4 Burst results for "Melissa Haislip"

"melissa haislip" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 2 months ago

"melissa haislip" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Five years it lost its funding. Which which is in one way, sad and in one way, just really indicative of what was happening at the time. And I think that I don't think it was a failure. I just think that because things were changing in terms of broadcasting and in terms of the shifting political landscape. It really was more representative of The C P B and the various powers that be feeling like It wasn't necessary. What was necessary was the show. But what had caused the show to be necessary had changed. I think that's what that was an important point that we made. And Gail Wald, who Ihsaa One of our advisors and wrote this wonderful book. It's been beautiful Ellis ah soul in the birth of black Power television. She talks about that a lot in her book and how We have to recognize that there is a difference between what what happens in terms of funding and what happens in terms of programming. I'm sure you know about that as well sign at my last question. Your sauna, Sanchez says in the film that Ellis changed minds. You think he did? I think he did. I think he was in the business of changing minds. And I think that he changed minds and he liberated minds, and I hope that that will be his everlasting legacy. It was my conversation with writer and producer Melissa Haislip about the documentary Mr Soul To Screening virtually through September. 24th. For tickets and more information, visit Mr Soll movie dot com slash screenings. The fall issue of Aperture magazine is.

Ellis Gail Wald Mr Soll Mr Soul Aperture magazine representative Sanchez Melissa Haislip black Power writer producer
"melissa haislip" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:35 min | 2 months ago

"melissa haislip" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is all of it before Oprah. For Arsenio Hall before Tom JJ owner or Joy Reid. There was Ellis Haislip. In the 19 sixties, Haislip was the executive producer and host of the groundbreaking current events show Soul. He's the subject of a documentary called Mr Soul, which is now screening virtually through September 24th via more than 90 online theaters. When the TV show sold, debuted in 1968, it was originally a local New York program. A year later, the Siri's went national on PBS. Produced by WNET E Channel 13. Saul was more than just a talk show. It was a political platform featuring African American poets, artists, politicians and activists at a time when black Americans were asserting their civil rights unapologetically. A documentary Mr Soul, was written and produced by Sam Pollard and Melissa Hazlitt, who is also Ellis Hayes Lips. Nice. Alice Hazlitt also happen to be a friend of my mom's in high school. I spoke moving Melissa Hazlitt on WNYC in 2018. When Mr Soll premiered at the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival, I began by asking Melissa what made her decide that her uncle's life should be the subject of a documentary. You know, I just thought that this was such an incredible story that needs to be told. I felt that it was an era of time of great. Pummelled and change. And yet nobody was really talking about the beginning of things. The beginning of freedom of expression, the beginning of redefining black culture, the beginning of a reassertion. And and somewhat of ah, rebirth of black culture as defined by black people themselves, and I thought nobody's really taken that point of view and told that story and I thought it's time it's definitely time. What was the mission of the show? What was Ellis's vision? I think Ellis wanted to To really be able to reflect true black culture for the first time and bring it into people's living rooms. You know there was such a divide at the time 1968, especially after Martin Luther King had been assassinated. Every every person who was of color was was being defined by the outside, Not by the inside. They didn't have an opportunity to show who they really were. And to show that they were more than you know. What do you see on television? You see riots You see? Garbage not being picked up in Harlem. You know, that's not really what's happening. There's a renaissance out there. There's a way to express yourself that you haven't had an opportunity to dio. And I think that was his vision. One of the things you do in the beginning of the film, which is very helpful is you provide context of what TV looked like a TTE that time and what the Kerner Commission found explain a little bit about why you decided to set up the documentary that way we don't learn about Ellis immediately. We learned about TV. I think it's very important because it was. AH, I think the birth of public television and the Public Broadcasting Act is really inextricable when you're talking about the story of soul reaching a wider audience and creating a black audience, which had heretofore had not really happened. And so we thought, it's really better if we can set up the zeitgeist of what was happening. What did soul interrupt? What were we used to seeing on television? What were the models We knew we knew? The Tonight Show. We knew Ed Sullivan, but there really was no Model for a show that was not only a vehicle for African American artistry, but a platform for political expression and the fight for social justice. That's a trifecta that we hadn't seen yet. So I thought it would be really important to understand why that was unique for the time and why it really was revolutionary for television, especially public television. You had a professor in the film Sarah Lewis from Harvard, who said the media had been weaponized to argue for the inhumanity. Of African Americans at the time. Absolutely. And when love Sarah Lewis, she's so wonderful, and she had that book she Ah, guest edited The aperture, um, beautiful edition of Aperture Foot Photography magazine, and Sarah really speaks directly to the time that media have been weaponized. Because what was being shown on television was very specific to convey a sense of Less than of barbarity of, um, inequality, and that was the theme that was being pushed and Ellis Hayes Up, said No, That's not who we are. There's so much more depth. There's so much more complexity and all you need to do is see us. It's we're not here to entertain you necessarily. But if you're entertaining, you learnt something in process. That's really wonderful when they came to him. Initially, they kind of described as a black Tonight show, he said, No, That's not what I'm going to do. And he he was very adamant about the content being undiluted. What does that mean? Unfiltered? I would say Ah, Sort of an uncompromising celebration of black excellence, which really hadn't had an opportunity to be seen The complexities of politics of poetry, literature and music. The black arts movement was all about that redefining really what it meant to be black. In America. What it meant to be black on this planet. Can you just go through a list of some of the guests he had. It's amazing when you when you start to think about it. Oh my goodness. It was a bevy of African American icons of the 20th century. We know now, of course, but many of them were receiving their first opportunity to be on television. Such as believed or not. Earth, Wind and fire for the first time, Al Green for the first time. Roberta Flack. Sicily. Tyson the last poets Oh, my goodness. There were just so many people that you would just die to see for the first time on television and that also iconic folks. Muhammed Ali, Sidney Poitier. Harry Belafonte, who's also in the film. Yes, sort of as a as a witness two L s in the show. He is an anchor for us because he was there and he really speaks to The the diversity of voices in the rich voices of the time speaking for black culture, Who do you think would have been a guest on the show today? You know, I think about that all the time, and we have the great opportunity to interview Questlove at the Tonight Show. Hey, had just finished taping a show and he allowed us to squeeze into the green room. And Ah, I thought This is a person who is the legacy. And so you know, here he is. Not only is he an exquisite sort of ethnomusicologist he's a band leader. He understands the landscape of late night television. And the the struggle of being an artist and also a representative of the culture. And what shocked me was to learn that he had Ah, in an encyclopedic memory of the show, and how the show had impacted his band and how he modeled sets that they did. Based on what he saw for the roots. Rather the seventh viewing for the roots for what he saw on Seoul and one particular example. We had to go in and re cut the film because he talked about this moment when Earth wind fire played about 32 counts of eight, but they weren't playing anything. They were mining it and the audience went nuts. And he said, We did that. In our show. We based our show. I think he would be the perfect host, if not the perfect guest because he's a combination of all of these various art forms, and he doesn't limit himself. Yeah, Ellis doesn't look didn't limit himself either. I was thinking Kendrick Lamar without a And, you know, really hadn't seen a sit down with Colin Kaepernick. That's true. That would mean that would have been a soul guest. The rebels were welcome, and I think in every fiber of his being Ellis believed in In liberation as redefined redefining culture based on liberation and freedom. We're talking with Melissa Haislip about her new documentary, Mr Soul about Ellis Haislip, who's a groundbreaking African American talk show host..

Ellis Ellis Haislip Mr Soul Sarah Lewis Melissa Hazlitt Ellis Hayes Lips Ellis Hayes Saul New York Arsenio Hall Alice Hazlitt Siri Martin Luther King Mr Soll Melissa Haislip Kendrick Lamar executive producer Roberta Flack
"melissa haislip" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 3 months ago

"melissa haislip" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Shaves. So part one soul was a pioneering television series that covered black culture. Starting in 1968. The guest list is like a who's Who of the era. Mohammed Ali to Stevie Wonder host Was Ellis Haislip, subject of the new documentary Mr Soll. We're trying to create programs of black love of black strain of black encouragement. Andi. We hope that you agree with what's going down. He died nearly 30 years ago. But his niece, filmmaker Melissa Haislip, tells his story with nuance and complexity. Her uncle Ellis had a strong eye for rising talent. The poet Felipe Luciano remembers Haislip putting him on air and I was flabbergasted. No one had ever given me the opportunity to do by talent No one had ever done that. Later. Another impresario would create Soul train, but Haislip show on public television came first. And went beyond music to explore ideas and politics. He broadcast a long interview with James Baldwin. After all, Baby We've survived the roughest games to the world. You know, we really have no matter what we say against ourselves out but limited. Hang up. So you know, we have come through some come through something. And get this while we get further. The show only lasted for five years, but this vibrant documentary extends its legacy to today. Mr Seoul is now streaming online through Art House movie theaters across the country, including the Maysles documentary Center in Harlem. For more information,.

Melissa Haislip Maysles documentary Center Felipe Luciano Mr Seoul Ellis Mr Soll James Baldwin Mohammed Ali Stevie Wonder Harlem Art House
"melissa haislip" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:58 min | 3 months ago

"melissa haislip" Discussed on KCRW

"Bynum speaks about the spectrum of reality for trade in her new book of short stories, Lipes I'm really hoping that a leader will have some kind of physical or visceral response before they might even know why they're having that response. Sarah Shin Lim Bynum is with us son Bookworm today at 1:30 P.m.. This is press play. I'm Madeleine brand. Well, Once upon a time in America, there was a TV talk show that was unapologetically black. James Baldwin was a guest. So his poet Amiri Baraka. Louis Farrakhan. Musicians like Earth, Wind and Fire and Patti Labelle performed it was 1968. There were platform shoes and big Afros and a perspective that existed nowhere else on television. The show was made by black people for black people. It was called Soul exclamation Point, and it was hosted by a mild mannered man named Ellis Haislip. His story and the story of the show is now being told by his niece Melissa Haislip in her new documentary, Mr Soul, and She joins me now, Welcome. Hi, Madeline. Great to be here. Thank you so much for having us Well, great to have you along with Emmy Award winning actor Blair Underwood, who is the executive producer and narrator of the film. I, Blair. Hi, Madeline. Thank you for having me and us. Well, it's good to have you all right. So most. How did Ellis come up with the idea for this show in the first place? Well, he really wanted to do something that was unique. For New York and unique for New Yorkers. You know, the late 19 sixties were both tumultuous and also progressive, and and it was a difficult time to be a black American for anyone. Should be existing at that time. But I think the idea was that to give voice to The underserved to give voice to Poets and activists and people of the African diaspora. And to give us a platform and some folks thought it would be a good idea to make the black Tonight show. But I think the idea really was to change the public perception of Black America and really, to create a space. For black artists and innovators. So the idea was to really mirror black culture in a way that it hadn't seen before, because the airwaves really weren't interested at the time. Right. So at the time so late sixties early seventies, the show is on the air. For what about five years? Yeah, 68 to 73. Yes. So you at that time you didn't see a lot of black faces on TV unless they were, you know, criminals, really right? Absolutely. And there was, you know, the media have been weaponized, you know, against African Americans, and of course, that was an extension of Jim Crow. And that was extension of You know the issues, post civil rights and the civil rights movement. So It was a way to sort of re imagine ourselves in this American landscape. And this idea that there was there could be more progressive, more expansive images and more opportunities for African American culture to be Experienced And Blair. Well, both of you are too young to have actually watch this show when it was on the air. But Blair, how did isn't born yet? I wasn't born yet. Well, okay. If you say so earlier, But you were too young to watch it right? I mean, you're probably watching Sesame Street instead. So what got you interested in this? Well, I would tell you that I was born in 64. So I was not only was I too young, but I did not know about this. This show at the time, you know it started off in New York and then became a national show. This really is and I always preface my comments that I want to give Melissa Credit. CAS you wrote, directed produced. It's in her family history. It's in her DNA. So when she approached me to be the narrator, the voice of Ellis's lift. I was blown away by what she had compiled just the images and there's clips from the show, and she had this beautiful trailer for the movie. And you know, they're narrator You're like the last thing involving lay the voiceover and connective tissue of the story. But I was blown away that I did not know of this show. I was not aware because anybody who was anybody you mentioned. At the very top. Some of the artists that were part of the show that came through there and there were actors, politicians, musicians. It was amazing thing, so I was not aware of it a CZ much as I should have, and was very much excited about being a part of telling the story. Um, So this comes out of the civil rights movement and the civil rights movement that Really was marked at the end with lots of periods of Violence, tragedy assassinations. I want to play a clip of activist Stokely Carmichael. And this is what he said on the show. And I want to play this because this is something that you wouldn't hear on. Well, you wouldn't hear anywhere really on TV either. Then or now. History don't begin. 400 years. Your history begins millions and millions and millions and millions of years ago while the white boy was in the cave, your father's We're building pyramids. The Eiffel Tower is falling. The pyramids are standing strong. You built them, brother. So, Melissa, you said that this was Ellis is vision to present the totality of black culture and also Tio Presented to a larger audience. Or was it mainly to say, was it mainly about presenting black culture to a black audience? I think that really was his razzle debts. I think he really felt it was important to say we have on Renaissance happening here. Away. Our existing under this gaze that has never really appreciated the the fullness and the richness, and that's what made the show so highly controversial and almost unorthodox for its time. You know, due to both. It's sort of political content about race and not to mention the format and also what it did singlehandedly was provide. Ah, an insight into the interiority of black people. It was just to say this is what we do, and this is how we get down. And if you enjoy that you can be entertained by it. But we're not here to entertain you. The priority is to share the richness of the black experience here. You had him showing people with, you know, historical weight and significance. Like James Baldwin and Patti Labelle on.

Ellis Haislip Blair Underwood Patti Labelle Sarah Shin Lim Bynum James Baldwin New York Black America Amiri Baraka Louis Farrakhan Madeline Melissa Haislip America Emmy Award Madeleine Bookworm Stokely Carmichael Eiffel Tower Melissa Credit