8 Burst results for "Melinda Ward"

"melinda ward" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:53 min | 8 months ago

"melinda ward" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"So everyone was learning on the job including our host before hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on. And then you know. The decision was that we needed to put a show out.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain curt Anderson Spy magazine Melinda Ward WNYC Julie Bursting chief content officer Julia Burstein Omaha Manhattan CISCO writer Brooklyn Bridge
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 8 months ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
"melinda ward" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:49 min | 9 months ago

"melinda ward" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"All of your right to you need to provide you and your employees with on limited IT help desk support don't even come to your business when necessary they do it all for one low monthly fixed price doesn't matter of the size of your business small or large nerds in a flash their goal is to keep your business running smoothly that's all of your I. T. problems solved for one low monthly fixed price nerds in a plastic bin around here in Austin since two thousand four they've helped a lot of businesses in town maybe one you know reach out to them today at five one two four zero one nerd that's five one two four zero one six three seven three or online check out the video online at nerds in a flash dot com for white nerds in a flash managed IT services is the right choice for your business this story is called the ugly truth about time share if you think you've done your family a favor by buying a time share unity my help hello I'm Chuck McDowell CEO and founder of Wesley financial group ten years ago I started helping folks cancelar time sure contracts and in the process started what's now called the Tom sure cancellation industry time sure is the only thing that you can buy out you can't tell me how much is going to college or when it's going to end when you buy a time share you give them a blank check to fill out any amount they won't for annual maintenance and assessment phase sound crazy the crazy thing is this never ends stop the insanity to die com office now I guarantee if we can't can't your time sure contract you'll pay nothing for you lied to and buying a time share and want out get the facts about times your cancellation call Wesley now for your free information kit eight hundred eight five eight eleven ninety nine eight hundred eight five eight eleven ninety nine eight hundred eight five eight eleven ninety nine fifteen and a check on traffic here's Melinda ward seven star vehicle thirty five.

"melinda ward" Discussed on Not Guilty

Not Guilty

15:54 min | 1 year ago

"melinda ward" Discussed on Not Guilty

"Sentencing on January thirty first nineteen eighty five eighty eight. Dan Ford asked the judge to give Bernie Baran two consecutive life sentences making him ineligible for parole for Thirty Years Bernie then nineteen would be nearly fifty before he could get out of prison. Judge Simon's allowed the parents of two of the accusers to give impact statements. They spoke talk about the long term impact of the assaults on their children. Their words were thick with grief and it was clear that they truly believed in Bernie's guilt but one parent who was not convinced was Melinda Ward <unk> Her son attended e C D C and was in Bernie's classroom she told Judge Simon's how Bernie had taken her son under his wing when he arrived at the school nonverbal and struggling to connect with other children she said she saw changes in her son. Thanks to Bernie's intervention Bernie who sat through all of the trial and sentencing hearing without showing any emotion began to cry as Melinda said he was not the monster he was being made out to be. She called him a miracle worker. Coming up judge Simon's hands down Bernie's sentence now back to the story in January of nineteen eighty five nineteen year old Bernie Baran faced life in prison after his conviction on eight charges related to the sexual abuse of Children Bernie's attorney Leonard Conway Conway pled for a more lenient sentence and for Bernie to be sent to county jail rather than State Prison Judge William Simon's took the arguments of both sides into consideration then he sentenced Bernie to the maximum even more time than A._D._A.. Ford had recommended three life sentences and five eight to ten year sentences all to run concurrently Bernie would. To be eligible for parole in fifteen years but he would have to spend that time in a maximum security prison Bernie nineteen years old and weighing roughly one hundred pounds was sent to Walpole state prison one of the most dangerous prisons in the United States at the time prisoners who were convicted of serious offenses against children are often put in protective custody. They're at a greater risk of retribution attacks both physical and sexual from other inmates instead Bernie was released into the general population. His attorney told the media that Bernie's life sentence would likely be a short one due to the violence he knew would occur within four days at Walpole Bernie was sexually and physically assaulted his mother and stepfather desperate to get him out of there used used every dime they had to hire an attorney for Bernie's direct appeal. This appeal was denied in March of nineteen eighty six on the Supreme Judicial Court refused to hear further arguments short of discovering covering new evidence Bernie would not have another chance at freedom until he was eligible for parole but he would only be released if he admitted his guilt and accepted responsibility for the crimes he was convicted of twenty two year old Bernie having lost all hope attempted suicide in March of nineteen eighty eight after a particularly brutal attack by another inmate after he recovered physically from his attempt he was sent to Bridgewater Treatment Center to be evaluated. Bridgewater was where inmates deemed as sexually dangerous were housed ironically Bernie was safer at bridgewater than he had ever been at Walpole because all of the inmates there had been convicted of serious sexual offenses the prison hierarchy that made him an easy target at Walpole did not apply at Bridgewater Bernie wanted to stay there but to do so he needed to be open to treatment in his first interview Bernie stubbornly insisted on his innocence and refused to say he was a pedophile. Even if it meant going back to Walpole two weeks later another other doctor wrote in a report that Bernie confessed his guilt to him and said he was ready to comply with Treatment Bernie denied he ever said this while detractors would point to this report as evidence of Bernie's guilt it allowed <unk> out him to stay at bridgewater likely saving.

Walpole Bernie Bernie Baran Bridgewater Bernie William Simon Melinda Ward Bridgewater Treatment Center Walpole Dan Ford Bridgewater State Prison attorney bridgewater Leonard Conway Conway Supreme Judicial Court Ford United States Melinda e C D C nineteen eighty five nineteen one hundred pounds
"melinda ward" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"melinda ward" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Kill. Stuck? So yes, I definitely draw inspiration from film films are often including ashes purest, white often, not entirely positive depictions of Chinese society. And I want to ask about your relationship over the years with the film authorities and the government you made your first home in nineteen ninety-five than a few years later. They said, oh, no, no more films, but you kept making films during that period where they said, you couldn't how did you manage that just doing that? Sanogo courtroom to go come January. That's the only way you can really pushed upon raise and expand the horizon is to keep on trying. It's not until the fourth films that I made at was allowed to be shown in China in theater. So I do think that this is what we need to filmmakers is to always be truth to your voice and make sure that you are not being silent by anyone and continue to be to advocate of your vision. And viewer voice to be heard by the rest of the world. But director I do think that depresses of censorship and approval. It's very tiring. Very time consuming beat us may to me it is still important not only for the people out China to be able to see a film about China. It's even more important for Chinese people. Do have to upper -tunities to watch a film by Chinese filmmaker making films about China. Judge could thank you so much. It's been a absolute pleasure having here talking. Thank you. Ash is white is in theaters now Vincent chain was our interpreters. And that's it for this week show. But before we go I want to acknowledge and say farewell to Melinda. Ward who is retiring after a remarkable career as head of programming at public radio international Muna was the driving force behind shows like the world and the takeaway and the enabler more than anybody of studio three sixty exactly twenty years ago. Melinda had the auditions idea that public radio really deserve to have a national show devoted to covering the arts and pop culture, and then had the completely crazy idea of recruiting novelist and former magazine editor with no radio experience to hosted. And here we still are here. I still in Melinda was the creative executive of whom makers of things dream devoted. Into the mission. Always had our back reliably graceful and kind Linda ward, thank you. Studio. Three sixty is a production of PRI public radio international in association with sleet, our executive producer is Jocelyn Gonzales. Our senior editor is into Adam Newman. Our sound engineer is low best months. Our producers are Evan chum. Laurean Hanson soom, Kim Saunders. Tommy zaria. Our production assistant is Morgan Flannery. And I am credential earn Russia Emara and. There's no place in this country for your type. Thanks for listening. He our public radio international next time on studio three sixty quiet music, where they're soft music have that stigma being passive, but within that it can be very powerful. Let's talk about this. Now, the deceptively chill music of a lotta Negra. Next time on studio. Three sixty.

China Melinda Vincent chain Evan chum Linda ward Sanogo Muna senior editor executive producer Jocelyn Gonzales director Tommy zaria Laurean Hanson soom creative executive production assistant Morgan Flannery editor engineer Adam Newman Russia
"melinda ward" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"melinda ward" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Us franklin roosevelt visited jefferson's home many times including this july fourth visit in nineteen thirty six today will renew my amish fdr revered jefferson whom he called the sage of monticello he claimed jefferson as the original democrat he built the jefferson memorial on the mall in washington and put his face and his home on the nickel <music> approach that house do you think oh it's the nickel no never thought that gobbling here actually got a couple if i see nikolai think oh is the house on the front of course jefferson's portrait but on the back we have monticello it's really funny it doesn't look like monticello and i would make one of the most easily recognizable buildings in this country it's much smaller than i remember it on this nickel keep nichols this is my nickel to this doesn't approximate the experience of going to monticello icee can look at your nickel but you should go there when are you tour monticello you need to realize that you're talking about a beautiful piece of architecture in the midst of enslaved african american population and that that's that's what monticello really is today monticello is not just in historic home but an archaeological site as well researchers working with thomas jefferson association continue scrutinizing every bit of the estate for physical traces of slave life toward the goal of bringing all berry row back to life so while the house on your nickel is frozen in time the real monticello is still under construction when we were you the pavement thinking seventy six the part of fdr understood that that's what makes monticello iconic it isn't just a beautiful piece of architecture it is deeply flawed as a place but aspires to greatness speaking of the founding fathers and of jefferson above all fdr said this club thing as a but the thing that they the baby there's we're not the gods of things as they were but the gods of things as they ought to be because even thomas jefferson himself knew that he was not the man he ought to be i think it represents a kind of utopian streak in jefferson's mentality never quite gets there so that sense of being a work in progress yes yes very much always a work in progress it's it's sort of you know if you think of magic words of the declaration hold these choose tonight deal towards which we strive but will never reach cello was was an architectural version of the same principle we hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal that they are in doubt by their creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are life liberty and the pursuit of happiness declaration of independence july fourth seventeen seventy six <music> sixties american icons was produced by manda around chick and ended by david crasner our thomas jefferson was performed by david straight there and almost all the music is thanks to david pryor thanks also to emily boutin tony field and heiferman kara oehler posey gruner wayne mogul mickie chris bannon melinda ward leslie wolfe allenwood mark and julie bursting since we first aired this episode in two thousand ten shay banks young has died and cinder stanton has retired from the thomas jefferson foundation studio three sixty is a production of pri public radio international in association with slate studio three sixties american icons project is made possible in part by a grant from the national endowment for the humanities great ideas brought to life and by an award from the national endowment for the arts artworks he our public radio international could not believe the outrageousness of the drawing next time on studio three sixty violence the sex the craziness the nrp of it all the appeal of the nineteen seventies underground comic see by thought oh my god this is an art form that's happening now and i was totally tracked to come expedia near a lean kaminsky crum and her shockingly autobiographical comics next time on studio three sixty

jefferson franklin roosevelt
"melinda ward" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"melinda ward" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Mo. David c, felts. Martin w. Edwin. He Francis. A lifetime from now I'm betting the Vietnam Veterans Memorial will endure because it's a work of art that looks unflinchingly and respectfully at enormous sacrifice and death. It captures and conveys the inevitably mixed feelings of heroism and loss, which is what a great memorial is supposed to do. Jay. George rowley. Thomas e rough. David, a Scholz. Said. Thank you for listening to this hour of studio, three sixties. American icons can hear my full interview with Maya. Lin at studio, three sixty dot org. You can also see pictures of my trip to the warehouse where they store all those objects. People have left at the wall today. Show is produced by Eric Molinski and edited by Lee, Tom Alah win sound design by John Delore. Thanks also to Chris Bannon Melinda ward, Leslie, wolf, and Ellen would Mark. Since we first aired this hour in two thousand thirteen, Marilyn young has got studio. Three sixty is a production of PRI public radio international in association with slate. Studio, three sixties. American icons project is made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the humanities great ideas brought to life and by an award from the National Endowment for the arts art works. Our public radio international next time on studio, three sixty every regeneration has the furious that are in Fahrenheit four, fifty one, the scifi masterpiece. That was a response to McCarthy had a. We continue to be people who care about books and care about life and care about the truth. Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit, four fifty one our latest installment of American icons next time on studio three sixteen.

Martin w. Edwin David c National Endowment Vietnam Veterans Memorial George rowley Ray Bradbury Eric Molinski John Delore Chris Bannon Marilyn young Lin McCarthy Jay Tom Alah Thomas Francis Scholz Melinda ward Ellen
"melinda ward" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"melinda ward" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"The family's home to the ground last week greg i would call that the florida try factor but that was really that's like six things there but try affected y yeah the traffic the twice as what that is the citrus county sheriff's office says fiftynineyearold a willie gun cisco was holding the families bird in its cage when they arrived home sixty one year old melinda ward says she was hit in the arm in the face with a shovel 33yearold jeremiah ward was shot twice in the head and thirtysevenyearold joke of ward was shot once in the arm in cisco was arrested and booked into the citrus county detention centre on three counts of attempted murder with no bond apparently greg everybody survive and authorities are still investigating the motive i'm going to go ahead and say that the motive is florida that's it that's the old lay the only reason why you would steal some but he's bird hit an old woman in the head with a shovel shoot to people in then burn their mobile home to the ground is because you'll live in florida that's all the reason you there all right to six seven one or two three there you have it that you're five things that are happening right now lots more coming up on the brain joyce show i want to get into the well the the trials and tribulations of bruce maxwell he's the first major league baseball player in history to take a knee for the anthem turns out that he's from a small town just outside huntsville alabama he was home and alabama i think it was last week went out for some dinner at a restaurant a server refused to serve him because he refuses to stand for the anthem i'll be right back i enjoy jewish ing talking to you one two point three fm follow us on facebook and twitter click the leaks at w g o w done even in the.

county sheriff cisco jeremiah ward attempted murder florida bruce maxwell alabama facebook twitter greg i huntsville sixty one year