23 Burst results for "Melissa Block"

Biden to formally establish new Gender Policy Council

Morning Edition

01:04 min | 3 months ago

Biden to formally establish new Gender Policy Council

"Today is International Women's Day. Then President Biden will sign two executive orders geared toward promoting gender equity, both in the United States and around the world. NPR's Melissa Block reports, according to an administration official, speaking on background, the goal is restoring America as a champion for gender equity and equality. The first executive order will establish a gender policy council within the White House reformulating in office from the Obama administration that was later disbanded by then President Trump and giving it more clout. The council's focus will be to advance equal rights and opportunity for women and girls with a special focus on women and girls of color who face historical and disproportionate barriers. The second executive order is directed at the Department of Education and seems expressly aimed at reversing policies issued last year by Trump's Education secretary Betsy Divorce. Those policies granted more rights to those accused of sexual assault or harassment. Melissa Block. NPR NEWS

President Biden Melissa Block Obama Administration President Trump United States Npr News White House Betsy Divorce Department Of Education Donald Trump
Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

Morning Edition

04:33 min | 4 months ago

Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

"Not long after Donald Trump arrived at the White House, he disbanded and office that focused on challenges affecting women. President Biden is now resurrecting it. Women's rights groups hope this will help them make progress on things like paid family leave and affordable child care. Here's NPR's Melissa Block. The wish list on Biden's agenda for women is long restoring an expanding reproductive rights, combating gender based violence, reducing maternal mortality, and he's pitched a slew of economic proposals. Major structural disruption requires major structural change. And I feel like thinking big right now is exactly what we need to do. So now is the time That's the co chair of the Biden administration's new gender Policy Council. Jennifer Klein. You know we're seeing because of the health pandemic because of the economic crisis, and, in fact, take care giving crisis that's been layered on top of it. These are core issues core issues, Klein points out that air hitting women hard and especially women of color. Just look at the most recent jobs numbers. In December, women accounted for all 140,000 of the country's net lost jobs. One factor behind that, with so many schools and day care centers closed because of the coronavirus. Many women have had to drop out of the labor force. That's been disastrous, says Joan Williams, director of the Center for Work Life Law at the University of California, Hastings. Mother's already We're at the breaking point in the United States. I mean, we already had a choc your system that was basically a Rube Goldberg machine and the coronavirus brought that machine crashing down. Williams says. What she wants the Biden administration to do is to recognize that Just as we don't expect workers to get to work without physical infrastructure like bridges and roads. We can't expect workers to get to work without a care infrastructure. What would that care Infrastructure look like for Williams? That would mean subsidized neighborhood based child care, paid family leave Universal, pre K and $15 an hour minimum wage, especially during the pandemic. Single moms have had to choose between putting food on the table and leaving young Children home alone. Now. Part of the reason is because the minimum wages so low that there is no way on God's green Earth that those moms can pay for childcare. The paid caregivers are also reeling from the crunch. President Biden highlighted this when he announced his covert 19 relief plan last month. Let's make sure caregivers mostly women, women of color immigrants. Have the same pay indignity that they deserve. Advocates like I Jen poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, are heartened by what they're hearing from Biden. Her group represents workers, including nannies, home care workers and housekeepers, actually focusing on how we're going to make Thies jobs, good jobs for the 21st century. That you can take pride in and earn a living wage with benefits. That is a really big breakthrough. Conservatives, though, are leery of an agenda that carries a hefty price tag and they warn, will lead to crushing government regulations. Charmaine Yost is vice president of the Institute for Family Community and Opportunity at the Heritage Foundation. My biggest concern is that all of the proposals that I'm hearing coming from their side of things inevitably seem to come back to big government intervention in government programs. As for raising the minimum wage in the midst of a pandemic, when many businesses are suffering so badly if there were a time that you could create, that would be the perfect time to not Raise the minimum wage. This would be it with such a slim Democratic majority in Congress. Biden's agenda could have a tough time gaining traction. But Fatima Goss Graves, who heads the National Women's Law Center, is undaunted. Her group has issued an ambitious list of 100 demands for Biden's 1st 100 days. Basically, what we're asking this administration and Congress to do is effectively walk into gum. We need them to both undo things that have been harmful and have been Holding this country back and launch us forward in a way that we're stronger for it, Graves adds. This president doesn't have the luxury of coasting in Melissa Block NPR news

Biden Administration President Biden Melissa Block New Gender Policy Council Jennifer Klein Biden Joan Williams Center For Work Life Law Donald Trump NPR Williams Jen Poo Rube Goldberg White House National Domestic Workers Alli Klein Hastings University Of California Charmaine Yost
Kamala Harris pays tribute to Black women in 1st speech as VP-elect

The Moth Radio Hour

01:22 min | 7 months ago

Kamala Harris pays tribute to Black women in 1st speech as VP-elect

"Says he ran for president as a proud Democrat. Now he'll be an American president and a drive in rally in Wilmington, Delaware, Saturday night. President elect said he'll work is hard for those who didn't vote for him as those who did that He'll be a later who seeks not to divide but to unify. Lydon says he'll work with all his heart to win the confidence of the whole people. Vice president elect Kamala Harris, the daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants will become the first woman to hold that office. NPR's Melissa Block has more Kamala Harris took the stage to the female empowerment anthem work that by Mary J. Blige dressed in a white pantsuit in symbolic tribute to the suffrage movement, which earned women the right to vote 100 years ago this year. Harris paid homage to women who work to secure and protect the right to vote for over a century up through this election, and she praised what she called the audacity of President elect Biden to break one of the most substantial barriers that exists in our country and select a woman as his vice president. Then Harris made this But while I may be the first woman in this office, I will not be the last other firsts. Harris would be the first black and the first Asian American vice president. Melissa Block NPR news.

Kamala Harris Melissa Block Lydon Wilmington Delaware Mary J. Blige NPR Harris Biden
"melissa block" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:25 min | 8 months ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KCRW

"This is who you know Amy County, Barrett is It's what Mom's deal with across the country every single day. So why the Republican emphasis on Barrett's family? Oh, I think it is totally 100%, a suburban woman voter appeal. Of course, I don't think that's going to work. That's Democratic strategist Martha McKenna. She calls the Barrett nomination, a last ditch effort by Republicans struggling to regain the votes of college educated white women. Polls indicate they're turning against Trump and some incumbent GOP senators in droves. I mean, I think it's the only thing they have left. I do not think that the fact that a mother Of school age Children has been nominated to the Supreme Court, by Donald Trump at all erases the previous four years of dangerous policies that Trump has promoted. A recurring implication from Republicans on the Judiciary Committee is the Democrats somehow just can't accept a Supreme Court nominee who is also a mother of seven. Here's 10 to see Senator Marsha Blackburn again as today's increasingly paternalistic and frankly disrespectful arguments have shown if they had their way on Ly certain kind of women would be allowed into this hearing brain. Political science professor Melissa Duckman of Washington College, took note of that She's written about gender roles, motherhood and conservative politics from studying conservative women for a long time. I think that there's a lot of resentment from many women that conservative women that women's voices are often depicted as being a liberal, Beckman says. Putting barrettes motherhood front and center is Grand political theater. It's hard to be critical of Mom's right. So when they're trying to basically frame her as a mom that could do it all. I think it's kind of more. Maybe not too subtle message that Somehow being against Amy Cockney. Barrett is also being against motherhood. But Democrats say they're deeply concerned that Barrett will roll back women's rights and potentially vote to overturn Roe versus Wade. At the same time, they've taken pains to compliment Barrett on her family. Melissa Block NPR NEWS Some other news now a complete an original copy of Shakespeare's very first collection of plays. Is going up for auction today. It's known as the first Folio, and it was published in 16 23. It is not only the first collected edition of the plays of Shakespeare, but it is the first time that 18 of the 36 plays have been printed. And there's 18 plays very likely would not have survived were it not for the first printing of the Folio? That's Margaret Ford. She's with Christy's, which is taking bids for the Folio in New York City. The 18 plays in the Folio include Macbeth, The Tempest and Julius Caesar. All of them would have been lost, if not for two of Shakespeare's friends who compiled the Folio a few years after his death there, the ones who took it upon themselves to gather up Shakespeare's plays course they would have been involved in acting some of these parts. To ensure that the correct text was actually going to be printed. Now, if you're thinking about bidding on this one bear in mind that the last time a copy of the Folio came up for auction that went for around $6.2 million that was in 2000 won. This Folio comes with its own original letter of authentication. But the really interesting thing about this copy isn't it is accompanied by a letter by Edmund Malone, who was the great Shakespeare scholar of the late 18th early 19th century, and this letter is to the then owner and John Fuller. Saying that he has inspected the copy for Mr Fuller and that he can't assure him that it is genuine and how very clean it is very clean. Five complete copies of the first Folio are known to be privately owned, and Ford says there's no telling where this one could end up after the auction. Because Shakespeare transcends national boundaries really like no other author. It's always been a little bit surprising that there is still no copy in some parts of the world from since China Russia, the Middle East. There's no copy in Israel. There's no copy in Denmark and, well, associates, You know Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. So good luck today in the auction to the modern day Hamlet.

Barrett Shakespeare Donald Trump Margaret Ford Republicans Supreme Court Amy County Senator Marsha Blackburn Martha McKenna Melissa Duckman Melissa Block Grand political theater Amy Cockney GOP Mr Fuller Denmark Middle East Israel Edmund Malone Beckman
USA vs. Netherlands World Cup final today

On Being

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

USA vs. Netherlands World Cup final today

"The women's World Cup final takes place today in France kickoff set in about four hours with reigning champion United States taking on the Netherlands Melissa block reports from Leon it seems like a mismatch the top ranked US is played in all eight world cups to date has made it to the final five times and has won a record three titles head coach Jill Ellis said of her team the day before the match their battle tested they're locked on and they're still hungry as for the number eight ranked Netherlands this is just the second time they've qualified for the World Cup but their team has been on a speedy rise in is the reigning European champion if the Dutch pull off a victory against the US it'll be a historic upset as midfielder Danielle invented on told reporters I love being underdogs I don't think they the U. S. think were that good that is going to be an advantage for us Melissa block NPR news legal and I'm Giles later in

Leon United States Jill Ellis Netherlands Danielle NPR Giles France Melissa Four Hours
Caster Semenya can run without testosterone restriction

Fresh Air

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Caster Semenya can run without testosterone restriction

"South African runner, caster Semenya will be allowed to compete without restriction in the female category. While the Swiss federal supreme court considers her appeal is NPR's Melissa block reports. The Swiss court ordered the immediate temporary suspension of rules governing testosterone levels of female athletes. Those rules were imposed by the governing body for track and field. The I AA f for female athletes with naturally elevated testosterone levels and last month, the court of arbitration for sport of health those regulations which require the affected athletes to lower their testosterone levels with. Drugs or surgery. But caster Semenya, a two time Olympic champion filed an appeal saying the rules, violate her human rights, and for now at least she's one of reprieve while the Swiss supreme court considers her case in a statement Semenya said, I hope that following my appeal, I will once again, be able to run

Swiss Supreme Court Testosterone Caster Semenya Melissa Block NPR Olympic
"melissa block" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KCRW

"I won't back down by the late Tom petty has served as an anthem of defiance for striking workers, an anthem of grit for political candidates, and for many, it's a deeply personal anthem. Resolve here's NPR's Melissa block with the latest in our series American anthem about the songs that inspire and unite us. The lyrics that speak to resilience empowerment and hope are as simple as they come and Tom petty worried about that at first worried the song was too simple here. He is speaking on WHYY's fresh air in two thousand six I thought that it was maybe just to direct. You know, I thought well, there's there isn't really anything to hide behind here. It's it's very bold in very blunt. There's not a lot of metaphor or any, you know, anywhere to go. But he said of all his many hit songs this one ended up having the most direct impact people would come up to him on the street during restaurants all the time and tell them how this song gave him the strength to carry on. He heard so many stories says his widow Dana petty. He told me that he heard read somewhere that brought a girl out of a coma is her favorite song. And they played it, and she came out of a coma, which blew his mind petty recorded, I won't back down. A few years after an arsonist burned down his house his family survived. But he lost everything. And in the fresh air interview. He said that horrific experience probably did filter into the song because I felt really elated that they didn't get me. You know, like, I kinda just that was the thought there was going to my aunt as you bastard. You didn't give me I I survived. Bush. Around..

Tom petty Dana petty Melissa block coma NPR WHYY Bush
Gun Shops Work With Doctors To Prevent Suicide By Firearm

Mark Levin

02:48 min | 2 years ago

Gun Shops Work With Doctors To Prevent Suicide By Firearm

"In their lane in Colorado. A group has come together to bridge the divide as NPR's Melissa block reports they found common ground on one thing preventing firearm suicide the group is the Colorado firearm safety coalition, it's motto fighting suicide together, it includes doctors and public health. Researchers also gun shop owners and a firearms instructor who is a competitive shooter, Michael Victor off this is my competition gun. This all day are fifteen Victor off is a gun enthusiast and a retired family physician. And when he thinks about suicide prevention one patient in particular comes to mind, a young woman who shot and killed herself decades ago when he first started practicing, and I never saw that coming. I didn't. Have the slightest clue? I didn't know she owned a gun. Now this week if I were talking to her I would say, do you have a gun house? Do you have access to a gun does this figure into any of your plans, you know, and if so I really like to talk to you about changing Victor off is one of the founders of the coalition along with Dr EMMY bets she's an emergency room physician and public health researcher who focuses on suicide prevention she's been affected by gun suicides in her own family, including one just recently a cousin in his twenties. And that's still pretty raw for many of us. I think and I think for me happening in the midst of the work that I do it made me pause and think about I want to keep doing this work, and how could I have not done more to prevent it. When they started the coalition. Dr bet says they knew they wanted to include both people in healthcare and gun dealers. What really struck me was that they think were astounded by the suicide statistics. And those numbers are stark, Colorado. Has one of the highest suicide rates in the US guns account for half of those suicides. And if you look at all firearm deaths in Colorado, nearly eighty percent of them are suicides. What I say to people is if you want to reduce suicide deaths, you have to talk about firearms, and if you wanna reduce firearm deaths, you have to talk about aside, they are so linked in this country. And when we talk with patients, it should not be about secondment rates. It should not be about politics has no place in the exam room. This should really be about the home safety. That's wants doctors to know. There are no restrictions on asking patients about guns in the home. There's no gag rule despite a common misconception. There was a Florida law that prohibited. Doctors from asking about gun ownership, but it was struck down as unconstitutional, and Dr bet says physicians should know the data about suicide and guns, which are by far the most lethal method of suicide eighty five to ninety percent of people who attempt with a gun will die. Because that's what

Colorado Dr Bet Michael Victor Dr Emmy NPR Melissa Block Family Physician United States Instructor Florida Researcher Eighty Percent Ninety Percent
"melissa block" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KCRW

"Eric westervelt air, thanks for that reporting. You're welcome. Families of people with dementia will often take away the car keys to keep them safe concerned relatives might also remove knobs from stove burners or lock on medicine, but what about the risk of guns in the home? That's a growing problem as the US population gets older, and the number of those with dementia source NPR's, Melissa block reports he's eighty seven and knows the songs from my favorite musical by heart. We know we belong to the land and the land we belong to grant. That's Ed singing with his wife, Cathy at their home in Aurora Colorado outside Denver, Kathy asks that I use just their first names out of privacy, concerns. Ed is a former fighter pilot proudly sporting a cap embroidered. With the words Korea. Vietnam veteran we've been married remarried. We are we are thirty eight years. No. Yeah. It's been a good marriage eight years and has Alzheimer's disease, which has progressed rapidly in the last few years when we're alone. Kathy tells me that Ed can get very confused and agitated especially after dark, and so it was the one night about a year ago. They reached a turning point for the first time. Her husband didn't recognize her. And then I realized that he was afraid of me so afraid that Ed walked into the bedroom. Locked the door and said, something ominous he says, I have a gun and the truth was there was a gun in that room. And Cathy knew it was loaded. She spent an anxious night in the hallway afraid things would escalate if she called the police by morning at had calmed down and unlocked the door too. Kathy's relief he hadn't found the gun. But the incident was so frightening. She immediately took the weapon to the basement removed the initiation and locked it away in hindsight. She wishes she had been more vigilant. Those who work with dementia. Patients say family members often don't want to think the worst most caregivers. Tell us married to him for fifty years. You've never heard anyone and then it's talking to caregivers about. Yes. He would not, but his disease might hurt someone. So we have to talk about this. Joe lean Sussman is a psychologist who specializes in dementia at the veterans affairs medical center in Denver. Of course, this concern doesn't apply just to veterans the number of people with dementia in the US is expected to double in the next twenty years to about fourteen million the vast majority over the age of sixty five researchers also estimate that nearly half of people over sixty five either own a gun or live in a household with someone who does Joe lean Sussman wants the safety issue to be top of mind. I think if I had anything to say the healthcare professionals across the country would be pleased along with driving please ask about firearms to she suggests asking not just do you. Have guns. But also how many and where are they once? I ask about firearms. They'll say, so do you keep those at your bed? Stan within arm's reach while you're sleeping at night. Many veterans will say yes is it load? ADS does your wife sleep with you? Yes. For many gun owners, their firearms are deeply entwined with their identity. So asking them to give up their guns can be really hard. You know, what they might say to you. I don't care. You're not taking my guns. Beth call Nyerere is vice president of care and support with the Alzheimer's Association. But they might say to you, you're right. I want you to step in when I can't make that decision for myself anymore. And then that helps the family later on call Meyer, advises families, not to wait to have these conversations early. And Dr EMMY Betts who studies guns and dementia at the university of Colorado school of medicine suggests that families drop a firearms agreement kind of advanced directive for guns to say, all right? Like who do you want to be the one to say, I think it's time who do you want to give them to is it your family member? Is it Joe down at the gun club? So that you're still the one making the decision even if when the time comes you're not aware of what's happening. Name is Lloyd narrow bait. Eighty seven. When I visit Lloyd Bates and his wife, Carol at their home, Denver. Carol tells me about another family member with dementia, and how hard it was to get his gun collection out of the house because those guns were like a part of his persona and he would throw temper tantrums. He would say nobody's gonna take my guns. Then Loyd was diagnosed with dementia, but the conversation about locking up his guns was a lot easier. I understood very well. The dangerous having a gun in the house in could lead to we can't trust his brain rate now to drive, so why would we chest his brain with a gun and Loyd says he's okay with that? For years because he wrote down the combination and he lost the combination. And I don't know the combination to the safe, so they're safe. They're safe. That's a real simple solution. Do a gated problem. Melissa block NPR news Denver. This is NPR.

Ed Kathy Joe lean Sussman Denver Cathy Melissa block US Loyd Eric westervelt NPR Alzheimer's disease Korea university of Colorado school Aurora Colorado Dr EMMY Betts Carol Stan
"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:16 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is weekend edition from NPR news Lugar Sienna Varo is off. This week, I'm, Melissa block. It's. Been a weekend of remembering old Washington a, place of principal disagreement honesty. And mutual respect at least that's the romantic myth and John McCain's, funeral yesterday that was also the reality as friends. And colleagues paid tribute to the late Senator NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson is with us to talk about that and the week ahead. Good morning Laura good morning Melissa the ceremonies for John McCain, started in Phoenix moved onto the US capitol and then yesterday we saw his, funeral at the National Cathedral today his private. Burial in Annapolis at the naval academy it has been a remarkable outpouring a remarkable outcome outpouring moat many people considered John McCain to. Be the most important politician of his age he described himself as, a flawed, individual like all of us but he also stood for, civility and honor and sacrifice and considering your political Opponents are. Not your enemies. He was willing to work across the aisle that's very rare nowadays and many. People feel that. This is a moment when a lot, of, those basic democratic values along, with human decency and. Character are really under attack and. That made his funeral even more poignant right and we notably we heard two former presidents George W Bush and Barack Obama essentially preach. About shared values and a common humanity at his funeral that's right McCain. Pointedly invited, these, two former. Presidents. Former adversaries of his they both defeated him, in presidential elections he pointedly. Did not invite the current occupant of the White House no one, mentioned Donald Trump's yesterday name yesterday but the entire. Service was implicit rebuke to him and that's how John McCain planned it when John McCain's daughter Megan stood up and said the America of. John McCain has no need to be made great again because, America was always great she got a huge round of applause that just does Doesn't happen. At funerals one writer said the gathering at, the cathedral was a giant meeting of the resistance, and that was certainly the tacit rebuke. Was certainly a a, subtext of this part of, President Obama's tribute to John McCain let's take a listen so much of, our politics are public life. Our public discourse can seem small and. Me and petty Trafficking and bombast and insult And phony controversies and, manufactured outrage Politics that pretends to be Brave, and tough but in fact is born of. Fear in Marin other circumstances those words might not, have been quite so, remarkable not quite so remarkable but also maybe they, wouldn't have to be said but we're in a first, principles moment in American politics and we have a president who rejects the traditional role as. A unifier in American life and Barack Obama has said that he wasn't going to get involved in every little political battle in America since, he's finished his German office but he would speak, out when he felt basic. Democratic, values were at risk Mara we mentioned that that President Trump was. Literally absent at that funeral he was at his Virginia golf course during the, service at the National Cathedral but he did tweet while. All those dignitaries were gathered he did tweet about his usual grievances about the FBI. And the department of Justice but, he also tweeted about NAFTA which is his one of his most important campaign. Promises was to renegotiate NAFTA it's a very important policy Goal, he says he has a deal with Mexico. Mexico says it's an understanding that needs candidate to. Come along the president, has said that he might just leave Canada out, of it many members of congress don't agree with that, and the president also tweeted he said congress quote should not interfere with these negotiations or. I will simply terminate NAFTA entirely it's very unclear if he has the legal power to do that but he's got thirty days left and, the negotiations with Canada resume on Wednesday and briefly, Morris Senate Republicans are guiding. Supreme, court nominee Brett Cavanaugh toward a lifetime seat on the high court. Hearings start on Tuesday Democrats are furious that they're not getting access to a, lot of records about one hundred thousand pages of Kavanagh's. Years in the Bush White House that's right and no matter what happens with NAFTA. Or the midterm elections Donald Trump, is on course to reshape not just the supreme court but the entire judiciary. He is putting judges and Justices on the court at a faster clip than any other previous president and he is remaking the judiciary in his own conservative image so Democrats are angry but they are on their back foot very few people think that they can. Defeat Cavanaugh. And this will be the most important part of Donald Trump's legacy no matter what else happens or doesn't happen okay then Pierre, national political correspondent Mara. Liasson Mara thanks thank you Ordinarily.

John McCain Donald Trump president President Obama Mara Liasson NAFTA national political corresponde National Cathedral Melissa block NPR Liasson Mara America department of Justice Lugar Sienna Varo Washington Brett Cavanaugh Annapolis White House Senator NPR George W Bush
"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The tube attached to the side of the wall is that real or fake just an april fool pranks story jake go real that's real that's real in two thousand and seven back before smartphones were commonplace leeann hansen reported on the center for reduction of noise pollution the group is responding to an increasing number of confrontation spawned by a new phenomenon called ring rage strangers getting into fights oprah obnoxious cellphone ringtones is that real or fake megan real i'm sorry that is fake here's more in two thousand eleven scott simon reported on a new safety initiative starting this week in new york city you might look up from a busy intersection and see says aggressive driver aggressive pedestrian to crash test dummies traffic warning haiku street signs are appearing on poles around the five boroughs posted by the new york city transportation department real or fake what do you think megan fake i'm sorry real i know and there we all are counting syllables in the middle of the street doesn't seem safe nope in two thousand eleven melissa block reported on coffee shops that were ditching wi fi in favor of the slow internet movement instead they offered dial up at twenty eight eight leisurely kilobits per second order dial up and drip activate one of.

jake scott simon melissa block leeann hansen megan new york
"melissa block" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Hi i'm mindy thomas from npr's wow in the world and this week it's all about operation earth how to be cool to a planet that's getting hot chick it out with the curious and conscientious kids in your life find wow in the world on apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast this is on point i'm melissa block and as i mentioned we're going to look now at the big geostrategic struggle over syria beyond syria you can join the conversation what do you think the real purpose the real message of last weekend's airstrikes was follow us on twitter and find us on facebook at on point radio nepal to see is with me she is foreign affairs correspondent with politico and joining us now from berlin is john corn bloom he's served in high level diplomatic posts in both republican and democratic administrations with a focus on russia and europe ambassador kornblum thanks for your time today very very pleased to be here melissa and also joining us from penn valley pennsylvania is i n lustick professor of international relations at the university of pennsylvania with focus on the middle east thanks to you too and investor crumble of let me let me start with you when you think about the message that these airstrikes sent to russia in particular key backer of the syrian president bush said what is that message well i think the message to folded saudi been said i there is however strong obama's red line was there is a red line on chemical weapons and the obama administration has already felt it necessary to respond and i think all of the countries in the western world wanted to be some kind of response when their chemical weapons the trump administration trump and that's one of the most important parts secondly however is that the europeans have been watching this with in the state of between the nightmare and shock for some time it has caused a great deal of people in their own societies of the many hundreds of thousands if not millions of refugees who've come for example they continue to hope against hope that somehow the united states can put together a strategy which will dampen this down and calm it down and of course neither obama nor trump have been able to do this so he looked with considerable fear and worry about what's going on there.

obama president university of pennsylvania professor of international rel europe john corn apple united states obama administration mindy thomas bush penn valley pennsylvania russia berlin politico facebook twitter syria
"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Carmen hsien trip was a senior one week away from her seventeenth birthday carmen's parents reached out to npr to tell her story and to talk about the family's newfound activism npr's melissa block went to parkland to listen it's been one month or an e on sometimes it's hard to tell which search for moral new normal i say those words i don't really know what they mean carmen's father philip is driving to pick up his younger daughter ninth grader evelyn from the bus stop after school carmen used to drive her sister home today evelyn's bus arrives late there was a minor accident said the bus the driver i was like crying and stuff so she can't drive now another reminder of how roy emotions still are in parkland back at their home we sit down to talk the parents phillip and april hsien trip and their children evelyn who's fourteen and eighteen year old robert a freshman in college and they unspoiled vignettes about carmen she learned how to read while before kindergarten she devoured books she loved harry potter carmen played guitar violin and piano she would go online find the song she loved and she would practice until she did it she was academically gifted skipping an early grade took six ap classes for senior year she had dreams of being a medical researcher was always asking questions she was driven by curiosity of the world in her place in philip chen trip is a tech executive april an elementary school principal before now they haven't spoken to the media about the shooting but they feel they can't stay silent any longer we become immune to tragedy regard ourselves from it because then we don't have to feel the pain and suffering of others and so we wanted to speak up we wanted to speak out try to imagine learning there's been a mass shooting at your children's school imagine hearing from one daughter that she is safe but from your older daughter you hear nothing you raise from.

melissa block phillip researcher executive principal Carmen hsien npr roy philip chen eighteen year one month one week
"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thank you you're welcome here's some other olympic news olympic athletes have a range of strategies to help calm their nerves and the ultra high pressure competition some nap others meditate or use visual as asian techniques but the olympic team from finland has its own unique way of calming the jitters as npr's melissa block found out how do you think knitting you finish millo me then made only imminent nice word you call them than knitting finn among them the team's head of snowboarding coach on because skin and a ski jumper ethanol shining whose knitting a black and white striped peace at the moment it gordon smith knows the island nitz in his room at the athletes village but you'll find coach skin and standing with needles and yarn in hand here at the top of the half or sloop style course knitting during competition he swears it's relaxing you have to concentrate and it's a repetitive lotion it's a good focussing point it feels a little meditated as well because in chose me the peace he's working on a navy blue rectangle about the size of a cell phone it was supposed to be a square as you can see i i over short mind the little wobbly it is a little wobbling there's been a couple of other mishaps but i don't mind i mean it's a living breathing thing kinda goes armfree styling here and skin in points out that lead back freestyle attitude fits his court well snowboarders we we tend to take things not so seriously but you can definitely tell.

finland npr melissa block snowboarding gordon smith
"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As for the gold medallist understand this you zuhdu han you is the equivalent of a rock star in japan idolized by millions after his skate when it was clear he had won he was emotional tears streaming down his face by ulan gung ho but he later he thanked all the people of cheered him on since his childhood and he made it a point to thank his ankle seeing get did a good job late last year han you suffered a serious ankle injury and he's been out of competition ever since the continent ice arena here was yuzuru to high country the stands were a sea of japanese flags a lot of hung you fans came dressed up in winnie the pooh costumes as because the skater has claimed pu is as good luck charm and mascot and honey was revered not just in japan his press lewis is price with yeah i found cape yang wearing a jacket lined with yellow fake fur gold for luck for high knew she explained she and two friends flew here from china just to see their idols skate and they were among the hundreds of fans who brought stuff to pu bears to throw on the ice after his performance like they have limited authorities so we can we can bring like small wise like easy to the role and if there were to limit maybe the big one a huge one yeah a huge one she said as big as use hanyu himself melissa block npr news at the pyungchon olympics the man who opened fire on a school in part in florida and killed seventeen people was nineteen years old he's been expelled from marjorie stroman douglas high school last year for disciplinary issues and has been widely reported this week that some of his classmates and teachers could see that he was a troubled young man even the fbi was alerted the chief public defender in broward county shed every red flag was there so why we're so many signs ignored what may have gone show monstrously wrong samantha havilland was a student and appear councellor at columbine high school in 1999 when two of her classmates killed twelve students and one teacher as havilland.

ulan gung ho lewis cape yang china florida fbi broward county samantha havilland columbine high school japan melissa block npr olympics marjorie stroman douglas high nineteen years
"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of eighty seven competitors it's the worst she's ever done when mother and daughter finally see each other after the race the death heightened read is laughing to win is too it's about my magazine i'm like oh good i sat on five this ben honestly they're both just happy to be here together melissa block npr news chungchong a new you are listening to all things considered from npr news in with a look at bay area traffic at 12 minutes before 5 o'clock here's julie deppish pretty they delays on the peninsula we have this wreck on northbound to weighty actress neath lane is blocking the left lane couple of cars you'll beyond the break spansih crystal springs stolen car much north eight eighty before thornton avenue may still be in the third lane for the left it's like his back to maori up to the north bay westbound thirty seven before cinema raceway dealing with at that crash on the right shoulder just a bit of a backup to noble road julie deppish for kqed that report was brought to you by manzini sleep world and julie will have more in ten minutes support for kqed comes from noriega furniture presenting their stictly made in america president's day event 25th avenue and tarabella in san francisco online at noriega furniture dot com noriega furniture celebrating beauty and creativity in the home for over.

julie deppish president npr kqed noriega america san francisco ten minutes 12 minutes
"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You are to south korea now where this week at the olympics aerials skiers will launch themselves skyward off nearly vertical jumps they're going to source some sixty feet up in the air flipping twisting their way back turf routes n peers melissa block introduces us to a us aerialist who is pushing the boundaries of the sport for women the first time ashley called well saw aerials with on tv the two thousand six olympics she was twelve years old wideeyed and she thought why are these people so crazy her mother was watching wither and had a different thought my mom looked at me and said he'd be good at that i was at her and went your crazy who tells or twelve your daughter they'd be good at doing too will backflips i of sixty in the air you're good good cold will was already a strong gymnast and a skier so zip ahead for years and they're she is walking into opening ceremonies in vancouver and olympic aerialist at sixteen she was the youngest member of team usa and it didn't take long for caldwell to set their sights even higher i wanted to be jumping doing is bigger tricks the boys were which meant not just doing doubles to back somersaults off the jump it meant trying triple back flip soften even higher jump which is a lot harder it's so much faster and the the hits are so much harder just a handful of women around the world even attempt triples in fact on this year's olympic team just me and now the 24yearold caldwell is pushing the boundaries still further at.

south korea ashley vancouver team usa caldwell olympics melissa block twelve years sixty feet
"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A could lead to new elections and then netanyahu's political future a really would be uncertain there were elections not that long ago in israel this coalition government is relatively young it is and you know in in israel coalitions of fall very easily and uh so you know this could be the thing that town does netanyahu win that's npr's dana estern speaking with us from jerusalem thank you very much thank you ari q south korea now where this week at the olympics aerials skiers will launch themselves skyward off nearly vertical jumps they're going to soar some sixty feet up in the air flipping twisting their way back to earth god npr's melissa block introduces us to a us aerialist who is pushing the boundaries of the sport for women the first time ashley caldwell saw aerials was on tv the two thousand six olympics she was twelve years old wideeyed and she thought why are these people so crazy her mother was watching wither and had a different thought my mom looked at me and said you'd be good at that i will get her and went your crazy who tells are twelve your daughter they'd be good at doing tool backflips i am sixty in the and you're good good cold will was already a strong gymnast and a skier so zip ahead for years and there she is walking into opening ceremonies in vancouver and olympic aerialist at sixteen she was the youngest member of teen usa and it didn't take long for caldwell to senator sites even higher i wanted to be jumping doing is bigger tricks the boys were which meant not just doing doubles to back somersaults off the jump it meant trying triple backflips often even higher jump which is a lot harder it's so much faster and the the hits are so much harder just a handful of women around the world even attempt triples in fact on this year's olympic team just me and now the 24yearold caldwell is pushing the boundaries still further at last year's world championships she did something.

israel npr dana estern south korea melissa block ashley caldwell vancouver netanyahu olympics senator twelve years sixty feet
"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Citizenship for migrants illegally in the us brought here as children republicans are seeking more money for a border wall attorney general jeff sessions has raised some eyebrows over a remark he made at a national sheriff's association meeting in washington on monday and pierce cat chow reports the office of sheriff is a critical part uh on the angloamerican inheritance law enforced that's attorney general jeff sessions addressing sheriff's from all over the country while a justice department spokesman says the phrase angloamerican law is common in the legal world many civil rights lawyers are critical of sessions remarks here's advancement project executive director judith brown diana's pointing back to the angloamerican heritage is really a wink and a nod to white supremacists brown diana said sessions comment shows the administration quote sees that support for law enforcement ended support for white supremacy as part of the seam agenda cat chao npr news apple winter olympic games in pyongyang chong south korea you a shorttrack speedskater mom eight bindi has been eliminated in the five hundred meter quarterfinal event as npr's melissa block reports hopes were riding on the eight tenyearold the first african american woman to qualify for a us olympic speed skating team mummy by any finished last in her heat of four so she won't advance and afterwards he spoke to reporters she had tears streaming down her face she said i just have to wait four more years to get back onto the big stage she will race in the 1500 meters that the 500 is considered her best event npr's melissa block the winner of the event was italy's ariana fontana this is npr south africa's ruling african national congress party says it has recalled president jacob zuma but top members of the party have not been able to agree on when he should leave party officials say they gave zuma no deadline to step down the south african president has been mired in corruption investigations and some a nc party leaders have pressured zoom adequate he's refused key south african elections are coming next year and the party's image has taken a blow a policeman is settled a lawsuit with a west virginia town he says fired him for refusing to shoot an armed man embarrassed cruel lawrence reports the white officer suspected the.

jacob zuma nc ariana fontana melissa block south korea apple director project executive attorney officer lawrence president us african national congress part south africa npr bindi pyongyang chong
"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A remark he made at a national sheriff's association meeting in washington on monday and pierce cat chow reports the office of sheriff is a critical part uh on the angloamerican hair a law enforcement that's attorney general jeff sessions addressing sheriff from all over the country while a justice department spokesman says the phrase angloamerican law is common in the legal world many civil rights lawyers are critical of sessions remarks here's advancement project executive director judith brown diana's pointing back to the angloamerican heritage is really a wink and a nod to white supremacists brown diana said sessions comment shows the administration quote sees its support for law enforcement ended support for white supremacy as part of the same agenda cat chow npr news at the winter olympic games in pyongyang chong south korea you a shorttrack speedskater mommy by any has been eliminated in the five hundred meter quarterfinal event as npr's melissa block reports hopes were riding on the 18yearold the first africanamer american woman to qualify for a us olympic speed skating team mummy by any finished last in her heat a four so she won't advance and afterwards he spoke to reporters she had tears streaming down her face she said i just have to wait four more years to get back onto the big stage she will race in the 1500 meters but the 500 is considered her best event npr's melissa block the winner of the event was italy's ariana fontana this is npr this is wnyc in new york good morning i'm richard hake if they don't four it's twenty six degrees fair skies right now in new york city expect a sunny day to day with a high near thirty seven degrees the man convicted in the 2016 bombing in new york city's chelsea neighborhood is set to be sentenced to a mandatory term of life in prison today augment conroy he me injured thirty people one one of his pressurecooker bombs bloated in manhattan just hours after another bomb went off along a road race in new jersey rahimi was found guilty on eight federal charges last year mayor de blasio will give his first state of the city address of his second term tonight last night he previewed the speech on new york one whatever we do uh whether it's her budget decision a policy decision of personnel decisions have asked the question does a helpless become.

manhattan ariana fontana melissa block south korea director project executive jeff attorney new york mayor de blasio washington conroy chelsea neighborhood richard hake npr pyongyang chong judith brown diana
"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This goal by any was born in ghana where her father jokes the only use for ice is to chill beer her father quake who binay left for the state's and mummy came to visit him when she was five she ended up staying her mother and brother still live in ghana one day driving through the virginia suburbs her father saw a sign that said learn to skate mommy tried it then obviously it kinda took dad has come to pyungchon he'll be in the stands when by any races tomorrow and he'll be holding the same sign he held at the olympic trials yes he's going to bring that kicks some heine bydesign a few days before her first olympic raise vining was thinking about her dead hoping he'd made it to korea safely because i worry about him sometimes and every closer new country because like he he's all alone he's nowhere he is let in her pocket now she has a new way to reach him a newfound an older model iphone success that she got for her eighteen th birthday it's silver i wanted to raise gold but they have it is okay because i always got a phone which is all over so how good can this young speedskater be coached by fell sees huge potential what she learns a little more finesse and been kosir she's going to be even better i think you guys appalling seeing a quarter of what she has maybe listener right now mommy by any is trying to stay focused and shrugged off the pressure by when i get on that line out me like holy moley i'm actually here this is the olympic wow mommy by any willto the start line in the five hundred meter shorttrack race tomorrow melissa block npr news pyong chung south korea thirty the the the this is npr news it's five twenty nine jeremy siegel will be in with kqed news right now.

ghana speedskater jeremy siegel virginia olympic vining korea npr kqed five hundred meter one day
"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is weekend edition from npr news i'm melissa block this week we learned that first a wealthy conservative donor and later the clinton campaign and democratic national committee funded some of the research that surfaced in the explosive trump dossier and over the next few days three committees in congress will hear from facebook gugel and twitter pressing them about how russia use their networks to influence the 2016 election also were expecting some more moves from republicans toward a tax overhaul the weaken politics run elving anne pierce senior political editor in corresponding joins me to try to make sense of all of this good morning run good morning rule us and let's start with the so called trump dossier this is a file that surfaced after the election detailing ties between the trump campaign and russia at also included some racy claims earlier this week we learned that the clinton campaign paid for the research but then we discovered another wrinkle right the conservative website the washington free beacon originally funded the research funded by billionaire poll singer got this research ball rolling with diffusion gps research company all right try to unpack that for us so let me conclude we can conclude that a lot of politicians who were running against donald trump in 2015 2016 were interested in finding out more about everything he might have gone and of this fairly started on the republican side during the primaries of mr senior was a backroom marco rubio at one point and then they kind of dropped it on that side window trump became their nominee defacto and the democrats picked it up and they have funded some of this research through fusion gps no we should say that there was more research done leader by former british spy and then this kind of circulated around town of came out on buzzfeed in junuary that's when everybody got started talking about it and let's just say it was a fishing expedition it was financed by troops opponents in both parties some fishing expeditions drew comeback with fish and if this one actually did and some of that finds its way into the hands of special independent prosecutor above moller's investigators of then the dossier might in some sense inform their questions about russian interference because all of this was about trump's charged to people russia fright and those questions about russian interference will also be free renton center in the upcoming hearings that we mentioned for.

democratic national committee congress twitter anne pierce political editor russia donald trump marco rubio buzzfeed prosecutor moller npr clinton facebook renton
"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"melissa block" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The listeners of members of key kqed after the morning dense fog and cloud cover becoming partly to mostly sunny the rest of today and a little cooler highs in the '60s along the coast to the mid to upper 80s inland and sony in the sacramento valley this is weakened addition from npr news i'm melissa block in kenya officials have once again postponed presidential elections in some parts of the country because of security concerns the supreme court threw out results of last august's elections and ordered a new vote that was suppose to happen and on thursday but about ten percent of polling stations did not open because of violence is paralysing kenya which is a powerful us ally and one of africa's strongest economies we're joined now by npr's aitor peralta and aitor tell us where you are and what you're seeing so i am in key sumo which is one of the places that has not seen any voting it's in western kenya but today it's quite today actually you know life has gone on in a lot of ways because people were protesting against the beginning of wood was supposed to be this rerun of elections but because they've announced a stop to it people have gotten back two to some normalcy but yesterday was a very chaotic day you know the chairman of the electoral commission called off the elections because he said some of his staff had been tortured and hijacked and when i got here to consumer there were roadblocks where people were trying to keep election materials from coming in i spoke to a man called david tyndall who was manning one of those roadblocks and he said they didn't want police in and they didn't want election materials and let's listen to a bit of what he had to say very much dead with diesel british room got be good luck this report will now y e well listen a gun we are led moved um the why why lie yes the put it does it lies more people the out of killing laws alive but like i said to the it's quiet you know people are trying to pick up some of.

sacramento valley melissa block presidential elections kenya africa npr aitor peralta chairman david tyndall kqed sony ten percent