the place I know you have to pick your battles and it's really difficult to try to figure out how to get all the guns off the street and out of the hands as people that shouldn't have them for that one saying I can go on coterminous CJ getting this explain what what what is what is my number but it's like when you go to court or you go to the airport the picture back pass through and it would prevent any type of weapons Fran and entering that campus so they would obviously require having consolidated entrances but I've written a sad I think it would be great for the sales as nine nominators answer this survey thing as those devices and for and he said and as machines now I I think that's a great idea you've written up would you send me a copy of what you written sure yeah I wrote it I sent it into our governor that you senators and to the White House I want you to send to me and we're gonna talk about that you have my email all right again good then I will expected and make sure you include your phone number on the email it'll just between you and me okay okay when the thank you so much what a great idea this just came in from Tim John I'm a special education teacher in a hundred and ten year old elementary school our building is locked if the front doors are open to you there are inner doors I think of these as Vicki soda doors we can lock our classroom doors from the inside a benefit from the rentals I a high school shooting we have a lockdown drills we know how to barricade our doors my assistant knows she needs to cover in a closet with our kids in a shooting while I deal with him or her he's not gonna get to my kids what can we do if you're a gun owner and someone tells you about their son and says I'm thinking about buying a gun I think about shooting with him you say no and explain why if it's so sad he says Sabit Kip Kinkel Statham Adam Lanza's mom did not receive advice I appreciate the sentiment stem what what bothers me is there's nothing for proof but doing nothing I tell you the previous caller twenty I like her idea I don't sectors maybe that is a start but you know what's sad every time a kid walks into school you have to think just maybe just maybe it might happen to me and that was the point of the teacher from seven thirty to you never expected to happen to you I listened on another network to a young woman from Santa Cruz said I appreciate the second amendment but I also appreciate my right to life interesting juxtaposition four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten John Rothman right here on KGO.

Menlo Park KGO ten year
"menlo park" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"menlo park" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kepler's books in Menlo Park coming up on a break here but let me read a comment from bill says you're a diamond posited in guns germs and steel and other books that the horizontal orientation of Eurasia gave its inhabitants a huge advantage over the inhabitants of vertical kindness like Africa in the western hemisphere I'm greatly simplify history but I found the ideal woefully inadequate in explaining why some cultures are with some people call primitive or uncivilized another's modern and civilized can your guests come well civilized non civilized this a a term that I think needs some on packing in itself I think us symbolizes a term that the powerful use for those who are not themselves so but the the general diamond thesis about the East West orientation of Eurasia and the north south orientation of the of America's in Africa I think there's probably something in that because there is a you know because of the the East West orientation of Eurasia the belt of most habitable land is very long and you know if you if you start anywhere there and pack up and traveled great distances you'll still be in kind of the same weather kind of the same vegetation whatever you've learned in one place you can still practice those things in the other place but you know I think go it's not just East West north south with Africa for example there's the Sahara desert in there and then below that there's this equatorial forest and below that.

Kepler Menlo Park Eurasia Africa America Sahara desert
A New Biography on the Life of Thomas Edison

The Book Review

08:27 min | 3 years ago

A New Biography on the Life of Thomas Edison

"So it's interesting that Edmund Morris is considered such a famous biographer because really he was the biographer slowly what were his work have it's like his work habits were unusual L. Trilogy and fourteen years to do Ronald Reagan so he does is to sort of scoop up massive amounts of information and he often therefore Pamela he's a wonderful writer I mean his his pros just sings Edison left five million pages in his archive and it took wrote the book backwards it's like Benjamin Button in other words he starts with the IT complicated I found that we would you know suddenly getting people I find it inventive I as a reader and as a biographer found we don't each chapter stands on its own the problem through the index and where was this person did this person fit into Edison's earlier into traditional and that he was going to break new ground on this research he obviously had unparalleled access but in terms of did it the one thing I will say that I do know the people at the Edison Archives head to learn mechanical engineering metallurgy all kinds of stuff order you would think that telling backwards might be easier if you had someone who had conventions and also I would imagine a challenge now a hundred engines are now so out moded and there are certain things about Edison amazing I for other talent he realized that he could not do this himself and nations in the country I in Menlo Park and then in West orange where he not only kind of like you know like bell labs do afterwards and that is a remarkable shen did he make a lot of money inventions he did he did could really is sort of going. After competitor like George Westinghouse he would do anything bulb whether it was the phonograph whether it was motion Pictures Edison and that included members of his own family he was distant and he could really northern or one or two of them came to work for him he would and he did not suffer fools lightly he was a very difficult allow initially baggy clothing because he believed that tight clothing would from the age of twelve right that is correct he was completely deaf in one ear he was basically self schooled his mother took over his basement of this rural home and have all kinds of chemistry experiments that kind of inventive mind and he didn't mind putting the time and marketable so yes I would say at quite an early age whether it was at a very young age really inventing the phonograph he was enormously

Edison George Westinghouse Edison Archives Ronald Reagan Edmund Morris Writer Bell Labs Benjamin Button Menlo Park Pamela West Orange Fourteen Years
Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:57 min | 3 years ago

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by Gucci N._P._R.. News Menlo Park California

Menlo Park California NPR
Washington, Silicon Valley Struggle to Unify on Protecting Elections

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:53 sec | 3 years ago

Washington, Silicon Valley Struggle to Unify on Protecting Elections

"National security officials and Silicon Valley executives are struggling with how to best combat for an election interference the Journal says at a recent meeting organized by facebook at its headquarters in Menlo Park California Shelby Pearson who was named over the summer to lead the US intelligence communities. He's new election. Threats group threatened a blunt message to the assembled executives and is simply this. You need to share more data with us about your users publicly. The companies in attendance facebook Google twitter and Microsoft said the day-long meeting was constructive. However questions remain about whether these platforms have done enough to prepare for the twenty twenty? US election or for that matter if the trump administration has focused enough on the problem the Senate Intelligence Committee is expected to release a report in the coming weeks reviewing doing Russia's disinformation campaign in two thousand sixteen and recommending ways to improve responses for future

Shelby Pearson United States Facebook Twenty Twenty Senate Intelligence Committee Menlo Park California Silicon Valley Google Journal Twitter Russia Microsoft
Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera Launched

This Week in Photo

12:55 min | 3 years ago

Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera Launched

"On the show at the pleasure in having my friend Mr Marc toll he's from Panasonic. He's joining the show to set the record straight about full frame Panasonic micro four thirds as Panasonic leaving microphone thirds behind are they adding full frame to the lineup. What is this new world? Look like the Panasonic Sonic is building. Marc toll look to the show man. Thank thank you very much you haven't you haven't given me too much to cover here. No no responsibility at all. It's nice to see you and it's great to be on on this week in photography. Thanks so much for inviting me likewise. I've been WANNA have you on for Awhile I wanNA. Let's let's discuss since since we had lunch in up in Sacramento Day. Remember Yeah Oh yeah yeah. Let's let's let's start with just what your major function is over at Panasonic. What do you do for the company? I am what's now known as retail services manager which means I am in charge of all the tech reps so I used to be for the past twelve years. I've I been a technical supposedly expert will say today on this interview but so I'm I'm basically Olympic technical expert and now I'm a manager richer of that team nice so you know what thing or two about Luma cameras and an INS and outs so if there's any person on the planet to ask a question about lunatics you should know it now putting the last there frazier yeah he he members your lives in the Matrix so it's been here but I've been here since the G. One what ten years ago and I was an icon shooter then so I've gone gone the whole route and I am a photographer also so I'm not a professional photographer anymore I used to be but so I approached approach these from both sides obviously you stand bias towards Panasonic but I also look at these cameras. At what can they do for me artistic. Well let let's switch gears in dive into it right. Let's let's let's start with the with the biggest elephant in the room and that's you know when when Panasonic introduced S. One series cameras it was oh panasonic is leaving microphone thirds after all others hubbub about microphone thirds and how it's it's okay to use it. You don't need a full frame sensor them Panasonic releases camera that s one series with it full frame arguably superior to some other full frames and I'll say that because I'm I'm I'm a fan of obviously but you know and I have s when here on loan on and I can say that it is a fantastic system so why what's what what set the record straight here what is the landscape of Panasonic look like with regard to full frame in microphone thirds well. They are feeling as they reside together that actually four thirds is is the bigger part of our business but but in still photography especially everybody wants full frame. It's it's hot at the moment but four thirds is still appeals to a a lot of customers who want a smaller camera. A lot of people are putting things online now. It works great for video the five I think you're using a four two record your side of this interview you know so we see both residing together. There's new models of the series on the horizon. New Lens just got released this week. The ten to twenty eighty five millimeter f one point seven so no we fully plan to support both platforms but again we see the anybody who's looked at the number sees that the full frame market is growing quite a bit you know and that again is is primarily still photographers but we're we're does where where does Panasonic put people in buckets. You just mentioned so primarily still photographers right so are you is Panasonic hoping that you know sort of the high end pros. This will be the ones that that migrate over to the S. Ones and everyone else we'll stay on micro four thirds or is sort of a path of ascension wall since well before third you move up to insulin. What do you think I think they should vote by them? Both small camera two camera. What's it's your credit card number again? So you know the way I look at it is that the s series but full frame is aimed more towards towards the professional or the serious landscape person they don't even the professional making money at the businesses they could just be like the which is forty seven mega pixels they could just be a high end still photographer. Maybe like shooter but we also want to appeal to that that professional portrait photographer like you said the camera hips every button and and arguably it's got features that other full frame cameras don't have but but the g series appeals to well. I'm probably more of a g each series customer. I'm a good example of it. I'm more of a street photographer. I want something small to carry with me all the time. It's a lot of times it's it's an older customer or a customer who travels a lot who who doesn't want to carry any big full frame camera in these big lenses. They want to carry a series so there's not a clear distinction and for video it works both ways a lot of people prefer the smaller sensor in the G. H. series for video because it's more forgiving of depth of field and things like that but now there's a lot of people who want more artistic videos with shallower depth the field and things like that so yeah. I guess if you really had a draw distinction. The S.'s is aimed more at the professional more advanced amateur market in the G. is aimed more towards the traveler the person who wants a camera just lighten easy to use news yeah yeah you know the interesting thing that I found after I got the loner in the S. One is obviously the menu system is the same across all of the cameras which is what I enjoy remember getting a little tight what was the little one the little tiny loomis camera the world's smallest microphone the GM one and five yeah yeah. I remember get one of those things and sort of looking at it was like this is the exact same menu system as my larger cameras. You know these missing some things obviously but it's the same I'd love that that sort of feel feel of being able to move from like say four that I'm shooting on right now to an S. one to the five that I use. It's behind me back there. Then you know used as for video so those I love that that flow of being able to move between the two so if someone is considering an s one or s when are right now in and they're on a previous g series camera. What's the flow for them from your perspective can they keep both in like you're like you're doing street photography but like someone like me? Is it feasible to keep both all things being equal monetary monetary. Are you worked for the company like I do and they just send them to you up on your desk. Hey check this out right but I I wondered about that because we change the menu system a little bit in the s series each but we know that that's one of the things that we really high marks for Panasonic has always gotten good reviews for having a very clean easy to use system so we didn't want to touch it so I I feel that like when I teach teach classes on how to use Panasonic cameras that I can have people from an es- series or point and shoot in the class the point point and shoot might have more things in the menu whereas the series going to have them as buttons bud or if you move up from a g series Jeanine to an S. series like now I'm just looking at it here next to me almost identical in the SEC put a few more chapter indentations in the menu things he's like that just to clean it up a little bit but no I feel somebody could go from the GM one to this and adapt to it very easily. I'll tell you the flow that I'm kind of looking got right now. I'm trying to convince the powers that be over there. So if you know put in a good word I want to hang onto this as a little longer is back there behind me is you know back there. There's the G H five which I don't know if you can see it but at the top of it there's a video. There's a there's a road video Mike on top of it so so that's sort of a running gun vlogger camera next to it is Jeanine sitting on top of the the what do you call it the tripod from designing nine you know the new the new tripod yet so that's sitting on there and then for what I call I don't know I don't know what you call proper photography or high resolution photography geography or whatever there's the s series you know so those I feel like I'm covered on all right now except aerial until Panasonic comes out with an aerial campaign or a drone grown right yeah yeah yeah but I feel like I'm covered on all basis from from the sort of running gun video to to non-professional Studio Non Studio photography which is the Jeanine and then studio level models shoots and that sort of thing with the with the bigger with a bigger camera with more or less depth of field right exactly exactly and I approach it the same way I was recently in your area in the bay area and for most of the time I'm working with Panasonic on teaching on going to you know going going to stores and I'm looking for here around me here. I'm carrying the little. LX One hundred two all tricked out with these accessories and might be designed strap. My Love you find her a hipster. You gotta you gotTa keep up when you get older. You're exactly a leather jacket that matches the leather jacket you put on the camera. That's not too far so I'm either carrying the elect hundred two or I'm carrying the Jeanine with with the fifteen millimeter millimeter lens but then I had a chance to photographs abuse. I used to live in the area. Somebody hired me who used to be a client to photographs and portrait's it. I I went when we first announced the S I I'm I'm always like getting dragged and tech technology and I felt like I'm not going to give up the g series you know I I love full frame. I love the look of it. I loved the show in the shallow depth of field but the big size wasn't for me but now I'm finding balance. Now I'm finding I probably use the the G series seventy percent of the time because I m mostly a street photographer but to be able to pull out this full frame and just be able to like you said switch from one to the other because the menu systems the same all the controls are the same you know yeah yeah that's interesting. I was thinking about I was talking to someone the other day about you know the the the the size differences between the g cameras in the s cameras and I remember when I first saw the camera. I was like Jesus this thing. Is You know. This is a camera you know he he has yeah it was Kinda like back to the old night count as when I had my by F. Four and all those like hey. This is quite that big but you know it felt like that but when you when you have this this is the this is the swan right here when I picked this camera up you know what it reminded me of. It reminds me of those Nikon days when you were unapologetically a photographer gopher right yeah not that you're apologizing by using any of the G series cameras but they're smaller. They're you know part of the like you mentioned before part of the allure of using those cameras is they're smaller. They're less obtrusive you know you. Could you know people don't know that you're shooting half the time you could put it on silent. Go into stealth mode the s series I would. I go out with that thing. I feel like I'm a photographer here. Who knows yes? I am a photographer a because I got a big cameras so obviously taking photos that's right yeah yeah and then and then be because you know it's a big cameras expensive so I've invested in this camera so you think you're right so yeah I I was wondering from your standpoint. Is that feel like when when people go out with these series cameras it's unapologetic that they are a photographer and they mean business or why would they go through the effort to bring this all this glass technology out with them. Exactly you know I mean example. I used a few years ago. I used to photograph a Country Club in Menlo Park and this was when there was just the g series and I showed up with one of the small G. Three cameras and the person hire me look at me and they go real camera exactly and I and I I had to back out by welcome. You know look at my website. I guarantee the pictures will be good you know and and they were they were happy with them but yes it does so this goes back to those rose feeling like you've got everything under control too. You can do more better low light. You can control the the atmosphere more work situation and you know it's funny like you said when you pick up the camera it it it I you look at it and if it gets big and the thing I noticed with customers because I was curious to see their responses when they pick it up their first responsive how good the grip feels yeah and their second responses how amazing finder it yeah you find her is five point seven eight million dots is just incredible incredible and and then the third thing that that I absolutely love about it.

Panasonic Jeanine S. Ones Mr Marc GM Sacramento Day Country Club G. One Nikon Luma SEC Frazier Menlo Park Mike Seventy Percent Twelve Years Ten Years
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