5 Burst results for "Melissa Townsend"

"melissa townsend" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"melissa townsend" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Welcome to native America calling from Studio Forty nine. In Albuquerque. I'm Tara Gatewood. Outbreaks of Covid, nineteen among people working in large processing plant are a health risk and reports aides slowing down production. This situation is also causing problems for some native producers cattle ranchers. And it's having an effect on what consumers have available at certain stories coming up, we're going to hear about the challenges in the food supply chain as more people navigate the endemic. We live right after national lead of news. This is National Native News Antonio. Gonzales the Mashpee womp og tribe, the National Congress of American Indians and the United South and eastern tribes are urging the Department of the Interior to reaffirm the status of the Massachusetts tribes reservation after a federal court, Friday ruled in favor of the tribe. The Interior Department had intended to disestablish the tribes reservation. The US District, court for. For the District of Columbia found the Interior Department's two thousand eighteen decision. The tribe did not qualify under federal jurisdiction was arbitrary, capricious and contrary to law in a statement Chairman Cedric Cromwell said the court righted. What would have been a terrible injustice and committed to fight if necessary to ensure their land remains entrust as the interior department is ordered to reevaluate its decision. Minnesota Department of Health. Officials say they're increasing the amount of COVID, nineteen testing among people who have attended protests over the death of George Floyd Melissa Townsend reports. Thousands of people have been gathering together across Minnesota for nearly two weeks. Floyd was an African American man who died after a white police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. Health, officials say these gatherings put many at risk for contracting covid nineteen. Mario and is a at physician and head of the center of American Indian and minority health at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Duluth while I'm really fearful of impact. The protests are going to have on rising rates of Cova and I have to admit. I went down to one of them myself because they just felt like they needed to be there. And also just let African American people in particular. Know about the solitaire. But I do worry Minnesota's Commissioner of Health Jan. Malcolm says her department will step up testing. The coronavirus takes about a week to incubate so Malcolm is encouraging people to get tested about a week after they'd been at large gathering for national..

Interior Department Mashpee womp og tribe George Floyd Melissa Townsend Minnesota Department of Health Minnesota Tara Gatewood Malcolm National Congress of American Albuquerque Cedric Cromwell America University of Minnesota Medica District of Columbia US District Gonzales center of American Indian Massachusetts Commissioner Duluth
Federal court rules in favor of Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe

Native America Calling

03:46 min | 1 year ago

Federal court rules in favor of Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe

"This is National Native News Antonio. Gonzales the Mashpee womp og tribe, the National Congress of American Indians and the United South and eastern tribes are urging the Department of the Interior to reaffirm the status of the Massachusetts tribes reservation after a federal court, Friday ruled in favor of the tribe. The Interior Department had intended to disestablish the tribes reservation. The US District, court for. For the District of Columbia found the Interior Department's two thousand eighteen decision. The tribe did not qualify under federal jurisdiction was arbitrary, capricious and contrary to law in a statement Chairman Cedric Cromwell said the court righted. What would have been a terrible injustice and committed to fight if necessary to ensure their land remains entrust as the interior department is ordered to reevaluate its decision. Minnesota Department of Health. Officials say they're increasing the amount of COVID, nineteen testing among people who have attended protests over the death of George Floyd Melissa Townsend reports. Thousands of people have been gathering together across Minnesota for nearly two weeks. Floyd was an African American man who died after a white police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. Health, officials say these gatherings put many at risk for contracting covid nineteen. Mario and is a at physician and head of the center of American Indian and minority health at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Duluth while I'm really fearful of impact. The protests are going to have on rising rates of Cova and I have to admit. I went down to one of them myself because they just felt like they needed to be there. And also just let African American people in particular. Know about the solitaire. But I do worry Minnesota's Commissioner of Health Jan. Malcolm says her department will step up testing. The coronavirus takes about a week to incubate so Malcolm is encouraging people to get tested about a week after they'd been at large gathering for national. Native News. I'm Melissa Townsend. The Canadian government has delayed its promised National Action Plan to tackle systemic racism, facing the country's indigenous people down carpet has more recently announced the delay in implementing the plan because of the covid nineteen pandemic, the plan followed last year's inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. That inquiry presented its final report in June, and it concluded that decades of systemic racism and human rights violations had contributed to hundreds of missing. Missing in murdered indigenous women and girls over the years, Sheila North is a former grand chief of northern Manitoba. She says she's disheartened. By the delay in the action plan against systemic racism, north also takes exception to comments made by at least one Canadian political leader that systemic racism does not exist in Canada as it does in the US I go meet that the mothers and the sisters and family members of the ones. Ones that have been taken a very very sensitive and touchy subject, and for people to be blatant, and to be so dismissive like that is just reminiscent of what they've been dealing with for many generations and very hurtful to here, and it's very concerning to know that this this kind of thinking still persistent Canada North says indigenous people make up just over four percent of the Canadian population, but more than twenty four percent. percent of the country's prison population. She says there are parallels in what's happening to black Americans and indigenous Canadians. Especially in their interactions with police, she says the biggest difference between the two countries is that the death of George? Floyd was caught on camera. She adds racially motivated. Incidents take place daily to Canada's indigenous people, but out of the public's eye for national native news. I'm Dan Kerpen. Chuck and Damian Tonio Gonzales.

George Floyd Melissa Townsend Interior Department Mashpee Womp Og Tribe Sheila North Damian Tonio Gonzales Minnesota Minnesota Department Of Health Canada National Congress Of American Us District Melissa Townsend Cedric Cromwell Malcolm Canadian Government District Of Columbia Massachusetts University Of Minnesota Medica United South Duluth Dan Kerpen
"melissa townsend" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"melissa townsend" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is National Native News Antonio. Gonzalez members of the native community are volunteering to keep watch on native owned businesses and native nonprofit buildings. In Minneapolis, Minnesota, as protests continue in the city after the death of George Floyd, an African American man who died last week and police custody, a center which serves native youth in the twin cities. McGee's e communications went up in flames Friday, amid protests, the group has been around for more than forty years and started with production of radio. Programming archives are reportedly safe. Native Roots Radio Host Robert Pilot speaking with members of the native community during an online forum weekend described McGee's e as more than a building when you want to hear about Leonard Pelletier. Mackenzie was there and nobody else was when minor peletier. was on trial. You know and. so we all laughed. There's lot of John Trial. And and Clyde and all the aim people from the beginning recordings from the early seventies on community members helped clean up the building over the weekend. Other areas people are gathering out, are the. American, Indian Center and powwow grounds coffee shop. The six bands which are part of the Minnesota Chippewa tribe are holding primary elections next week. Reporter Melissa Townsend House more Malek's wider boys for leech-like fondling and grand portage will be choosing candidates for board chairman and several district representative seats. The primary election was postponed from March. Thirty first because of safety precautions due to the COVID nineteen pandemic Gary Frazier is the executive director of the Minnesota Chippewa tribe. I think the voter turnout is. is going to be way lower than normal at the polls because they've been asking people to come vote by absentee for the last month and a half, he says tribal leaders are taking a number of precautions to keep voters safe Minnesota Chippewa. Tribe members can vote by absentee ballot up through June. Ninth at polling places, some bands will practice social distancing, and some may require a temperature. Check before you can vote. If a person has elevated temperature, they can get an absentee ballot. The candidates who make it through. The primaries will run in the general election, and that scheduled for August. Eighteenth was Melissa Townsend reporting. The Canadian government is increasing the amount of money available to help indigenous people living off reserve in the fight against covid nineteen as Dan. Carpenter reports Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has announced an additional seventy five million dollars to the Indigenous Community Support Fund. The money is aimed at indigenous people across Canada who live off reserve. The indigenous community support. Fund was created mid March and included more than three hundred million. Million Dollars for regional urban and off reserve indigenous groups to confront the covid nineteen pandemic Trudeau says topping up the Fund for those living off reserve and in cities is needed because organizations that help indigenous people. There are facing a high demand for their services. Indigenous community organizations in our cities and off reserve do crucial work year round that these days their services are in high demand because of the pandemic. We need to make sure they have the resources to adapt and grow their services, so they can fulfill their important mission Trudeau says there are as many as one million indigenous people who live in Canada's urban centers or offers. He says the Support Fund recognizes that the government must adapt its approach and programs to meet the needs of all indigenous peoples. The money is expected to go to projects such as providing access to food transportation, educational materials and mental health services. Trudeau says it can also be used by sanitation and personal protective equipment. He says funding projects will begin rolling out in the coming weeks for National Native News I'm Dan Carpenter Chuck and Antonio Gonzalez..

Indigenous Community Support F Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Minnesota Chippewa tribe Minnesota Antonio Gonzalez Dan Carpenter Chuck Melissa Townsend Canada Canadian government McGee Minneapolis George Floyd Gary Frazier John Trial Mackenzie Clyde Leonard Pelletier Indian Center Robert Pilot
"melissa townsend" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"melissa townsend" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The National Native News Antonio Gonzales after closing in mid March to slow the spread of covid nineteen many tribes and Minnesota are reopening their casinos reporter. Melissa Townsend has more joe nickname either ahead of them lacks beautiful job ways corporate ventures said. The decision to close was a difficult. One Buddy says. The decision to reopen is even more difficult. It's harder because there's this fact that we will be increasing the same risks that we were trying to avoid by closing the pursue community opened their doors earlier in. May the shock of team at Walkerton suit community prairie island Indian community. The Red Lake Nation. And the Malacca envoys work bands of ojibway casinos are all reopening this week. Angela Haikus is president and CEO. The shot could be Milwaukee Ensue Community Gaming Enterprise. We are really watching and understanding the guidance coming from the federal government and the CDC different health organizations coming from the state of Minnesota. We also have our own tribal public health department. The scenes are not opening to full capacity. So that patrons can practice social distancing customers will have their temperatures taken at the entrances shock. Apy IS REQUIRING. Everyone to wear masks wall ax is not other tribes around. The country are also reopening their casinos. Jason Giles Muskogee Creek is executive director of the National Indian Gaming Association. Honest it's not without you take ups right off the Bat. I mean there's been already reports of employees showing up as symptomatic but they have the virus. There's been other reports of people showing up not wearing a mask. Jail says there are some tribes. Who say they will not reopen their casinos in the near future? There's plenty of tribes in South Dakota North Dakota Arizona New Mexico. Some of the tribe that just don't have strong healthcare systems on the reservation and our commute away from the nearest hospital their particular risk if the virus starts to spread here in Minnesota Tribal Casino heads. Say they will pay close attention to what's happening and adjust as needed. That was Melissa. Townsend reporting Minnesota's Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan a citizen of the wider. Th Nation is speaking out as people in Minneapolis protests. The death of George Floyd an African American man who died in police custody this week it goes without saying that no one should he treated differently by worsens due to the color of their skin and no one should live in fear a law enforcements because a color of their skin in grief in this moment is unbearable. Members of the native community are among those calling for justice and drawing attention to police violence against people of color including native Americans cell phone video. From Monday's incident showed George Floyd face down on the ground with the white police officer kneeling on the back of his neck. Floyd says he can't breathe an appears to go unconscious. Thousands of people protested in Minneapolis. Tuesday and Wednesday the Minneapolis Police Department fired. Four officers involved and the city's mayor is calling for the prosecution the president of the Navajo Nation announced what he says is good news and the tribes fight against covid. Nineteen President Jonathan Nez in a virtual town hall. This week said the curve is flattening pointing to health department statistics showing the peak was reached on the Navajo nation. In April Nez says it's due to a majority of citizens following emergency orders. The things that you were all doing Navajo nation public worked boy staying home. As of Wednesday the tribe reported nearly five thousand positive Cova nineteen cases. More than one hundred and fifty deaths and more than one thousand recovery's I'm Antonio Gonzalez..

George Floyd Melissa Townsend Minnesota Minneapolis Minneapolis Police Department Antonio Gonzales Red Lake Nation prairie island Indian communit Antonio Gonzalez president and CEO president Malacca Walkerton suit Minnesota Tribal Casino Milwaukee Jason Giles Muskogee Creek Angela Haikus Jonathan Nez reporter
"melissa townsend" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

10:29 min | 1 year ago

"melissa townsend" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The way genn skin gone more eh Hey Ah they ask you aw you're listening to native America calling interrogate would and we are talking about native podcasts today. It's international podcast day. Do you recognize nicest storytelling power a- podcasts. Have you always wanted to start one but didn't know where to start. You can call in with your questions to our phone. Lines are open now. One eight hundred nine nine six two four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and with us today is Michael Gibb Wayne the host and creator of of invisible choir podcast he comes to us from the red cliff band of Lake Superior Ojibway. He's in Saint Paul Minnesota today or pleasure to have him here and Michael Right before the break you were sharing something very intense and something that has happened to you being a survivor of assault in really appreciate you sharing your thoughts in Michael Win. You are able to share something like that. I know it's very personal and very intense and I appreciate you who feeling safe to share that with us in our listeners in Michael. This seems like something you are also experiencing in this podcast that you know own what people have gone through and what it means to feel like you never had justice or to be on the other side of the story in Michael. Has any of this been a healing Ngoni for you. You know it absolutely has and I think it's one thing we try to do differently from other shows I think it is true true crime as a Jonah itself. I think a lot of people view it as sort of inherently exploitative something we try to do and this feelings being sort both very personal endeavor for me but also a professional one is we try to bring a more respectful voice in a higher level of empathy to these stories in the way they're told and information that's included and the audio that's included. I know specifically for me. It has been very healing. I thank in the years since all of this has happened. I also I it's part of my day job. I work inside of prisons and and so I spent quite a bit of time confronting sort of in a lot of respects the people behind some very you know horrendous crimes and I think for me to to for me. It's been healing in the way I've been able to sort of reclaim my piece around assault around murder around homicide and I think if people take one thing I the name itself again invisible choir the ability of some of these stories these entire families and communities these are sometimes rendered invisible when these things are not shared lessons are not appropriately learned I always try to ask the listeners you know what can we do or what responsibility might you have. Individually you know what that means to speak up or to act when you see sort of escalating violence in the early stages ages and then we also we try to provide resources to folks doing that so you know we we really try to bring different a different level of empathy to into the Shawna and and one that is respectful because these are very difficult cases I call them cases instead of stories because they're not necessarily stories for me to tell you know these are moments in time that happened and so we're constantly looking for the most respectful way to tell those well thanks for sharing that Michael and where do people find the podcast right you can find out apple podcasts to learn more about the show at www dot invisible choir dot com and and we are available at all that works anywhere you can find podcast you could subscribe and you'll get that that episode every other Sunday download right to your fault all right thank you for that Michael ojibway join us to one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is a number. Are you an avid podcast listener which ones ones are your favorite You can give us a call one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number. Let's go and take a call. We're GONNA hear from Melvin in santee Nebraska catoon today Melvin. Thank you for giving us a ring. You're on air more they you know this podcast. Tool is which is a great tool or us to live out in rural areas to that Lee contribute not only our our culture language they can be used to teach language here and everywhere else Bourbon areas and culture but you know I sit on the Treaty Council and we pretty much failed at teaching our young the people their treaty rights and maybe we can use this as a tool to get to younger people to educate. I am on their treaty rights and it's. I think it's GonNa be a fantastic tool. Were Future Agree Melvyn in we know you see young people be have headphones on What are they listening to? Are they listening to some of these things. What if you had something like Melvin suggested podcast podcast teaching about treaties the language in in something else about this medium is you can go back and listen to it over and over again um I'm and as we know that's how you pick up linkage to great thoughts Melvin? Thank you for giving us a ring. They're insanity join us to at one eight hundred nine six two who eight four eight is the number. We're going to introduce you to another podcast. It's called native lights and with today is one of the Producers Melissa Townsend she is joining us out of Minneapolis Minnesota our pleasure to have her here Melissa Welcome. I think you in Melissa Talk to us a little bit about no native lights yeah so native flights it's our first season we dropped five episodes this summer. there are four four producers here kind of across the state of Minnesota and we really started by just asking people in communities around around the region what they wanted to hear and people said they want to your funny stories because they feel like need if humor is this thing that not a lot of people are aware of and so had to be funny there had to be music and they really wanted to hear from their neighbors from everyday people who are or dealing with everyday stuff or finding new ways to deal with everyday stuff inspiring stories and so that's what we tried to focus on we we did a lot of interviews but we also went to a lot of events with people so we try and really take the listener to a place they you haven't been before and explore what happens why it happens and and what's significant about it so hopefully these are just really great stories by I to people who are you know strong and interesting in some Melissa when people tune in to hear the voices of coal in Leah and they have a very special relationship. Tell us more about those voices Yeah Columbia are brothers and sister. They're they're both in their thirties. They're citizens of the Malacca Band of Ojibway but they actually grew up in the suburbs of the twin cities here in Minnesota so they have deep connections to the reservation but they I grew up off reservation and so you know they have a lot of experience that really is is varied invest and every time we we tell the story or we interview somebody. They usually kind of get together on tape in the show and talk about you know. Do you experience that. How how did that go for you? I remember when mom said this for example we did an episode that featured a lot of young people that had been in foster care and as it turns Ah Leah and Cole Were Foster family so they talked about that experience as siblings in a home where foster children were coming in and and how attached to them and how much they loved having other kids around and how it really made them more attuned to what the experiences like for those children who come in and go out and and and how that made them more sensitive to different people's experiences so yeah they have this this great report were there hilarious and they're incredibly talented musicians. Lee is a vocalist and she plays piano and guitar. sorry coal is vocalism okay listen plays guitar and they do almost all the music and the podcast and they're just incredibly incredibly talented and it's really exciting to hear hear the different experiences that these different producers are bringing to this medium end you know that extra view that they have into the world world and what they're able to open up and maybe that's something you've been you know thinking about. I have a very specific view on the world. Maybe I.

Melvin Michael Minnesota assault Lee Michael Gibb Wayne Michael Right America Michael ojibway Lake Superior Ojibway Michael Win Saint Paul Minnesota Ah Leah Melissa Talk Treaty Council Melissa Townsend Melvyn Minneapolis Melissa Welcome Melissa