11 Burst results for "Melbourne Museum"

"melbourne museum" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

05:55 min | 9 months ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

"Politicians or sayings it and you know make reasonable decisions on their own rather than depending upon wikipedia or somebody else who often has good opinions opinions but you want people individuals making their own decisions about things if you inspire that in young kids. Don't make them feel like you know. Their opinion is not worthwhile. Oh and encouraged that. I think it's it's worth it's worth the fight. That's awesome millions so prime size something that I hope will continue long after. I'm gone cool. Yeah it sounds well. It's all over the world already so it's self supporting. I mean it really is. We managed somehow create. Yeah for our listeners and If they wanted to learn more about you and your work or your projects that are happening or ongoing where would the best place be for them to go probably to us but also prime. Cy Is a good connection for teachers and for students not only primary students but high school students as well. Tom's museum would be another another place. the Science Center in Singapore Beautiful Place to get in touch with and and get into their programs quite frankly also those those are those are contacts wonderful. Yeah thanks so much for taking the time to talk with us this afternoon. Thanks for asking the questions coming out and see us. Thanks again Tom. Tom And pat for the awesome interview and also for the gifts that gave us some books in l.. Lots of wonderful materials. Yeah it was really cool and after are we spoke to Tom and Pat. We made it over to the Melbourne Museum and got to look in the collections and see all sorts of amazing stuff some of which has already been published on since There and a lot of it was stuff that they had told us about that they had found. Yeah like the really cool new mega-rapid which has Ostra love and like and we also saw one of the feathers that ended up getting published here and there was also a little microscopic flea. Microscopic fossilized flea which has a little tiny thing. It's really cool to have quite a collection and it's growing all the time there and if you want to see the dinosaur were dreaming project. Tom Sent us a pdf of it. which will be in our show notes on our website so you can go to our website and you can get a copy of that? They're also have a link to some of the things we talked about including the video of the Melbourne Museum. So if you're interested in any of that then head over to our longer shown outs which are on. I know dot com and now onto our dinosaur of the day melena resource which was a request from dinosaur four six. Oh two so thanks. Six Millennia was a sore potter more of the lived in the late triassic and what is now South Africa in the Elliot formation. It was probably our business. It had fourteen Ortiz on each side of the pre Mexa and nineteen teeth on each side of its maximum. It was quadrupedal and it had sturdy limbs like a sore pod and a large body it was estimated to be about twenty six feet or eight meters long and weigh one point three tonnes not too big for us or pod. But I guess we're on the traffic and it's a sore pot morph oh true millennia. was probably a facultative bipeds and that means that it could walk or run on two legs but normally used for so who is mostly quadrupedal. It had a somewhat pointed snout and a triangular skull the type species is Melena restorers Redeye and it was found founded on the north slope of the Thaba Nyama Black Mountain in Eastern Cape and Free State provinces in South Africa. The genus name means Black Mountain Lizard that it was described in nineteen twenty four by Sidney Haughton there used to be a second species molyneaux resources dobbins is named in Nineteen ninety-three by francois-xavier golf based on a femur found in the Elliot formation of Lou in nineteen fifty nine but in two thousand sixteen a study found that the femur and other bones were actually a new type of dinosaur Marocchino Mirror. Ten of stubborn insists. There's also a synonym for Millennia. Resource Roca source tetris. Gross that was named in Nineteen eighty-four by Van Heerden and others. But now wow that's considered to be a normal. Newsroom is not too much information on it. In nineteen twenty four Houghton wrote that the bones consist of a Tibia. A fibula part of the pelvis ask some vertebrae and metatarsal together with a femur lying partly embedded in the overlying sandstone and the proximal half of a humorous phone weather down the slope. They are in the collection of the South South African Museum. And in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine inherited analyze this tight material and assigned most of it to euskelosaurus except for sacral Tibia and Femur in one thousand nine hundred seven Van Heerden appear golden referred another specimen to molyneaux resource redeye based on the femurs being similar in two thousand five Golden Van. Heerden and Yates said that many additional bones mostly of Plato stores were assigned to Melena resources. Nineteen twenty four. They also referred a new specimen to molyneaux resource read. I had said the dinosaur. Aw was a quote Sore Pot. Morphou Incertus said spending further analysis of the hall type and of all the referred specimens and quote. And that basically means they don't know where it fits in the family tree in two thousand seven. Yates revised the diagnosis is some of the specimens. But not the type specimens there were two and this is known as the sin gene type. Yates also described a referred skull. So there's some uncertainty around millennial resource now since the sin type specimens haven't been studied in a while and they should be reexamined to identify diagnostic unique features. And the way scientists think of MOLENAAR source now is based on the referred specimens. Yeah but some of the referred specimens are indirectly referred. They're referred based on a referred specimen homework up so it seems that Milan resource in general needs to be reexamined examined. The sin type both specimens are housed.

Tom Van Heerden Yates Melbourne Museum South Africa South South African Museum Redeye Ostra triassic Milan Sidney Haughton Ortiz Science Center Thaba Nyama Black Mountain Black Mountain Lizard Morphou Incertus Golden Van Houghton Aw Marocchino Mirror
"melbourne museum" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

01:47 min | 9 months ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

"Feathers some of them are are on display in the six hundred million years exhibition at the Melbourne Museum. And Sabrina put together a video from the Melbourne Museum. And it includes a little little bit of those although we didn't probably zoom in enough that you can see the feathers themselves. But they're near the animatronic Quanta Sorus and the Marlboro Soroush. If you've been to that museum and if you haven't an year near the Melber area we definitely recommend it. There's a lot to see their. Yes and that exhibit specifically typically the six hundred million years. One is probably the easiest thing to miss. When you go into the Dinosaur Hall you have to turn right and kind of go behind? It took us a couple tries. He's the only reason we found. It was because we knew it was there. There were like make sure you don't miss the holiday types and we went through a couple of times before we finally found it. We saw the little Marlboro source. Head sticking up way in the background and then we noticed where to go. Well there's a few fun quarters. Yes when that museum when we were there they also had an exhibit on like the Gut microbiome crow by on that was really fun. Not Dinosaur related but really enjoyable nonetheless. Yeah there's a temporary Affect still around in my not be but yeah yeah really Nice Museum and a gift shop was really great too and before we get into our interview where we talk a lot more about Australian dinosaurs. If you're interested in hearing more about dinosaurs including DELUCA cursor who made it to the cover page of our fifty Dinosaur Tales Book Easy Breezy Beautiful Awful Cover dinosaur sure you can find a weaker by getting a copy of fifty dinosaur tales. There are also a lot of other dinosaurs in the mix not a ton of Australian ones because.

Melbourne Museum Dinosaur Hall Nice Museum Sabrina DELUCA Gut microbiome Melber
"melbourne museum" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

"Dinosaurs were around in the early Cretaceous it was at about seventy degrees south putting well within the Antarctic circle and officially polar holier in quotes because you know Antarctic or Arctic makes a polar. They found ten feathers total including everything from down unlike body feathers to flight feathers or at least flight ish feathers asymmetric. And that's Kinda the keys to flight as having these asymmetric feller so that the air going over the top gives you the newly effect anyway. The range of these feathers is from ten to thirty millimeters long basically careening that they're all under about an inch so these aren't massive feathers coming from big dinosaurs. These are small installation feathers or maybe a little feathers that that might have helped with flying on a small bird kind of thing. That's what we're looking at. They also used some microscopes to check out. How many millenniums or other her characteristics they could find and they found what looks like you Milan's oems or the black colored Molina's homes and they appear pretty even across the feathers so maybe they were evenly covered? But we're looking at individual feathers. We're not really looking at full feathered dinosaur. So it's a little bit less useful for figuring out the kind of patterning on the bird itself her dinosaur. I should say they give some interesting reasons though for having dark colored feathers that give the usual you know maybe maybe it was used for signalling you know species recognition or maybe for blending into the environment but an interesting one. We don't usually think about is. Maybe they use them to to absorb more light and therefore heat in the cold Antarctic environment that they lived in. If you're interested in seeing these feathers some of them are are on display in the six hundred million years exhibition at the Melbourne Museum. And Sabrina put together a video from the Melbourne Museum. And it includes a little little bit of those although we didn't probably zoom in enough that you can see the feathers themselves. But they're near the animatronic Quanta Sorus.

Melbourne Museum Quanta Sorus feller Sabrina Milan Molina
"melbourne museum" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:33 min | 11 months ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Tan that take a brief look at some of the other stories. Making these insights. Is this week with the science report. New Researches found growing evidence that vaping may harm the hot and signatory system as study in the Journal. Cardiovascular research compile the available data on the health effective cigarettes finding proof of harmful effect on the heart and blood vessels accumulating the authors warned that his most of the studies they looked at any considered the short-term effects vaping longitude effects. Maybe even more so via the public simply shouldn't assume that vaping is a safe alternative to smoking. Aw may well. A separate study warns that people should consider a cigarette safer than tobacco at their peril. The warning follows the treatment of a teenage Kboi with life threatening lung failure linked to vaping. The boy who had no history of asthma developed. A case of hypersensitivity monitors where the ASX Airways of the lungs hongs become severely inflamed which led to a month long hospital stay and lengthy rehabilitation a report in the Journal Archives of disease in childhood found that the teen had recently taken up vaping and got worse when doctors tested his skin reactivity with vaping fluid leading doctors to believe that one of the chemicals in the a cigarette fluid was triggering a an intense immune response facebook software has been covertly. Activating iphone uses cameras as they scroll through. FACEBOOK news feeds aide. FACEBOOK claims glitch was caused by a coating era and that there was no indication that any of the photos videos had been sent to it servers. The tech giant says version Asian to forty four the facebook. IOS APP would incorrectly launch in landscape mode. And it's already sent a fix to apple for now the bug is affecting android devices. It appears to be exclusive to Ivan users running Iowa's chain as a work around. We recommend you revoke camera and microphone access to the FACEBOOK APP in your settings penny intelligence. Discover the first evidence of fed polar dinosaurs in Australia. Scientists on cabinet the cash of one hundred and eighty million in your fossilized dinosaur and bird feathers. Inner deposit known as the Kunwar of fish beds one hundred and forty five kilometers southeast of Melbourne. The site was once in ancient shallow lake bed originally situated south of the Arctic Circle Researchers analyzed a collection of ten fossil feathers. They displayed an unexpected diversity of tufted hair alike Predator feathers from meat eating theropod dinosaurs together with downy body feathers and wing feathers from early. Avian birds which would have been used for flight. The unique discoveries discoveries highly significant because they came from dinosaurs and small birds that survived seasonally very cold environment with months of Polo darkness every year researchers say fossil feathers have been recovered from the site previously and were thought to be evidence eventually birds but had received little scientific attention new study by scientists from the Pavel's have Sephardic University Monash University Melbourne Museum Obsolete University and Swinburne University of technology examined birth newly discovered and existing fan that fossils they found the dinosaur feathers would have been used for insulation in the Ancient Paula. Habitat the authors also detected microscopic remains of cellular the structures thought to contain Cala pigments suggesting both uniformly Dr Services on some dinosaurs and distinct bands. That might represent original panning others. The International Atomic Energy Agency has warned that Iran has begun enriching uranium at secret fidel underground nuclear facility in breach H of United Nations nuclear agreements. Tehran had earlier transported. Uranium hexafluoride gas to the facility and connected the supply to to cascades of advanced centrifuges also in breach of applications. The report says the move will allow Tehran to continue growing. Its enriched uranium stockpile. It's now estimated ETA. These lower republic would have enough enriched uranium within a year for a nuclear weapon however the oil-rich nation insists nuclear program is for peaceful power generation. Only really Andy Studies found that people who tend to believe in conspiracy theories are also often very lonely. The findings reported in the journal plus one on a based on a study. The language by read it uses on conspiracy forums such as a conspiracy compared to other uses direct with these forums researches found that conspiracy theorists hostile. They were less likely to use tones. Let it to categories such as affection optimism and friends indicating they may be more alienated or socially really is related..

facebook Tan asthma Tehran Melbourne Sephardic University Monash Un ASX Airways the Journal apple Australia Andy Studies Iowa International Atomic Energy Ag Arctic Circle Journal Archives of disease
"melbourne museum" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast high. They this podcast is one of your end our favorite shows from the and it's well, it's a good one for you Christmas ride troops. Remember, those long road trips as a keyed buckled up in the backstage, endless interminable games of ice spy. Are we there yet men when the car stopped and you got out to finally stretch your legs relief? Do you? Remember that cornucopia of insects, plastic Olivia bonnet and bumper and heavy noticed that you might just get a few stray squash bugs on a long trip these days, but nothing like the carnage of the past where have all the insects gone. Welcome to science friction Haina Tesche, which with you last year. You might have read those shocking headlines, climbing, the world's insects are being what dad on mass not just Bs but other species too, and it matters because if insects disappear way probably will too, but hang on. Disappearing. Billions of them invade salvos failure. And the state declares war. Mobiles bring guns deadly. Already in swarm after swarm move across the countryside. Devouring? Mosquito players hit the top end stretching Donald Gretchen each. There's another one now doing battle with a plague of grasshoppers. The health infinitely shop. She's joined. Plane. The European Union. After years of debate has just banned three tops of widely use Neo nicotinoid pesticides because of their talk city to vital pollinating insects like bees, whether we like it or not allies, depend on six legged friends. Oh, I think they're amazing into Maula just Dr mono saunas, the more you dive into their stories and find out what actually do it's just well, it's like it is the best. Well, science. In the label says Tyke in the west kale's on the all white twentieth of what was seventeen eighty six my friend. Mrs Thompson, look at the condition. They're in. Absolutely perfect. Now for us interests. That's a postcard to the past. Well, that's essentially this is Dr king Walker Hayes the super enthusiastic senior curator of the intimate collection at the Melbourne museum. We can actually side that that thing occurred on the all and in seventeen ninety six if it doesn't occur them, then we can ask why there's a story stories until whereas if you didn't have this and you simply head migraine father, someone of the city's got no evidence there, but that's their that's like peer review. This was surrounded by heck supports six legged critters millions of them draw upon draw upon draw. And there's that familiar walk of multiples in the let me show, you another little example. You've heard of Charleston one. Have you heard if Russell Wallace? Yes, we have specimens of Alfred Russel walls. Roundabout at the same time the child Darwin was going round the world got to the Galapagos sold the different fish Biggs. And that and then thought about when you go back to England theory, vivid Lucien, they offer brussel Wallis was going through the Malaya's cappella goes, and he collected a lot of stuff and he went back to England. And he wrote a book called the malaria cappella go in which he spells that they're volition. So he took it to the Royal Society to get published. I said hang on the road called exactly the same theory. Is you these specimens here? So these were handled in collected by offered Russell and they're beautiful looking specimen such papery wings of moths. Manley moths, oh, some Beatles. And all that looks like a grasshopper there. And it's really only when you look back that you're our to understand. And appreciate the value of what they did at the time off at the time. You don't really understand what you're doing? But later on when people say, well that things have been found there again. It's completely new record. Or importantly, it's. A new species that we didn't know. Which is what makes as museum collections? So so volatile the sides they serve as a crucial benchmark scientists estimate. There are over five million different species of insects in the world. But around a million heaven even bane identified or ninety eight so recent claims that is a mess insect extinction happening while they really hard to taste and yet last year headlines screamed that loud and clear, great insect. Dial global ecological meltdown the New York Times aditorial laid with insect Armageddon. Little critters have been attracting big attention of light. And the trigger was a striking study out of Germany and the Netherlands ecologist, Dr casper Hellman from red bowed university was the late author on the study words that I wouldn't have chosen like Armageddon, but they surely did help to spread the news. And the news was alarming. A massive disappearance of insects over three decades at the heart of the study is a passionate group of volunteers. These diehard insect lavas an intimate group in west Germany near the Dutch border system medically sampling in sakes, in a set of protected Nitra reserves. Adjacent agriculture lands. But he's a thing. I've been totally scientific about they're collecting recording temperature variation and landscape and vegetation changes -mongst a whole lot of other variables kept on doing that for many years in the same way. And I did this for thirty years, and they're still doing this. So what darter did they present? You was it, you know, it big bags of insects or insects of alcohol or. Into their collection. And it's it's an amazing school building. And the first floor is full of rooms with shelves with bottles with insects in alcohol. It's it's really amazing to see it. But luckily, that's not what they gave me. They already digitised the weights of each bottle, and the present me just an excel file with with the numbers and why they collected it. This was the white of insects that bad collected H point in time across those thirty years. Yes, exactly. Or another way of describing that is the bio Ness of insects over twenty seven years, they trapped and sampled fifteen hundred bottles of flying insects. That's a lot of legs a wide the samples and the dropoff in the total. Biomass of insects was staggering. Well, we saw seventy six percent in twenty seven years. Yeah. So so three quarters of the buying much of flying. Insects isn't there in nature reserves anymore? We shocked by this result yet. Well, we expect it to Kline's. This is very severe. This is Kenya. Imagine three-quarters away. This is really a lot. It's just empty and sterile empty Abbott soon. That's shocking. If you realize this the number everybody would know, okay. There's probably a lot less insects than in the past with how much less was are known. And then you put a figure in seventy six percent. And you're like, wait a minute. This is this is really scary action. A lot of people made global conclusions about this that the world's insects were in deep decline. Can we make a conclusion like that from one study in one country in one location strictly set note? But so we know quite some things about butterflies, for example, quite more charismatic than you can find more fallen tease out in the field to count them for you. So in new flies down, we know bees are down this goal. We know that in many parts of the world's. But then what about the other thousands and thousands and thousands of species? Are they doing any better? And this study was what made it. Well, if you go and measure, their weight, you will see the same baton that is tremendous decline. So you think there is a global story to be drawn from this. Yes. Although we don't have the data, and let's face it in science without data is no conclusion to be drawn. But what I'm afraid of that? There's lack of knowledge ignorance that we have fuel as our inaction to do something we are late right with thirty years. Too late. We should have seen this declined coming way before we could have done something with nobody was counting insects. And so now, we thirty years down the road. And we find ourselves troubles caught. Everyone by surprise. There had to be some other studies pointing towards a decrease say populations, but nothing as dramatic as that. Ari Hoffman is leading into malicious Tim biologist at the bio twenty one institute at the university of Melvin of course, you know, it was one of those situations where are walls a careful study over a long period of time and those studies can be incredibly valley. You will. But I'm not done often enough. Unfortunately, Nari grew up in New Zealand in Assam family. He's parents ran a market garden attention to insects. You could say it's in his blood. The reasons for the dramatic decline in insects in this European study aren't cle- there. Awesome. Prime suspects excessive use insecticides land clearing urban sprawl and intensive agriculture to meet heavy consumer demands of the lease. But do these results herald, an insect again, I tend to be bit suspicious when I say headlines that into Maula just Montessori disease opposed doctoral research, fellow at the university of New England, and she's studying the benefits of wild pollinating, six culture. So the good bugs, not just the pace Spacey's a firmly. It was bit of an accident. When I got to my honors year. I actually started my project my honest project on koalas, and that Phil free, and I had to sort of quickly find something to finish up my own year with them and may happen to be an insect project valuable in at the time. I remember thinking, really. Insects. Oh, I have to do. Come on. And here footage. She hasn't. Looked back bugs have got onto her scheme to she's co-founder of the annual wild poll night at can't in a strategy, which you can be part of takeout science fiction website. And she writes, a blog called ecology is not a dirty word, but back to Armegeddon and the serious question of whether the world's insects are going. Under Armageddon is a pretty serious thing, we own I wanted involves across the globe sort of things was thinking, hang a minute. There's gotta be more to the story because nothing's actually been done. That's go. So I mean, the study actually only measured by which is so grams of insect bodies in these traps, so that doesn't tell you anything about what type of insects. They were or how many insects with their, and you know, one blow. Fly can weigh the same as one hundred yards or something to really sort of measure a decline in insect, diversity or speech. She's you need to know more about what actual insects of it. I saw a lot of headlines we all you know, insect abundances fallen in the seventy percent in the last twenty seven years at cetera et cetera. Which is a big figure. It is a scary one. It is. And it's a my I mean, we should be doing twenty-seven years studies. That's that's an awesome long-term monitoring data that is the holy grail in ecology. But with this study, there was no one saw that had actually been followed for the entire twenty seven year period. I mean as a whole it's still an important data set, it's really well done. And it's everything is rejected about it. But it doesn't tell you anything about whether these particularly use that was sampled were, you know, with a outbreak keys was there like a really severe winter that killed off a lot of insects United sign many environmental things that can affect year to year fluctuations in in insect populations. And that doesn't come out when you any sample once Twas, but might all of a sit up my well, I'm concerned. That is making a direct comparison between Europe and ustralia. I would not be surprised if there was a marked decrease in the biomass. But is a twenty percent. Thirty percent is fifty percent being a scientist with having data on very hesitant to make a conclusion has anyone done work like that anywhere else in the world. Not to that extent. And not for that reason. No one to mind, Allah, just on a by a mess study with a book, the white physical white of the insects that were collecting that hasn't been done as an Australian scientist looking at that study could we do the same here. Do we have the same picture? So the answer is we don't have the same picture at all. And we should get the same picture. I think we do want an national grid. If you like of traps that are going out on measuring these sorts of things he gets a good question. We don't ignore the corals, Dewey. We spend a lot of money monitoring the corals very well. And we don't do that with a lot of frustration sex or even our quality six despite the fact that they are, of course, well from an economic point of view in terms of supporting our life probably much more important than the gray area. Reef.

Armageddon Haina Tesche Donald Gretchen ABC European Union Russell Wallace Royal Society Europe New York Times west Germany Kenya west kale Melbourne museum Mrs Thompson Alfred Russel Nitra Dr king Walker Hayes Charleston
"melbourne museum" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on Science Friction

"Hey. Tesha Mitchell joining you this week for another science friction live from the floor of the Melbourne museum. So we're told that learning maths and science matters a whole heap for the careers of the future and not just for those who go on and become scientists or mathematicians all sorts of jobs. I mean, Netflix even employs mathematical minds as days, it's part of the history of knowledge. It's pot of mankind's like appreciation for the wealth. But it's also very part of the inquiry process pot of what really drives us to be this way. What really drives us to live in the well this way, and I think that's just really cool. You don't have to go on to become a Nobel laureate or a racer or a science teacher. But you do need to have in the win the world around you so studying science and Mets not only raises your awareness of the world around you. But also gets you to think in an open way, you use your critical thinking skills easier problem solving skills, and it takes a lot of hard work as well. I think maybe a bit of the work ethic aspect in combination with the creativity. I'm expected to exhibit Mamie just realize that science is something that is not only beautiful that is not only useful. But it's also something that is fundamentally a pot of us. And yet so many kids more and more than a running a mile from science and math subjects at school. Something's really going astray. What exactly and can we stem the tide? The if Betty Chung speaking there, who's finishing you twelve at the Methodist ladies college, she's founder of the Victorian student science scored which links up Hough school students around science events. You also heard from Sola banish alone time science teacher, president of the science teaches association, Victoria, and director of quantum Victoria, which develop a whole lot of science programs for school students imitators across Victoria. Also on the show is Eddie. Woo. Who's causing a big stir? We've he's Chubu channel. He was a top ten finalist in last year's global teacher prize, and is author of a new book wonderful world of maths. He's hit Mets teacher at cherry brook technology high school in Weston CBI. Paid a coke kill has taught in schools from rural Maryvale to Frank Ston to Brunei he's founding principle of the John Monash science school Victoria's first specialist science high school and was principal of the year in the state in two thousand sixteen. When you started out you loved history and English at school, not maths. Thank mats. He didn't feel about good Abed was definitely humanities buff. And I still I still love stories and characters and and the tension when you try to work out what's happening in a mystery. But when I looked at mass, it was sort of characterize myself this way, all those sills adults that I now race through as I could see them as a student memorize them for just enough time to get through that damn put a number in get a number out cross my fingers, really hot. And the monks were good enough that I could say, yeah, I can do but do not have much of a fundamental grasp of why are we learning calculus? I can draw an in Jerusalem, really neatly. But I don't really know what the point of it is. And for me. There was a very rich lack of appreciation of what was crafted. Why did fractions lead to algebra which led to treat an almond tree which led to? There was actually a story on that. I was told us at all. I mean, I say that a lot I'm now wondering if I was told and I just didn't listen lesson. Just like everyone else. But for me that watershed moment was to be able to get to university with the full intent to become an English and history and to say to find out actually that there was this critical shortage of mathematics and science. Teachers particularly physics, and this is what it was like fifteen years ago. It's still true today. And I had a professor push me and say, this is this is where there's need would you consider going this direction rather than that? And so that was kind of what sent me done this rabbit hole. Pay to-. What is this conversation matter for you? And how would you respond to the third annual who says amid gonna use these why do I need to learn about maths what do logo rhythms have to do with anything?.

cherry brook technology high s John Monash science school Vic Frank Ston Betty Chung Netflix Melbourne museum Tesha Mitchell Victoria Mets Hough school Mamie Eddie Weston CBI Brunei professor Abed president Methodist ladies college director
"melbourne museum" Discussed on The Flow Artists Podcast

The Flow Artists Podcast

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on The Flow Artists Podcast

Jay Brown Goso Melbourne museum Jimmy Sarah Facebook Shantou APPA Tom Geneva Jamie twenty fifth seven day
"melbourne museum" Discussed on The Flow Artists Podcast

The Flow Artists Podcast

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on The Flow Artists Podcast

"Online course. We also have to buy a practitioner courses coming up. So this is the deployment. Of course, it's a seven day diploma course, which is. Is held at Melbourne museum, and we've got one in November from the nineteenth to the twenty fifth and November. And then we've got one in December from the fourth to the tenth of December, there's only a maximum of ten places for both of those courses details again can be found on our website and then our. By practitioners as well. We've have on our website under the directory practitioners directory. We've got a listing of all of our practitioners that people can look at checkout where the practitioner is living closest to them, and they all have their own things happening as well. They'll run their own workshops in courses and during a great Jewish in message that she say, tomato into me a great. It is, and we do appreciate paypal's Tom, you know, you've your podcasts. Every people her in spice that we would gripe people will want to have conversations, especially from every person. Finally, people line to listen and learn about the knowledge and richness Tamou forgotten voice in this. When people understand that there's a lot to be in I shade and lots of elect from him all credit Chinese. Thanks for inviting us today on. Thank you so much for sharing. We appreciate it, and thanks to out. Is not a lockdown. Embarrassment. Thank you because she's helped me remind he'll Geneva to to bring something didn't realize of such significance to to the spice to that can be Shantou. The level can be shared. Yeah, it is amazing. I'm going to go up without the knowledge in the passion that she's had for just the not just the the business foundation as well. So was he this amazing woman here? So you think you as you can tell the get the gift from APPA in the knowledge that Jimmy has, it needs to be sheriff it world really does the world's missing out by not having not listening to indigenous knowledge in connection practices. It's time. It's time just from observing the saying, like pretty familial teams. Why work. Listeners Sarah's work. But he's got the knowledge. As I said at the beginning, Jamie and Sarah adoring some amazing important work, and I wish them nothing but success and getting wipe out into the world. I think there's a wealth of wisdom held by indigenous communities in astray via and all over the world, and that it is wonderful that this local knowledge, this wisdom is being sane by the world by the community at large now we would really love to hear from you. So if you had any feedback or comments about this episode, you can reach out whip site at podcast off outta stall, calm, all search for the float podcast community on Facebook. We would absolutely love to hear from you. All right. Sorry, I don't want to jinx this at next guest is going to be Jay Brown host of j. Brown's yoga tolls. Now I want to jinx because we haven't actually recorded the interview yet that's happening tomorrow, but I'm really. Sighted. He is one of the most popular yoga podcast is out there. So we're really looking forward to having the opportunity to have a little bit chat with him. All right. So the song in this podcast is baby robots, point, Goso, and use with commission. Do yourself a favor and get as music from Goso? Dot band came dot com. We'll see you again in a fortnight outta newly big, big love.

Jay Brown Goso Melbourne museum Jimmy Sarah Facebook Shantou APPA Tom Geneva Jamie twenty fifth seven day
Wayapa Wuurrk - From Self Care to World Repair

The Flow Artists Podcast

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Wayapa Wuurrk - From Self Care to World Repair

Jay Brown Goso Melbourne Museum Jimmy Sarah Facebook Shantou Appa TOM Geneva Jamie Twenty Fifth Seven Day
"melbourne museum" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on All In The Mind

"And so even if for instance, a specialized program lot, my DBT is not available, and lots of people don't necessarily need that, but. Least understanding acknowledging that there's a problem going on going and seeking help can be a great step. So as well as the pictures and the story for children, this book, there's a half a dozen pages of what I call psycho educational material, which addresses directly issues around that. We've been talking about like emotional dysregulation, some information about borderline personality disorder, and some wise gentle wise of pets, staying calm, and also seeking help. So the is to Kate about borderline personality disorder, both for the child, but also for the parent ends fit Williams from Helen mayo house. In Adelaide. She's co, author of meltdown moments with artist, Marie Johnson Harrison. The book is available through the women's and children's hospital foundation, and we'll linked to that on outside. People talk about mental health issues. A lot more there still is a terrible stigma, which is why people don't really want to address any mental health issues. Having sunny don't word as badge of honor, but I'm not ashamed of fact that, yes, I am borderline yourself from depression, but it's so important for people to understand that there is no shame in it. And the only reason why people do have this negative stigma is simply because they are not educated and they don't understand and. They're not really worth it. To be honest, it's more about furthering my children's life and my life. And do you have any reflections or insights into how this condition developed few why? Yes. I grew up in a very abusive home. I ran away when I was nine and I had been in. I care from the age of nine. As an adult, they're different kinds of abuses that continued. I think that's Birtles stemmed from often people that I diagnosed as borderline had difficult pasts. It really is a very big step for you to turn around your history in a way for the sake of your children. Here. It certainly is I coming from my background. There was no chance that I was going to allow my children to have any of those experiences. They didn't choose to be here and they deserve to be loved and live in a safe environment. And as I've decided kiss I, I was actually thinking at one stage of giving didn't think I was going to be able to do it after signing that. I couldn't part with them. It's not my job to ensure that that happens. So I would do anything. It takes to ensure my children have a happy and healthy upbringing. Many things to Sonia end to him for speaking today about their experiences with mental illness and motherhood. Thanks also to make a Nielsen for the ratings. Our producer is dying. Dane and sound engineer is Judy replica unin Malcolm, it's great to have your company till next time. Just before I go. I want to let you know that if you're in Melbourne, check out the science friction, live events at the Melbourne museum. It's a series of hot button conversations about science society and culture. Her stood by Natasha Mitchell. I Nick's first day the sixth of September is hoesch metoo with incredible speakers on sexual harassment and activism in science. It's free. But you have to book look out for science friction on ABC dot net, dot EDU slash Aren.

Marie Johnson Harrison Williams Malcolm Helen mayo house Adelaide Melbourne Melbourne museum Kate harassment Birtles ABC Nielsen Natasha Mitchell producer Dane engineer Judy
"melbourne museum" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"melbourne museum" Discussed on The Science Show

"But how do you keep their eyes away from the screens long enough to discover the outside world and indeed the everyday objects you have in the museum yeah i think the ability to touch to feel to get closer to is really important and this comes down to a balance between conservation and accessibility children to touch and feel and playlists and those objects form essential component tough see exhibition that will be launched it science works that's what children need and want to do because as you say the screen greenstein 10 to answer all of the needs and interests tell us when next mission is open what sort of things when you see so inside out is all about bringing our collections out many of these items of never evening seen before but seeing them in a way which is now in a context that is quiet unusual for museums the they will be seasonal unusual see things there will be new worlds creation age it will be very experiential in terms of how they get to understand the life that those up cheeks had and we think that both of these exhibitions planet to melbourne museum and one at science works will be something really interesting and found today to people when they're out and about on the holidays and visiting and also what we're aiming to do to wrote in is to create more experiences for adults i think museums often venoos rather that will visit with families and we seeing increasingly that museums across the world are offended at night time different evening events and so inside out little side half earnings on tuesday and friday evening's for adults to come along and enjoy a drink can wander around and something to be and have very different museum experience.

greenstein melbourne museum