40 Burst results for "Mellon"

Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on Web and BeyondCast

Web and BeyondCast

02:54 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on Web and BeyondCast

"Dot APP and you can then loaded into your phone. Next. Up is that Google ranks? It's. Youtube channels by the number of people who subscribe and that is the primary vehicle by which many of us see the success of our channels. We see how many people subscribe and that then usually correlates very closely to how many people few videos on our channel generally I just that was recently interesting that digital trends. gave us a list of the top ten youtube channels and I'm just going to list them here so that you can get an understanding of them and then really take away some important points about what happens on Youtube and why so starting from the the number ten and going up to the number one. Number ten was actually wwe e, the the wrestling network there at sixty three, million users The next one number nine is five minute crafts at seven point, four, million users. I didn't even know five minute crafts existed before seeing his top ten channels chart we then have sports the Sports Youtube Channel at seventy five million set India. I'm not even sure what that is but I'm guessing it's a channel focused on things happening in the country India. Seven point five million subscribers. The gaming channel on Youtube is eighty five, point six, million, Cocoa Mellon Nursery rhymes at eighty eight point six, million directed at children Pudi Pie of the unfortunate notorious probably racist. Youtuber, he's got one, hundred, five, million subscribers, which is both amazing and unsettling at the same time. Then there's the music channel on Youtube at one hundred, twelve million subscribers. Youtube movies has one hundred, seventeen, million and t series, one, hundred, forty, six, million subscribers, and so when we look at this, just from a general overview of the number of subscribers and the ones that have the most So for example, the t series most people don't know but they are a popular Indian Music Channel So at one hundred. Forty six, million subscribers had one hundred, sixteen billion views over the course of its time We know that people are coming to youtube for entertainment, they're coming to be entertained I, and then they're coming to solve problems next that's why parents come to youtube to play Cocoa Mellon nursery rhymes. So we can take some very universal principles when it comes to us as business owners publishing content on Youtube is to I figure out what is going to be useful and entertaining to people on Youtube, and then produced that kind of work. Okay..

Youtube Cocoa Mellon Nursery India Google Pudi Pie
Peanut Butter Diamonds

Wow In the World

04:24 min | 6 d ago

Peanut Butter Diamonds

"All right now, peanut butter. We've been through a lot today, but it's not over yet. Now drop and give me diamonds. Mindy, are you talking? To your peanut butter Jauregui Guy Rasi trying to turn my peanut butter into diamonds. Well, in order to do that, you'd have to apply a lot of pressure on the carbon rich Petersburg so that the carbon can form diamonds trust me. I've tried that, but nothing is working. Now I'm trying to put the peanut butter in high pressure situation, you want to help I, guess. What do I tell it? Something like don't make me turn you into a sandwich mindy. Ip a little too aggressive peanut butter can handle it. To Second Mindy. I, think it's actually turning towards diamond. It smells good too. I can't believe it. Should we celebrate with one more round of our game show can't think of anything better roll out the red carpet I mean. Man. The. Lights in three to. Run. And now, everyone's second favorite game show after holding although puppies. To what's Food. Welcome back welders. It's time for another. Round of to what's and while. Scientific game show that separates the White House from though. Now before we begin today's round. Let's review where we left off yesterday. We gave you three scientific statements about smells and challenged you to guess what was the one true. Wow. Was it a the center of the galaxy smells like raspberries or was it be some people's smelled grass while they sleep or was it see your burbs have a similar smell to your family's burbs and enter yesterday's question joining us by phone? It's clear up from Washington, DC. What's the? Wow. Hi, my name Clara. I've in Washington DC, my Mellon royalty center of the galaxy smells. raspberries. For Dinner. That is correct intestines. If you guessed the answer, Hey, that the center of the galaxy smells like Raspberries, you've found the winning. Wow, congratulations, astronomers founded chemical called Ethyl forming in a dust cloud at the center of the Milky Way. This is one of the chemicals that gives raspberries their flavor and contributes to their sent now guest B. or C.. You weren't too far off. Your sense of smell is usually turned off as you fall asleep, and while some people do experience smells in their dreams, you typically have to wake up to smell the roses. You chose C. Well, you're bronx are typically determined by what. It turns out. There is a genetic reason for the way you're to smell. The way they do is some elements of your flatulence trace back to your family. So it's pretty likely the dip. Your relatives have particularly smelly dudes you might have to. Carolina, don't you tell her win? Hauser's what they want? Well, the all of our winning contestants today, we'll be taking home their very own in visible. Shar of toots harvested from celebrity, the animated characters and world leaders. These one of a kind invisible jars of will leave your home smelling tower. Okay I. Guess Congratulations. So all of the winning

Mellon Royalty Center Mindy Guy Rasi Washington Petersburg White House Hauser Carolina Clara DC
Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

06:30 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"Whole mentor idea that every there has magic it's just on magic is, is like the kind of weighed one unsworn one unlocks everything else but she's kind of front on a little bit. Yeah I think part of the question comes in like okay. If they've got the the Abbott Magic, why are they not the protagonist if they're going to be the psychic, right? Why aren't they fixing everything? They're cool. Unique powers. Why? Why are they just polishing the dishes instead of going out there and defeating the Dark Lord? Why are they making us do it so you do need a reason if there is they're not going to be the protagonist. Yes, I think the. kind of AB references interesting because the menta figure because you could argue, Mullin would fit those that kind of category as well. Really because like while Mellon is an extremely important figure, he isn't author an author is the hero of the be cool in the all therion legends. So we don't call them the Merlin legends maladies definitely aside character in authors. Quest to. Be. King in retake England and whatever other king onto the hill narratives he won't to include in this. So that's another think it's very interesting. You mentioned the whole idea of mental beginning. 'cause meant is aw like by the very nature, then what the main character but they're are absolutely necessary to the story of the hero and trying to get into guide them. Another example that came to me I don't really know if it is a side, Keiko naught because it is the title character but I quite liked what they did with Disney's malefic. Because yes her story but in the grand scheme of things, she's also kind of the site cake in a weird way helping Aurora come into her own I know in the original version, the cartoon version she is villain but she kind of is sidekick material in the film but it is it is debatable because I mean, the whole was called lessons that they rescued. She's the title character, but then the end she. kind of gives way to Aurora she steps down from the Dog G has in the forest gives over to a got daughter. So I don't as little bit on the edge, but if clips come but the same thing you could save a wicket as well. Gorka Maguire's in oversee the stage that followed you could say that wicked is the Wiki, which is the tissue a character. So you know they have a protagonist. But interesting isn't it that we talking about we're trying to find kind of examples, lead cakes coming up with these stories that are rewrites of of much better known stories the There are some authors who have seen that villain to be. Less villainous than. Has Been made out. So they have rewritten the story from that perspective instead and often then have upper magic that highlights very interesting link between Albert, magic and Villainy and the other ring and setting appalled, and the the fact that typically this is this is very evident kid that the fact that very few people can really understand whether magic comes from and you know. Who that person is because they had different and then youth, Oscars will is that way billions come from? Is it the they have been rejected by society because of that difference? Right, and that's that's such. A common villain backstory. Why? Why are you doing this? Well, because society cast me out and so. You know I'm now going to do this to get back at society or take over the world or even sometimes you get the again the magneto like villain who is supposedly doing it to help their their own similarly oppressed class of people or whatever. So that inversion. Seems like it's most likely to happen a trying to think of a case where people have enjoy turning around and telling it from the perspective of the villain where it didn't in turn out to be a basically an inversion in Everett magic situation where it's just an inversion of the the rebel hero magic story like it really the only differences methods rebel hero has address. Everett magic overthrows the the government or the dark Lord or whatever with magic but then the magic villain really does the same thing. Is The Bajic I mean rebel hero just the back story for the magic villain WHO's in power. Well I mean villainy. WHO's the villain? WHO's the hero? It's much like history was written by the victor so. If the hero wins in the end, it's clear that they've got the PR campaign, not the villain. On my allowed to throw deadpool into the ring because dead food himself doesn't have any magic. He just so happens the he has longevity but he's got negative sonic as his sidekick and he couldn't get to the villain unless she helped him but she's very definitely a kick character. is coming back to X. men so whether we'll pick group the that was the one example I could think of whether it was the main character without what you would club to magic versus on can five pulse. What is also reminds me of the kind of Race Lynn Majia in dragon loans way he goes back to become the villain in a way it goes back to come the great may who? was in a way, the one who reached out to him in the test. So like they play with time travel in paradox is in that. But as everyone nice. is my favorite character will time. So I'd like to destroy him in because he's amazing and yeah effort magic a his magic really is rather than upper. He just is really really good at magic. But it's also interesting because he is often old somboon cast. Where he certainly the main character in any of the original books until it gets his off series where he is the main character and he begins to grow in importance than you realize how close his story is to villains story. Well this has been a really really fun discussion all about Auburn, magic and thank you so much. Melissa coming on and talking to US thank you so much for having me..

Abbott Magic Aurora Mullin Gorka Maguire Mellon Keiko Everett England Lynn Majia United States Albert Melissa Disney
Gold just hit $2,000 an ounce — but that could be a scary sign for the economy

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:14 sec | Last week

Gold just hit $2,000 an ounce — but that could be a scary sign for the economy

"The price of an ounce of gold is now up to $2000 but analysts say this could be in people are losing confidence in the stock market. Carnegie Mellon Finance professor says people are buying gold during the pandemic has a safe asset, but the price is not

Carnegie Mellon Finance Professor
Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

08:12 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Really like what does in is a phenomenal phenomenal. Artists if you will yeah, I've known for a ears from even his previous life at be nectar, and then the business that he had for a while with Solomon's and now with you guys. So we go back away as he had lots of talents and lots of education into the new, a lot of history into the products that he was making that. I always found interesting I've had him on the show before and always enjoyed hearing on talk about what they're working on. Always got me excited about CIDER and mead, which is something that you know not as many people always get as excited about but I love talking to someone knowledgeable about it. It makes me want to try it which again. Is One of those things where you know who's your cider drinker right wild I think you're right. I think that's changed just like it has with Salzer and I think there's a broader appeal. If you're making an interesting a good product that's interesting to folks. That's high quality. Wouldn't you agree they do and I think the general consensus of what a CIDER drinker was ten years ago was probably female dominated and probably sweet will now with with people like lakes and with like an show and Free Chew Infanta Mellon Pucks, they're going a little, not a little they're going towards that drier side. With a lot more flavor than just as diabetic sweet sugary cavity driven product So Ian has. Devoted to being very dry base. Now, the the first off that we're coming out with distribution. Wise. It's very fruit forward. So you'll find apple which just pineapple and cheap grand Cherokee, which is cranberry and Cherry but that. Name I. Don't know why I never said the name out. Loud. So maybe I didn't like pull it in that way. That's hilarious a area. Still names all the stuff. So I'm looking look I'm looking at list your home's Bel Air, and we have juice, which is J. V. I c. e.. You know says, jv ice or J. Vice Bright Bright. In new areas and we just kind of let. Let it roll off the time and what she would he comes up next but Yeah I. He's genius. He's gray I. Was there yesterday Because, all of this stuff being made in Rochester because we have the space in a tink spaces, that's what I thought. And he's making a peach cider right now but he's determining whether it's going to be peach basil or a Peach Black T. cider. So he's playing with that I. Really my mind. He has these two naturally fermented CIDERS. That are single apples from Michigan that he just do their thing for about ten months bottled up. Gorgeous low carbonation. Fantastic. He has that blackberry lemonade cider called juice. That, he put in June barrels. Four or five months ago. That students thing. He doesn't really need any direction whatsoever because he already has it in his brain. He's brilliant and we're just going to ride his coattails. Of That was. Getting them, right. That's an awesome thing. I think it's a good two way street right? He gets. He gets resources that weren't his disposal, and now he's gets the have some creative freedoms for awhile with you. That's pretty awesome. The. He, literally good due to he's so is as stories, but every part of the state about every person, the state he is more stories than I can ever fathom. And he's just means. Well, he's just a good hyphen hearted man that just so happens to be when the smartest guys. That I've ever met in to the witness him and Dan Rogers. In the same room is one of the most like interesting spectacles in the history of his industry he both very intelligent both. Drastically different. And both come from completely different histories, but yet meshed together pretty Dang well, and so Dan, these days Dana Rogers is now up in Rochester hills to in he's doing all the experimental fund batches coming out with okay. It's it's n and Dan in the same building every day. So it's Really except for today actually, Dan Rogers isn't Birmingham brewing on the system the fifty barrel system for the first time in. Almost two years. Because, we've been so busy. So so it's a hundred percent of all the barrel aging is really done in Rochester Hills, right? Yes. So Most ninety nine percent of the barely start beer. So the beer that we goes into the barrels is brewed and Birmingham we barrel him and then send him over to Rochester Hills where they sit. For Eleven, twelve, ten, eight, whatever that we decide. And, then we ship them back here and UNBEAR- on here. So, that we can. Bass packages down here because their packaging system in Rochester hills is a very small. It's actually the old packaging system elements so Yeah, we bought the cantor. That Sonum, INS that ribbon rest that eastern market was using. We that's all of our cans come off of that little packaging system. So dating I didn't pick up on that. Okay. Yeah. That's systems been around a little bit a little bit. It's tried and true. It's Drastically different than the one is Birmingham and eventually the plan is for the Birmingham system over to Rochester in graduate to a much bigger system Birmingham. that. Comes time. You're not GonNa do that next week Aria that might be a little tricky. No, I hope I some downtime. Maybe some slower period of time. Papa, needs a vacation. I went to I went to Skoda this weekend to the I like it is the first weekend that I've gotten away and months and I took the family to Lake Huron and OSCO, her two days and. Somehow, it was burnt. My thought is. I'm very Pale, very pale, and it was the first time. I've gotten away from trae since probably December, all my God. Okay. It was forgot what the rest of the world looks like I know it'd be gone gone away for work like I was in Ohio last week for work but that's not really getting way. It's. Drastically. Keeping using redress. A lot drastic going on over there. There's nothing that's that's minimal. There's nothing that simple anymore. So everything's drastic. What's talk a little bit about the spirits business so you guys do Ramzan you do a rye whisky You GotTa White Rom. You got that weird Polish liquor thing. Let's talk a little bit about that thing. How do you say that? Nick Yeah. Okay that right? Yeah. That's that's an interesting flavor profile I never actually I've never had it or maybe I just haven't had yours because that's a that's a thing for the Polish folks I feel like I've been at some Polish celebration and somewhat put a shot in of me and was probably something in that line maybe. Head like Apertis digestives like I. I have. It reminds me a lot honey look were apparently goes well in t okay. Not My jam but people loved it during covert. So lot of Govan really. Okay. Our spirits took off in Kobe I. Mean we've we've been making spirits and liquor since you started riffing, right? Yeah. Because in order to sell anything. Alcohol based we have to make it ourselves. So we. Invested in a little still..

Rochester Hills Dan Rogers Birmingham Free Chew Infanta Mellon Pucks Rochester Solomon Nick Yeah Salzer IAN Govan Bel Air Lake Huron Apple Michigan Cherry Sonum Trae Papa Osco Ohio
Using Your Brain Without Thinking

Developer Tea

07:38 min | Last week

Using Your Brain Without Thinking

"What does it mean to use your brain? And how is that different than just thinking? As developers engage in thinking all the time but here's a entirely separate part of our brains that we might be missing out on using. That could be better at solving some of the problems that we face on a day-to-day basis. My Name is Jonathan trailer listening to develop for T and my goal on the show helped driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. One of the amazing things about the. Human. Brain. Is Its ability to process complex topics. This is why we can write code that is abstracted so many levels. Away, from a physical reality that we have to tangibly think about. We can imagine entire. Kind of universes where we can create stories and. keep track of those stories while we read a book. A book that was written with a bunch of characters that are enough themselves abstractions. These are characters that we may not have ever even seen that specific character that specific size before. But somehow we are able to process all of this information and create meaning out of it. This is an incredible feat and part of our kind of intellectual superiority that we are aware of the domination that we have over the world around us. Has Given us. A somewhat distorted picture of what the brain is actually capable of more importantly where the limits are. And it's very simple to see the limits of your brain and specifically limits that we're gonNA talk about today. If you want to test these limits you can. Try to brute force memorize the first twenty digits of Pi. This isn't a lot of information. It's just twenty digits in after all we can process a lot more. Information than just twenty digits, we can read entire books with thousands of pages and understand them. So what is it about remembering twenty digits? Makes it difficult? Here's another exercising might want to try. that. You've probably faced already in your career, go and look at the features of what say three or four different libraries, popular libraries or three or four different languages and try to decide which one is best. This kind of information that you have to process. It's really difficult to do because the number of variables and that's the critical factor for today's episode, the number of variables that you have to weigh against each other. Can Be really large temper variables. You can imagine for example. That you're trying to deduce which which language should you learn next let's say you're a beginner programmer and maybe you're trying to decide which language to learn. You can use variables like the market size. You can try to quantify how much you enjoy that language or. Even how much you expect to enjoy it in the future, you can imagine you would use measures like the number of available repositories on get hub or get hubs own report of the trends for a given language. How do you decide what trend to use or how far back to look? These are all different questions they you would have to try to answer and then compare between the different languages. And so now you have this very large list of pros and cons and. You sit down and try to look over that information, but this is. Where we hit our limit. Our ability to cognitively process or think about something on purpose. We only have so much capacity to think in parallel. This is critical factor remember again, the number of variables were very good about thinking about one thing. At a time. In fact, most of the advice that you receive on this podcast is an attempt to get you to think about fewer things at any given point in time and reduce the things that you are working on to the simplest form. So you don't have to keep a lot of information in your head. But if you are trying to make a decision complex decision with a lot of variables. There is another part of our brains we can tap into what's interesting is that as knowledge workers, we are paid for using this one specific part of our brain, this prefrontal CORTEX. The part that's responsible for thinking very deeply and thinking very focused manner. But. There's another part of our brains that can help us think more abstractly. And without the same limits of the cognitive processing limits, the would find in the prefrontal CORTEX. Lots of studies. For example, one from Carnegie Mellon support the idea that the rest of our brain is working on the problem. In parallel to us focusing on other things. For example. If you expose yourself to all of the information about the various programming languages that you're considering let's say you have four of them. Then you can go and do something totally unrelated to that. Your going to keep on working on that decision problem. Now, we're not really consciously aware of this and there's no way to become aware of it but once we return to that problem at a later point in time we may have a different sense of clarity and we might even have. We might feel is a gut intuition, but actually it's an intuition that was given to us by that unconscious processing that's happening in the rest of our brain. So. Here's the critical thing to to take away I. We said the the most critical thing is to remember that this has to do with the number of variable. So if you can reduce the number of variables that you're thinking about, then you can actually process those entirely in that prefrontal. CORTEX. For example, if you're working on a math problem, this is a perfect example of processing in the prefrontal. CORTEX. But if you're working on something that requires much more evaluation much further a can of discussion about multiple variables or a comparison between multiple things, and that's not something that you're going to be able to hold in your prefrontal Cortex, the working memory for of a better explanations too small. So the prescription to fix this problem is to expose yourself to the information all the relevant information for making a given decision and then go and do something else. Maybe take a walk give yourself something that's totally unrelated that won't allow your mind drift backing and try to process that information again, on purpose in that intentional and conscious way.

Cortex Carnegie Mellon Programmer
Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

03:51 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"If if if the condensed universe was pre Black holes than the conditions might not have been right to produce blackhall under those circumstances I imagine. You've incident. No. Look at. What we believe. By. Believe I mean this is war relativity theory tells us that the universe began with a singularity. A single point and that effectively is a black hole So it started as a black hole. But for some reason. The. exploded. Maybe an instability really don't know much about the mechanism of of what caused that explosion, what caused the expansion and the release of energy that we still see today with the expanding universe. So It's. But but it, but it is. A. Rich. Describes it a condensed universe and that comes universities as singularity single point, which is the definition of a black hole except he's got infinite density and maybe the early universe infinite density to some people have thought in terms of the universe having its own event terrorism in much the same way a black hole. The everything is within the Ventura is not to get my head around I have to say that once again underlines the parallel between. A black hole and the universe a as a whole. Okay. Thank you. Know I mean? The. Thought of the whole everything starting as blackhall. Prompted, the question in the first place and added it sort of go beyond that and not collapse in on itself and we never existed at all. Well, obviously we do. but that's probably one of the greatest mysteries of the universe are, how are we? Met many. So Sir. Richard. Not reached. He's names go. That's ridiculous. So what happens when we'll call him back? No, no. No. I'm talking about one of the Great. Physicists Roger Penrose. Okay Penrose's theory is exactly the the universe starts off a black hole x becomes unstable expands. As, it expands it full of the black holes and eventually they grow big enough that they to turn into new universes. So it's you know that that slightly kind of penrose idea is. Maybe. Parallel with whatever Richard Mellon suggesting. Okay, they're good long. I also like this, come after the question Andrew which he didn't read out. Don have in front of me. Let me have it in front of you for you for you. Richard Says Love The show Ridge which is nice. But he also says ps Mr Pack is already a giant Australian broadcasting that's. Yes. That's probably true. Talking him one guy to be more famous. Which would it be? Would not be difficult and. suggesting that he might just be a one hit wonder. It's a distinct possibility in this guy. We got a photo yet. I'm sure we'll be asked again. Yeah. This this one at least. That's what they all also checks in the mile. I think thanks for the question Richard. Really appreciate it in the The good that goes along with it. Thanks..

Richard Mellon Roger Penrose DON Ventura A. Rich Andrew
How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

Outcomes Rocket

04:55 min | Last month

How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

"Welcome back to the outcomes, rockets, Sal Marquez is here today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Tony Manual Dr Tony. Manual is a practicing anesthesiologist and Austin Texas. He's a partner with the United States anesthesia partners central Texas and has been in practice since two thousand two. He's an assistant professor. In the Department of surgery and Peri, operative care at Bell Medical School Dr Manual received his undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt attended the University of Texas Health Science Center for medical. School, completed his residency in anesthesia at the University of North Carolina or Or. He was recognized as the outstanding resident and fellow cardiovascular anesthesia at Duke, university in two thousand seventeen. He received his masters in medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University and today he's playing. Multiple Roles as as he has in in his career and today we're going to be talking about physician innovation, and in particular how physicians can evolve their career to be greater contributors beyond the point of care and so. I WanNa thank you Tony for joining me today to have this very interesting discussion with you saw thanks so much great. Great to be owner podcasts, and I WANNA. Thank you for actually doing this podcast. Because for a lot of people like myself, it's been a great conduit to learn about what other people are doing, and what best practices that are out there, and it's an alternative to sort of the Journal Review articles that we have historically read and I've actually looked up several companies that you've had on and engaged with them. Really appreciate what you're doing I. Love that man now. That's great. I'm glad to hear that you've done that. That's the intention. Intention and so I appreciate you for doing that, so you know we are having a discussion. Folks Tony and I connected and said you know what the role of the physician is changing, and and so what I wanNA. Do today is just highlight how that's changing through the life of Dr Manual here and so you know I love for you Tony at to just kind of walk us through some of the work that you're doing and how it's changed from just practicing to actually doing more You know as we engage this. You know three five trillion dollar industry that call healthcare. Yeah, it's it's been an interesting journey for me and you know have to credit one of my anesthesia attending when I was in residency, his name's Dave mayor said Gimme, grapevine goes Tony You have to continually strives to maximize your career and Let's see well. What does that mean well? You definitely want to start trying to be the best clinician you can be once. You achieve that you should really look at you. Know becoming really strong in other areas, and I always took that to heart in so I think back to when I first started here in Austin I became the division chief of cardiovascular. Cardiovascular Anesthesia Rochester, saying I helped create division of cardiovascular. Because at that time we were Basically, everybody was doing it, and I fell coming out of myself. This'll be really better if we limited number of people at work in that space and you know put together some protocols and got the team together, and we saw some really good outcomes from that work and I fast forward to what I'm doing today, and that work has changed so much partly because I think every clinician you have to get educated, and I use a rudimentary tools back then, but in after getting that masters degree from Carnegie Mellon I really developed at toolkit that allows me to take on. On much more complex problems that we face and healthcare today. Yeah, that's so interesting, and so you have that entrepreneurial bug from the beginning right so you kind of re retooled the way that you guys approached cardiovascular anesthesia and I'm sure with with much improvements and outcomes, but then you've taken other steps to. You've been involved in startups, and now you're doing different roles. Can you talk to us a little bit more about that? Yeah I worked my way of the medical staff leadership and ultimately became the president of medical staffing while that was a great experience after I graduated with my master's degree. The entrepreneur apart really was intriguing to me. In more important is the. The interface between the clinicians in technology and so The startup is called Dynamic Lights based here in Austin, and it's actually technology out of the University of Texas and They had great idea concept. Basically, it's how to noninvasive map blood flow during Sri will hand you an aneurysm surgery and uses what's called speckled laser technology and I was like honestly Craig. It's continuous. It's noninvasive, but they never really thought about the interaction. How you get it. It's dockers hands. How do you test it? And that was sort of my strength and so I, said well. Let's work together and figure this out and to date. You know we've incorporated. We're FDA approved, and we're. Ducking clinical trial and we're looking to partner with a couple of larger health tech firms,

Dr Tony Dr Tony Manual Peri Assistant Professor Carnegie Mellon University Austin Dr Manual Texas Austin Texas Sal Marquez Dynamic Lights Carnegie Mellon University Of North Carolina University Of Texas Health Sci Bell Medical School United States Department Of Surgery Vanderbilt Duke
Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

06:30 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mellon" discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Countdown together. So if you just press play three minutes to midnight, it's like I will never play the song and it's Silly and fun and I'd met one. I almost freestyle the entire thing. So yeah. Some days I'm very formulaic and somedays not as somebody's people give me very specific. You know what they want for an antisocial. In of a movie what they need or you know or you know what reaction is looking at the moment sound, she's a war he is attracted she really likes the United. Sometimes I get direction and I take it I just take it and I I don't work so much with artists anymore but it was so helpful to work with artists because like. I am really good at like being of service. So I could totally eight sheet sandwiches island like if I were like divas or whatever, and because I knew, I would still be getting sixty percent or thirty cents or whatever of the publishing. Dissuade them arm saying something extremely silly or a bad. Then I've done my job but you now that if they wanted to sing a song about something that I found Bonello stupid. That that was fine the I'm just there to support what they're trying to do and. I'm out challenged him some degree. It's very, very bad but otherwise, I'm just but that was really helpful to me because of that helped me, I think in terms of becoming a direct director. Right. Ryan redoubling and talk about that I for I wanNA, pause bookmark for a second for people who don't understand the Peculiarities or the intricacies of the the music business and he said the percentage is a publishing. Can you explain what that means for folks? Just they understand how different people make money in the music world? Yes. Publishing's really the only growth touring. If you're a called play, you might money. Oh, you too. But touring usually musicians will might loss. Side really only march she can sometimes make money but really the best way to make money in music if you're going to be in addition is to write as it and so. From is as pop split snus Irvine slits. And I can tell you that saw I guess in Flint is like whoever's in the room? Or whoever does one tiny word or something against tweeting you Really I think I think that's an sleep but I don't do that. And it was really funny because Betty Blanco like right me. It was like, why don't you? Why don't you? He's a producer heeds that what he did a whole bunch of. Hits he's disrupt seats. Law Hits Law. His will be stopped counting after he had ten top number one to me. Anyway, he was. He was riding the news like, why are you? Because he was working with a partner on producing a song and I'll I believe that if Iran melody and the top line I get jeep was in his law if you write the cards, you get fifty percent of the song and do the production you get paid for your. Separately aside from getting paid for the writing. So a producer producer, they sisal might thirty forty grand for producing a song that means for using his main. Putting all of the sounds in all of the piano sale via violence sound Gora or the the vice in the end debate that skulk production. songwriting prices literally just courts. And Melody. And lyrics. So cords are worse fifty percent of publishing. and. Lyrics and melody are worth fifty percent publishing. And then if you go on producing, you get a fee for producing. So I'm sorry lackey I wrote the courts to Chandelier. Can you explain what that means because I think cores I think strumming like a C.. Or A D. on a guitar but I don, I don't know if I'm thinking of the same thing. About it like it's so is I. Guess It's On Piano. And they make court and so. I'm doing I'm doing the knowledge of. Be like. that's four different like and then for different nights. I and then you you give that to the producer they put it. They take that they put it in just since you mentioned the the piano. and Near. That Chandelier I did again, right reports. But I then I sent them to Jesse Shatkin and I said You Mike Song out of this unheated production and Nice. Guy Twenty five percent of the publishing. But I'm I'm not required to do that like I could have one hundred percent of the song and paid him his production. Forty thousand volts let's say. And Melody is the sound of the voice or the and. That's just. Don't know whatever like. Yeah. It's fast melody and then. Once, you add lyrics to that. Top One. Mellon weather is called top line. Got It and so I am I talk line Ryder but. Now I guess I mostly I can write some chords I'm pretty shabby at it but I do. Do plenty clang ally on piano or occasionally in send Jesse like videos of me playing the piano is like he can see which ones I'm playing. A. Songs out of those and I am because I appreciate he. Couldn't do it without him I always even for any five cents. But again in.

Producer Melody Jesse Shatkin Ryan Redoubling Betty Blanco Director Flint Ryder Mellon Skulk Iran Partner Irvine
Ivy League suspends fall sports due to coronavirus pandemic

Total Information PM

00:26 sec | Last month

Ivy League suspends fall sports due to coronavirus pandemic

"League schools announced today they will not have any sports in the upcoming months. The eight prestigious Ivy League schools have cancelled all fall sports because of the covert 19 pandemic. A decision on winter sports is expected later this month. Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh is also canceled All fall SPORTS The 11 members of The Centennial conference that compete in the Division Three have also cancelled all fall SPORTS because of Corona virus.

Ivy League Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh
Incontinence Problems at Any Age

Dishing Up Nutrition

07:08 min | Last month

Incontinence Problems at Any Age

"Welcomed addition of nutrition today's show is brought to you by a nutritional weight and wellness. My Name Is Kara Harper and I'm a licensed nutritious I also have a masters degree in holistic health, and I'm very excited to be here this morning with my co-host Melanie Beasley Melanie registered and licensed Dietitian. She's been practicing nutrition for three decades. I think in a variety of settings bono. Okay sorry. You would never know by looking at you mail, but. Both Mellon I. We've personally had our share of health challenges over the years. Some of you maybe have even heard some of our personal stories. If you've tuned in for many years, and if you also have health challenges, we understand we know what you're going through. We also understand the importance of eating real food to conquer those health challenges, so we want to welcome you and welcome all of our listeners to today's show and the topic of our show today is incontinence problems at any age, and isn't that interesting because he always thinking continents is just you know someone's getting older, but it really kinda fact. Yeah from bed-wetting that wedding from the time you're little you know up until end of life it can affect. People ran. It affects quality of life so I'm really excited that we're talking about this and putting things out on the table for people to think about good morning. Everyone, I bet some of you are thinking. What is my diet and nutrition have to do with incontinence or lack of bladder control? Control well, many of our clients have said to us I thought my problem was structural problem and only doctor could help me certainly not a Dietitian nutritionist I know by UCAR, but they fill out a lengthy wellness form to come in for us. Look at in. That's of the questions on there, so some of you may also be thinking the exact same thing, so it may be surprising to know that. A number of our clients ask us for help with incontinence, which is defined as involuntary loss of urine. But car you and I were talking about. It's more than just you know. Expand a little bit on what you were saying that you had listened to that matter. I was just listening to a doctor. She was a urologist and she was just discussing kind of the criteria for diagnosing incontinence. And you know it's the involuntary loss, but it's also the frequency that urgency you know I have to get to the. The bathroom right away. I can't wait also night. You know nighttime frequency is one of the diagnosis as well you know if people are getting up two or more times per eight, that would fall under incontinence as well. Yes, and it affects it affects sleep which we've talked about before. Definitely yeah, and because continents is such a very personal topic, it can also be rather embarrassing to a significant number of people. Many, people feel uncomfortable talking about it even to their doctor. And when we bring it up I, think they they're almost relieved to have someone to discuss that issue with For that reason, we wanna get into the topic. Get it up and out in the open as a dietician WHO's helped numerous people overcoming continents I, believe your food choices can work magic on the symptoms of incontinence, coronary artery and talk about the foods that are certainly considered bladder irritants. We will also talk about foods that helped strengthen and maintain certain key muscles that are necessary for bladder control. And incontinence it's a really common problem like we already mentioned for both men and for women, and in fact, twenty five million adults in our country suffer from incontinence, seventy five to eighty percent are women. That's probably not a surprise in reality in a one in four women over the age of eighteen will experience episodes of leaking urine, and and this is the statistic that Kinda got me. Is that half of women over sixty struggle with this, but again it can happen to under sixty as well absolutely. And Stress Urinary incontinence that that's just kind of a data separate diagnosis, but kind of a subcategory that usually shows up. You know after childbirth, and after menopause for women, and then some prostate cancer treatment can also trigger incontinence for men, yes, and getting men to talk about it in clinic. I find too, that they're. They're happy to bring it up, but you have to bring it up I because people just assume well, this is just who I am. I'm getting older. This is my portion. That I have to deal with now. Not knowing that could, there can be some help well. Have you noticed the number of TV ads for disposable incontinent products? Now? Yes, I have some people. Call them adult diapers. I don't like that I. Think it's In two thousand eighteen five billion dollars were spent on the purchase of incontinence products. The cost of these incontinence supplies can easily beat two hundred to three hundred per month. The National Association for Continents Reports that. The psychological cost of urinary incontinence can be depression. Isolation decreased self esteem and work related difficulties. Yeah I mean even the sleep piece to think about how lack of sleep. If you're getting up several times at night, you don't get that quality or length of sleep. That can affect mood that can affect work performance immune system, so it's you know it's a big issue. And why isn't continent so prevalent? Well one reason it could be from following a low fat, low calorie style of eating in addition to not eating enough protein, and often those will go together. And a lot of. We say women because I think a lot of women are. Wanting to lose weight and. They're working. They're trying to do this by going fat, free low calorie, and that automatically sort of cuts out a lot of protein in the Diet because if they're trying to avoid fat, you're. You're not getting a lot of protein so. Following a low fat, low protein diet has left some people with weak pelvic floor, muscles and thin fragile tissues in the urethra, so it's a lack of beneficial healthy fats, and then short changing the amount of protein that you're getting that could really have a direct influence on incontinence, and I always tell clients how important it is to eat. Sufficient amounts of beneficial healing fats I mean feel like we're always kind of trying to promote the healthy fats right now we are. We're trying to overcome decades of it is. It's fear fat forty to fifty

Urinary Incontinence Melanie Beasley Melanie Licensed Dietitian Mellon Kara Harper Ucar National Association For Conti
Apricots and Cucamelons

Plantrama

06:28 min | 2 months ago

Apricots and Cucamelons

"Going to start out with what's for dinner with to like really wacky things I write these are wacky. What's for dinner items? And the first one is unripe apricots. Yes I wish everybody could see the face that C. L. is making right now unripe. Apricots are almost as interesting as ripe apricot. I would say I look forward to them even more. You can do things with them. That are unexpected and unexpectedly delicious. Anybody who has an apricot tree knows that when that green fruit forms if forms in great abundance I mean the branches get so heavy they practically pull down to the ground so you have to get in there and prune out some of that fruit remove some of that fruit in order for the tree to be able to ripen. What's left and then you've got all these green apricots and you're thinking. Well what do I do? It seems like such a horrible waste and there are two things that you can do with them. That are very tasty. The first is that you can make a really good pickle out of a green apricot. I advise you to cut the apricot and half I dig out that seed and then do the pickle. You don't have to but it makes it easier to eat. Once you've finished pickling but the real reason I love unripe. Apricots is because you can make the most delicious. Looker out of them. I can't even. It tastes vaguely like apricots. But it's not fully developed with the sweetness if you've ever had you may shoe. Which is the Japanese liqueur. Made from unripe plums that particular plum is very closely related to the Apricot? And that's the best description of this flavor that I can give you. I look forward to making it every year and I tell you it's just it. I'm speechless that good. Well well regain your voice for a minute because I have a question and that is how big are these apricots when you take them off the tree house. Big AN UNRIPE APRICOT. Are we talking about? We are talking about between an inch an inch and a half and what you do. Is You take a needle and you poke holes in each apricot and I know that sounds like a lot of work but it is absolutely worth it and then you stick it in a jar with vodka and you let it sit there for you know I forget six weeks or something and then you it off and you combine it with a just a very little bit of simple Syrup and it is refreshing alcoholic sweet tart delicious on its own used as a cocktail mixer. I will bring you some the next time I see you. And it's a precious liquid. So that tells you how much I love. You absolutely can hardly wait. Now Tell me could you do the same with unripe peaches because I know a lot of people who have peach trees that need their fruit thinned for the same reason you probably could? I'm sure the flavor would be a little bit different and I don't know I've never done it with peaches. I don't have access to unripe peaches but I do know that peach leaves. I've made peach leaf wine and liquor before they give you a nice almond flavor. So I think it's worth trying now. I have to find somebody with a peach tree and recommend that their fruit needs thinning. Oh and by the way. I'll take the fruit. I'll dispose of that for you. No EXTRA CHARGE. Well in terms of Wacky. Let's talk about the Cuba Mellon because this is an heirloom vegetable. I guess you'd call it. Yeah that is so cute and it is so sweet as well. I am by sweet. I mean charming in the way that it grows not Sweden flavor the Q. It's also called Mexican. Sour Gherkins or mouse melons or miniature watermelons Mexican sour cucumber. There's a million names but basically they look like teeny tiny watermelons. And if you've got kids you've got to grow this. Vine because kids are charmed by these little cooper melons and they taste like cucumbers. They're a wonderful cocktail garnish. They are cute in a salad. You can pickle them any number of ways that you can use coupon Mellon. I Love Cuba melons and the first time I had them. I did not realize that they were related to a wild edible so tell me the genus and species of the Mellon Molo three escape okay. So mellow three is the genus and MOLO THREE OF PENDULUM. A slightly different species is the creeping cucumber that you can forage for and very restricted parts of this country. You find it mostly in Florida a little bit. Maybe in Texas Louisiana Alabama and it looks almost exactly like the Kuka melon. It doesn't have the quite the pretty variegation on it. But it's very similar in flavor and in growth habit and I didn't realize until just now when you said mouse melon that it was a close relative of this forage -able plant so I love that. I learned something excellent excellent. Well I I WANNA give people a little clue about planting this because this in many parts of the country you see. You are planting this now but if you haven't planted yet and you think oh. I'm going to have to wait till next year. No you aren't. You can go ahead and plant this. In fact being a heat loving plant it's could not to put seeds in the ground too early so you can still have time to grow this plant the vines get to be about five or six feet tall so very good in a small for a small trellis or how where we grow them. Is We have a fence to keep the Bundy's out of a certain section of our vegetable garden we call it the bunny been and we grow Q. Milnes on the outside of the bunny been and as I say. The little tiny yellow flowers are just adorable and the vines are at the right height so that children can pick those little cucumber like fruits and they look like miniature watermelons and you'll just have so much fun with this plant

Cuba Tree House Mellon Molo C. L. Mellon Kuka Melon Bundy Sweden Florida Texas Alabama Louisiana
Rethinking Model Size: Train Large, Then Compress with Joseph Gonzalez

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

05:44 min | 2 months ago

Rethinking Model Size: Train Large, Then Compress with Joseph Gonzalez

"Art. Everyone I am on the line. With Joey. Gonzalez. Joey is an assistant professor at UC Berkeley in the e S. Department. Joey welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you for having me. I'm really looking forward to diving into this. This conversation and in particular talking about M. L. Systems and your recent paper on train large then compress. But before we do that. Please share a little bit about your background and how you came to work in. Yeah excellent so my stories of it. Funny I started my PhD at Carnegie Mellon with an interest in actually flipping helicopters. Because that was the thing to do back in two thousand six awhile back. Lipping HELICOPTER LIVING HELICOPTER. Flying THEM FIXING THEM UP. Sell or fly them and then flip them. Actually a colleague of Mine Peter Beale now at Berkeley When he was finishing up his his thesis work is looking at how to do interesting. Control for helicopters cool and I knew I was. I went to my thesis advising the you've worked on control as well. I'm kind of interested in flipping helicopter. I think that's that's really neat research and you know that was And it actually was some of the pioneering work that we see today in reinforcement learning. But what's kind of cool about? The story is my adviser at that time being a real machining researcher. I was like you know what flipping helicopters. That's that's that's exciting but there's something more important like we can actually help the world with sensors we can build sensor networks to to monitor fires. We can use principle machine learning techniques. I should add that when I was looking at the flipping helicopters we should flip them with neural networks. And the other thing. My advisors said which was good advice at the time was a neural networks. Really serious research. We use more statistical methods graphical models things that have formal foundations that we can reason about right kind of detailed analysis and understand what our models are doing and that was good advice and so I went down this path of how to build a proxies Beijing per metric methods to reason about link quality incident works and in that process of doing that. I kind of stumbled into it problem. I was reading a lot of Matlab code to compute big Matrix in verses and then approximations that to make it run faster and one of the things I enjoy doing in the process of exploring these efficient matlab programs was trying to make them more parallel and I think advisor clued in is a good is like you know what maybe you enjoy that more so maybe instead of focusing on the per metrics and the sense now works. Let's start to think about how to make machine learning more efficient in particular at that point in time Duke was taking offense. Map Produce. That's GonNa Change machine learning and we were thinking well we're working on graphs and they just don't fit the map produce pattern and the kinds of computation. We were doing just wasn't it didn't actually fit the technology that people were building so we started to explore a different design of system so designer systems for computation graphs which took down the design of of graph processing systems system. That I ended up writing. His kind of the end of my thesis was a graph lab for doing very large analysis of graphs and so by the time I finished my PhD. I was actually writing systems papers. Not machining papers in the field was changing very very rapidly to this around two thousand twelve and if anyone's been following the history of machine learning around twenty twelve everyone started to realize maybe actually neural nets for a good idea. The deep learning these ideas actually really dated back to Nineteen Eighty S. They're actually really starting to work a and they were changing. The field machine learning and grass are also taking off so we built actually a company around the systems that I was developing as a graduate student who was graph. Flab that evolved into a company for building tools for data scientists do interesting machine learning at scale that was ultimately acquired by Apple. And around that time I also joined the UC Berkeley employed as a post doc. A chance to come out to California and it was really exciting opportunity to do research in a different system. A system called spark which eventually became Apache spark and there we started develop the graph processing foundation for the Apache spark system and again as I started to explore more and more into the field I learn more about research data systems and transaction processing and how those connect back to machine learning and so after finishing my post doc I came to Berkeley in fact I chose not to follow the much more lucrative path of the and it was going to ask about that. A made a terrible financial decision. But I'm happy because I have a chance to work with students. I'm a little less happy because I'm not as wealthy as one could have been but now I am teaching students that do research at the intersection of machine learning and systems and so we have a pretty broad agenda around how to better of technologies for delivering models to manage machinery. Life Cycle not just training but prediction how to prioritize Training Experiments on the cloud to use service computing to make machine learning more cost effective and easier to deploy. We have a big agenda around autonomous driving building the actual platform that supports autonomous driving not necessarily the models but how they are connected together to make a reliable car and we have work in natural language processing and computer vision and one of those papers when the hoping to talk a bit about today which is our work on on making Burt models easier to train and it to has kind of funny story how we came to To actually realization that what we were thinking was entirely wrong. And that's what that paper talk a bit about.

Berkeley Joey Advisor Uc Berkeley Carnegie Mellon Gonzalez M. L. Systems Assistant Professor E S. Department Peter Beale Beijing California Researcher Duke Graduate Student Burt Apple
reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

How I Built This

07:01 min | 2 months ago

reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

"Think about the small moments or decisions in your life that actually had a huge impact on how your life turned out. Maybe it was a conversation. You struck up with the person next to you on an airplane. Maybe it was a party. You reluctantly went to only to meet the person you'd eventually marry or maybe it was a decision to stay on vacation an extra day that sparked a new idea for Kevin System. It was a random remark from his girlfriend that made him decide to use filters on instagram for Blake. Majkowski was a chance meeting with a group of young Argentinian who took him to the countryside where he saw kids with no shoes. That one day inspired him to create. Tom's and for Louis Fun on it was a free lecture at Carnegie Mellon University in two thousand. We'll get deeper into the story in a few minutes but that single lecture would lead him to invent to ingenious new tools the I was capture. Yes captures those annoying twisted and blurred letters. You have to type into a website to prove your human and the second one was duo lingo now. The biggest language learning APP in the world which is now getting even more popular because people are looking for new things to do now that they're stuck at home but was captured and duo. Lingo were designed to harness the power of crowdsourcing to solve problems. And I'M GONNA blow your mind here if you have ever typed in a capture or reused dueling go. There's a good chance you've taken part in a massive online collaboration that you probably weren't even aware of and it's amazing. How Louis came up with all this but let's start at the beginning. Lewis was born in Guatemala in late. Nineteen Seventy S. Both as parents were doctors and though he was surrounded by poverty violence in Guatemala City. Louis screw up in comparative privilege and as a kid. He spent a lot of time hanging out at the family business. My Mother's family actually had a candy. Factory everybody is always a Mesa. The fact that I grew up with a candy factory they think it was like Willy. Wonka or something. I was not all that much into the candidate. Self I was into the machines because basically the candies made by these gigantic machines. That bump out I don't know how many thousands of pieces of candy per hour and basically all my weekends. I spent playing at the Candy Factory and I would They the machines apart and put them back together they would be some extra pieces after. I put him back together on that. That would be a problem but what? What kind of student were you were? You were school pretty easy for you. Yeah I was pretty nerdy basically. That was really good at math. Math was just easy to me. I what I would do during the summers is basically get either next year or you know. Couple YEARS LATER. Math books on all the sizes. Wow it kind of came easy but the way I really got good ideas by doing hundreds and hundreds exercises. That's what you do in. The summertime was bored. I mean I was an only child I is. I didn't have that much to do. This is remember this is also pre Internet pre everything. So what was I going to do? Man That's what I did was putting playing cards in the spokes of my bicycle and by jolly ranchers seven. Eleven should math books. So you were. Did you just love math? I mean it sounds like kids. Don't think about their future. They're not like I'm going to study math so I can be in tech one day like unless I've really enjoyed it. I I enjoyed it was it was like a puzzle for me by the way this is not the only thing I did. I mean I I also played a lot of video games Pirated Video Games in my commodore sixty four like floppy disks. Floppy Disk loppy discs. That's right I wanted a Nintendo. When I was eight my mother would not get many intendo. She instead got me computer. Commodore Sixty Four. And I couldn't figure out how to use it but eventually I read like the manual stuff and I figured out how to use it more than I figured out. I could buy other people's video games. And so I became a little hub in my in my little neighbourhood but these were not other kids adults or kind of basically young adults who had a computer and they would come to my house and I would take their games and give them my games exchange so then. I collected a pretty large number of video games but sh- mentioned right that I mean because your childhood sounds pretty nice but but like as a kid I guess or even as a teenager there was a civil war in Guatemala right. I mean we know that today. There's a a lot of violence there. Obviously violence in the US and other countries to but Guatemala's has been particularly hard hit. I mean did it feel dangerous when you're a kid yes it did. There was a civil war pretty much since I was born in seventy nine to nineteen ninety-six. There was a civil war going on the whole time. It always felt dangerous when I was fifteen or so. My aunt was kidnapped for ransom. I mean she was gone for seven or eight days. Wow People's cars would be stolen. I don't every couple of months. Somebody's car would be stolen in my family. Going past seven thirty PM was rare games. You needed to go out in a large group. If you're going to go up at seven thirty PM and I did my house had walls and barbed wire yeah. It felt dangerous. I mean this is one of just one of the reasons I came to the US. Actually I mean I was. After my aunt was kidnapped I thought to myself. I don't WanNa live here. Yeah and I guess you did end up leaving Guatemala for college because you went to Duke in North Carolina and you describe yourself as a like a math nerd in school and and is that what you intended to do like to do something in math. That's what I wanted to become an economic math professor. I was pretty certain. I wanted to become a math professor at the time. I thought the best thing that I can do is really learn a lot of math and I really it and I thought it was futile to learn how to deal with other people. It is interesting because my job. These days is one hundred percent just dealing with other people's problems. I'm just trying to understand the so so by becoming math professor. You thought. Hey I wouldn't have to deal with people I would just deal with facts. Data and numbers. Yes yes and you know I. I'll do math research all day long. And every now and then after class of but whatever that's like a tax That's that's what I thought so all right so you are She gets your degree and you this path to go into academia and you go into a PhD program at Carnegie Mellon Correct and I guess you go into computer science right yes. I changed from math computer science because I visited a math Grad school and what people were saying the professor was saying. Oh I'm working on this open problem that nobody's been able to solve for the last three hundred years and I thought I don't think I'm smart enough if you haven't done it and nobody's done it in three hundred years that's Kinda not for me whereas when you visit in computer science I mean this is crazy thing before like. Oh Yeah I still have an open program yesterday. Well it's a much younger field yet so that I thought that was much more exciting for me. At

Guatemala Professor Louis Fun Math Grad School Candy Factory United States Guatemala City Carnegie Mellon University Instagram Majkowski Kevin System Carnegie Mellon Blake Nintendo TOM Wonka Mesa
How a restaurant's ventilation system can affect the spread of the coronavirus

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:07 min | 3 months ago

How a restaurant's ventilation system can affect the spread of the coronavirus

"And what researchers are learning is that there's more for restaurant owners to consider when wearing masks and social distancing ventilation they say complain important role as well a recent study out of China showed how one customer with covert nineteen spread the disease ten nine others when a virus is caught up in an airstream it has the potential to to move much further than six feet professor Kevin van den Y. Mellon Berg and five other researchers from the university of Oregon and university of California Davis all the authors of a paper focused on minimizing viral transmission in buildings your team has a three D. model of how would may spread we created a conceptual visualization of how the aerosols may be spreading in that room with a with a fan that is simply recirculating the air whether it was an air conditioner or just a fan moving air the visualization is really trying to articulate how the particles get caught up in the air and move around space the team created a second animation

China Kevin Van Den Y. Mellon Berg Professor University Of Oregon University Of California
3D model shows virus can spread farther than 6 feet inside

WBBM Morning News

01:57 min | 3 months ago

3D model shows virus can spread farther than 6 feet inside

"A recent study out of China showed how one customer with covert nineteen spread the disease ten nine others but look at the pattern of infection some people seated at the diner's table and at the one in the front and behind were infected but nobody at the table next to it was when the virus is caught up in an airstream it has the potential to be to move much further than six feet professor Kevin van den Y. Mellon Berg and five other researchers from the university of Oregon and university of California Davis all the authors of a paper focused on minimizing viral transmission in buildings your team has a three D. model of how would may spread we created a conceptual visualization of how the aerosols may be spreading in that room with a with a fan that is simply recirculating the air whether it was an air conditioner or just a fan moving air the visualization is really trying to articulate how the particles get caught up in the air and move around the space the team created a second animation for the same room only with an open window you have less people turn red and get sick what is opening a window right so in this conceptual visualization what we were seeing is that with increased outside air exchange through the open window particles deposit more quickly and then also being exhausted from the airstream more quickly fresh air fewer infections or people in the restaurant business gonna have to consider in the future in your mind what kind of air conditioning system how it moves there I think we're all going to be considering our air systems in buildings much more seriously moving forward and I think restaurateurs will be included in that scenario as for the outdoor dining professor vanden Y. Mellon Berg says that is safer than any indoor

China Kevin Van Den Y. Mellon Berg Professor University Of Oregon University Of California
Felicity Huffman's daughter Sophia accepted into prestigious university 1 year after college admissions scandal

John Williams

00:21 sec | 3 months ago

Felicity Huffman's daughter Sophia accepted into prestigious university 1 year after college admissions scandal

"Says and Felicity Huffman's daughter is being accepted into a top university Sofia Macy is heading to Carnegie Mellon university's theatre program after mom's rolled in last year's college admissions scandal her mom pleaded guilty to paying fifteen thousand dollars to alter Sylvia's SAT answers well Sophia took the test again on our own got accepted into the

Felicity Huffman Sofia Macy Carnegie Mellon University Sylvia Sophia
Facebook map shows you where people are reporting coronavirus symptoms

Daily Tech News Show

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Facebook map shows you where people are reporting coronavirus symptoms

"Let's talk a little bit more about another couple of other efforts actually multiple efforts to track. Where infections might go next by having people self report systems symptoms rather facebook partnered with Carnegie Mellon University's Delfi Research Center on a survey asking users to report their symptoms both Carnegie Mellon and Facebook have now published websites with their initial. Findings can see a little heat map Go TO COVA CAST. Cmu DOT EDU. And you'll be able to see these heat maps later this week and eventually provide forecasts based on the data to help. Local health officials anticipate where hospital capacity needs might spike next facebook's own site provides a symptom map of the US at the county level showing what percentage of the population has reported systems county by county facebook's also partnering with the University of Maryland to take that survey global and Carnegie Mellon is building an API so let researchers access the data.

Carnegie Mellon University Facebook Carnegie Mellon Delfi Research Center University Of Maryland United States
Facebook launches map to help identify coronavirus hot spots early

Sean Hannity

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Facebook launches map to help identify coronavirus hot spots early

"In the social media giant is opening up about how it's helping fight coronavirus founder and CEO mark Zuckerberg penned an opinion editorial for The Washington Post in which he offered up the vast resources of the social media giant to help fight the covert nineteen pandemic his reasoning is straightforward accurate county by county data is needed from across the U. S. and Facebook has a community of billions of users globally and as we have all learned over the past few years I spoke knows a lot about us Facebook has already rolled out and often a symptom survey run by health researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Facebook says answers to the survey were sent to the researchers not kept by the social media site so far Carnegie Mellon says they're getting one million responses a week in the United States Zuckerberg says the social media data is a new super power in fighting pandemics and urges people to use the data

The Washington Post Carnegie Mellon University Facebook Carnegie Mellon Founder And Ceo Mark Zuckerberg United States
The Evolution of ML  and Furry Little Animals

Talking Machines

08:58 min | 4 months ago

The Evolution of ML and Furry Little Animals

"You are listening to talking machines Catherine Gorman Lawrence and Neil. We are again taping an episode in front of a live audience digitally recorded though on on talking machines. And if you want to be part of our live. Studio audience big quotes. You can follow us on twitter at Ti Okay. N. G. M. C. H. S. Or hit us up on the talking machines at gmail.com and our guest today for this interview on talking. Machines is Dr Terence. Annouce key doctors and thank you so much for taking the time to join us today. I really appreciate it Great to be here so we ask all of our guests the same question I. How did you get where you are? What's been your academic and industrial journey. You're also very involved in the reps conference. Tell US everything well. A wise man once told me that careers are only made retrospectively and I have no idea how he got here. There was no plan. It went through a sequence of stages starting with graduate school at Princeton in theoretical physics. From there when I finished that I for reasons that have to do with the field of physics. At the time which was a little bit more bummed I went into neuroscience so that was a post doc and then from there that's when I met. Geoffrey Hinton and had changed my life because we met him at a small seminar here in San Diego and set nineteen seventy nine. We hit it off and From that over the next few years you know blossoms the the Boehner Sheen and back prop and you know. The rest was history. Terry who you post talking with where you post talking in San Diego no no. This was a post doc at Harvard. Medical School in the Department of Neurobiology with Stephen Kofler who was widely considered to be the founder of modern neurobiology and It was an experimental post. Doc I actually recorded from neurons. Subic seventy nine. You mentioning physics. It was a little bit more bond a in some sort of connection modeling. That was also a very quiet period. That wasn't a lot going on it. Was this sort of age of classical. Ai Right you're absolutely right. This was in fact. It was the neural network winter. The seventies and it was primarily because of the failure of the perception. That's neat because you say failure of the percents on I read about that a lot. Do you really did fail. All was the men's ski paper little. What the mid ski books are in Minsk. Eighty books have killed it but was it a fair representation. Well you know it's interesting. I think that that's the myth that that book killed it but I actually think that there are other things going on and and Rosenblatt had died as well which seems pretty significant. Yes well He. He was a pioneer. But you have to understand that digital computers were regally primitive back. Then you know that even the most expensive you know the biggest computers you could buy. Don't have the power of your wristwatch today. Rosenblatt actually had to build an analog device. It a million dollars in today's dollars to build a analog device that had potentially otters driven by motors for the weight sums the learning. Wasn't it potentially because you know digital computers? Were good at logic but they were terrible. Doing a floating point is amazing so he built that at Cornell. Right that's right yeah Funded by the owner. Any case by by the time that we were getting started computers was the vaccine era. It was becoming possible. Do Simulations You know they were small-scale by today's standards but but really meant we could explorer in a way that Frank Rosenblatt couldn't so what you're saying around the perceptual and so just forbid of context for Central and sixty one. Is that right? It was fifty nine. I think it was the book but you know it was in that era of early sixty zero and so then there's this period where the digital computer actually wasn't powerful enough to do much and then digital kind of overtook and divinity but these analog machines would just now impractical from a point of view of expense. So you're saying it's less the book and more of a shift to the Digital Machine. That in those early days wasn't powerful enough to simulate the perception. Yes so I I have you know. I have a feeling that history will show that A. I was like the blind man looking under the Lamppost. His keys and someone came along and said where did you lose your keys He said well somewhere else. But this is the only place right can see. I was reading Donald BACI quote. I recently At the beginning of his book about the I which is just a fascinating area and I guess he spent a lot of his career and he did work in in the wool on radar and he was talking about the Radio Club. Which is these early Cybernet assist and the potential of the analog or digital computer to be what represented the brain and his perspective was he. He was sure it wasn't a digital computer and he wasn't sure it was an analog computer either and he thought it was kind of somewhere in between but it feels like that in between is what you're saying is that was the difficult bit to look and perhaps a police were able to look now. That's right I you know. It's I think it's being driven. This is true all science that what you cannot understand is is really determined by the tools that you have for making measurements for doing simulations in it's really only this modern era that has given us enough tools both to make progress with understanding how the brain works and also with a because of the fact that we have a tremendous amount of power now but just to go back to that early era. I think you know I once asked L. Annual you know who is at Carnegie Mellon and it was a time when Geoff Hinton was an assistant professor and I was at Johns Hopkins and I you know he was at the first fifty six meeting at Dartmouth or a I was born and I I said well. Why was it that you didn't look at the brain and for for inspiration and he said well we did. But there wasn't very much known about the at the time to help us out so we just had make doing our own and he's right. That was a era. You know the the fifties was kind of the the beginning of what we now understand about the signals in the brain. Actually potential synoptic potentials. So you know in a sense. What what he was saying was that we basically use the tools we have available the time which was basically computers but what they were good at. What were they good at? They were good at logic at rules. A binary programming. So that you know that was In a sense they were forced to do that. That's a really. WanNa come back to nine hundred seventy nine in a moment but this is an interesting context to that because of course. Vena initially was someone who spread across. Both these areas of Norbert Vena who was at mit founded cybernetics spread across both these areas of the analog and digital he did his PhD thesis on Russell and Whitehead's book but one thing I was reading about recently is there was a big falling out between Vina. I'm McCulloch Pitts. And it's sort of interesting. That Vena wasn't there at the I. E. T. in fifty six and I sometimes wonder was that more about personalities and wanting this sort of old guard to stay away because you always feel veto with someone who who bridge these worlds it. You know that's the fascinating story. I actually wrote a review of a book about Warren McCulloch came up. They were friends. They actually had had been friends yet. It has something to do with their wife's. Yeah I think the lifestyle McCullough was not line with its a side story but but I guess the point you're making which I think is an I'd like us to take us back to seventy nine and the meeting with Jeff is and I think that that's true. Despite the story between humans the real factor that drove things then was the sudden available at a t of increasing cheap digital computer. And no longer the need to do this work that Rosenblatt and McCain and others had done having to wire together a bunch of analog circuits. That you couldn't reprogram to build system. Yeah I think that was a dead. End It for the very reason you gave. Which is that you know you. It's a special purpose device. That isn't good for anything else. And and really if you're trying to explore you need the flexibility of being able to try many ideas and that's in that really is a digital simulation allows you to

Frank Rosenblatt Geoffrey Hinton San Diego Norbert Vena Twitter Catherine Gorman Lawrence Dr Terence Subic N. G. M. C. H. S. Harvard Minsk Boehner Sheen Warren Mcculloch Princeton Cornell Donald Baci Terry Mcculloch Pitts
Dating at a Distance

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:44 min | 4 months ago

Dating at a Distance

"Should PEOPLE STILL DATE? Everything is aligned. Date no no no no blind date center definitely not but even before this tender. I'm kidding that was mean on the late show with Stephen Colbert. A month ago before most of the country was staying at home at the time. A conversation about dating during a pandemic may have felt like late night comedy fair. You know Stephen. Everything in life is is a risk reward. Proposition is riskier to do things versus before. Perhaps being in close contact with somebody especially somebody. You don't know Is Is. It's a different time right now. But as their new reality has evolved so as the act of finding love people are using dating apps more both tender and bumble have reported an increase in daily messages and user engagement. Other APPS had a video chat feature and some people are reaching out in ways I would have never imagined a look out my windows. Bill dancing traps to take and needed to say here down. She waved back. That's the start of the story you may have heard before. It's from a video on Tick Tock by Jeremy Cohen a photographer from Brooklyn New York. After Jeremy Waves to the dancing girl he flies his drone over with his cell phone number. She picked up my job and I guess it works. 'cause I our lady's Jeremy's video went viral if we're still allowed to say that it has over thirty million views on talk now. I'm not at all surprised. It's the meet cute of our time if our time is defined by isolation and physical distancing Jeremy and Tori Cigna Rela. She's the girl on the roof have gone on a few dates after that. Here's Jeremy and Tori. The first date was we had dinner. There was another restaurant she is on her roof and I was on my balcony. It was so funny because we'd be talking to other on facetime and then sometimes I like look over like I'd see him there and then we'd look at each other. It was like such a weird scenario lovely on another date. Jeremy win inside a huge plastic bubble so he could take a walk. I just couldn't stop laughing. I like hit the ground. Basically I was not expecting to see him in a bubble. It's a lot more effort to go through than your average date and it's hard to express the usual social and physical cues when you're six feet apart but there things about this new normal that for Jeremy Cohen. Surprisingly work well. It's really nice to get to know her. Just not have any of this pressure at the end of the day like okay. Am I going home or am I gonNA invite her back to my place? This awkward moment of okay. What what is the other person thinking? I don't WANNA be too forward but I also don't want to be a scaredy cat. Jeremy isn't immune to the loneliness of social distancing of not actually being physically around someone even though he's found this new connection I am in my apartment either remained but he's with his family in Minnesota. So I'm alone in this two bedroom apartment for about a month. Now it makes me realize how much the small things in life such as a hub. Like hug skill great. I've actually putting myself a couple of times. It doesn't feel the same because it isn't the same. There's a lot of research that shows. That physical touch is important for health and wellbeing. One behavior that we have focused on in some of our research is interpersonal touch or affectionate touch. We've shown that touch has powerful effects on our physical. Health are mental health. Our relationship health. That's Professor Brooke Fini. She's a social psychologist at Carnegie Mellon University. She studies how relationships impact our health throughout our entire lives. It increases feelings of security so it just makes people feel more secure. It increases people's willingness to embrace life opportunities affectionate touch has been associated with lower daily stress lower reactivity to stress A lower likelihood of even perceiving something as stressful in the first place for Professor Feeney affectionate touch has benefits even above and beyond sexual intimacy. Which is something else were missing in? A time of isolation can engage in sexual intimacy for a variety of reasons that have to do with reproduction and drives and less to do with communicating care and acceptance and love and value. And so on. They're both important forms of touch and Communicate very important information to significant others But we think they are very different types of processes hearing about all the benefits of touch at a time when a lot of people are deprived of. It isn't exactly comforting. So what happens when we do lose it in our everyday lives? Here's Professor Brittany Kubiak. Who Studies affectionate touch in romantic relationships? Children form attachments with their caregivers in a lot of ways through touch and in adulthood we think that some of the same processes happens you form an attachment to your romantic partner just like you form attachment to your parents. Although the relationship is obviously different long-term not having the ability to touch. I think there's the possibility that you may not be able to form as secure attachment to that person but Professor Jacoby Act doesn't want to overstate the benefits of touch. Either it is still possible to have meaningful connections with each other without it. We know that people maintain very satisfying long distance relationships. Even when there's not a pandemic going on people do things reminiscing about times that they did spend together or planning times that they will spend together and so I think we can find ways at least if this is going to be a somewhat short term separation to make sure that we're maintaining high quality relationships even through physical distance for Professor Feeney. There is a positive outcome at least in terms of human connection about the fact that this is all happening to us together our rates of loneliness and social isolation even before they pandemic had been increasing and people have just been feeling more relational disconnected across the board. One positive thing that I think has come out of this. Pandemic is that people first of all are all in this together. You know so. We're now all part of a big group of people who all this happening to them. When people are facing adversity together they usually reach out to each other more and try to connect stance. Oh I do see one positive side effective at this is that there are these more creative ways that people are trying to connect and help each other out and so on like Jeremy and Tori and whether or not they do end up together doesn't even matter to them anymore. We're absolutely going to meet up. Probably something a little bit more low key like drinks but definitely still could never forget it honestly no matter what happens between us like we're going to remain friends like there's nothing like this that doesn't bond to people and said it's just like look if he's not like in my wedding he'll be at my wedding like that's. I certain that's a powerful connection. Now there was a study from Harvard. That came out this week. Saying we might have to prolong intermittent social distancing measures. Up until two thousand twenty. Two professor. Feeney doesn't know what that means for physical and mental health. No one does she and a team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon are just about to begin a study on this if we don't find these other creative ways to connect It remains to be seen. How well We can continue to abuse remote connections as a proxy for the more physical connections but I think the the core issue that underlies it all is. What touched communicates and so I think what we have to do. During the pandemic is just find other ways to communicate to our loved ones that were available to them if they need us even though we can't be physically proximal to them right now and might be more difficult to communicate that remotely but I think we can do it. Human beings are social creatures by nature. We crave connection. We're not meant to be isolated. These days. Some people might not have the security that comes from physical touch. But that's not all our relationship is built on find those other connections and lean on them. I think you'll be surprised by how strongly though resonate in your life.

Jeremy Professor Feeney Jeremy Cohen Jeremy Waves Stephen Colbert Stephen Carnegie Mellon Carnegie Mellon University Tori Tori Cigna Rela Professor Brooke Fini Social Isolation Professor Brittany Kubiak Professor Jacoby Act Bill Professor Harvard Minnesota Partner
Neural Architecture Search and Googles New AutoML Zero with Quoc Le

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:02 min | 4 months ago

Neural Architecture Search and Googles New AutoML Zero with Quoc Le

"Welcome to the PODCAST. Hi Everyone. It's great to have you on the show I've followed research for Your work for quite some time and I'm looking forward to digging into some of the new things that you're working on but before we do that I'd love to have you share a little bit about your background and how you got started working in machine learning okay so I was born in Vietnam. I did my Undergrad in Australia. And in my second year. My undergrad I started some project doing machine London with Alex. Mola a back in Australia and back. Then I was played with. Kodo methods Then I Did my PhD AT STANFORD. A on a lot of deep learning back in the day when deployed in whispers or very cool. And that's the route two thousand seven and around two thousand eleven I did a summer internship at Google and that was when Google Brin project was founded so when I was there that was a long and Jackie Naan Greco data was there and I. It was the sun so we started out small. That sounds cool. Yeah and then I did some of the Scaling Up Neuro networks with Google Britain folks and then You know at the end Up to two years did some work on machine translation with the media and Oreo VR. He's now did mine. Owner of Ilya is now at opening I and we develop sold end to end. Solution methods and Around two thousand sixteen. I started looking into more like You Know Auto. Mau Architecture search and more recently are looking to Malacca together with Otto may also look into Sent me supervised learning and it's awesome awesome now. You mentioned early on doing work with Alex. Mullah was he was this before he was at Carnegie Mellon was visiting in Australia. He was a professor in Australia. Yeah I I went to a university. In a small air. In the capital city Austrailia go Kendra. He was yeah camera and he was Professor Edward Research. So I thought I had. I have along Very interested in AI and machine learning and took me for that. I took a class data mining and so on and talk a little bit boring but the ability to actually learn. It's actually a super fascinating so I contacted him and he was moonlight co methods machine learning and we worked together for maybe a few years before he went to he went to America then. Cmu and Amazon. Okay okay so a lot of your. Recent work has been focused on this idea of You know automating machine learning and neural architecture surge to allow machines to find the best deep learning architectures in like. It's a little bit about how you arrived at working in that area. What some of the motivations were for getting started digging into that problem so I've been Along interested in this idea of self improvement machine should be self improving itself a machine learning and even and when I started doing co methods with Alex. I always ask him. You know how the Dakota bandwith and so on how some of the HYPOC Ramat does include methods decided and apparently they decided by using things like Cross validation on then where I work on. Koroma two narrow networks. My hope is to make the hype. Affirmative go away. But that's how is the opposite so if you look at the a Kabul Lucien neural networks at has a lot of hype privatised right like how many how many layers you want it to be and how many channels you wanted to be. And what are the some of the high assize apprentice since on a Coulda with all the training parameters? Yeah all learning. Dry and as researcher develop more and more techniques FAW EURONET. There's more decisions that you have to make. That feel like. This is like a problem that can be helped by a little bit of automation so So I I observe a lot of my colleagues who will when designing networks and I asked him about the principles of design. Your neural networks. And you started are having some really solid principles like Skip CONNECTION SO. The gradient can flow through the network concern. But as you tune the network Karen Hata do no longer have the principal is around. You know trial and error right you you try this a little bit and simply with better so you try that more so. I think that that is something that may be ready for automation so even during my Grad School. I already talked about trying this but I thought you know. Maybe we didn't have enough compute because training net already takes took me days so when I saw that new control. Units are are in thirty minutes. Something like that on on safer I thought. Oh maybe this is the right time to try this. So that's when I started doing this. Newer architecture search in two thousand sixteen. It's interesting that you know. Even with all of the compute resources of Google. You had to wait until the time was compressed. Enough in order to be able to tackle the problem. Yeah to get really good results. You want the networks will be really big and that will take a long time to train. Yeah and it's it's It's funny coming from me that we have so much resources that will go train in EURONET still taking a long time And so maybe talk about the the first steps in In that area. Did you jump right into neural architecture? Search or was that the you know a a an end stage or end result of this work where I I on some of the related ideas on and off since two thousand twelve like playing around with how to do. Better hyper profitable tuning and none of that. It's really published. Because I didn't have good results have pugh and so on so so I tried it on and off over the time you know every year I would set out some time to try this idea for a few months and you know and it didn't work very well because like a procurement song and then Two Thousand Sixteen. I met Barrett's off would as my colleague now at Google and he's very talented. So we say oh. Let's let's try at the idea of Jews in like a reinforcement learning to generate and network like a little layer in an network for for a ceasefire model. Seafoam motto. Is already at the time you could say that you know enough of you depends on how where you want to be but you from thirty minutes to a few hours and the seems like about the right amount of time to get this going and my prediction is that you have to train. Maybe either between from one thousand to ten thousand bottles and I did a backup our calculation and thought. Oh this might be the right time to do it but you know I have tried this some of these related ideas in much before

Google Austrailia Alex Mola Vietnam Stanford London Mau Architecture CMU Jackie Naan Greco Carnegie Mellon Faw Euronet Professor Edward Research Ilya Hypoc Ramat America Euronet Professor Mullah
How to track coronavirus movement without violating your privacy

The 3:59

08:50 min | 4 months ago

How to track coronavirus movement without violating your privacy

"With the corona virus pandemic exploding around the world. Some countries have taken too aggressive. Contact TRACING. Identify how it's spreading. There may be a way to do this without invading your privacy. I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge. What Me Stephen. Shanklin were the biggest brains at CNN. And someone who can understand when folks from MIT get involved with this project to get everyone in the same footing talk a bit about contact tracing. What is it? This is a very old technique for dealing with epidemics or pandemics where you basically A healthcare professional interview. Somebody who has whatever disease finds out who they've been in contact with that. Lets them trace? What the origin of diseases and also potentially figure out where it's going next What which people that person has been in contact with? Who might have got afterwards? So it's a very old technique for tracking disease figuring out who needs to be quarantined or sequestered needs to shelter in place or be treated and the problem is it doesn't scale. It's something you need a medical professional to do. And if you're looking at something like cove in nineteen the disease caused by corona virus. It's really hard to talk to. Every person in the world I mean this is affected hundreds of thousands of people. So it's not very easy to do. Large-scale contact tracing definitely. It's actually hit over a million at this point so Talk about this product. This basically like everything else in the world recruiting for it and so talk a little bit about this Private automated contact tracing or packed yet packed. So this is a project done by a team of people in. It is spearheading the effort but involves a lot of other universities as well including Brown Boston University Carnegie Mellon and some other folks as well researchers at a lot of different institutions. The way it works is it uses. Your Phone's Bluetooth connection to broadcast digital. Id Number from your phone into listen to digital. Id numbers being broadcast from other people's phones. There's no handshaking or or any kind of actual acknowledgment but each phone keeps a record of the digital. Id's it's come in contact with and what happens next is if you are if you test positive. You can voluntarily load the list of ideas you've come in contact with and if you haven't tested positive you can go to a central server and download the list of ideas and see if there's a match with your phone and that lets you find out if you potentially have been exposed. Gotcha and so this is. This is actually really interesting because the use of this digital ID. That's sort of the key here for keeping private right because with contact. Tracing I mean requires a lot of information. You know. You're you're you're giving all your details as well as all folks you've been talking to this sort of solves that problem of kind of keeping things someone anonymous right. Yeah exactly so there. There are two interesting comparisons. Here's the first is to traditional contact. Tracing a lot of people when they enter the healthcare system they might be okay participating in that kind of assistant. But if you're not you might not want to actually share all that detail But the other comparison is other ways of doing this large scale contact tracing with an APP so one obvious way might think about doing it is sharing a GPS log a of recording of everywhere. You've been your phone can very easily keep now. That's relatively easily done but you might not want to do that. Might not want to share that with the authorities are all the world so what the interesting thing is about. Packed is it. Lets you find out who you've been? Excuse me it lets you find out that you have been in contact with somebody but it doesn't tell you where it happened or who it was with so this let's this contact tracing happen in the large scale way without actually sharing personal details. It stand. Tell me some of the some of the folks behind this because there are some pretty big names behind his project right. Yeah there are some very interesting names To the people are Ron revest and audience. Jamir Those are to the people involved in the RSA Encryption Algorithm It's a very important invention that let's your computer. Set up a seeker connection On network so they are very big names. There's a big gap between having a lot of research credibility though actually deploying the system in the real world writing an APP writing out that works reliably and running the system. That does the records the ideas of people who have a negative. Excuse me running the system that records the ideas of the people who've tested positive. Checking it for security vulnerabilities. There's a lot of real world implementation details so these guys are really big names in the encryption world and they have a lot of credibility when it comes to things like security and privacy but they're still a long way to go between the initial idea and actually making something that works in the real world. Yeah I mean this is a problem that we're dealing with right now. Like what is for the time life or something like this because it is right now. It's a project. So it can get ruled out like are we actually can be used this in time to halt a spur of covenant or is this really for the next big pandemic. It's not clear at this stage. They don't have a release deadline they do have prototypes working on both android and us. They've actually had some trouble getting those two Getting smartphones from those two worlds to talk to each other but they do have prototypes working so they. They're not starting at zero right now but they don't have an APP released. They don't have a schedule. We've seen the new rates of couvert. Nineteen infections decreasing. So there's some evidence that the curve flattening is working. I still seems like there's going to be quite a while before. Were out of shelter at whom rules so there could be some window here for still for people to Get some use out of this APP and they're also could be. There's a lot of fear that there's going to be another flare up later after. Shelbert whom rules are eased. There's still a lot of risks that this could blow up again so potentially could be useful in detecting another outbreak. One of the really important things here to note though when it comes to the this time issue is how hard it's going to be to get this APP installed everywhere so it's going to be. We've seen cases where authorities recommend wearing masks or staying at home and then people voluntarily comply with that We haven't seen anybody recommend running a particular APP. Something like that could help encourage adoption or some direct support from apple in Google promoting this on their APP stores of their Kobe. Nineteen information pages. But without something like that. It's GonNa be really hard to get this APP into a lot of onto a lot of phones fast right. I think. That's that's my. That was my next question is really the scale ability issue like this only works if everyone download this. App EMBRACES THIS IDEA. But that's not the case right. Well you can look at it two different ways. It only works in a large scale way if a large number of people download the APP but even on a small scale could potentially inform some number of people that they are at some risk of infection. So if some small number people are alerted and get follow their symptoms more closely or potentially get treatment. It could help with that small number of people but for this to be really effective at the large scale it yeah has to be deployed widely. That's much more challenging. And is this the only game in town? I've seen pitches for a number of other APPs that that promise contact tracing that prompts the track things like what's the difference between those bitches and what you're talking about today. Yeah there are several efforts actually some of them have already come together. This one At Mit joined with some folks at Boston University. Who has very similar idea there other efforts? There's one in Europe. There's something called Kobe Watch. There are different efforts that use this basic approach than there also are other efforts that use other approaches and then there are other apps that do things like help you identify your check your symptoms and other apps that I've been used to see if people are generally obeying the shelter in place requirements or advice. Lots of different APPS. It's very confusing right now. I think one of the big challenges we're going to have is for people who want to help themselves or help the overall fight. It's going to be a kind of a mess to figure out what. Apps they're supposed to install what APPS are useful. What apps are potential privacy invasion and? I'm sure there can be a lot of cases. What APPS ARE SCAMS OR GARBAGE? Yeah that stuff is something that's GonNa Watch out for.

MIT Roger Chang CNN Shanklin Europe Brown Boston University Carneg Ron Revest Apple Google Boston University
"mellon" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"mellon" Discussed on Unchained

"Representatives that then can enter the council and start voting with the council on decisions. And let's talk also about the melon token in your system people can use Mellon, but they can also use ether. So why don't you describe the purpose of the token and how that works? So actually we you do need Mellon to use the protocol. But we abstract this away from the user by charging gas fees in eighth just to make it just to improve the user experience. So on a on a function that you you would basically get charged on setup fund, according to the computational units, you're consuming and we use the same unit calculation that theory amuses for smart contracts. But this time we multiply that number of units by the Mellon gas price and not the theory of gas price. This gives the amount of eath charge east goes to a contract cold. Melon engine smart contract and the Menin engine contract. Basically is like a what a unit directional market being provided in east Mellon. So it's always selling eighth and bidding for Mellon and the more east it acquires or the more Ethan the melon engine the higher the premium for the Mellon. So basically, you can almost guarantee that the Menem who always get bought because someone arbitrage and then it gets burns immediately. And it's the burn that's the really beautiful part because it really links the usage to the to the purchasing power through the we've we've we've model of the m vehicles PT or the plant. Yeah. You can have both PTO p q quantity or transactions..

Mellon east Mellon PTO Ethan
"mellon" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Yeah. If you look at the meteor, it's like between learning this and intelligent agents that right, whereas now as a people are going back in the hands to the electrical, computer engineering, this happens at Comey amount on its books in EC primarily helping us solve the sense our. Yeah, that's that's one end. Yeah, there's another end above machine learning. If you go something which can spot patterns or notice that your elbow is in is in an image and stuff like that. You still going to want to put it in its system which makes decisions. Right? And that really is the original dream of official intelligence of the dominant conference these things which can observe think about what they observed and then act. Right. And so making the action decision is really important, and it goes into ways. One of them is a little bit like warrior talking about with. Google. The early days of this is a human has to make a decision and as much too much information around for them to actually really be able to just look at all the source information themselves, how can you support that? And that goes from everyone doing stock trading to helping decide if a medical claim is legitimate through to people. One of our professors for instance, is interim instrumentation classrooms, so that teaches can notice if they've accidentally got some unconscious bias, which means that they're not attending to kinds of students and say full. So that's great. That is human assistance. In my opinion, many folks in the official industry intelligence industry. By the way, I'm a minority. I not speaking for the whole discipline focusing on that because it's so much more palatable less scary than the other thing at the top of the stack, which is autonomy. Right? And. Nope. Meaning to him. Ever ever write us robots, don't care about. That toasters toaster is one of the other. They don't. We don't. They don't care. You know, oddly ahead, it didn't in a good deal on must have been using. I thought he was quitting tells you that they're going to think of is like house cats. Like, why did they want to kill us? It's kind of useless to wanna get like it was really, I was like, oh, yeah, you're right. We're. So we're so obsessed with ourselves into science fiction feeders territory. The reason they don't care about us is then thinking about us, they are simply machines every row books, computer that you can see is just a set of. We only have just a few minutes just two more minutes. I just love to know why we're self-driving is because that's where community you were all involved. Lots of people left Carnegie Mellon. They set up different shops. Where do you see that right now self-driving Thomas vehicles. This is me speak yet myself. Yeah. So my personal understanding is that every year now in the major self-driving experiments, the metric of success to track. Is what fraction of the time do you need a safety driver? In other words, what fraction of the time does the human need to take control? And if we were shooting for the early two thousand twenty s for us to be at the point where you could launch autonomous driving, you'd need to see every year at the moment more than sixty percent reduction every year to get us down to ninety thousand nine point nine, nine, nine, nine, percents safety. I don't believe that things are progressing anyway near that fast, right?

Carnegie Mellon official Comey Google sixty percent
"mellon" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on Recode Decode

"So there are many creative things that can be done to reduce the cost of these kinds of of education, Georgia techs, mostly online system. As an example. That's I think that's a place where I can demand has to go now is to actually value engineer. It's expensive master's programs creatively so that people can afford domestically. Take me. Get you have all this demand who people who can pay in. That's where you have. So I'm gonna finish up talking about the concept of where the big trends in academic sir, going around computing. What do you see is important you obviously robotics and. Missing saying that Cardi Mellon was a big player in Uber's Uber, a lot of self driving cars, a lot of robotics, a lot of things like that that had sort of rocky ten years. Let's play mover for that, but talk a little bit of where it's going, Carnegie Mellon where overall, you see the most important areas of computing going. The huge change. Of course, we will seen in the last ten years is being machine learning and the the real push on these convoluted neural networks, ton outs to Bill to solve problems that we haven't been able to solve using most of his super AI in Silicon Valley. Now, whatever the new marketing turn on the radio. But if if we went on the radio, you'd have seen me, I rolling. They have all kinds of names for it. Go ahead, just marketing, I don't mind. So he's, he's the important thing that machine learning component fits in a slot of all the technologies. You need to build an a system. So one of the things we've really been pushing on both in our developments of education and in our recruiting faculty, the other slots adjacent to machine learning. Right? So important one, which I've usually withdraw before machine learning because machine lending depends on it is all the sense work sensing work this necessary to be able to understand the world, right? So that that's an astonishing area, but exactly. So if you're using robots to fight a fire, they absolutely need to understand what's really going on in the building. And so creating devices and robots, which can actually understand what's happening right now is I think if. If I only had one research topic that I could work on, I would regard that as much more important than improving the algorithms which is going to take that sensory data. It's going to be amazing when they figure it. I was talking to someone one of these future. I like to talk to a futurist and they were like at some point. And I think it's actually being created, say there's a nuclear spill or so the chemical spill or something like that that they would have sensors that were small as like grains of sand and they throw them on like from faraway, they'd spray them onto something in these sensors would pull in and the information of what spilled and what to do about it. And it was, I love the concept of it like, I'm sure it's not. Possible at this point, but that's the idea. It's like it's there. So sand is the way I looked at like they're so pervasive. They're almost like in the air without knowing their there. Yes, I do think we're moving in that direction. It actually totally makes your totally making this point. The. The idea of just trying to really focus on machine learning without being able to get hold of the killer one really important part of that turns out to be power and actually having it so that a sensor which is tiny is purchasing high-definition video. You can't have it sitting next to a big GPU of the now putting in. 'cause because that would be all the weight for a mobile platform and so forth. So for me, a lot of the stuff that we mathematicians like me doing in the middle of it movie stalled without that huge growth of book in the which he had our sensing and sensing everywhere going out to space going out inside of people. I mean, I remember that movie where they've traveled inside a human being. I'm like they're going to have sensors all over human beings at some point if we can deal with these things. So a very interesting aspect of that is, in my opinion, electrical and computer engineering departments, which. To some extent of had to watch computer science, getting older blurry that hopefully coming up. Oh, man. With friends, but still wrenches going what the hell if you used to be cool..

Bill Carnegie Mellon Cardi Mellon engineer Georgia Uber Silicon Valley ten years
"mellon" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"Welcome the main engine cutoff. I'm Anthony clans low and we've got some special guests here. We've got Andy and Mike from cube Rover, I ever Andy. Thanks for Anthony. Thanks so much for having us here today. We're really excited to be on your podcast for the first time and hopefully give it a little bit more information about what moon companies are doing. This is we've vaguely touched about moon stuff, mostly policy related on the podcast in the past, but not a lot about actual payloads going to the moon and things like that. So I'm pretty excited to dig into it. So before we get into the technology stuff, that design of cube Rover itself, all that fun stuff. I would really like to hear the roles that you have on the team, and you know what you're working on day to day. So Mike, you want to start. Yeah, sure. So I'm the president of the cube Rover division here at Astra botic, and we're soon spinning out as its own company cube Rover, and I'm the principal investigator on NASA contract under which the key. Rover is being developed in collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University, and that's the small business innovation. What is it was the are. They are. Yeah, I forget what the are is the type of contract used to develop technology focused Pacific toward small like Astra body, and that was a twenty seventeen award. But that came pretty recently. Is that right? Yeah, there is these these phases. So we had a phase one, and then we re proposed for phase two for more dollars and much more. Exciting and bigger development on the project. Leading to that point is kind of interesting because you mentioned that cube Rovers soon to roll off on its own, and you've got these cube Rover, small awards coming from NASA now. So it's seems like an interesting history there. I'm curious to find out how did the project itself start and maybe now the full company, like what is the origin story there. Yeah, I can. I can take that Asser botic and Carnegie Mellon have been working together for ten years since the astronautics inception. And we've developed a lot of Rovers over those years. CMU students and professors have developed their own plant a Rovers over the years all mostly targeting the moon, and it's only been recently that our government has switched its focus, much more towards the moon and started investing in development of technologies, including Rovers to go towards the moon. So what we do is heavy Klabin with with seamew students to develop this Rover is very challenging because of the small size that we're developing. But we have a lot of heritage and learning over the years to lean upon. So what phase would you say cube Rover, both the actual technology, but the company is in at this point in time? Yes. So we're, we're pretty far along with technical progress. We're at what you'd call tier all four going into KIRO five technical technology readiness level. So we have a prototype working driving around in the lab. What we're doing right now is we're trying to build that up to be a flight qualified Rover. So by the end of two thousand or by the middle of two thousand and twenty, we're aiming to have this Rover be ready for flight tested for all space, environmental testing, and ready to send off to NASA if they decide to file it on the company. And we're incorporating right now, we're looking at our location which I can't say where we'll be incorporating, but it will be very soon and we're hoping to have more information on that by the end of the summer. But yeah, we're actually on that note. We're going to be hiring four qb Rover. In probably November or December timeframe. So check out our website for updates on that. Could you talk at all about the decision to roll out as its own standalone enterprise of sorts? Because it seems from from someone like me who's a little bit outside looking in, it seems like a good fit with what Astra botic is offering that you could extend these services to not just Lander, but then have some ability on the surface. So it seems like a good fit there. It is a good fit. It really does align well with us.

cube Rovers NASA Astra botic Carnegie Mellon University Mike Anthony Carnegie Mellon Astra Andy Asser botic KIRO principal investigator president qb Lander ten years
"mellon" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

Grumpy Old Geeks

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

"That's where they got all the people from carnegie mellon yeah when they when they pulled them away it's looking more and more like oprah's just gonna pull out of the the rnd on this and they'll probably just rent a fleet from tesla or waymo or waymo after you know after that whole thing happen with knowing well we had tech we couldn't make it work so i guess we'll just lease your car's maybe that'll be yeah we'll see how that that pans out because i guess they're really trying to make nice now this new ceo from peres really trying to make nice with google because you know they need them there's yeah there's no way they're going to get you somebody they're not gonna do it by themselves anymore that i mean that's that's become clear so yeah it's either going to be you know waymo tessler gm i this is like the top ones that are going to going to make it i think but we'll see how that plays out but yeah it sucks for these people than in pittsburgh for sure but it doesn't say that they're actually laying off any of the engineers yet so no so far is just the people that were sitting in the cars so yeah tough job yeah now this one this one got my goat i wanted this last week but you weren't around so i waited on it court rules copying photos found on the internet is fair use everybody is pissed off about this one well basically it just says there's no such thing as copyright then like we don't own anything like nobody owns a damn thing and if you put it up on the internet it's now a free for all that's kind of it so how much money to pinterest pour into this thing yes seriously you know their lobbyists were in the back i five in each other when this game down no shit basically gives them a business model which has been lacking for the inception of interest yeah virginia federal court has made a decision the photographers won't be happy to hear no shit the court ruled that finding a photo on the internet and then using it without permission on a commercial website can be considered fair use how okay but how does this not then slippery slope to well i found music on the internet it's fair use i found video on the internet it's fair use i don't understand any differentiation between a photo or any other version of media if you find it on the this to me this ruling will obvious is going after the supreme court and get shut down there's no way we can have diety with this rule in place we can't yet i mean it's a seven page ruling you can go read it if you want the link will be in the show notes it said the use was transformative noncommercial which if you're putting a photograph on a loaded commercial website that's bullshit the use was in good faith oh no god no it wasn't good faith they stole it fuckers in the use was of a factual photo and instead of creative photos in the use was previously published photo well anything on the internet is previously published photo at that point the use was only a crop rather than the whole in the houston hurt the potential market for that photograph well okay there you go there's your loophole but i mean you now you're now you're in the opposite case you're you're you're guilty until proven innocent because now you have to prove that you could have made money off that photo and how do you do that and how do you do that and how are you going to take somebody to court every single time that they use your photo that's ridiculous yeah it's it's not good it's not known so this is going to have to get overturned it must it must which means it probably won't that's good that's a good point welcome to our society can this awesome isn't it this.

oprah tesla carnegie mellon
"mellon" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Skyrockets and if you can't pay that they get your car or take away your license which then makes it harder to get to your job to pay that ticket and that's what she'd been driving a ton of bankruptcies in the city i mean i guess if you're desperate and you're looking for a fast fix for your financial troubles like playing the lottery seems like the quickest way out at least that's how i think about it but it sounds like you're saying it's more than that like these people are actually being misled or maybe do or something and you know this actually goes back to two thousand eight study like the number of studies i'm quoting today on all these studies i come came with them but this was a group of behavioral economists there at carnegie mellon and so what they were looking to is is is it really like the reason why poor people are so much more likely to play the lottery than those who are better off and what they found was that a lot of the desire that drives these low income players isn't so much from being poor as it is from feeling poor so here's how the study's authors broke down their findings it says in experiment one participants were more likely to purchase lottery tickets when they were primed to perceive that their own income was low relative to the implicit standard and then an experiment to participants purchase more lottery tickets when they considered non lottery situations in which rich people or poor people receive advantages implicitly highlighting the fact that everyone has an equal chance of winning the lottery so basically when you make people feel poor they played the lottery more and when they feel like it's equal like that then they wanna put money on it because they feel like it's a fair game i mean it's kind of heartbreaking when you think about how low their chances of winning actually are though right.

carnegie mellon
"mellon" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on LadyGang

"Hey guys it's your lady gang jack van kelty night and becca tobin thank you so much for subscribing on itunes and thanks for supporting the great sponsors who make it possible for us to have this much fun with you every single week for for ru i don't know if he has but recently the late again was featured in people magazine because we have such good style and to be completely honest i barely styled myself and elena styled me but anyway i need talk about things so one of the things that we actually after two years of doing this podcast had no idea that we had in common was our love of the shoe brand tamara mellon and we showed up and we all had a tamara mellon hsu in our bags so how funny is that now you might not exactly understand or recognize the name tamara mellon but you will recognize this name jimmy choo that's right tamara cofounded jimmy choo in the nineties so she really knows about shoes fast forward to twenty sixty and she launched this namesake brand and support for today's episode comes from luxury footwear brand tomorrow mel when we love them so much you can check out the article at people style and see becca myself and jack all rocking a pair of their shoes the shoes are handmade in italy by family owned factories both out the six time retail markup she creates the best shoes for better price direct to you they're really cute they're really stylish they're certain shoes that you've seen on celebrities on every red carpet the really comfortable and most importantly they're really high quality so if you're someone that maybe can't afford a crazy luxury shoe tamara mellon has got you covered and we have a really really exciting story for you to marry loved our article and people so much that she's giving you a one hundred dollar gift towards your first order on her site that's right visit tamara mellon dot com to receive one hundred dollars off your first order using the code lady let me spell it for u t a m a r a m e l l o n dot com use the code.

people magazine elena tamara mellon tamara mellon hsu jimmy choo becca tobin italy one hundred dollars one hundred dollar two years
"mellon" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Exactly exactly and that's what i was doing what's the worst advice you've received along the way titled don't matter and that was the worst that was one of my biggest mistakes and someone told you that early in your career they told me that early my creek and not because i think they were giving me bad advice it's what they thought at the time and then what i realized you know i i was the creative director jimmy choo but i gave someone else a title which was very confusing to the outside world so i would say titles probably do maddox it's it represents to the world what you're doing inside the company tamara mellon thank you so much for joining us on no limit thank you thank you for having me okay no limits listeners stick around for a few more minutes here to hear from our no limits on for noor of the week where we feature one of our listeners who's building something of her own and this week still limits entrepreneur is francis produ she's the ceo of ageless beautiful clever creations llc an inventor of hanging secrets francis recently one hsm's project american dreams which by the way one of our other entrepreneurs of the week hip patient lopez was also a part of so i love that there's some crossover there the two women probably know each other right okay taylor shaking her head yes they know each other good so i'm loving that we've got all of these inventors on our show i love that you're sharing our stories so without further ado here's francis product to tell you about hanging secrets.

jimmy choo tamara mellon ceo lopez taylor director maddox francis
"mellon" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"A whole potato by the way so toys r us which is going through liquidation right now had a private equity deal they had they took on so much debt they couldn't manage through it and that's all alternate mitsui where they find themselves now going out of business i think for a lot of people they hear private equity and they just assume well wow it's this massive capital infusion and then you just get to spend the money and have fun with it no it's not a toll if you want capital infusion that's venture capital you wanna go to a vc firm they'll actually invest in early stage companies how have you thought about fundraising with tamara mellon so i went to i had to have a vc from which is been so different i cannot tell you to private equity so vc foams or early stage investors they do actually put money in the business and the company i've what with cold any a new enterprise associates and they have been so incredibly supportive so helpful oil stay really care about building the right company with the right culture the right people they care about the long term viability of it it's been a completely different experience when you went out and were initially marketing the company to venture capital firms how were you choosing between them and how much did you have already prepared in terms of the model and what your projections were for the company so we did so i had an interesting story with tamar mellon so i i will launched in two thousand thirteen and i tried to put a new business model down an old distribution channel so i tried to put it through neiman's and saks nordstrom and all the big department store chains which didn't work they didn't want a new business model so i actually thought i go to pull the ripcord on this so i put that company switch up to eleven i really nice myself and then i went out and raised money and any came in and funded the new business model so.

mitsui tamara mellon tamar mellon neiman
"mellon" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on qualified candidates in an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash higher i couldn't negotiate what i thought was fair pay and what she when i looked at my competitors in the business i was probably at a quarter of what they were making so i decided i could either i could stay here another five years or i could leave now and start from scratch again from abc it's no limits i'm rebecca jarvis in each week we're talking to the most bold and influential women lang at the top of their game trying to demystify success and what it really takes to get there in all the tradeoffs whether you're looking for answers or you just want to hear a good story you're in the right place on today's episode how a high school dropout became the co founder of jimmy choo and why she made the decision to leave the immensely popular brand she started to build her own namesake label tamara mellon what tomorrows learn about choosing the right partners and business advocating for equal pay and how to know when the time is right to pull the ripcord on a business here's entrepreneur and shoot designer tamara mellon tomorrow mellon welcome to no limits thank you very happy to be here i'm thrilled to have you with us i was looking at your website coveting all of the shoes all of the boots the beautiful things but i love how it says cofounded jimmy choo nineteen ninetysix twenty plus years later now still obsessed with shoes but not doing things the traditional way know.

rebecca jarvis co founder jimmy choo tamara mellon abc five years
"mellon" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"If you were talking to somebody fred who's interested in getting involved in the user experience as a craft maybe they're a designer graphic designer maybe their developer maybe there a product owner or something and they wanna move into that right what what would be your would you i'm guessing you wouldn't tell them to go to get a masters degree in you x what would you guide them towards well i am a u x designer so i wouldn't actually answer their question that's right yes i would begin by asking them questions about you know what their current situation is what their background is what their goal is for example one of our family friends is a graphic designer she is really not feeling the profession anymore she sees what's going on out there in the u x world and has and we've been talking about what sorts of opportunities are out there for someone like her and we talked a little bit about what user interface design was versus user experience design and it turns out that what she's more interested in is the user interface side than the user experience side so i'm not going to say oh you know you need to you know go away from your family for two years moved down to pittsburgh and get a masters degree from carnegie mellon it's not that that's not really vice that's going to help anyone so my approach is always understanding their needs and their goals and things like that had another gentleman who i talked with recently who was debating whether or not to go to a local boot camp school and he told me about some of his background about his his personal situation in life because i mean that's a really yeah like my my friend who wants to become a ui designer she can't just move i mean she's got no three little kids at a mortgage.

developer carnegie mellon pittsburgh two years
"mellon" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"She owned a home and angatia i mean all kinds of places put her father started list terrain o and she basically married paul mellon and they were married until he died he died at the age of 1991 and the age of nineteen anger at israel's occurred age vital sri light ninety one now i got that don't exist anyway he was you know uh banking air and he when he died his estate was one point four billion vat mellon family is at carnegie mellon university has yes yes yes very very very rich and so um but here's the thing she always like she was like so old school money she believed delayed these named should only appear in the newspaper threetimes in her life birth marriage and death really this is how old school money area and she had the most private life until she was a hundred and the john edwards thing came out and she was like almost blind at by that range could hardly see and yes she'd given him closer million dollars because he reminded her of her dear friend jack kennedy rail and she also contributed to his campaign promises in this port because she dislikes hillary clinton who was running for president at the time in two thousand and eight right um calling her an old rag in the elf and i'll tell you why those are really yes words she was dear friend with jacqueline kennedy okay all right and um so shares introduced to jackie kennedy and nineteen fifty seven by a mutual friend and these to realize they were soulmates even though bernie with nineteen years jackie's was nineteen years her senior and she was only four years younger than janet's mom but they were bonded like contemporaries jackie's own sister lee radziwill said bunni was more like a sister she said they loved art they loved fashion they loved ballet they loved all things french they could tees each other and tell each other the truce that they were just dear dear dear friends and um anyway so what happened was it she became they just were fast friends and they also um when jack kennedy was elected um she bunny became a frequent visitor to the kennedy white house and she would tell give jackie advice on how to decorate the.

paul mellon israel carnegie mellon university hillary clinton president jacqueline kennedy bernie jackie janet bunni jack kennedy kennedy white house vat mellon john edwards lee radziwill nineteen years million dollars four years
"mellon" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"And as a result apple's marketshare is actually declined over the past year from around nineteen percent fifteen percent according to a market research firm called parks associates which recently did a survey on the we're speaking to the wall street journal's trip nickel about the latest details on the new apple tv device you're listening to the wall street journal's tech news briefing we know you will you who became a multimillionaire at fortythree in you who was born one we know you lose sleep over how your kids will deal with inheriting fortune in you no longer getting a paycheck but not needing one either and also you who doesn't have to work but can help not to use siri launch benard you at bny mellon wealth management we know because we know you will then that gives the necessary insight to help you grow protect and transfer your wealth bny mellon is the corporate brand of the bank of new york mellon corporation and its subsidiaries thanks for joining us you know four k is it it seems like it's one of those hot ticket items that tech companies like apple are starting to bank on its bear round but it's still quite new i suspect ultra hd movies are only starting to get some real attention and you know maybe they're seen as maybe it seen as something that can breathe some new life into things right among those who are who are active in the tv marketplace and the content marketplace there's a lot of enthusiasm around apple moving into this format because there's so many people with apple devices in their pockets who are in their homes that they're hopeful that apple could accelerate adoption and wariness of of the four k format and and that highresolution a capability that it offers.

apple wall street journal bny mellon apple siri four k nineteen percent fifteen percent
"mellon" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"We know you will you who became a multimillionaire at forty three in you who was born one we know you lose sleep over how your kids will deal with inheriting fortune in you know longer getting a paycheck but not needing one either and also you who doesn't have to work but can help not to use siri launch you at bny mellon wealth management we know because we know you will the neck is the necessary insight to help you grow protect and transfer your wealth bny mellon is the corporate brand of the bank of new york mellon corporation and its subsidiaries thanks for joining us so our people perceiving this as a pretty historic day the model 3s arrival him obviously represents a potential turning point for the automotive industry if it successful in terms of doing what it wants to do and going mainstream as promised could this be a real breakthrough for electric cars and electrification as a whole today let's definitely a milestone for tusla um the the idea of of of coming out with a mass marker car would really change through their hold business their whole dynamic everything about where they are going in the future so it's a huge huge a new chapter for them to begin the oughta motive industry is definitely inflection point here's a startup company from silicon valley that many in the traditional space um have long um you know it has been critical of saying that is just around their their competences just around the corner and yuan has been able to prove them wrong and create a really a powerful luxury brand.

bny mellon siri
"mellon" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"And also you would is enough to work but can help not to use siri lodge you at bny mellon wealth management we know because we know you will then that gives the necessary insight to help you grow protect and transfer your wealth bny mellon is the corporate brand of the bank of new york mellon corporation and its subsidiaries thanks for listening everyone christie an adult senate republicans faced this dilemma if they don't repeal the affordable care act belfast's criticism from conservative voters but if they do repeal at the result could be destabilized insurance markets and senators will face angry constituents back home yes that is a dynamic that very difficult for them i think more of them are starting to hey we should probably try and figure out a solution that includes democrat that way poetically we share responsibility for it so you now here moi said that her family should have hearing elect be talking like democrat it seems like probably the most likely outcome here is that there's some kind of bipartisan agreement on much narrower measure that shift seeks to sharp individual market and make sort of minor changes around the edges of the aca because people know that it's difficult to take away or radically overhaul a major entitlement programs in place so that seems like where we're headed by it it may take uh you know many months to get there right but in the meantime there is this plan vote does planned repeal vote for next week wait that's the current plan mcconnell has had early next week as on the senate will tickets vote there currently are not the vote to to actually bring up the bill to start debating it but that can change between now and then wall street journal reporter cristina peterson thank you very much for.

bny mellon christie republicans belfast moi aca mcconnell senate cristina peterson wall street journal reporter
"mellon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The ford hoon culture dangerous it takes away valuable ricco scarred resources that could be used for real search and rescue cases and one of the major things is it puts our people at add a significant risk how would voice profiling help here at the coast guard research and development centre we actually looked at several technologies we have teamed up with carnegie mellon university they have really helped us basically determine if it's the same caller that's making these calls and end gives give us some information to help cut to track down these people were what kind of information can give you is far as the forensics goes the carnegie mellon team can actually tell us the age of the person weight height country of origin and they can also give us some information on the surroundings the calls were made from for example is there a lotta concrete in the area are there are a lot of windows so they can give us a lot of information merck casey an area like that could be could be in oregon her it could be in maine how do you know the difference exactly the other tools that were employing in addition to the voice forensics is some directionfinding capability which can actually give us the direction the calls coming from we're also using some social media analytics tools because what we have found out based on years of experience is that these callers like to brag on social media so they might like to see a coastguard response whether it's shift but boat an aircraft and post pitchers online this going to sound like an awfully naive question but obviously some voices are pretty easy to imitate can voice forensic spee fooled too it's a lot harder and i want to say he say now i've certainly not the expert yeah basically everybody's windpipe acts differently than somebody else's so even though they try to imitate their windpipe responds differently when they're actually talking for example of these sound sometimes these people are at different levels of intoxication and were able to will her we're able to pinpoint the calls to the same person even though a off i was listening to him i would say there's no way that's the same person gonna tell you i'm impressed by what you say the forensic technology can do and also a little intimidated yes in this is that the forensics piece.

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"mellon" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"mellon" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"That affects it's called the mellon absence censure in your brain yourmedicalandrea are deciding whether it's day or night when you were these glasses the medical eyes and your brain are convinced its pitchblack so they act like noise cancelling headphones for your eyes you've literally just chill out when you put them on and when i wear them for an hour two before bed i'd double my deep sleep on an average tonight is completely transform ability to sleep and i'm immune from jet lag even when i fled to europe even when i flight to dubai and back in in just a few days is completely completely amazed me that they're that they're this effective you can go to bio hackedcomthat's be iajckddcomand the glasses or called true dark they are an amazing biohacking it's just like a one time thing and you wear them more energy all day long from blocking some of the blue but you get enough of a signal to tell yourself that it's daytime and you look pretty good if you see this i'm video like these are not crazy pants glasses and the nighttime glasses will rock your sleep i could never seen all right let's get into the show today today's gas is drjoe lean brighton and she's an expert in hormone balance thyroid and a functional medicine leader and i met her through a jayjayvirgin a mutual friend of ours and what's interesting about drjulianis that she's trained naturopathic medicine but also in biochemistry so she goes a little bit deeper than you're likely to find and she wrote a book called healing your body naturally after childbirth the new moms guide navigating the 4th trimester and.

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